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Airx Spitre Vb with Alley Cat Vc Conversion Eduard Bf 109 G-6 Wingnut Wings Fokker E.III Kitty Hawk MiG-25 and more

6.50 - Nov14 (issue 043)

HK Models 1/35 Dornier Do 335 B

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9 770268 832071

THE PFEIL FILE

11

aircraft edition

www.militaryillustratedmodeller.com

26/09/2014 12:41

Photo-etched fret
included

Super decal sheet

Catalogue 2014 Ask your local distributor or contact: Italeri S.p.A. - via Pradazzo, 6/b 40012 - Calderara di Reno - Bologna - Italy - Phone +39 051 31 75 211 - email: italeri@italeri.com

Contents

modeller
military illustrated

ISSUE No.043 November 2014

NEWS

PACIFIC SPITFIRE

PREVIEW

Whats happening in modelling and aviation

Airfixs 1:48 scale Spitfire Vb converted to a Vc


by Brett Green

Kinetic 1:48 Sea Harrier

20 TENSIONAL INTEGRITY

Wingnut Wings 1:32 Fokker E.II/E.III (Early)


by Dirk Polchow

26 SHOW REPORT

Australian Model Expo 2014

30 THE PFEIL FILE

HK Models 1:32 Dornier Do 335 B


by James Hatch

20

44 SPEED DEMON

Kitty Hawk 1:48 MiG-25PD Foxbat


by Kamil Feliks Sztarbala

54 THE EAGLE HAS LANDED


PT.2
Eduard 1:48 Bf 109 G-6 by Brett Green

60 MIM INDEX
Issues 1 to 15

20

65 NEXT ISSUES

Whats coming up in the next issues of


Military Illustrated Modeller

66 TAILPIECE

Revell 1:32 Junker Ju 88 A-1

54

44
Aircraft Edition

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News
ROUND THE WORLD
IN AN AIRFIX KIT

James May with the team and a very well-travelled Lightning kit.

t the start of 2013 Jon Plumb sent a new


Airfix kit to his friend Stu Bradley in France,
thereby starting the money raising project
now known as Round the World in an Airfix
Kit. The plan was to circulate the Airfix kit around
the pre-determined group of 15 modellers of varying
abilities, each to complete their own part of the
build and pack the kit ready to forward on to the
next modeller. Jon chose the 1:48 English Electric
Lightning because it was the next model he planned
to make from within his existing collection. It was
an ideal choice as, based on the parts included it
offered an even spread of parts for each user.
This well-travelled Airfix kit has met modellers
in the UK, France, Germany, Croatia, Greece,
Romania, Spain, Italy, Australia, California, Illinois
and Northern Ireland. Initially we felt there was
a risk of people letting the team down; only two of
the team knew each other previously but regular
communication helped to build a relationship and
trust. Surprisingly there have been no breakages.
Bryan Finch in California had to start putting the
wings on so he took responsibility for the creation of
a lightweight transit case. When Erica Rose sent it
from Illinois to Northern Ireland, the HMRC charged
us 115 import duty to release it; thankfully Chris
Spalding of the Modellers Nook Model Shop came
to the rescue!
James May completed the final pieces on 7th
August 2014. James is a long standing fan of
Airfix having begun modelling kits as a child
and was delighted to help this worthy cause by
donating his time and additional publicity. He
patiently applied tiny parts under the watchful
gaze of the team. James said Ive been involved
in the Help for Heroes cause before, they do some
excellent work and I was delighted to be able to
help Jonny raise money for them. I think Airfix is an
important part of childhood and its interesting to see
it develop into something more mature, when I was
young it was the birthday present for all my friends,
teaching us all patience! With Airfix you can have
your own aviation museum on your table top.
The brief to the team was to treat the kit as their
own using their skill and materials. The only rules
were... post lots of pictures, make sure the build
is done to represent XR770. If they wanted to use
aftermarket and additional bits or super detailing
they could. The final rule was to enjoy the build.

James May working on the Airfix Lightning.

