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H e l e n aG o m m

C o l i nB e n n
SimonClarke
G i n aC u c i n i e l l o
Paul Dummett
PaulEmmerson
Jon Hird
Mark Powell
NicholasSheard

I n t e r m e ida t e
T e a c h e r ' sB o o k

M
MAC
M ILLN

t:

d.

Oontents
$*rtr*si***t{*r*
Skills-basedapproach

tv

Why are the units divided into categories?

iv

Languageinput

Lexical syllabus

Grammarsyllabus

Class Cassettes and CDs

VI

How can I exploit the dialoguesfurther?

vi

Readingtexts

VI

How can I exploit the texts fudher?

vi

Fluencywork

vl

Teacher'sBook

vi

$t*d*nt's

S**k *cl$t*nt*

$twd*nt's S**k p*6*x wrlth *r:*rv*r*


3*m*h*r'* N***ts

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1 InternationalEnglish

2 Making contacts

3 Making calls

11

4 Keepingtrack

16

5 Speed of life

20

6 Businesstravel

23

7 Handlingcalls

28

I Making decisions

32

9 Big business
10 Smalltalk

37

11 E-mail

44

12 Presenting

49

13 Technologicalworld

54

14 Beingheard

56

15 Snailmail
16 Solving problems

61

17 Globalvillage

72

18 Eatingout

74

19 Messaging

78

20 Negotiating

83

*vesnsx*s s*d t*xi*

40

67

limks i*s{th**s\ssrs

&ddlti*n* *rxet*x'i*{qr*lthmn*w*r*

88
118

ffies*sxr** stt*1l*ris$s
Contents
Teacher's Notes

T126

Photocopiableworksheets

T136

T128

Introduction
They are motivated by topics which directly relate to their
own personal experiences.
They expect to see an immediate, practical payoff of some
kind at the end of each lesson.
It is English, not business, they have come to you for help
with (but see 7).
They want to be able to actually do business with their
English rather than just talk about it.
They appreciate texts and tasks which reflect what they
have to do in their iob.
They also appreciate texts and tasks which allow them to
escape what they have to do in their job
They don't regard having fun as incompatible with 'serious
learning' (but see 1. and4).

1 0 They like to see an overall plan and method behind the


classesthey attend.

Sktil$s*ra*ee$mppr*a*f'l
In Company is a practical course in bout to do business in
'With
English
target language selectively introduced on a
need-to-know basis, each unit is a fast track to competence in
a pafticular business skill. Recognising that people need more
than just phrase lists and useful language boxes to operate
effectively in real-life business situations, each unit provides a
substantial amount of guided skills work to give students the
chance to fully assimilate the target language and'make it
their own', before going on to tackle fluency activities.
Target skills developed at this level include:
. keeping track in cross-cultural meetings
.
.
.
.

creating a favourable impression in e-mails


handling unexpected phone calls
getting people to do things for you
opening, closing and fuelling conversation

querying and clarifiiing points under discussion


o making and reporting decisions
. applylng and resisting pressure in negotiations
.

exploiting the power of your voice in talks

Wky mr* the umltsdivided into catego,ries?


In Company is Macmillan's skills-based Business English
series, aimed at professional, adult learners seeking to realise
their full potential as speakers of English at work - both in
and out of the office - and in social settings.
In Company Intermediate takes students through fwenty
progressively more challenging units ranging from basic
networking, information-sharing and small talk to higher
order skills such as problem-solving, presenting and
negotiating. The course reflects the need for students at this
level to consolidate their grammatical awareness, increase
their lexical range and, above all, boost their communicative
power in both professional and social situations.
Ten key observations on the teaching of English to
professional learners underpin the course:
1 Professionals like to be regularly reminded why they are
studying and what's in it for them.
2 They are used to goal-setting and time constraints and tend
to welcome a fairly fast pace.

In Company Intermediate contains four types of unit: Talking


points, Nettaorking, Desk work and Meetings Categorising the
units in this way means that you can teach the course in:
o eitber a linear fashion, starting at Unit 1 and finishing at
Unit 20, selecting the most relevant mateial as you go, but
knowing that you are varying your skills focus from lesson
to lesson and covering the basic gramrrlatical structures in
a tried and tested order
.

ora modularway,
doing all the units in one category
before moving on to the next, thereby ensuring that
srudents see some real improvement in one area before
going on to another.

The approach you choose will partly depend on your needs


analysis with your class and pafily on the importance you
place on structural sequencing, bearing in mind that
intermediate learners are likely to have met most of these
structures before.

I n t r o du c t i on
\Tithin each category, you may want to consider the
following:

&ftu;tgrperxfx

. the use of getas a generative verb in the context of


communication (get througb on tbe pbone, get J)our ideas
across in a meeting)

***x**s*sb*$Ceh$s

In these units, the emphasis is on using the English students


akeady have to discuss a topic of general business interest.
These units tend to rotate around a text or texts, usually with
accompanying listening work. There is some lexical input but
no grarnmar focus in Talkingpoints units Unit 1 assumes you
are working with a new class and therefore acts it pafi as a
kind of informal needs analysis.

In Company Intermediate devotes a lot of attention to lexis,


showing students how to build words, many of which they
may akeady know, into larger, multi-word items they do not
know. For example:
. compounds - searcb engine, belp menu

N*fw*;kdmgr

Given the choice, most of us would prefer to do business


with people we like. Networking and building business
relationships are, therefore, important business skills and the
focus of these units. Unless a sffict structural syllabus is being
followed, the units in this category can be taken in any order,
with the exception of Unit 2, which is best done with a fairly
new group.

S*s& xr*rk
Business people now spend many hours on the phone and
online, taking messages and sending e-mail. This places a
new impoftance on listening acuify and writing skills. The
units in this category can also be studied out of order.
However, it is probably better to do Unit 3 before Unit 7, and
to leave Unit 19 until last, since it brings together phone and
e-mail skills.
i.t,{**fingm
Meetings are endemic in business, but, of course, a lot will
depend on the kind of meetings your students take part in.
Unit 4 is the best one to start with as it provides
communication techniques your students will certainly need
later on in the course. Units 8 and 1,6both address fairly
common types of meeting. Unit 12 (Presenting) and Unit 20
(Negotiating) are more specialised, but nonetheless useful to
anyone in business, not just presenters and negotiators.

&*mngax*:gc
*npx.lt
At an intermediate level, students have typically met much
more grammar than they have mastered, and recognise far
more vocabulary thar' they are as yet able to produce. A
certain amount of recycling is, therefore, essential, but the
worst thing we, as teachers, can do is simply to go over old
ground agan. A better idea is to try to help students apply
and begin to integrate their existing knowledge -'noticing'
grammatical patterns in lexis, lexical patterns in grammar and
the underlying function in a business context of both.
For instance, in teaching the expression'I'll get on to our
suppliers right away', students' attention 66gld u5ef'rlh' he
drawn to any or aIl of the following:
. the phrasal verb get on to (contact) and its complement in
a Lrusinesscontext get backto
. the time expression right away and other time expressions
(later toclay, sometime this afternoon, when I'ue got a
minute) that could fill the same slot in the sentence
o the collocation get on to our suppliers and some collocates
for suppliers (negotiate witb, cbeck witb, cbange)
. the grammar of will as a modal verb and its use in the first
person singular to respond to urgent requests (I'llfind out
for you, I'll see uhat I can do, I'll get bach to you on tbat)

.
.

collocations - sbarp Nse,go out ofproduction


noun phrases - cost ofliuing, rate ofexcbange
phrasal verbb - sell ou4 buy up, cut back
discourse markers - aboue all, by tbe way, to sum up
fixed expressions - Leaue it uith me, I'll do my best, I'm

afraid tae'll baue to break off bere


c partial frameworks or scripts - ITIME] ago ue tuere bauing
dfficulties witb ..., tabicb tuas also affecting ... and ..., not
to mention
So, wbat was going urong? Well, tbe
problem we tuerefacing u,a.snot ... but .. Haue a look at
tbis .
Pre-constructed lexical chunks, like those above, are a crucial
part of native-speaker interaction and, if judiciously selected,
can significantly speed up the language processing time of
non-native speakers too, allowing them to sound more fluent
in situations they can predict they are likely
f:".."*i:I,
Lexis, therefore, is given a prominent place in the units
themselves and, in addition, students are referred to optional
Lexis links, which effectively double the lexical input in each
unit and can either be set for homework or made the basis of
vocabulary-building lessons.

*r*mxryrmr
sV$*eh&*s
Of course, Iexical chunks are only useful in so far as our
students arc able to produce them in real time, as and when
they need them. rilihen, for whatever reason, they are unable
to do so, they will fall back on the generative power of
grammar and the simplest words in their vocabulary to get
the job done
The approach irr In Company Intermed,iate ts to highlight
target grammar as it naturally emerges in the activities, but
there are no long detours in the units themselves into
structural matters. The reasoning behind this is that, though
some formal errors persist, when it comes to the basic
grammar of English, iniermediate students tend to have more
problems with use than form - and such problems require
more than a short exercise or two to put right. This is where
the Grammar links come in. Fifteen Grammar links, crosslinked to the fifteen main skills-based units, systematically
address the usual questions of time, tense, aspect, voice,
modaliry and conditionality as well as broader areas such as
reporting and diplomacy, where gtamfrrat becomes as much
a mattet of choice as of rules.
In the Grammar links, students are encouraged to explore
grammatrcal use and, to some extent, fathom out the rules
for themselves Tenses are usually presented contrastively.
Practice exercises are mofe commonly text- or diaioguebased (rather than simply sentence-based) to give a feel for
the discoursal role of differenr structures.

l n tr o du c t i on

*l*sx *mxs*tt*s x*d *llls


Throughout the course, substantial use is made of audio
recordings both to input business expressions and
grammatical structures and to demonstrate subtler
communication skills in action Indeed, very little of
the language work is not presented or recycled in
a recording.
As well as the usual dialogues and narrative extracts, uoxpap
- ordinary people's views on a particular topic - is a
characteristic feature of the recordings. These have been
scripted for the sake of clarity, but they do help students in,
smal1 classes and one-to-one - it's easier to articulate your
views when there are other views to suppoll or differ from.
The recordings feature both native and non-native speaker
accents, providing the students with extensive exposure to
real spoken English There is frequently an element of
humour in the recordings which, besides entertaining the
students (and teacher!), motivates them to listen again for
things they missed the first time round. The target language
in the units is printed in bold in the recordings.

students read/listen to a texi and complete sentences to


reflect their own reaction to it, e.g. I tbougbt tbe point
about .. xuasinteresting; I'm surprised tbat . ; I'm not sure
I agree u)itb ubat it says about ..; I'm not conuinced. tbat
..; I completely d.isagreeuitb tbe idea that ..
. give students the first half of 8-16 collocations and a time
limit in which to search for the collocates
. give students a set of miscollocates and ask them to coffect
them by referring to the text
. students find expressions which mean the same as, e.g.
incidentally: by tbe uay; TnoreoL)er: in addition;
generally: by and large or the opposite of , e.g in
practice/in tbeory; in general/in pafiicwlar
o give students a set of prepositions and ask them to scan
the terl for noun phrases / ptrasal verbs / idioms which
include those prepositlons
.

read out the text pausing in the middle of collocations /


fixed expressions / idioms for students to predict the
completions either by shouting out or writing down
the answer

Slxsn*v*w*rk
Ss*e **:rx* *xpi*$t tih* e$Em**g*x*$
$*$$'thsy?
Play some of the diaiogues a second time and:
. pause the cassette after questions for students to recall
or predict the response (if they write these down as they
go, you can ask them to recall the questions as weli at
the end)
. pause the cassette after responses to questions and ask
students to think of other possible responses
pause the cassette in the middle of lexical chunks
(coilocations, fixed expressions) for students to complete
them either orally or by writing them down
. ask students to speculate about the personalities ofthe
speakers in the dialogue
. ask students if they have ever met / done business with
anyone like the speakers
. ask students if they would have reacted differently to the
speakers in the dialogue
.

$Qe*e5{ng
t*xts
The reading texts in In Company Intermediatehave been
chosen to involve, entertain and provoke students into lively
discussion, as well as to contextualise key target vocabuiary.
Squeezing a text completely dry of all useful language usually
demotivates a class, but many of the longer texts in 1n
Company Intermecliate are informationally and lexically rich
and can usefully be revisited.

*{*wy**n $cx*l*it lth* jl*Nts fwrtl'l*r?