This was not supposed to be the best ever lightning


Airfix model, but the team have produced a world
class model!!!
Jon Plumb who has been the driving force
behind the project is proud to announce that
the idea has already raised over a thousand
pounds for Help for Heroes. The final sum will
be announced after the completed model, with
decorative plinth presented as a raffle prize at
Scale Model World Exhibition in Telford.
www.bmycharity.com/roundtheworldinanairfixkit

supplies, and selling raffle tickets and anyone


who would like to get involved can donate via our
charity giving page.
Thanks to Hornby Hobbies Limited for the
information and images www.hornby.com

I also have a remarkable admin team, of


which Stu Bradley, Alan Hooker and Mark
Davey. Over the project weve become a real
team, really supportive of the aims of the
project. said Jonny We chose Help4Heroes as
its multi service and our project aims, by its very
nature, to be inclusive of all.
We raised additional money by getting
companies to donate modelling kits and
The Airfix Lighting working on James May!

Military Illustrated Modeller - November 2014

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30/09/2014 12:48

Saturday 8 th & Sunday 9 th November

2014

The Worlds Greatest Model Show!


Presented by

Open: Saturday 8th 10.00am to 6.00pm


Sunday 9th 10.00am to 4.00pm
Admission: IPMS Members FREE Adults 10.00 each day
2 Day Pass 15.00 Concessions 7.00 per day Children under 16 FREE

Venue: The International Centre Telford Shropshire TF1 4JH


SMW Ad 2014NewA.indd 1
p 05 IPMS 043.indd 8

IPMS(UK)
08/07/2014 22:31:09
25/09/2014 17:16

FEATURE ARTICLE: AIRFIX 1:48 SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE MK.VB. Kit No. A05125

PACIFIC
SPITFIRE

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The Editor transforms the new Airfix 1:48 scale


Spitfire Mk.Vb into a Mk.Vc using Alley Cats
resin conversion.

he 1990s saw the peak of Airfix excellence


with their 1:48 scale English Electric Lightning,
Seafire Mk. 46/47 and Spitfire Mk.22/24
kits. These were the equal of anything coming
out of Japan at the time, and they have remained
the pinnacle of Airfix quality until now.
Airfix picked up the baton again in 2007
and have been busy releasing new 1:48 scale
Spitfire and Seafire kits ever since. The first of
this new generation was, appropriately, the Mk.I.
That kit was generally nice but had a number of
weaknesses including thick wings, chunky clear
parts, decals with visible dot-screen effect, and
a fuselage that was based on the 1970s-vintage
Spitfire Mk.Vb kit. After a short shuffle backwards
with their Mk.IXc, Airfix picked up their game
significantly with a Spitfire Mk.XII and Seafire
Mk.XVII during 2011. These were all-new kits with
improved surface features and clever engineering.
Even so, they still hadnt reached the standard
of the Spitfire Mk.24, especially in terms of
surface finesse and detail.
Airfix released a 1:48 scale Spitfire PR.XIX
in late 2012. This was a brand new kit, and a
definite improvement over the previous years
Mk.XII and Mk.XVII, with finer panel lines and
better detail. At last, Airfix had matched, or even
slightly bettered, the standard of their 1990s
Spitfire Mk.24 and Seafire 46.

THE NEW AIRFIX SPITFIRE MK.VC IN THE BOX

The new Airfix 1:48 scale Spitfire Mk.Vb comprises


123 parts in light grey plastic, 17 parts in clear
and markings for two aircraft.

This is an all-new kit with absolutely no parts in


common with any previous Airfix Spitfire release.
In my opinion, this kit is even better than 2012s
Spitfire Mk.XIX.
Moulding quality is very good. The plastic is
smooth, and moulding imperfections are few. The
most obvious is a faint vertical line on the midfuselage at the location of the rear cockpit bulkhead,
but this may disappear under a coat of paint.

Surface detail is by way of recessed panel lines.


These are finer than those seen on any of Airfixs
latest generation of 1:48 scale Spitfires. Fabric
texture on the elevators and rudder is subtle.
As good as the Spitfire XIX was, this cockpit is
the best effort yet in any Airfix Spitfire. It features
the correct bottomless floor, with separate parts for
the various bulkheads, the seat and an instrument
panel with simple but effective raised bezels. I
particularly like the separate lower cockpit halves,
which are moulded with crisp raised detail. All
you really need is a set of harness straps, although
even that wont be required if you choose to use
the supplied pilot figure. You may wish to drill out
the lightening holes in the seat bulkhead though.
A separate pilots entry door with moulded-on
crowbar is also included.
The exhausts are one piece for each side. The
outlets are solid, so a little time with the sharp end
of a hobby knife will be required to hollow them
out. Three styles of exhaust are offered.
Two propeller and spinner options are included
Rotol and de Havilland.
The wings are moulded as a full-span lower
section plus separate upper wing halves. The
various bulges are all moulded in place. The only
insert is in the leading edges for the Hispano
cannon barrels. Strengthening strakes are moulded
onto the upper wings. Check your references
carefully as these were not universally fitted to the
Spitfire Vb.
Control surfaces are all supplied separately
except the flaps, which are moulded closed. This
is appropriate, as the the flaps were generally
not seen deployed except on approach and while
landing. The port and starboard elevators are
moulded as a single part so you cant accidentally
pose them out of alignment.
The main wheels are bulged and flattened,
and keyed to the axles of the undercarriage legs
to ensure they sit flat on the ground. A second
set of unflattened wheels are supplied for raised
undercarriage. The wheel hubs are five-spoke.
The kit features two styles of separate saddle
insert on the front fuselage decking for alternative
windscreens. A one-piece mid and rear canopy
piece is supplied for the closed option. If you want
to pose the canopy open, Airfix has supplied
separate overlapping parts.
Other options include Vokes tropical filter,
alternative oil cooler housings, poseable radiator
flap, a large slipper tank, two 250 lb bombs and
racks, clipped wing tips (supplied as separate
parts in both clear and grey plastic) and two styles
of aerial mast.
Parts breakdown is conventional, with locating
pins and other devices that make this model perfectly
appropriate for even less experienced modellers.

STARTING AT THE FRONT OFFICE

Construction gets underway in the well-appointed


cockpit. The instructions are typical Airfix fare with
colour callouts (Humbrol numbers only) along the
way, but the painting suggestion in Steps 1 and 2
appear to be incorrect. The Interior Green colour

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FEATURE ARTICLE: AIRFIX 1:48 SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE MK.VB. Kit No. A05125

Airfix supplies a B wing with reinforcement strakes on the upper surface,


plus the small inboard bulges to accommodate the wheels.

The big clear sprue includes early and late style canopies, and different parts
for open and closed canopies.

Both Rotol and de Havilland propeller assemblies are provided.

Markings are supplied for two aircraft.

Many options are offered, including the large slipper tank.

The cockpit is very well detailed straight from the box.


Note the moulded detail on the sidewalls.

The cockpit bulkheads and


bottomless floor parts.

The seat is made up from


six parts, but youll have
to bring your own harness
if you dont plan to install
the pilot.
The fuselage interior was sprayed with Tamiya AS-12 Bare Metal Silver straight from the can. The mating
surfaces were masked with Tamiya tape before painting.

(Humbrol 78) should extend one station further back


before the silver starts. Indeed, it is possible that the
entire fuselage interior was painted Interior Green,
with silver not being used until later in the war.
I decided to follow the paint instructions though,
and found that it did not make much difference
as the seat and the bulkhead largely hid the
demarcation line once the cockpit was installed.
The cockpit parts were built up as subassemblies and separated into groups depending
on whether they would be painted Interior Green
or black. The fuselage interior was painted while
the fuselage halves were still attached to the
sprues. I used Tamiya acrylic XF-71 Cockpit Green
for the RAF Interior Green parts, and Tamiya
AS-12 Bare Metal Silver straight from the spray
can for the relevant silver fuselage and cockpit
interior sections.
Weathering was applied using a mix of Tamiya
X-18 Semi-Gloss Black, tap water and Future