Try some of the following:
. students set each other questions on a text
o students set you questions on a text, and vice versa
. give students several figures from a text and ask them to
recall the context in which they were mentioned
. read the text aloud but slur certain words/phrases and
students ask for repetition/clarification

Each unit culminates in at least one fluency activity which


draws on both the specific language presented in the unit and
the wider linguistic resources of the students. Activity types
comprlse:
1 skills workouts, where students practise a specific microskill (such as effective interruption or voice projection) in
a semi-guided way
2 roleplays and simulations, where students are given a
scenario and perhaps some kind of 'personal agenda'
3 case studies, where students are confronted with an
authentic business problem and then compare their
solution with that of the actual company concerned
4 'framework' activities, where the students decide on the
content for a presentation, e-mail or phone call and the
Student's Book provides them with a linguistic framework
to help deliver that information
Preparation is essential for types 24 and it may sometimes
be advisable to carry out the acfual fluency activity in a
subsequent lesson, allowing plenty of time for feedback
]b**8**nus S**$q.
In this book you'll find comprehensive teacher's notes that
give an overwiew of each unit, detailed procedural
instructions for all the exercises and an'If you're short of
time' section at the end of each unit. These are interleaved
with the Student's Book pages and contain the recordings
scripts that relate to the Student's Book page opposite The
Student's Book pages themselves are faded slightly so that the
overprinted answer key stands out clearly, helping teachers to
Iocate the answers more easily. Suggested answers for longer
tasks are provided in the teacher's notes The Grammar and
Lexis links pages may be photocopied and given to students
to check their answers
The book also features a Resource materials section
containing thirty photocopiable worksheets which extend
and/or revise elements in the Student's Book These were
written by eight practising business English teachers and
provide afl exl'ra twenty hours of material to supplement
the Student's Book.

1 lnternational
Engtishp*

Colrplsting11necdsanalysis

3*l&i*g ;:*in{*

Diselssinqallitudesto Fnglishusingexpressions *- Feopleialkingabouttheir


stiiludeg:lolearningEnglish
for talkingitbcut langila{,}o
neeCs& learnrng
preferances

Doinga qulzcn languages

*::gli*l': *s * gir:h*l
1$*$$*Ss

ffi:,

Making contacts

& Adicieabout[nglishdOminating
woddcemTnunicalions

peccie
Lescr'bing

Extractsi'on a businesstravel
pr0gramneon eonfgrencevenues
PeopiegcssipinEat a cafilerence

FresentSirnple

!* Fecplesocjalising
at a conference

PresentSimple
vs Frosent
ContinuoLls

Verb +
prirositions

Telephcne
lar
exPressions

Discusslngappropriateconveruatiol-rtopics
!

Prssnt
Conlinilous

N*'h,ti:riti$S

going
Koepingthe ccnvera&tion

O$st*|efi*ss

Netr,vcrking

3 Makingcalls pt:
n8*[ $$rk
*sln$ tl]s t*i*p**$*

l\lakingte{ephonephrases

Planninga telephone6a1l

PastSimplo

Exchenging
infdrmetionon the telephone

Voicemailmessages

Timeadverbsfi:r,

Teldphcne
conversatlo
ns

t t . i t ) r, q . i ) : l , .
i erord

oler

4 Keepingtrack !!*
,lt**iirq*
&da*llng
skiil*

Checklrrg& clari\rirrgiacls & figures

Queruingrirlcrmsiron

X Texts:the Sudwejsercompanies

{.. Extfaclsfron
l"

s Soeedof life ' "r:


'illili::g

p*!r-rt*

pl**$lli{:

D,qcLss:nq
I;r.3 naitgp"leni slraeEies

a meeiiiig

A briefinql
meeting

Compaiefivg$
&
gUpelaltves
Comparative
&
cupeflalve

"le/ ;nC

' :r

.' :j. ll'^ ;r L<' .1


l"-'
ctsliaclrois

Phrasalverbs
with cn, out, off,
up, dawn

Mini-texts:statisticsairoutihe
workingweek

DiscussingFtalmentson how speedaffects


ysur workirg life

:ii*a r*******1**{

Fxkactsiiom rneetlngs

eellocaticns
'relatingto
cOn'terences

Extracifn:rnrGettrnglhrhgs
Ooneby RogerEiack

*i rvi:*

Peopletalkingabeuthcw speed
affecistheirwork
Peopietalkingatlouthow they
unwindaflrwork

6 Busine* travel
pl$

lr.r.eilr-E
i:^p'csc;ng
,ikc,& dislr.{e;;bouj
o"r
buslness

Extractsfiom businesstravel
cQnversatlonS

Polrtequestion
forms

*elx*dri*g

Makinqpllte feqrests& enqLriries


Silualionalreleplays

Aftlcifromldewsweekaboui
peoplewho livein two ciiies

lndireciquestions

liavelli*S *;: b*linE$*

Shcd exeharlqes
in British&
Americanfngiish

ldenlifyingsigns*s tsrilishor AnrericanFnglish


Greetirig\lsilris

ffi

Conv6rsations
at the airporl

Z Handling
callsp*$

Discussingyourattitudeto usinQthe lelephone

lss.!:.:.:*th

MakingpolitetelephonerequestsuSing,{ &
Couldycu ...?

t". Tebpl'r0neconversati0ns

,&iti:i:*s$ t!. iicit'l$ th*


t$l*$h{:*
}!*1***no

l\linr-lexis:relepno,roct.itislics

DPU| [aL rEUU)

MakinQtelephonexpression$
wjth /l/

I Making decisions

on rnakingdecisions
Doinga questiirnnaire

i iii

Usingexpiessionsfor rrrakingdecisions&
ccnductingrneeting$rn a decision-making
mesti&g

, {ir*il:lg::
***i*ioir-*l*king

,-

E,(kactsfrpm e documentary

Extract{rom a rneeting

Articiea}:outJamesBond films

unless

Actorpro{iles:JamesBond
con.tenclers

(thet)

p*?
s Bisbusiness

Statingopinicns,agreeing& dlsagreeing

fr*ls
1'h* 1*,,";*r*{ }ig
suSin*$:t

Staliagpreferences

'l*lllit

Collocations
relatingto \,vork
routines

Corciii;cnals
l+

i\

,.^

...i^.1.

Coliocatrons
^^

rc a|nd

1A +ha

r r..ti---

lnttiiviewi;with JamesBond
conten06rs

ffi

Vv/ill
lor future
predictions,
decisions,ofre:'s,
requests.
picinises
re{usals tirea:s

Dealinqwith incemingcails

ni*i:*er

Collocations
io travel
relating

2 e,'ca

laa,-

,c

surpcse,'sJtctsjng

Peopletalkingaboutthe sizeof
theircompenies
Article:Landirf lhe Granis- are
companieeof governmentsin
charge?
Feopletalkingaboutihe arlicle
Landof lhe Granls

ffi

to Smalltalk
;,.u
S**ri:*!**

cn cultural
eonrpletinga questlcnnaire
aw&reneSs

Extracts{rom pre-meeting
conversalicns

l$e;i<lxgsxrall l*lk

TalkinEaboutexperiences

Peaplechaitingat work

|]illirifei rliS**s***
nls*ii**s

in

fngaging]n srnalJtaik

-::-:_

:::

l:
_:

i'S
ULI

Conrmon
adjectival
collqcaticns
&
Exaggeration
understatement

't1

E-mail pAq
!]*sk vr*rk
Writixg*-rn*il

Diccussing
attitudesto e:mail
Writinlle-mailequivalents
of formaltexis
Simplitying
a lengthye-mail
Exch*nginge*ails

t, Presenting
o+!

Peopletalkingabouttheri
atutudect0 e-mail

Guideline$
for writinge-mail

fr'l**t!11$$

qualitiesal a good tlresentailon


ni$eu$$lng
pacing& senteilcestreg$
ftrausing!

'3rese$t&ti{:!* skill$

Delivering
a pfesentaticir
Structuringa pressntalion
Usingvl$usls

m Aniele:e-mailresearchresults

m [xlra(J lronrfhe Bt\)lfersGuide'


fo the lnlgrreii
Voicemaitmessages
ItreopJe
conversing& givinga
presernation
lbast: try GeorgegernardShew
to AlbertEinstcin
ffi Hxtract{rom FirstDirectwei:site

A presentation
abouta technical
pr0Dtem

Fre$enting
a $olutionto a pfoblemat work
13 Technological
world $54
?elkl$SFoint$
Ts*h*el**y *il$ *han$*

14 Eeingheard p$s
M*etingx
{:rjlt*.ei d;ffs{*il$ss it}
m*stis*$

Dlscussing
the pras & consof technoiogy

R Article:the age of technology

Makingpr6di0tionsaboutfutilrcteahnology
usingexpressions
for speculatingabouithe
futur

L PeopietalklngaboutJuture
te0hn0logiq&l
developments

Peopietalkingabout
tlreirattilrrdesto rntings

ni$cussingattitudest0 meetirgc

TyBesof paperdoeumentation

n*$i{ i**fk

eorreetinga fonnallettdr

Writ!$S bu$ir1*$* le*sr$

Writinglettersof eomplaintand apology

't6
$olvingproblems Discussingsolutionsto problems
ps?
Expressions
for making$uggestion$
Ms*ti*S$
Pr*b1*rn-${r!vl*S

roi Jt" r\-Jlo

intenlion:
lre
golng lo/itannrng
io/rnfendhg fo
elc

oomFulers

f:ast Continuous

fcr
Fxpressiens
stru-cturing
a
preseniation

PactPedect

PastSirnplevs
PastC0ntinuou$ Coll0eatians
to
re.ldiing
vs PastPer{ct
prosentaii0n$

Collceation$
relollngl0
meetngs

Multi-verb
xprsslcnsIn
bu$ine$$letlers

Preposiiioirs

Sontocnocorrectinga
colleague's
ilusinessletter

{, Case$tudies:threproirlems
sotveo

Oondiiional:i
{p$! referenee)

eolloeations
relatinglo peoplc
& products

Fassivewith
commonverh
structurcs

Collocations
relatingt0 tocd &
drink

Exiractsfrornmeeting$In
dllferentoultures

Discussingmeetingstylesin diflerentcountries

tU snailrnailpsj

Ccliocaiicns

i: vr ,, *q r r, ,;,

Modeiverbsr
r?|]sf,naj4
might,can,
eould, wor/ld,
ougfif lo tc

in
Oompletinga questionuaire
on assediveness
me1rng$

casesludies:
Ineel,r:g
stylesril
threecountrie$

Intenuptinge speeker

t&

f:dure fcrnis

Aticle abeuta paperlessoffice

|:jltractsfrom probiem-solving
meetings

Devisinga procedurcfor solvlngproblems

fxpre$sionslcr
$tatingopinions

R lexts: adviceon solvingproblems

r*
17 Globalvillage
pr*

ffi

&

Diseussing
opinionson glolralisation

re lextsi four peopls'sopinionson


giobalisation

Telkin$F*;*t$
Si*baii$*ti**

your
Usingtime exrlressions
tc eommunieate
viewson how gloflalisaticn
affectsthe conrpany
you wQrkfof

p?4
tu atingout

Dscrilringrectaur?nts

$- A ooi]versationin a restiurant

Xeiilv*rki*g

fxpressionsfor discussingfood

$. Convefsations
overlunch

X*$*{uri*nt$

Dr-rrng
a quizun tablernarnerc& etiqiletle

Ft:sd & drink


'lkl*{*
;-::an*ers

Categorising
food & drink

tt Messaging
r?E
!]gsk lv*rk

Discussingattiludesto eiectronic
communications

Fxtractabcutthe roleo{
e'mail in busine$s

f;-*'l*i!

Seqrrerr{.ing
3 series
of e-nrails

V*i*e mall

Fxpressions
usedin e.mails

PeOple
their
diseussing
opinionson ngsaging

Describingtypicaldishesfromyour eountryor
regi0n

Dealingwith me$$ages

e|

20 Negotiatingoa3

Soundingmorediplomatic

R Exiractfrom GetirngFas/ 410

lvisstiil*$

Expressions
for negotiaiing

N*q*ti**i*x*

Compleiingnoteswhilelisteningto two
negotiatiCns
Negotiaiinga transferdeal

Reportedspeech

Humorous
voicemail
messalles

Note{akng frcm voicemail

-lig

Casestudisisolutionslo
in two companie$
Pr0hlenrai

Peoplesharingiheir views
on neqotjating
Joke from Complleldlot's Gurde
ta WinningThraughA/egotualron

r"

Er.traets
ffom negotiations

${ Afticlecn foctball

e. Jescript'onot tootbarlorayers'
tranEferdeal$

Grammar
of
dlpl0maey

Collocaticns
felatingto
negotiatiorl$
fer
Expressions
negotialing

Yhsn* *:as **v*r h*s*: * langr*xg* xp*!**n hy s* rx*rxypx*plc i* x* rnxxy pNx**s.


Fr*fe*s*rS*i'iC

$r$*t**sexlle$ysirs

ery.e1iil }}* **m$rldEe *ncy*lcp*dj*

*f ls*$#sgls

Completc thc fallonring scnt cncc. Llsc ilre words in the box if yei6 1i1*. 15.r-,
c*mpar{j ra'ith other p*<.rple in tire chss
'tsor rne: learning Fnglisir is
,
e pl*s$llrc
an in\reslrn{]nl
a probleln

* hnhlry
nn oppi.:r1r-rnity
a n*ccssily
tn effofi
a pain
* nighfnrare

Why are yo$ irarning linglish? ColnpJ,etcrhe


sentcncr$ hr;lorv and nunli:er them in rtrrler qrf
irnportance l'or you. Cr:mpitr-ei,r,"itha partncr,
In gcncral. I .qv-entt*:
Iearn
fecl

write

read

rlakc

&el

more confidfnt whr:ii I spcak.

ir"rorove

inr li;tcnine skills.

learr

luts of nex'vocabulary,

M4ke

f'ewer gramrnsr mi$take$,

y C C r t g _ _ l i c t l t : r t j t . r r r ' rl i r i u i j . l r

r"eAd _
$o much.

withcnt rlsing a dictjsnary

In particulaq I neer:tr
Hnglishfur:
I

taking

':i:*

tr:rir*lling

sr:cialising

';vriti*g
:::l

tfave.llir\6_ r:n l:usiness.

fu

doiy_

businerir on {he phone,

wntin{

c-ma_i}s,thxes anel }r$ers.