floor polish as a wash. This mixture settles in the


recesses and edges, leaving a subtle impression of
shadows and perhaps just a little grime.
The instrument panel features raised bezels
and switches. Airfix supplies a single decal sheet
to apply over the textured plastic part. I was a
bit dubious about how this would work but, with
copious quantities of decal setting solution, the
decal finally sat down onto the panel. It looked
quite good in the end, but next time I will use my
favourite Airscale instrument and placard decals.
The only aftermarket item used on the entire kit
was a photo-etched harness that I borrowed from
an Eduard set for a 1:48 scale Sea Hurricane.
With the sub-assemblies painted, I started to
test-fit the cockpit components. I found that some
of the locating slots were too tight, so I removed
some fine flash using the tip of a new hobby knife
blade. The instrument panel, floor/rudder pedal
assembly and what I think is the gust lock (Part

C20) are effectively sandwiched between the two


cockpit halves to form a tub. This step took a bit of
fiddling, but a good pair of tweezers and a little
patience did the trick.
The locating slots for the two rear cockpit
bulkheads needed to be cleaned out too.

GETTING IT TOGETHER

The completed cockpit tub was glued onto the


starboard fuselage side per the instructions, then
the two halves were brought together. The fit
was perfect.
At this stage, the upper fuselage cowl insert
was added. The fit had been so good to this point
that I did not even test fit, but it soon became clear
that the fit was not good. In fact, it was pretty
rotten. I had to cut out the closed cockpit door to
improve the fit at the back of the insert, but even
after lots of fiddling and adjustment I was left with
a noticeable step at the top front of the insert.

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Smaller parts were built in sub-assemblies then grouped by


colour. They were then attached to small boxes using Blu-Tack,
which makes them easier to handle and faster to paint.

The fuselage interior was then masked and


the cockpit area sprayed Tamiya acrylic XF-71
Cockpit Green.

The painted sub-assemblies ready to be fitted.

Fit of the bulkheads is tight, so make sure


you clean up any flash prior to assembly.

The completed seat, along with a colour


photo-etched harness from Eduard.

The control column and rudder pedal


assemblies have been added here.

The seat and rear bulkheads have been


fitted to the cockpit here.

The cockpit is built as a tub before


installing in the fuselage.

The cockpit tub has been glued to the


starboard fuselage side and is being held in
place with a clamp while the cement sets.

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FEATURE ARTICLE: AIRFIX 1:48 SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE MK.VB. Kit No. A05125

Fit of the cockpit parts is very good, but make


sure that everything is snugly in place.

Although fit until this point had been close to perfect, the saddle
insert for the windscreen / cowl area was very poor, even after
tight taping.

Alley Cats conversion provides a replacement wing with the


correct large C Wing bulge and panel lines.

The problem area after some sanding. Next time, I will radically
trim the forward bulkhead, sand the insert and keep test-fitting
until the fit is better than it was here.

The bottom of the wing includes the revised shell ejection chutes
and panel arrangement, but the K shaped reinforcement on the
roof of the wheel well should be replaced with two parallel strips.

After laying the resin wing over the kits lower wing, I used a Post-It Note as a template to draw cutting lines on
the plastic.

10

This rheostat was thin enough to apply


pressure on the forward cockpit where it
meets the fuselage interior.

The view from below. The fuselage landing light protrudes into the bottom of the
cockpit, hence the hole.

Alley Cat also provides new cannon fairings for all four positions, plus stubs for the
more common two-cannon configuration.

The pencil line before cutting.

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A strip of self-adhesvive Dymo tape was used as a guide to a new Olfa


knife blade to cut the plastic. Rather than one deep cut, try applying
multiple light passes of the knife.

One half of the cutting has been finished here!

Dont forget to drill holes for the slipper tank before fitting the
wing to the fuselage.

The mounts for the landing gear are quite authentic, but in scale and
in plastic they are fiddly and delicate. They dont offer any positive
location for the rake or splay of the landing gear legs either.

The resin Alley Cat wing sections were


secured to the remains of the plastic lower
wing with super glue. They were clamped
until they had set.

Clamps are a very handy tool to


have on your modelling bench.