;ecialisi^q rvi{h c}icnrs and colLeagues.

t4kt4+

prrn i) iucctings.

4ivin4

s h ( ) t TD r c s c n t a t i ( ) n ; ,

Are you trearning English for any other rea$on$?


Ackl ihem ri) ihe list;$ abovs.

ffi$*bm$**mxffi:timx*m*$mre
Sq;tlx

How lnuch do yr:u knnw ah*ut the worlel.s


major languages? Try the quiz on ti:e right.
Then checlr your an$wers in the ertjele opposite.

This unit is about both the role and importance of English


in global communication,and its role and importance in
the lives of the students. Students complete gapped
sentencesand phrases as they explore their need for
Englishand their attitude to learningit.

Students should work individually at first and then


compare their lists in pairs. You might iike to point out
the grammatical structures of the two sentences: u6tnt to
+ infinitive andfor (preposition) + -ing form. Then ask
for further examples.

Make it clear that students are never limited to the


choices given in the book and encourage them to tell the
class ifthey have any other ideas.

They then try a quiz on the world's major languagesand


check their answers in a text on the predominanceof
Englishas the languageof internationalbusinessand
communication.
They have the opportunity to discuss their own views and
whether or not they agree with the article, before listening
to six businesspeople talking about their attitudes to
learning English.
In this first section, students begin by exploring their own
attitudes to learning the language, the specific areas they
wish to concentrate on and their need for English in their
everyday lives.

Ne*** e$xe{ysis
$

Allow students to discuss their sentence completions in


pairs or small groups before they report back to the
class. Encourage them to give reasons why they chose
the words they did by asking follow-up questions such
as:'X/bat kind of oppottuntty? Why is it a necessityfor
you? In tubat taay is it a problem? Wbat would turn it
from a iigbtmare into a drearn?

ffi $mkxm$
m*rxxffixwrx**m$
*rx
In this section, the focus changes to the place of English in
the world, pafiiculady in the business arena. Students are
encouraged to react to and discuss information in an article
and listen to business people talking about their attitudes to
learning English.
*q,xija
$

Encourage students to try to answer all the quiz


questions and discuss their answers in pairs or groups
before turning to the article on page 5 to see if they were
right. You may need to point out that the answers are not
in order in the text and that the answers to question 2
are in the panel to the right of Exercise 2 on page 5,
rather than in the article itself. Give students time to read
the article, find the answers and give their reactions. Ask
them if they found any of the answers surprising

T e a c h e r ' sN o t e s

Siseuss!*n

&t'**tu$*s t* ffir-rg$$sh

Students should discuss the questions in pairs or small


groups and report back to the class. Before they begin,
you might like to put some expressions for commenrlng,
agreeing and disagreeing on the board or OHp. For
example;
I tbougbt tbe point about . was interesting.
I'm surprised tbat
I'm not sure I agree that
I'm (not) conuinced that .
I totally (dis)agree tbat ...

EI 1,1 Suggest that students write the numbers 1 to (r


on a piece of paper and make notes as they listen to the
six speakers. They can then compare notes with a
partner Encourage them to use the expressions for
agreeing and disagreeing thai they studied in ihe
prevlous exercise.

e$ Ask individual students to read out the sentences.


completing the gaps.

I7hen they report back to the class, encourage them to


use some of these expressions.

To add a little movement and make this more fun, as


each sentence is completed, ask the rest of the class to
stand up if they think the answer is correct and to remain
seated if they think it is wrong. play the recording again
for a final check

ql

't
: l r .e'

s p e a kKfr o r e irggnnlraanngguuaaggeesss5 o0 il t s n o r h i n g n e w
for u
r rss T l lree::aam
mee g o e : f n r p e o p l e f r o m
I-uxembourg, Belgium, scandinavia. Eighty
Der cent ofDutch oeoole speak English.
Mosr of us speak some
*-.
c...r.,
Cerman
,oo] or
too,
o,
We cenainly dont expecr anytody
to speak Dutch! In fact, the

aDout
l e a r n i n gn
Enngglliisshh..Ti rryy il .euarri n
- gi n gi ,r n rl rreenn y o u n a t i v el a n g u a g ei s :{oreanl
{oreenl A
Actualiv,
i r u a l l r . II find
tlnd i
cnn spe"k English oK, if I m doing business
with other no"n-nativespeakers, llke
Argentinians
Arge
or fapanese But
Sr,oiJapanese
Bur with
with native
native
Engl
I do feel at a

,?:11.llili'-11',1'l'*?:kr?'disa'

,ta:a

ia:],

o sure
oI of
,
_
the
that means
.'m,tiying to

lt's certainly not as bearrtiful a language


as mylanguage, which is Ifalian, fu1d,
anr\?y, I think it's more difficult as vou
get older to learn foreign languages. Br
lo-pon11
don't real

ih. gruln*u, is much srmpler rhan mr


language, Hungarian _ ar least at rhe
beginning. that's the thing about EngLlish
i['s eas[
:i-

English
Inc.

he wa: :lrorgly critlcisedfor tatlingta rJelendFrancc_g,,,n:r


25 the aclance ofthe Fnglishlanguage.
The Fr:enchhavea poinl.lwqnty l*nguagesdlsappe.a;,
eyery yilar !rccausenoboclyspea,kthern anymcre.At lhat
rate,by the enCof the l ist eenturyalmnsta -ihii.rlof the

nglishis tc interlationalei:mnunie::lionwhatVhs is
to video,l"lirn:scft te sotwarr anclPe*tiun:tn ilre
microchlp,lt is,i:r better cr wcrlr:, the 'inCustry
standarr1'.
And tircse whc cion'tspeakat leasta lrnle risk
5
l*sing busirress
to tire increa:ingnumber llho Co A q.rarter
e:lthe planeteurrenly:peak Engli:h.That:;one and a hal{
Lrillionpeeplc,tvo-{hirc's of r*hoirr sp*akii as a 1i:rr3
language,
In a rccent srrvey*, 69%ef Europeanssair!ihey tholght
l$ e',/eryoneshor.idspeakLnglirh,fl*re than halfi:f thern
alreadyeJeFr:r most,it's nct a questicncf ch*ire br.rtc{
necessiaes Fnglishhasrapidlybeeonrethe f,rst langLrge ol
business,
scienceanCpopuiar-cultur"e.Thr:ee-quartert
of ,lhe
,*orlcJsrnailis in [nglish,5c pre lorr *ut cilve e-rnailsend
l5 n'!os[l:i wh*t y:u Ind en -theInternet
Hcwevel nol c\rycne welcomesthis linguislic
menopol;iTheFr"enrhfliristry cf Fin:nce,for lnstance,
recenily:urprisedthe inlernalionalbi,r:iness
eamnrr;nrtyty
ba.rnlngEngliihtenls ljke e-mri/ aneJlnterrer.ln lael seven
?0 tesms.f l,rngL;age
*xperlr havebeen empioyeCto aorne
up wilh Frenehaiternatiles.le \i!'eb is nrlt aecep-table.
lc
ic;ls is.AnC when the FrenchFresidenthinrselfreGred to
s&rt-!rp eompanre$
a5l*s sls{-rrpi$lesin a lelevisedspcrci,.
,

.i,l

:0

i5

4t

{5

wulci! stx;nc1a h;ilth*rsand langr:ages


rvil{be d*d. [ven
rn GernranyrvhereDengrish
is {ashicnabie,
and phraseslike
are ecfi rnen,
Jc,ntlnilfs,fc,.rerpudnerand Sirness-tcining
th* lesCerofthe FroeDemocratshasexpressecl{:$ncefn
alnut the'food oi angiici:mscleseenCing
on us l.ermtlre
nrediaaelverising,preCr-ret
d*scriptionsand teehnelogy.'.
Scrnego sr far astr: ca:liit 'a bmn of violeree',
l"laybeii is,md big businet:c*rtainly aeeelerat$th*
prreess,As liro&s:or DavielCr-ys*!,ar.rthoral ihe
CcntrnCg*[nryc/cpedr*ci Lcngucge,
puts it, 'waved*rllarbiils
in i^snt ol:orneone. and they wiil learncornplicated
spelling:anCgramn*r:'
RLrtwhal al:orJ peopl* r,vhr:learnibr.eigriangr.rag*s
;r-:l
for trn? A 37-year-oldAn:eriran,Greg; Ccx, ha: takenthis
srnrpleplea*re 10 extrenes. He holdsthe world recerrdior
- :ix1,fu*'- r:L*n. ,urt
speakingthe mo:t. fcreignlanguages
co*nil t1ewould unCo,-rbiedly
b* arr iissetto any ccmpany
d*ing internattcn;rlbl,srness.
ELrt{:r th*se of u: wh* ;ur:
lessgiftedlingr.iis:tlcally
the por,vorcl the Anericxr derllarmear6 lhere nreysoon be cnly cne i:reign languagewe
needt* Ie;vn,and th*t langu*gewill be finglislr.

[i.u,!bt]:.r:..rlei{rl
::i

*lx;:r,l**i*r

lhe ru,ctb*r ci lra.Nre

Discu.tr the fi:trl.wing quesli(]*s

:"- ::,,:j

/*m

.i:

i1
r::

:
4

ingll:ir
5pirrirf
i-linji

.t]:
l::
:1i
i|

5
6

Ar'lbr.
i.arglelE

"tll:n
16{rr
illn
i$ I rr
:65rr

/
!

1;1
ili

I
lQ

*ergrti
Ru!1r:tft
j::perr.es*

b
c

Do you fhink the article ovcr"litaiqsdre importancc of


Hnglish'i
What odler languages might er"entually take i.rver frcim
Engiish il$ rhr intcl'naiicnal lairguage of husiness?
Do you agree that big l:usiness &cceleraaeslhc adrrance
of thc English lenguage'l

I,lrnrn

l6:ir
l58n
l?,tr
:)l;r

iii':i:lllt:liilll::::i,irrt:.ttt:i:i::::il:iilr:::lt::::i::::itiitai:::r,ir::U:

At!t***x t* ffir:gii*h

EI t"l Listen ro six business pcnple talking ahnut thcir attltudr:s ro iearning
.linglish. Take nr:fes. !(hose opini*n is ck:sest t$ y{}ur own?

Complefe rhe f*llowing exprei$idlns, They werc uscd by the people y{ru
lLl,sr
iistenecl tr:.
0

Lerrning lln.qlisli

I went t{} get _o....A.......-_*


in my carcer.

English is thr: la:rgu{ge af ..." , rile nlrdia,

lt's eertainly n,ot 4.5 _

I think it'$ txore djlficr{t ^t

I'11always tldnlq in

\{/ith narive fir-rglish spc.:tkers,I do feel 4t


a clisaclvan&rge
'fhat's
the thing abq4t
Xnglish * i{.$ easy to speak a
quire quickly.

my idea -ef-

tiin.

beautihrl a lang_ugc s$ ... I{aliiur,


you get older,

ltalian.

$
!.
1l

& **nf*rsn*c lx * gxlirering *f i*rp*$a*{ g:**pl* xruhn*[ng{y *an d* n*ghin6, !:ut


t*getlr*r ei**id* th** ::*tl"ring *e:tni*e d***, Frcd,q#*n,uS eornsdien
*

which of the {cllondng ciiies would you mo$ like to visit i{)r :r conference or on
holid*yi l)iscuss with a pitfincr,
lSarcelona L*ndt:n
trlio cle Janeiro
Hong Kong
Parin
$yelney
Nq:w Ybrk
Venice
]Suenos Aires
ilokvr;

tr

rr:
Pr':rgr

Some busincss people were risked for thejr opinions about conferences,
Complete what they saict using fhe words in the box:
d*ys + year

excri$e + g<;ssip

cards + inlention

videc;conferencing

time + ieleas

+ $21

audience + stomach

Frankly, they're a cnn:plete wasfe of tir.ae

- same olcl.faces.

same oid talks, sanre r:lej tdeqf_


b

I can o.ftr:n }earn rnr:re in rhrce days

than I clo in rhe re$t of

rhe year
c

The q'orst rhing is havjng tc: gct up in front of an aurdier\ce


that sick feeling in your f_ioqaSlr
__.

I usually end up with a milLion bu.:iness cardt


alrsoiutely no ! tq\tiq^

with

fi'om people I've

of contacting.

They're realiy just an exC4,e

to have fun on expenses and catch

itD
' trn rll the ao5^s
f

Wt do a lct of vrdeeepafqre^ciw rhese days. The troul:le u'ith that is you


can't meet iti the bar

afterwards.

\|lhieh opinion5 in 2 do you agree with?

ffi mgx$w$.ffi
$ry
#* w#ffi&"$
ffis
$

El *"'! Lisren to three exkacl$ fiom a business travel programme. s4rich venlles
L:elcw elo you ehink the extract$ refer tqt?
\&nue t = Extract l
Venue ? = Extract 2,
\tRue 3 = Extract I

As students discuss the cities in pairs, go round listening


to their conversations and make a note of any interesting
points. At the end, ask for any interesting information to
be reported back to the whole class.
'When
students have finished compieting the sentences,
ask them to say whether each of the speakers has a
positive or a negative attitude towards conferences.
Encourage them to read the sentences aloud, reflecting
that attitude in their intonation

Most businesspeople attend a conferenceat some point


in their careersand this unit is about making business
contacts and socialisingat conferences.
Students begin by talking about their attitudes to
conferencesand discussingconferencevenues.They
learn languagefor engaging in small talk and keepingthe
conversationgoing and they listen to people chatting at a
conference.They will also practise doing it themselves.
The grammaticalfocus is on the PresentSimple and
PresentContinuoustenses and the lexicalfocus is on
collocationsrelatingto conferences.
This first section is about attitudes to conferences. It gives
students an opportunity to talk about their own experiences
and ooinions

Do this either as a class discussion or ask students to


discuss in pairs which statements they agree with

ffimm$*$.*ffiffiffi
w*ffi &t*ffi
In this section, students meet some common collocatrons
associated with conference venues. Recorded extracts from
a business travel programme are used to show these
collocations in action and also to train students to listen for
detail, in this case picking out numbers and saying what they
refer to.
$

EI 2.1 Focus attention on the three photos and ask


students to say which of the conference venues thev
wouid be most interested in going to.
As you play the recording, students match the extracts
with the venues.

it,:r:::::uti:aaa
:ti.ii:tr:i:i:a:l

T e a c h e r 'N
s otes
Before playing the recording, rcad aIl the figures aloud,
or ask students to read them, ensuring that everyone is
clear how each is pronounced.
You may need to play the recording several times and
pause it between extracts for students to match the
figures to the venue and note down what the figures
refer to.
See if students can complete the collocations from
memory before playing the recording again for them
to check.

twVhm's
w8xm?
This section begins by introducing students to the kinds of
things they will need to say at conferences, beginning by
identifying specific people by appearance, manner, location,
etc. and saying something about them.

pesple
ffiexani&r*ng

To make the activity more interactive, you could divide


the class into two teams. In turn, one member of each
team calls out the first word in a collocation and the
corresponding member of the other team replies with the
second word.

This exercise equips sh-rdentsto identify people they


want to talk about. \Zhen students have completed the
questions and answers individually, ask them, in pairs, to
act out the dialogue with one student choosing a
question and the other giving an approprlate response.
Do not let this go on for too long as they will be doing a
similar thing in the next activity, but with a freer choice
of words.

For homework, you could ask students to use all or some


bf the collocations in sentences.

Put students in pairs to make new sentences following


the gtructures practised in Exercise 1.

Direct the students' attention to the Lexis link on page 89


where they will find more on conference vocabulary.

Make sure students can pronounce some of the trickier


items such as pbarmaceuticals, buffet and moustacbe
before they-start.

Srudents can discuss the question in pairs or groups and


report back to the class.

Invite some pairs to perform short dialogues for the class.

Li$ten ag&in anel match the figures to eaeh venue. r&'har do the
&g;ures rre&r to?
1zt rdenue if hei{ht o{ the bhildi^j ix vetret
4:6

Venue l2j

rrnraber o$ roolvrs

z:rh venueUil
&3{10 l&n*e ffi 11uber of peoplethe corventior cerrtre c^^ jv:>^re
1{l-300/o Venue fldircor,lrrt available or 4pecial value dales
tpace i^ ;qt^ re uetre1
3,000 \fonue 3 SiLe of exhibitio^
--.r--ic'it-"1' site o$
t"f)-:lJ{) \r'nri.'
_deldxe ;;itet.--i^ lq^^re \1+:"1

95 Yen*em@t
?00 verruelZ l9y-.t-flf private
*

\iihat qrther lacilities docs each venue have? complete t&c collocatiEms
belor,They wc're all in rhe extracts 1,ou iusf hstenecl tn.

2 fllght
3 spacious

$er\llee

e room seruice

Yerur compalqr agrees to sencl y()u l{l an ioternation.al conferrnce at c.rne


of the
venucs abovc, providcd that you give a prc$enretion in Enelish.
\Xhich wculd
you cherosc and why?

kffhw*swhm?
Sex*x&b-ixxg
Seep&e

in
aa
eirl
to
with

one of fhe main reasofis far g<iing to eonferonces is to meet the rtght people.
complete the fullowing que${iofi.s and answers using the prsp_o$itions
in fhe box,
1

in
ilt
by
fbr

tr

titc ctrtrlttcc'r

stirr:tlinc
. , bv
_

with

him/herselfl

the long ciark h*ir?


the loucJ voice?

S i r

the cOrnelf
the blue srri0,

4 a t

tlre llar?
the table in dle comer.?
tht: rvaiter?
theise people?

ralking tp

is !1.

works fet-

is stnyjng at

is giving a talk c,\

financiel s*rvices.
ehase-Manhattan.
The Hilron.
glob*lisarion.

use the modei ahove tn rnake new sfrltenceii &'i|h rhe fblln*.rng.
lhs Hya*
ph*rmaceutricals
rhe bufJer
fhe glasses the por:y_mil
Rcnault
ncgr"rtiating skills
tir* long elr*ss
the cclnferenee organiser
the rnmrstache
the awflrl ;ie
the lrelian accent
her b*ck tc; us

i,::;r:iraa.
{,'ll:, :.::,'l
i :llli'i l::l:i" 'l.ti:i:,1
ilt :l,l:::il ....I iirir irt-lirit.ll
i:lltla:rll :tti'.:ii':inl::,r-:a-rr-lt
aa .i:ii:ia .:!

'11,,q
1;,.,'111,,'1-r,1ri-.ll'::
r l i i , , ' - t : ; t a ; , ' : , . . : l { r i r : - ; l l t , i , 'lt.ti : l : 1 t : r : t i f - ' r . ) t r i i , ! ' l r 1 t . ' i : i . i
l . ] ] l j r . : i . ; i ri i. t. i i t r . : r : t ; r , r . t : l l

, i r : r . i i .i r : t i r ' : l r 1 r

j ::e"hinrArD{r:t
L:l,
:lr:rr't rl I;:lhLi:9!111I
.c .

. , , , ,' , , , l . '

I..

:.. L...

.. -.. 1...-*, ,F.n

-..

,l-a-lr

' i''- ' i' 'i : i-r-'

r rlj;-'rjirl-"::-1::r.:
. : r i - r . :- i i ' r ' , r , : l : ; : , , : , , 1 , .l ' . . : , : , 1 ' ' ; i r , r :

: ] , , : : , i r _ri .

, 4 , , , ' : . , , t , ,l ,.

ll

1 ' 1 : 1 ,i i

r.:

l-i. :r
_r.,

..,

:":

'"i
"

':t i'

"

, i : : 1 . , . : .l -i ,. l r : . l i r , . , i , r;,l i r

ctl'g-LDMlq.r ne il,n-[ierri6

, : : 1 . . . ,

i .

,
:lf,r:ial

T e a c h e r ' sN o t e s
$

El 2.2 Focus srudents' artention on the phorog raph arrd


ask them to use some of the language they have been
practising to identifr the people. For example, tbe
woman in the pink sueater witb tbe shot t bloncle hair.
For fun, you might like to invite students to see who can

grey skifi and talking to tbe man in tbe ubite sbirt

Play the recording and ask students first to clecide which


of the people in the photograph the speakers are
discussing.
Play the recording agatn for students to comolete the
information. You may need to play the recording several
times and pause it between extracts to give students trme
to write their answers_
Draw students' attention to the Grammar link 6n page gg
where they witl find more information about the uses of
the Present Simple and present Continuous

Before playing the recording, estabiish the meaning of


gossiping Either here or at the end of the activity you
might like to invite students to suggest some potential
gossip abour the people in the photograph.

il::

1tg!1g&'@,
1s |

T^^^h^",^
IUOUIIUI

Nt^+^^
I\ULUJ

" Y m h msm
r m*timb** I

In this section, students discuss the issue of what is and is not


a suitable subject for conversation with people you meet at a
conference for the first time
Establish the meaning of taboo. Ask students whether
taboo subjects in their culture differ according to how
well you know the people you are talking to and the
circumstances of the conversation Invite them to suggest
topics which they think would be taboo when meeting
someone at a conference for the first time and which
would be safe
Point out the other categories given in this exercise:
conuersation killers and a bit risk! Ask for examples, e.g.
subjects rhat arc not exactly taboo but wouldn't
encourage people to continue a conversationJ and
subjects that are risky because they may cause offence.
Ask students to share with the class any amusing or
embarrassing moments they've actually experienced in
conversation. Ifyour students are from different cuitures,
ask them to work individually at first to group the items
in the box under the headings. They can then compare
their answers in pairs or small groups If students share a
culture, encourage them to discuss and do the grouping
m pars.

EI 2.3 Students may be able to decide whether the


speakers get on or not before they identify the specific
details of the topics of conversation. Ask only for this the
first time you play the recording to encourage students to
realise that it isn't always necessary to understand every
word of a listening in order to pick up the gist of what is
said or the attitude of the speakers.
Play the recording again for them to note down the
topics of conversation that they hear and allow them to
compare answers in pairs before checking with the class.

o {F : l ' ; ^i c r n } ' f } U :* } r t ' . . ' S f S : " .

{x*sffiff
This section gives students some of the tools for keeping a
convefsation going once it has staried.
\trrite the expressions on the board as the studenr
complete them. Then wipe off some of the word*s and
see if the students can still remember the expres-sions
Gradually wipe off more words so that fewer anci iel-er
remain, each time checking if the students can stil
remember.
Play the recording as a final check.
Ask students to discuss the questions in pairs or sn-iall
groups. Then have a class discussion on ri-hat rher- rr'ould
do in their own language(s) to open, continue or enc a
convefsatlon.

It q'a-s ir. Lhe

ct a compa:rf

?! rgutt .tt

) Morecurar
.
lJ:tsl no inanxs'
tnanKs''ll'm
nne
m rne
:' :t'
A : S u i":e ?
:' ::t.:t
l'::':t.
- TL--,.-

_^_ning.
thanks.yeah.it went quirewetl. I

c:Audi?oh' sorry'Thoughr\ cii Rete

like to talk ro you about some of your


ideas. My company may be interested in
- . - - pioduct.
- ^ ' , - ; ' f v/here
; ; - : ^ : are
^ : ^ "you
. . - ^ .stavins?
.--:^:-:^;"'
staying?
your

Conversation 5
Oniegi. :i: : ir
J: I like your watch. An oniegi.
. :: ^. ^
;K; ;Er.
K;, - - : - - l i : ^ . ^ ' ^ - ^ ^ - r ^ ' . .

--{;:_"
e\c-- r-e.r
_"^,,-,"_-_-",;,:":," n,+iT."""3'*:ti',iuou.r,
andsayherotosomeone
iusr
so
l::
l*^'T'"::?-:'fJT*:'9,*,;;"
,,,
utE wdyirIgi;::[:qi]ri:r:,i:i::r::iriiri:i:i:ir:arii:ii:iiiri:r,i,rr......_...
uuupgl,
I
llr
Aury
vy
a:l!t]:i:

y.
r,ii ,i'Jir"e"'.
?'ffilri:"]:j:o;"11;llll"IlTf;.{^n-..,
drinking?The Chardonnay, ;, i;;;."H""'o.
*hu

iia:ia:tii:'a
A: \x,ftatare you

isntil?

B: Erm'.yeah so' what line of business are


youln?

ijke

in oil.
Ve made : r'israke. I m
not in oil. I work for Audi

do.,.,we flx up a

;,;".;-;;i;;;rua1i"r.i-n.r."--yi"ra.

r, on, ,nu.,t r. r've got mine here ...


.*;;;;

uu

l: *", air.ff ilLlf.,-_ ,""f


't;;"il

ro mr -r1sre dic

K: Turkey, It cosr me r,'enn'-r'i'. cir.:::.


i' A-;rt""!
so.dovouk-oowma.ay
Sl'p;:doyouknow manr

cJrro.t"rtlor, 2

me.
C; Oh, then try the cheese dips instead.
They're good, too. E4v_we met

that's for sure.


F: Erm. wouldyou excuse me a moment?
fl| be right back

ncun Fabulcus hl:tl

-&ei

I getsouansthing
c:Mmr wassure' *'"ul'::1l""ji, You'rei,ii;J]?i,l
;??:il-."", quitearoror
'
BT*H.tJil;;can
you?I canlf]]
forus,bir. fine.
_ il *q."i;.:,,areni . m -rea'v
-__:
-.: a..__
, a- l l y i n t o - . ;*"rr.
.a t1l-*P":ll;^h,
:' - r n
;.":. ..
i --:
Oh,
D : \ i l e l ] . I d o n . t k i r o w ' Inot
n o t r einto
l ' - . * ; . . . ^ " . ^ * ^ ^ ^ i m i . , , l t s ^ K : o h . t h.K:
. s aihars
l l ' , 6 'all
' . . righr.i,.,,
.' : - i ; ;y:'j1fl1f,:i":I":
.
,r'.,
th.:
B..
B..:-:
,.:
,
.:
:,:
:,:
fl*
like
::il:
some
ilro,"
more
or
of
-horoscopes,
r'marnid.
:a
1{t::1,:^"
DeIOre lt all goesl

Ymbmmffir $xcp
*mhmm?
\Xbrk wirtr a paltner. Imagine you meer seme husiness people at a confer*nce
lbr the lirst tirne. \fhirh nf rhe fi;llowins ropiL.$ are
r inieresting?
. converxntic.inkiilers? . a biL risky? .
" safe?
taboo?

Sl x"x Llsten lo some pecple socialising at a conference . \ilhat are they


talking
abuut? Du ll.rey gt:t on with each orher?

':
l

Kwmp$mffi
tFx*ffi*ffiw*rse*mm
g*$mg
'$

The expressieins helow wt:re in tht: cq:nversations you just listenecl to. Can yq)u
rcrner:rber thc first threc qrords of each expressioc? contraclions
lit,s, y*tt'll" ]'nt
ete_) count as tr:rre worel. 1l nr:cessarlr, listen again ancl check.

a l s

!\it

Y?tf

b Wltl

9" -

ygl ..* cto,b;, rrrew*y?

lir'.e

?f

brwiness:rre you in'i

of

fhese - they're rlelicious.

fir${ f isir ro Runsia?

c s*!.*
d

What

Have

we

pret

$omewhere before?

| -

y?,9-!]- ?|:l:l1? me, r'havero m*ke a phonccalt


l9-"-l - ll"c-9"---ratkinsro yor.
lndty g!?y--eiyour ralkthis mnrnins.

How

^re

Irit

lltis

Would

y?r^

g
h

ry51

yot

Yo|^
enloying the eonfurcnce?
*911f9t**ftrl? Half
a merer of snor*,this mornjngl
t?
?\c
ml: a mornent?I,ll be right baek.
)l\5t - go anclsay hello ro $omeone.
krcry many people
her-e?

o
L*ok at the expressions in 1.
A, c, e, f, i, j, k, l,
b, c, d, e,j, k, ,r,

a
b

1, h, l, r.^ c

Which wr;uld bl: gor:cl way:s


of opening a cnnversalion?
W:ich vrould help you to
keep a convers*tion gnin$
\qhich eculcl y*u usq t{)
politely end a eonversation?

party
&* m m*m$wr*nce
dr*sxkw
Wclrk as a class tn l*eep the conversation Soing at a conference drinks pafiy at
Disneyl*Rd, Paris. trt'.s& warm summer evening and the place ls full of delegates,
Tlre conference the:me is Bttsiness in the Twertty^Ji,rstCentun'.
S

Invent a oaille and nationalin- for yourscff.


liiarionality:

]liame:

"Tlhqn, eomplete the questions below lT:ink oil possible ans!*Ers fs each and
make ncltes in lhe space prorided.
<o, uto do you work for?
Q $o, who I rvork for'r
A

And what,/ clo there? And what do yor,rdo lhere?

*hcre I 6ased? Where Are yota based2-

Hew.l btrsiness?H*ls \rtsixess?

Car I letJou-1!lrl1r<,1
e csn / get / anngT
A

oriti^r}}y?
e whereI fiom originally?!{lref9 tl9 yqr ffry
A

first iirne / pangls

thrs youir +irtt

tir.ae ia, Paris?-

A
How are '/ou euo'/ir'5 tle
Q How / enfoying / confetrnce?

u"furrrce?

A
Ara you qivixq a pre5e*tatiu+?
Q giving I presentation?
A
Do you krrow uany people l2rzq
Q kncw many people here?
A
3o, where ar-e yon Stayir4?
Q So, u,here / stayingi'
A.
Caa' I let
Q Cen I get / anything / buffet?

'/ou arrfthia{

f,ru'

tla

tuFet?

A
S

Wh*n everyone is ready,


. mingle with other people in tht: class"
I
intfo<luce y*urself to as many peopie as possible and shoq- interes( in s-har
they tell yr:u.
c usc the questions above to try to kcep the conversation going. Remernber
that you ean talk about other people in Ehs room as s-ell a-sloursclf. exchange hu-siness cards or fix an appciintment with anr-one r-<x.rccx-rld do
business with.

T e a c h e r ' sN o t e s

&t m *#m$ffir*$x*#
e$riimkw
*

p&*.

F"ic{f {.y
In this section, students put into practice what they have
learnt about stafiing and maintaining a conversation at a
conference by roleplaying a conference drinks party. Students
work together as a class to do this and they are given plenty
of supporl by preparing questions and answers in advance.
,$
Students could use their real names and nationalities
here, but some may find it easier and less embarrassing
to assume a fictitious identity when taking part in a
roleplay. The fantasy role approach may also work better
with in-company groups and those who already know
each other well; it certainly allows more room for gossip.
R

Ask students to complete the questions first and check


the answers with the whole class before getting them to
fill in the answers. Students should work individually to
devise answers for their character, and you will need to
go round offering help and advice where needed.

If you have the time and the facilities to do so, you might
Iike to add ro rhe realify of this by having some
refreshments availalle andby encouraging students to
bring to class business cards (real or imaginary) and
name badges

Draw students' attention to the fact that they are not


limited to the questions and answers they have just
prepared. They have already practised other techniques
in this unit for talking about other people in the room
and keeping the conversation going They could even
engage in a little (fictitious) gossip about the other
people they have met at the conference.
Conduct a feedback session at the end in which students
report back to the class on the fascinating people they
met, the interesting gossip they heard and the
appointments they have made.

Making and receivingtelephone calls in Englishis


perhaps one of the most difficult skills which business
students need to acquire,and certainlyone which can
cause a lot of stress.
This unit provides strategiesto make telephoningin
Englishless stressfuland gives some usefulformulaic
expressionswhich will facilitate dealing with calls.
Students practise listeningto and dealing with voice mail
messagesand returningcalls. Finally,students do a
guided roleplay,initiatinga phone call in order to find out
certain information.
The grammaticalfocus is on the Past Simple and time
adverbs, and the lexicalfocus is on telephone
expressions.
This first section provides an opportunity for students to
explore their attitudes and worries about speaking English on
the phone. The aim here is to demonstrate to students that
many people have difficulry with telephone calls and it is
nothing to be ashamed of Several techniques will be given in
this unit which should helo.

clasil

l!3$**ninq ii{if"fi' e,*l*s


Planning calls in a foreign language is vita1l1'rmponani If
you prepare what you are going to say when ),ou make a
call, the conversation is likely to progress much more
smoothly and with less chance of misunderstanding If lou
are aware of what you should say when you recerr-e a call.
then you will sound more confident, and ]rou are less likely
to cause offence by not using the established formulae
which the caller will expect.
R

El 3.1 Play the recording and elicit anss ers ro the


question around the class.Encourage studens to suggest
the kinds of things the person answenng rhe phone
could have said instead of his abrupt one-s-ord
responses (Hello. Yes.Yes)which q-ould har-e been more
helpful
El s.z Play the recording for srudens ro !r-'ren and
complete the gaps. $7henyou har e checkco uc
answers.ask them to say what n ould l.c an :cpropriate
way of answering the phone in their on'n siuations
El g.S Play the recording and elicir ans'r'ers ro rhe
question. Again, you could ask srudenL.:o sa,.'ho*- the
caller's utterances could be impror ed bercie r-ou plarthe better version
El s.+ Play the recording for sruden- :o lj-.ren and
complete the gaps. In pairs, ask sruden-r.rrer-h- to
roleplay the first part of a telephone cril s-iih one
answering the phone properlr- and the other sar-ing rl-ho
they are, where they are calling tioni n ho lhe\' \\'ant to
speak to and what it is about Ther- cai fiel sn'ao roles

****tiq:*m*ir*
{

Give pairs time to think about and discuss the questions,


encouraging them to give details of the incident when
their answer is yes. Ask them to report back to the class
on any interesting anecdotes they shared.

..
received.

veS'{o) er' Laulerrne1\te!o'tlla:laii:rr:1;;11rili11:bgi0o6e:of


your catll
..
B:It's about an invoice
\d^,- ^^rr^^ ^r-^-^,
B:Sorry?.
u:sofry/

ask the

**r t*{*g*h*xs *n*wering cy*t*m has *:r*}r*n cl*w*" Thi* is a }:urnaRb*ing. M*w **n
I h*ip y*u? Sn*nymoi,,sr:il$rsri.l*rs$?.y!ss,.ep$sr?fafiva

&r,*'s*w!li*nneix's $

How comfortable are you speaking Engli.sh q:n tlre phone? Ivork witlr a pa$n11f.
Complete and cliscuss the questior:naire beluw using the coffecr fr:rm of tlr{:
fblk:wing verhs:
have

iose

souncl

shor-rt

iry

kccp

want

mhunrJ.erstancl
I

F i * n r r i n g y * u a rc c l l t

Making phone m-lls in a foreJgn language reqtrires planning. It's espeeially imporrant
to ltrrow whar to say righr at rhe beginning crf the call.
*

*"x Listen to rhe pl:r:ne call" Why cioes the cailer get angry?

EI

x"g Listen to c better version of ths s:une phone call ancl ct;mpiere lhe
following: Hello
, accounLsdepartraerrt . Mlujus Fot jpeakin4

s{. $II s"x Now listen ro another phr:ne call. \lhy does rhe caller slrrincl sa
unprofessiunal?
El *.* Again, Lislen tcr a better ver',sionof the s:u:nephone cell ancl cornplete lirc
f'oilowing:
Il'tis
Cq^. *
It's

Ranron llerengucr te".


I -about

5p4}

te-_

_ Genex Fharmaceuricals.
't
- carherine Meiloq p)elze

aninvoice.!'' j ..i ,;
,,...
',-1-r.".
l,

..;;.,1;

l
,rt-.r,'

:'.

':):

l'ji,.ii

",'1+

ii,i,

T*3*ph*nex;xkr**i***s

A kil of thc Engli,sh )icil nlled on the pl:eine is iLt$ta sm*lJ nul:her of kcy worcls
useel in diffsrent cornhinetions. 'str* r-r,ith a p&rrner. !{*w *rany felephclne
rxpri]s$ion$ can you nrekr' irr z ruinutes Lrsjng or:e worcl or phrase frnm two or
more seetic.rnsbrrlow (eg. dhru I bn,a* your fi,&?ne,1:lease"fi.Write fhem down.

re'llbe back

Yi:u *v*rhear a c*li*ague say rhe f'ollr:wing tlrings on the phone. whar qucsrions
cio yot-t think sht *-as asked? Llsr some of the telephone expreri$ions yorr macie
rn h"
a Can I help you
Yes, I'el like tn spe;,rk to lfakat Karsli, pleast:,
b

Ca,r I have yolrr na,rvre'


please? ,/ Cax I agU who'Ecallirr4
Yes, it's lvan:r Medvedeva"

Can yor,,r<pell that,

please

M-E-O-Y-A-D-fi-V-4, Meclvedeva.
d

Carr | 4ive her ^ Me11^qe


Yes. Can you itrst tell her lvana calleel?

Car yote tell hipr I called


Yes, I'll tell hiln as soon as lre gets in.
Can you read it back to ue

Of course.Your rrference number is 45-8f099-Kkl.OK?


n

Car you Jpeak uF, pleaJe


Sorry, is that better?

Can, yor,r tell r.,rewher he,/she'll be back

Around rhree, I should think.


i,

S1" y"f jet back to r"rewithirr the hor,rr


ean we make that ftro hours?
Can you al( hi*/her

to call rae back

Cenainly. Can yeruE;iveme your number?


Cax | yet back to you on that
Sure" {fhen c*n i expec{ to hear from you?
Can I feave 6 Metsaqe with you
Sure. Just a minute. Where's rrry pen? OK, go aheacl-

T e a c h e r ' sN o t e s
"Xbleplre*x'l*
phrexses
I

Students will find the phrases given here useful in a wide


varrely of phone calls. \X/hen they have found as many
expressions as possible, divide the class into two teams.
Each team takes a turn to call out the first part of an
expression and the other team has to complete it.
Point out to students that the key to successful
telephoning in English is confidence. If they have a range
of expressions at their fingertips to cope with all the
practtcal aspects and eventualities of telephoning (the
person being out, on another line, offering to take a
message, etc ), then they will sound more confident and
will have more time to concentrate on the more
important parts of the call (imparting information, finding
something out, etc.).

In this exercise, students predict what the person at the


other end of the phone must have said to cause the
responses given. Give students time to complete the
questions individually
For a more interactive way of checking answers, select a
pair of students and ask one of them to read out the
question they have written. If the question is correct, the
other student should give the response from the book. If
the question is not coffect, helshe should either say
nothing or give a response which is appropriate to the
question that has actually been asked Establish what the
correct question should be before moving on. Do this for
all the questions, selecting a different pat of students
each time.
Direct students' attention to the Lexis link on page 9I
where they will find more useful telephone expressions
for dealing wirh difficulties and disrracrions.

T e a c h e r ' sN o t e s

W * $ m *f f i e $ K

$xmst
S*n*lp{**m{$$$Ss

In this section, students practise listening to voice mail


messages and identifring the important information in them.
The messages are then used for grammar work on the Past
Simpie and pronunciation of Past Simple regular verb
endings.

&

'$

&

EI 3.5 Encourage students to take meaningful notes


when they listen to the messages. Elicit that these notes
should contain the important information from the
messages,which is likely to include the name of the
caller, what the message is about and any action that the
receiver of the call is required to take.
Make sure students have read the questions before you
play the recording so that they know exactly what
information they are listening for.

You might like to ask the students to try to put the words
into the correct columns before you play the recording,
and just use the recording for them to check their
answers. V{hen students have to categorise things by
pronunciation, always encourage them to say the words
aloud to see what sounds right. Developing an instiact
for what sounds righr will help them rhroughout their
language learning careers.
Elicit that the verbs rn the /id/ column all have infinitives
ending in t or d.
Students will find more information on the form of the
Past Simple in the Grammar link on page 90.
Focus attention on the cartoon. Ask studens whether
they sympathise with the woman's frustration. Do they
find that increased technology in the office gers in rhe
way of cop-rmunication rather than facilitating iL?

an estimee for a co@ad in


. Errq we rlilcrscnd
m,v dient's
and,welt lqtdmhear
you las week Could you give re a
01865 iiJ959 Ls m
as p6ible!

I
I
I
I
I

I
I

.s me. Sorry" mte, I tded e'enFhing,


office saywe cant have anynore
say rleyrefredsix
rnq*hs fo
repo4 arctilersix
msrths
,feasibility sady and nm-tlrey want
geme results. Anyery, I boo&ed the
nce room fo three tsnorrow. Give
whea you get in- Sb need to rzlk.

W*$*mxxxm*$
t

trl
a

$.s Liiiten t<; six voice mail messages, Take notes. which mt:s$age is a6out
en order? L4-.]
d a cteaeJline"iK

sermefi6;ure* ill

a repart? K

a meetingi 7-l

a remin<{erl []

tisten again

lnti

ititsu'i't lltr

rltrc-ti<tns.

Me*sage 1 How many rimes tliel Cheryt ph*ne ycsterdayr f!:ll


flyg
it
wa,'
fia.irhed
phase
on tiue
Message 2 \Pbatls the goocl news about
One?,

whet did Zolrin inctuclein his repc;r$!9 i11f19jly 1!t9l1g


s:rs rhc rlclilury'/-t!,t ryl:U=_
Message 4 W'h<.n
Message J

Mess*ge I

He$. lalc is the estimalc:

A weck

Messag* 6 What elo you think is happenintiiar 3 romorrowl$l4glti,?!^,


$)..tsl :i,s 1l.tl,",c:nd;rrqr

'lke
I
2
I
4
5
6

idear)

me.*sagesaltove con{ein the following verbs.


phonecl, corrected, faxed
wanted, finished, e,rplained
slafied, e-rnailecf,included
talked, despatched, deiivercd
called, diseusseef,expcetecl
triccl, waiteel, booked

The '-ecl' enelings of regular vt:rfus in the past simple can b,: pronouncecl in
tlrree diflerent wiry$: ldl, ft/ r:r /rdl" List*n to the mes*ages aga.in"{ilhich vefbs
take rhe /rdl ene{ing?\fhy? Pur rhern in rhe third co}urnn hciow.

,riir:i::rtt *ll:,ltlllllllWXtXxa*
Now pul thc other vr:rbn in ths e$ffect eeilLimn.

A L IE I, I T U S T
SENTYCIUAN

g
q
Q
6

g
s
F
g
a
e

HERE'5A COPY
0F l'{Y I'dE5gA6E
BUT tr'LL TUSTTELL
YOUTJHATTT 5AYS,

F
o

t)
{J

o
,o

u
3j

0.
n
rd

IT 5AY5 T 5ENT
YOU A VOICETNAIL
TELLINGYOUTO
LOOKFORA FAX
THAT SAYSI l,rJANT
TO TALK TO YOU"

i:*) ; ci rhe quesfinns,

1a.Vh<lst'ans\\L'lT)l}()ncitiL:1''i..--''(Y|via-W4
b
2

\fhet does ilre caller n.i:r-.: b

*ro,. iou, the r.aeet_in{with Terco wer\t

Put the r*corde<-lllrusiage :.-: --: -J'f


th* riglrr place.

-:::

lhc first anell*st parrs arc in

t ut il'yor-i'cj.like to leavc

'i:- :.jnc. ar:rcl


l,ll get back
"1 rr:r:i
;. *. ,r.- ',r::ght's officc. Tj-rank r.ou

f,r. cnlling I'm afiaicl

,1

a ttax,plca.seclo so

Lli Uett,r. This is Fatterson }It.*:r

lf; y.r.rt call ri54htnow,

:: :, i -,'-ic ro rake
1 *,='...,;: ,:ri.SeDCl
i r- :i ciron as I can

14 r

.'. !*tXrirllrlfX},
I

Wha didn't cr:me to ihe neeti.:j


a i}iiiAndrews @Stephanic H*J''*

j-;i:ir.-

Prri-ell

d :Velanie Br-rrns

Who ctrncsTira 'alrcaelyknon':


Andrex;
b $tephanit- F:'i:.G , r'-*l-:i- l:.ri-cll d Melanic- ilr-rrns
@f:in
tiilhar clidn': the visitors from rh.; :1, *:
a thi: processing plant
c ti:r r*r,-rr-,rr ,iri- :::::-,;i a:
e
a pfesinlatl()n

th,: factory

- l

Tim w*s inlerrupred during the l.-- r:


Sorrr' 4!*or,rt that

f , . " !

--r"

. I iust hqd tp rrt^ Jot.e'tiu^1

Sfhere were we
rii'hal were the Fritish visitors $'or::E ; ;-r N-ii"

]./Kcwt"-erZ459ej!'@
6

T;*?klrx6**3*i"!*t&* pxst

,*: .t: r.hat hc saicl to Srlria.

\fottlcl the product fl-reyr;uol. to S<'r-";


pcpular in your countrf Would vou r-, :::

Ft-t{thcse irregular rrerbs tl'om Cali 2 i:-.


Plxlt $imirie" Yot: haye lii scconcls!
sct 4ot

met:t Met

takr tmt

clo did

speak lpoLe

531. SnrC

go went

rhink !hel4h-t

h;rr r ha,sl

59y161ient

C{jmt] CAMe

tc-lltoU

b( w65/were

uii r'44,vC

T e a c h e r ' sN o t e s
l ' ; . r , r ) ' . '- \" {or l i j { ' rr ' , * * l , i !
'

T**kr*6 *h*ilt ih* p*xt

In this section, the work on telephoning is expanded to


responding to a voice mail message.
$

Students should not have much difficulty in putting these


verbs into the Past Simple, so the time element has been
introduced to encourage them to work quickly and to
give an element of fun. You could structure the activity as
a race, with the first student to write all 14 verbs in the
Past Simple and raise their hand being declared the
wlnnef.

El 3.6 PIay Call 1 and do the questions relarrng ro it


before you play Call 2.

Call 1
t

Make sure students have read the questions in 1 before


they listen to the recor.ding so rhat they know exactly
what information they are listening for Reassure them
that this is all they are listening for at this stage and they
shouldn't worry if they don't understand everything that
is said

-il4ren checking the answers, you


could write the
irregular Past Simple forms on the board as students call
them out As they listen to the recording again, ask them to
raise their hands every time they hear one of these forms

Students should be able to identify fairly readily that


extract a is incorrect because the word order is wrong ln
both questions.

Al1ow students to work in pairs to number the message


in the correct order and to compare their answers with
other pairs before you play ttre recording again for them
to check their answers.

Direct students' attention to the Grammar link on page 90


which has more information about the formation of the
Past Simple

CalI2
Again, make sure students have read the questions before
they listen so that they concentrate on listening only for the
information they need. Encourage discussion in pairs or small
groups for the questions in 6

beef.
l:-lt

al I

^ffi#,tr'rt'r'#ffir,"
[i3**-#*#i:ru*d
,::"*-

i?dlr"*t+"w*'*.,"t;"y:[Hr*?iu:;
when ;rou went ro ihe UK last month.

A: Hm.

-r^^^t-^.'^
IUdUIIUI

Nl^+^^
I\ULUD

*xxgmmt
ffi*xxd
Sluelt'?cy
The aim here is to get students to put into practice all the
skills they have learned in the unit so far. They have a choice
of subjects on which to base their roleplay and there is plenty
of preparation work and guidance before they embark on
their calls.
Make sure they don't just rattle off a string of questions when
it is their turn to initiate the call. They have a lot of
information to find out, but they must listen and react to their
partner's answers to one question before they proceed to the
next. It might also be useful to go over some of the language
they could use to introduce each new question so that the
impression of a list is reduced For example:
By tbe tuay, wbicb
Ob, and I'ue been meaning to ask, ubat ...
And. I was wondering bou long ...

Draw students' attention to ttre usefui expressions for


showing interest in the box at the side If necessary, practise a
few of these around the class by telling individual students
some information and getting them to react appropriately.
For example:
Yott: I'ue just won a lot of money.
'1,:
Student
Great!
Yotr: I'ue just bougbt a neu.car.
Student 2: Really?
You: Someone I bauen't seenfor ttaenty years is coming to
dinner on Sunday.
Student 3: Ob, tbat's interesting.
'When
students have done their roleplays, encourage some of
them to oerform them for the rest of the class.

ffi$m*$mffi
#w*
Fl****y

X/o.r]*wjtJr a pa|tnel:. Phunc e*ch uther in o:der


tt fincl $ut somc inli:ni:*ti*r: tn help yo1;
't tla
busines* in a fixeign *ily
r;r X give apreni:nl;rtir'rn
or $ attenci a job int*n'ien'
T:rik tr: ]rour pil.ltn11rJ:Sfi:t* yt;L: hegin en*
elcci.dr rn th*: sr"ri:jectr:1 1'*ur ph*ne ce.lls.
'fhink
of rhe langu:lge vciu wi l nrcd.
li*gin yciul plu:ne call in this *'ny;

{jrar par&tet'sronrsl, l/:ir


{-1*rurnlrnre} *orc llorr atr
l&d'rugs:?.
. C r;rl **u,' l,;&&slt'lss.ti
'1"1*n

use drt notcs belox' ril help yuu ask yor.rr


qufsrlons, Ask other qursti{}1-}.rif y6s 11L*.

.Renlcfiber lo sirslw inLrn:st itr


*'hal ,vou' pill-lfief telis y:r"i,
&ralll:r
J,reg.

,clqr/.
t/l;tt,ft.
Ci?nd.
{i;"tttt.
Ol:. l/:*t lr vrfercs/jr.;,q,
|inish yor,irceil kkr: this:
Au1a;tt1t,loo&, I m;;st l*f .1ux
go. ?'I;criAsa lcxJbr j,our iefp.
lpss;,&fo.1,o#r*ori. Blc rroff;.

CK
W**n {h* r**uit caf* rx**tix6 i* t* s*h*d*ls
l.$i&*S$urpi* &usn*ss wrl**r

*h**kl*g
xnd*rxt***i*g

\fhen you take par[ in rnccLings in linglish, ir is emy to losc track of what
people are saying, $fho c.l$yr:u g*neralfy finet fhe harclcst to rrnclcrstaR.l?
nitive

speekers

peopl*

r**r* rn*ctings it usually sign*ls {r*xhi*"

othcr non-nalilre

speeker$

e'ith $tr:ong accent$

Herc arr: six simplc x,ays of cheeking what someone h;,!sjust said. $rrite in Lh{r
rnissing pairs t:f t&'orcls
s*e * be
r{n * gr;

cateh + slrw
rnissed + say
+
uneierstancl explein
g

ui55ed

rlrai, CorrldYou

it ellLini/

t4.v

thal Could you slow

didn'c catch
dilwn a l:it'l
eion't 4^de[tt^\d
y*u mcan?
d

fbllorv + rurr

. Could you explair

rv]rat

not x,itir you. Could you go


*ver that again?

clont fe!"!e,I,--- you. Could you


tluough tha,tagain?
elnn't qnite 1?l9
be
S

\fhich
a

rrhat vou mean. Could you

a Lrit n"iore specific?

of dre abnr.* cl* yon i,rsc w.hen yor-r

dicln'r hcarl lai lr]

:c;;

dje]n't un.ier$r,.rncl'l

Match the phr-*sal vei-bs from ? tc rhe me*nings on thr: right


a
b
c

slow dnrvn--.,,,7
so no*.---)a
run tJrrough.-2-===\8

]rr.::::::::::.a{:::rttitlt:]::iii

n:renfiorl quiclely
spe*k mor* slarvly
erarnine, eliscuss

C*n you remember th* phra*es in 2 x,"henyou need thcm? \\brk n ith a partner.
Take it in tulns te; throw dice anel try r* prodr:m the cxact cxprcssion.s r:sing {}:e
wnrds b*low. t{} hc}p }-0u"

mi*sed*
say-.
again?

not with you *


g(] cver again?

eiidn'tcatehslowbir?

don'tfellcwyou*
runthr*ugh*
agein?

e{on'tunderstandexplarn-

don't quitesee *

whai you mean?

bit more speeifie?

meat *

Preparation:
Bring to class enough dice for pairs to have one die each
for activity 5.
Meetings in a foreign languagepose a problem for many
businessstudents. Loss of concentrationwhen meetings
drag on is one issue,and inabilityto obtain clarification
on points that have been missed or misunderstoodcan
be a tremendousobstacle to businesssuccess.
This unit providessome simpletechniqueswhich
students can use to keep themselvesabreast of what is
being said. Then they learn some formulaefor asking for
clarification,checking what people have said, and asking
them to repeat or slow down. These can go a long way
towards making students more adept at dealing with
meetingsin English.
The grammaticalfocus is on comparativesand
superlatives,and the lexicalfocus is on phrasalverbs.
This first section begins with an examination of the problem
of conducting meetings in a foreign language.

ili:**:kl* g r..{n$pf
$1*rn*iris
tr

The aim is for students ro identify what they personally


find the hardest in meetings and who they find the
hardest to understand. Have a class discussion on this
question and encourage students to be honest about
what they find most difficult. If anyone has an interesting
story about a time they misunderstood something in a
meeting, they should be encouraged to tell the class
about it.

R, $ Once they have completed the gaps and identified which


expresslons you can use when you didn,t hear and
which when you didn't understand, give students
practice in actually using these expressions by saying
something to them in a way that will make it very hard
for them to understand, for example, mumbling,
speaking too fast or too softly, being too general, using
too much technical jargon, etc Select individual students
and elicit an appropriate response from them
Direct students' attention to the Lexis link on page 93
which introduces some more common phrasal verbs
which are frequently used in business.
This game helps students to remember the key
expressions by giving them only a few prompt words to
use to reproduce them They roll the die and recreate the
sentence for that number Make sure that students have
covered Exercise 2 before they play so that they have to
reproduce the expressions from memory

,,,,lttr rrio!6t6l rt

T^^^t-^-r^
IUdUIIU{

I\l^+^I\ULUJ

Sil*,t**:*v

$'
Q.-t
'
* " * - re"r,
J

In this section, students practise pinpointing the exact


information that they have missed.

Students turn to their respective pages and read out the


Budweiser texts, asking for clarification where necessary.
Make sure that as they do this they are genuinely making
the words in bold difficult to hear or understand and that
their clarification questions are appropriate.

Students work in pairs to put the sufitmary in order

Elicit examples of comparatives and superlatives. Ask


'When
students to underiine them in the summary.
checking the answers, write the word on the board and
elicit the superlative form of each comparative, and vice
vefsa.

Slxrifyi*6 $p***fi* p*{nt$


t * S EI 4.1 once students have completed the gaps and
have checked the answers by listening to the recording,
you could give them more practice by devising some
more prompt sentences to feed to individual students
who then have to come up with appropriate clarification
questions Respond to their questions and encourage
them to end the exchange with one of the expressions
used in the exercise.
Some extra prompts you might use:
C)ur ma.in d.fficulty is tbe timing ctf tbe proiect.
'We
baue to deliuer these units by Febnmry 25tb
New equipment will cost us at least $25,000.
Yolancla Squatbush told me about tbeproblem.
7he components are sentfrom the taarebouse in Pocatello.
It will take at least six montbs to get tbe proiect sta'rted.
Alternatively, you could ask the students to prepare some
suitable prompts themselves and have conversations in pairs.

:l:lrl:ll
ut:::rl:ij
::l:li:::l
::::t:ir
;t:ri::::l

Direct students' attention to the Grammar link on page )2


where there is more work on comparatives and
superlatives. If your students need more work on this
point, you could do the exercises in class

ffi*nry?
ti*r{$*$xg xp***f**
S*isi*s

In mccting$ wb.*re y{.}!l an'ediscrissir-Lgkcl.s *nd figures, $:,ryi*g .lbr,}t or I rl.on'l


n*t{e*tg,ttd is ${it *l$r;lys rnr:lrgh. li$1}re{iR!(rliylr-r nrcri {<.:hc *l*1"* prerisr.
L(:ok a{ ihr: ftrl}r;*'ing shurr extr*{lsi f!-(xr inr{lt!**s. completc thi: scc<inc{
sp**kt--r'srcspanscs x'il-h the .ro1r*ct rpreslic.nx.r::cls.
when

whal

hol'v long

1 , q Tllie problem !s monev"


I
$orrv, what
ditl
l''ilu

5X),?

A ?he pr*Lrlem ili tr']on{:v.


EI *l:, ;rs r-rsu:rl,
A \{!: her.* lc: rc*clt *
clecision by next'*,tek.
tst 5orry, whql
.1t.1

g
S

B
*

Xext rveek.
{}h, I s*{:.
',vi}tr
,{n i.qrp';rrlr:
cnsl $3,00C.
$orry, hew laqqh diel
ycr-rs*y?
et lcesi.
$3.CI1x],
Oh, as i:nch

ts

),rlL! ,"i*!'?

A
B
A
g

&

g
6

iis lhat?

A
B
A
I

lrolv mucir

Ildlkd }}ue{is.spt;ke to mc
about il yesrerei:ly.
5 , ) r i ) . h r h o - . . .- - .

r.liri \ r,tt rll\ I

tleiikd $r:rJas * ltorn dle


lludai:cst officc.
(}h. yrs, of c*urxr:.
'lil:re
r:omparqr is based
in Taipei"
S , . , , ; )w. h e . J - e - , l i r i t < , r t . . , r ; i
{n T':Lipei.
Oh, reallvl
The v,,h*l* proj*ct *'riglrt t*ke
*ightern rnontl":s.
S*r:':,, h-owlel{r.iid vr:u sav?
Iiightccn m*ntirs.
t}h, as long *s tlut?

*.t Usten to the cnnversatjcns ir:r 1 ancl chec.lt vour answers.

\ibrk wi{,h tr } ,.u:tner to pritctitir ciari$;ing specifie points. ytru *.re going tc rexel
rl]r$ul two t{ifferent companies; both calieci l}udweiser. $peaker A see page t1s,
Speaker l} see page .l??,

F$**r:*3e

Xbrk wirh e partner t{} put tl:is surnrnarv {.rf tlre textq yo!"I
rced in 3 in the {olTcct c;xler. "fl"refirst and lr.$!tp;}.rt$:rre
in rhe rlght pklec.

:r.f

i,l,l Ainerican Br,iekveiseris the woricl,s i:estselling


Ii,l *.*"

firrg ciifl'ercr:. countrics. -tts slog*n is

i7..] c,rhet henel, is *ne


ffi f*u".r fl:.cjourcf,sthan t-j$ Sudrvciser, it mlrkcts its
product in rnr:rr
or*rtpr-rr
d:an its nrarc$l

[l

L6j of lh* rvnrlcl's *lciest *ncl mo.:r


l2,l branct of ircer. The cnmpany the* makes it is rh.e
biggent in
i.6"1sl*g*n w.*s 'Bueir;l'ciser:th* King of lSerrs'. Credr
lir-rr:lx'ciseq 0n ihe

F: f u n t o r t s l r t t : r s . \ { ' i t h I i r
FI

conlpt:titr:1Hein*kcn. I3y far its r:nostsneeess&llactrertisirrg

the rrorlei wittr 50% grra{er


simply; 'lluelweiserrfhe Beer of Kings'.

i)l

m
aEl

H*w rnany {:0mp*fntivfs end superl*lives een Y{)Ll


finrl in rhe sur'nm*ry? \

rr

iJ{a;g&$ai{]*'::i

i;iri*l't i s*'S trir;r*?


f i " ; : r p l , " l g r s l i r - t " ; ? 1. ": 1 1 , *

Per:ple soructin':es riisagr*e about fecls in :neeiings. Onc n-'av of politely qu*rying
s*:x*tliing is simpiy to {epeai th* part you tirink is rvrong ancl esk a qu*sii.o:r.
l-ook al the ex**rples $n tlle iefi.

Xhrh with ir paltncr. Takc ic i1-rauf,nr to reasi q:ut the follos-ing false infarrnation.
Query each o{her using the coffrct information from the bor. The lirst cnr has
been cl*r::e fi.rr y;u as an tx*mplc.
Finlancl

Itr
9aJtJ|;.

B I 6? Shbuldn'i
mai Qe b.u'a

199-

f,rr'd

Kotc'ln

sr-rl'ttlllr'

|he*ie+l+e+|ar+tlr

Th* biggest Se::eh-rx col-ultr),-is llelgium.


'}
Selgdu*li Jloll 3r*r+ mes* fi&e&tbf&rd*rudri
Il:iew<:t.r is '* rvcll-1rnc.:wn.iapancsc car lnanrifbcturer.
Japaxese2- Don't you p,ean Korea,r?
e Clllna regained conlrol of l{ong Kong in 1!p$.
,??B? Do,rt you ..ear, l??7?.
{i Microsott is fhe rvodel's leadiag comi}u{er h*rdrvare manufactlrrer.
Hardware? Do^t you rv{eax goStware2e &*lls-Re;yce was *v{nnraily tnken E.n.erby General }.{otors,
Cqereral Motort? Dorlt yor^ r.rean Ford?
f
America has mr:te lroiriic l-l}rr:lc-s pcr lrouse.h*}ci than anli other country.
A,vrerica? Don't von uearr Finland?
g ' {TV ls t}:e biggesit &erl.l; chili}rrei in &e xlorld.
News? Do^t you v,e^^ Ma'ic?
Wijte dr:sn a fuw false business fuets r.rf your swn. llead them out to thc rest of lhe
cians. C",rnthe,v cr:rr*ct yriu?

8.6% c{ total

A Yes.6.8. Drcint i

tnu^sic

snvmat/

3 q.x listen tc an extract frorn a m*elinp anti rick the sentences vhich are corftrct.
a
b
*
d
e
f
g

T'he r:ieeling is hcixg held to riiscuss last month's *les figr.rrc.s.7


Overali, ."ialcs'.rreup bv ?.6ih. 6'22
Thr besl results arc in l)enmark ancl Nnnv*y. 7
30.00{JL}i1ilshav{: i:r:sn soki in Scanc{inevja. ./
La$t rrlenth w*sjune. Jr,{y
John Munroc is head r:f l.l*rthern !iurr:i:e. Jir.^
i\.{unrq;cis in ScoL}anclal t}re mcmenl, He ir not ia, -(cotland. He ir playirl

Listen egain '"rnd corxr:ct t}re mis{akes in zi.

sound

q:isfeke

The folloiving expressinns arc used to cluery inf'ormaticn you ere less sure about
They wer* all in tlle convl:.fiiatioil yau jusl trislened lo. Comi:lete tirem.

riSni.

$ufe

Ar(" )(,il ture---?

I'hli cln't 1.r.'njlt


i,li'

yl$.

T e a c h e r ' sN o t e s
'

, ] ,
;

,,a

In this section, students practise techniques for dealing


politely and appropriately with situations where they disagree
about facts in meetings
: 1tui}:lt'!$ : ll1'*l',*r:*t|**

Students work individually to invent their own false


statements for the rest of the class to correct This could
be done in the form of a team game with teams writing a
series of false statements and taking turns to call out each
one. The opposing team has to come up with an
appropflate coffection in order to win a point.
E2 +.ZGive students time to read the sentences before
you play the recording so they can identifiz exactly what
information they are listening for. Check the answers
before going on to Exercise 5

Wa

Play the recording again and then ask individual students


to coffect sentencesb, e, fand g

Read the explanation with the class and then ask them to
look at the dialogues in the side panel
Point out that in each case B is politely correcting a
factual mistake that A has made and that B is sure that his
or her information is coffect. By doing this indirectly,
asking a question rather than simply stating what is
wrong, the coffection is softened Intonation is also
lmportant here A tone of mild puzzlemenr is polite in
these situations, intonation suggesting astonishment
would not be polite Read one of B's lines first with
intonation suggesting astonishment and then with
intonation suggesting slight puzzlement so that students
can hear the difference.
Then ask students to practise the dialogues in pairs.

The expressions given here are useful when something


does not sound quite right, but you are less sure about
what is wrong
Students should be able to complete the expressions
without listening to the recording again, but be prepared
to play it if necessary. Note that these expressions don,t
represent the total response to a mistake. The person
using them is likely to go on ro say whar they think the
real facts are, as in the dialogues in the box at the top of
the page:
Isn't it .?Don'tloulnean ...?Shouldn't tbat be . ?
You could invite students to make up some more false
statefrents, perhaps with mistakes not quite as obvious
as the ones they wrote before, and practise using the
expressions to respond to each other's statements Make
sure they use foilow-up questions to establish what they
think the facts are.

Students take turns to read and resoond to the


statements. Go round making sure that their intonation is
appropriate. Encourage students to also use Isn,t it . ?
and Shctulcln't tbat be / where appropriate

B:
A:
B:
A:

C:
A:

C:
A:

.' Tli?ai!e an't be rigJ|;t Sales havc nerrei


l , c e ng u u , l i r r ! . : n t l ; n ; :i 'a
. rA:-fhat'sjust i:l'repoint. Salesin Scandinr
.
,
1,,' . . are usua-liytenible, but ihey rr'cre

tr^^^,-^.,^
UdUIIUI
J

Nl^+^^
I\UIUJ

It doesn't matter how many of these the students actLlally


get right, as disagreement over the facts will lead to more
language practice. Students can find the correct answers
on page 724 of their books.

lisriir;ti::rg; {:r::': i:ir::ti$|:ipi:ti:{;i*t:


$

Discrepancies are mismatches with information that


someone has given earlier. Ask a pair of students to
demonstrate the example dialogue

i:i:.;:::''::1,.,
$

El +.S Go through the instructions carefully ancl allow


students time to read the notes so they know exactly what
information they are listening for
The briefing meeting is quite complicated, so you may need
to play it in sections and repeat pafis of it.
V/hen you have checked the answers, ask the students if they
have ever experienced a situation where they were expecting
to do one job and suddenly found that things had changed
and they had to do something completely different.

Students turn to their respectlve pages and practise the


dialogues The discrepancies are fairly obvious, but you
might like to check in a feedback session that everyone
has understood them. Yor-rcould ask students to explain
the discrepancies for homework
SpeakerA
a Dublin is in lreland, not Scotland,
b Bordeauxis a Frenchwine, not a Germanwine.
c Ulrike can't be one of the speaker'sclosestfriendsif he or she
only met her yesterday
Someone who smokes as many as J0 a day cannot be said to
have nearly given up smoking
If the woman is the speaker's wife, he cannot introduce
solneone to her husband as that is himself
Speaker B
One of each means one of each sex There are only two sexes,
male and female, so if the speaker has three children they can't
be one of each sex Two of them must be the same sex
Lisbon is the capital of Portugal, so the French negotiating team
wor,rld not have their headquarters there
C Dutch is the language of the Netherlands, not Denmark,
d If the managing director is 70, then his grandfather is unlikely
still to be alive, let alone mnning the company
A company called Network Software is more likely to make
computer software than domestic appliances

n . l

^'i":
A:
A
: JJO'
U . wel('ume
*ll.?T-ti:
U er(UmC L
Lo
U rloKlo'
O K l U , .vlatl
V l a i l . llll . S
s g
U U L rllo
O
Euulr
naveyotl on tnei"TI:'rvrarr'rrsgoooIo
lealn
,, lii: I:'::ilil
l1']", -r^ L, L-.,

r:: '--l
ffor...i
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A:Corporate
finance.I thought1ourwo lrad

thoughttwasjusthereasanadvisor.
thorrqht
lwas iust here as an advisor.
A, Erm.l Thesinratioo
A
s changeda limle

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mething; iame np
i fill you in on most of
essistantsv,.orking
t \{'hiie and itobln
'r)

Janet Witite a.nc1

;p mcrgei-s and
st I think you tv/o
:'11be helping 1'eu
And Robin's your
y fanr:Lar vrrth
; here as s,.eLla,s
:resc. of corirse

Tt9

4 K e e o i n ot r a c k

a takeover as big as this I'i.n the 5Juvrvith


thc pocket calcul.Lior' I just rnake slrre tlre
figures acld r,rp
C: Oi'r. corle on, fulatt You're too ilodes[
Tib know _vonrtracl< iecord Janet can
i r k i , a r Lu f r h . f i g r , i . s\ . w r n l] o t r l ( )
ieacl the f it'st ronntl of negotrations on
the i3th
l3:Your r.nedn thc 30,th, ltght? T'he l3th is
next n'eek
-A,:'I'fi:rt's rjgiht Wc've scheCuieci the ilrst
-A':'I'f
meeting for next Wednesclay J:rnet r,irl1be
able to bnet.1'ou before then Tlrrs ts youl
big chance I'm counringl on you, Matt I
knov,r 1ro11
!v'on't let ile clc;nrr-i

:!

l':[ci*i gincl is yt,ur husiness ger:er;rl kncwledg*? Uncler.littg.thc cr:rrecl


inklrmari*:l belcr'.

ffi

flr* numberof eokec eaRsumed


in rh* w*rld Ber
*ay ex{qggs
l.i't rliiii$nI I ll*dr*ri nllfln I s t$gf

ffi

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l5;gt / 5levejobsci'App/c

fne w*rld's bestselling


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e h.r:it{ S*ii:rbLrn

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The rv*rlcl'r*rost p*puiar


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Xr*rk it'l pilinr lo ilr?{rti$* pr.rin{ing $u[ di${rcpnnci*s. fipr:lker .4.see pagr }1*i.
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ffi ti':,];\ n:*lg*rs *nd ecquisitx,ir:s spcciaiist h*s bc*r: rrer;sfun'ctl rr: $r* 'lirliyc
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etlt:nejrin:{h:is $rst hri*ling r:rer:ling, but things don'i !i{} quirr: as hc t:xpecieel. 1.istr:n
and c*rnplet* his n*te:.

4 t'(*:ri:t1 l: rl!.

a::;

!$ev*qghimg***:rt$ ur:sl*r *nr*n*$,y*u're j*st nnt g*ing feastenou6h.


&{*npAndreff;,f:$$s$t* **s i$ing drii/sr
*

Are we all working harder than we r.rseclio? I)oes ir seem like ).our u'orking
.\7hich
week is gefting longer and longer? Reacl the texrs below.
slatistics surprise
you mo$ll

it Wired t
rs iharrthev did
ocq'sdrscover
lar. The rnost

OLISINESS

; revealedtha
' dr E udy-

; t d a y sI d o n ' t '
rareryworK

1
I

Hclw pressured do you feel at work? Indieate your level clf pressure r:n the
thermometer on the 1e{1.Then colnpare r,vith other people in the class.

Y*vm*
rYt&$3effiffiffi**'*
$

Look at these strategies fbr


maneging yolu time.
.
.
.
r
.
I
r
a
t
a

say'no'rnote of'te.n
make iists of things to do
throw things away
keep a recorcl of liow long
each task tiikes you
holel fewer meetings
screen phone calls
check e-mail at specific
times of the d*y
deiegate meire
pl*n aheacl
milximise your'uptime'
<lo'nasty' jobs first

I)cl yr:u dcl eny of these things?


Aciei your own icleas tq: tlrc lisr.

s ikingpoi

Ask students to read the text individually Test


comprehension by asking each student to write two or
three questions on the text for other students to answer
Students take turns to choose another student ancl ask
one oftheir questions That student then chooses
another student. and so on.

This unit is about pressureat work, the pace of business


life,time managementand relaxation.
Studentsstart by readingsome statistics about working
hours and working practices.They are invited to
comment on what surprisesthem most about these
statistics,and then talk about how much pressurethey
feel they are under at work.

Alternatively, you could have two teams and score


points for correct answefs

The next section investigatessome strategiesfor


r-nanaging
time better and students are invited to add
their own ideas to the list. A readingtext, written by a
managementtraining specialist,then offers advice on a
iechniquefor findinga magic hour in which to catch up
r,'itheverythingyou've been too busy to do.

Ask students if any of them regard themselves as


workahohcs It is unlikely that any of them can match
BiIl Gates, but it might be interesting to see how nrany
hours a day or week they work To make this more
interactive, you could ask them to stand in line with the
person who works the longest hours at one end, and the
person who works the shortest hours at the other

Studentsthen listen to four speakerstalking about how


the need to be faster than the competition affects their
',,,ork.They match statementsto speakersand then relate
tne informationto their own industries.

Each student should decide where on the stress


thermometer they should appear and then compare
notes with others. Ask them to comment on what they
think the causes of their stress levels are. Is it just a
matter of long working hours or are there other factors?

The final section looks at ways in which people unwind at


rhe end of the day. Students listen to a recordingand
centify the things that each speaker does to rerax.
-:ris first section, students read and talk about workrng
.'rs and pressure at work.

Warm-up

'.1
' '
. ;
.\

: '

'

This section investigates some techniques for time


management and focuses on a strategy recommended by a
management training specialist for finding a magic hour in
which to do all the things you want to do but never seem to
have time for.
$

Encourage students to discuss the list in pairs or smali


groups and to come up with some ideas of their own In
a class feedback session, write the new ideas on the
board and ask students to say which straregies they find
most successful
You.could also establishwith a show of hands who uses
which of the strategies and which strategies are the
most populaf.

-r^^^1.-^-t^
IUdUIIUI

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I\ULU-

Focus students'attention on *re photograph and ask


questions such as W'batis tbe man doing? Wbere is be?
Does be look relaxed or stressed?Is tbis sometbing you
utould like to do in tbe middle of the working day? If not, is
there anytbing you toould like to do as a breakfrom tuork?
Aik students to read the text individually. Make sure they
follow the instructions and write down the things the text
tells them to write, so that they have something to discuss
in the next exercise

Allow students to compare what they have written in


pairs or small groups, then conduct a class feedback
session.
l
Ask students if they have read any 'self-help' books on
'W'hat
avoiding stress.
do they themselves do to relax?
What works and what doesn't work? Compile alist of dos
and don'ts for the classroom wall.

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S;f, S"$ Li.stent* four business people telking *bor-it how being fuster than the
c*mpelition affects their w*rk. lFhi.h ir"rdusny cloes each spcaker helong rr:?
Speaker I caf

$peaker 3 Ccr.4prteC

Speal*er 2 elgslfeAlst*

$pcaker 4 fi'rance

Haeh speaker m.al*e.sthree tndn points frorn thc list below \Vitte the nuini:er of
the speelker in each boxa

Tllc incir;lsr.ryis more :rnd lRclre res*arcll-led. iH

}1:u can't stop competitors copying yorir tdeas. 7

Yuu ne*cl to movc inventory very rapidly" 151

lt's ihe little eletails tUg

valLle ts} your prcietucf or service. i!l


.1,{U
f'hcl*'s no customer ioy*.tq; nrrym,rr*. i{l

lt's very difficult t* clifferenriate yolrr procluct frr:m the competition. lf

As m.Lrchei'fcrrtgoes inrc hraniling *s int* technr:logy.

Cuslomers are J:elter informed about the serwices yr:,u otfur. [i

lltociuct leacl times are getring shorter ancl shorter:. ll!]

Tcehnok:gy is advancing almost ctaily. B

Costs Eir* steacliiy talling. 3

YErr-r'reopcn for busine*s all rhe ti**.

iL

Llnclerlirre the poinrs in 2 whiclr arc also tr-ue fcr your indusrry. Discuss thcm with
c;ther people in the class.

$peeel is impr:riant at every ntage cf the clevelopmrnt of a product <ir selvice. Dr:
yeiu egrcc? i)iscuss wi*r a pafin*r.

T m k eE t* e s v l

, ' . . ' ' ' '


Q g,x sfe askedten pt.r;plt.horv they ,,n*i*dt"t rfr-'end of the clay.listen end
wdte dowri the rnain rhing(s) lhey ekr.1)o you do any eif the samc things?
t

have a drink

chat oa, the shone

T e a c h e r ' sN o t e s
- ' , ; i a - "r 'l ir l r r r \ l i ; i;

i,\

d { \ i

i.;r .. 1':
r . $ }
r - r

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.b

In this section, students listen to four business people in


competitive industries for whom being faster than the
competition is vital. They discuss the implications of speed in
their own line of work
EI S.t Play the recording. Sruclentsidenrify and make
notes on the industries involved Check answers with the
class before moving on to Exercise 2.
Allow students to read through the statements and
discuss in pairs before piaying the recording again
Students might like to see how much they can remember
of what was said

Tm${*xt *m*yl
El 5.2 aft"r ali the work on stressand fast-pacedbusiness
Iife, this sectionon unwinding and relaxing should come as
somethinqof a relief
Ask students to tell the class what they do to relax after a hard
day at work and to share any successful relaxation techniques
that they employ.
Play the lecording for students to identify and note down
what each of the ten speakers does to unwind Then continue
the class discussion by finding out if any of them do the same
things.

Students work individually to decide which of the


statements are true for thelr industries and then discuss
this in groups Ifyou have a large class and stLldents are
from several different industries, you might like to get a
representative from each industry to give a minipresentation to the class on the points which are true for
them. These could be prepared for homework, if
necessary
Students discuss the statement in pairs and then report
back to the class on their discussions.Encourage them to
back up their arguments with examples

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