The port wing before any filling or sanding. Note that there is a slight overlap of
the plastic leading edge. This was later corrected with Milliput and a sanding stick.

This is an all-new kit with absolutely no parts in


common with any previous Airfix Spitfire release.
In my opinion, this kit is even better than 2012s
Spitfire Mk.XIX.

The wing was attached to the fuselage.

Fit was generally good, although there were gaps at the wing root
that would need filling later on.

Aircraft Edition

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FEATURE ARTICLE: AIRFIX 1:48 SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE MK.VB. Kit No. A05125

Control surfaces are separate and may be posed to taste,


including the paired elevators.

One of the wing root gaps.

Parts for the tropical Vokes filter and the large slipper tank.

The surrounding areas were masked with Tamiya tape before the wing
root gaps were filled with Milliput.

The model after filling with Milliput and a topping of Tamiya Surfacer.

Dear reader, do not do what I have done! Next


time, I will probably cut off the top of the front
cockpit bulkhead then test-fit and trim the insert
until I achieve the best possible fit. It may even be
possible to assemble the fuselage halves and the
insert before gluing the cockpit in place.

ALLEY CAT CONVERSION

By happy chance, just as I was sealing up my kits


fuselage, A2Zee Models announced a new 1:48
scale Spitfire Mk.Vc resin conversion in their Alley
Cat range.
Ali kindly sent me one of the first castings even
before the instructions had been printed.
The conversion comprises two large resin wing
castings incorporating the entire top wing and the
unique panel and shell ejection arrangement of
the C wing, plus four cannon barrels, two stubs
and new bulged undercarriage doors.
The lack of instructions was not really an
impediment. I used the resin wing as a template,
then drew the cutting lines on the kit lower wing
using a Post-It Note. The lines were cut with a

12

Clamps come in all shapes and sizes!


This one is being used to squeeze the
slipper tank while the glue sets.

The joins at the bottom of the wings received the same treatment.

The cannon fairings and the wing leading edges were


drilled and pinned with copper wire reinforcement.

new hobby blade and self-adhesive Dymo tape


as a guide, making many light passes in case of
slip-ups.
After I posted some photos of my conversion
on the Internet, it was pointed out that the wheel
well roof of the Mk.Vc did not have the K
shaped reinforcements of the Mk.Vb, but instead
two simple parallel strips. This is the same as
the arrangement on the Mk.IX Spitfire. This
information was too late for me, but you can make
this simple modification if you wish.
The resin wing sections were fixed to the plastic
remnant of lower wing using super glue. Fit was
pretty good, but there was a gap at each of
the wing roots once the wing was glued to the
fuselage. These were filled with Milliput White
two-part epoxy putty.

PAINTING AND MARKINGS

For this project, I used Mr Color lacquers in my


Testor Aztek A470 airbrush. I love the way these
paints spray.
This particular aircraft was delivered in the

Lower surface filling complete.

desert colours of Dark Earth and Middle Stone


upper surface with Azure Blue below. Upon
arrival, the Middle Stone was overpainted with
RAAF Foliage Green. For the purpose of this
exercise, I used Mr Colour 123 RLM 83 Dark
Green as a reasonable match.
Markings were sourced from Aero Imageworks
Decals Item No. A014807 RAAF Supermarine
Spitfires in the Pacific War Part 1. These are limited
run decals that come with a small booklet with
reference and marking information.
I have had these in my collection for years
and never really been game to use them as I
was worried that the ALPS-printed decals may
be translucent. In the end though, I thought that
the scheme was so interesting that I would take
a chance.
As it turned out, the decals performed
beautifully. I cut the markings out the carrier film
cover the small decal sheets and then simply
applied them after dipping in warm water. The
decals were not noticeably more delicate than
standard screen-printed markings, and even

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The entire model was sprayed with Tamiyas Fine White Primer.
The port-side wing root gap kept cracking open, so I re-filled it
with a mixture of super glue and talcum powder.

RAAF aircraft in the Pacific Theatre wore while tail and leading edge markings in line with US Fifth Air Force instructions. The tail and leading edges were
masked off with Tamiya tape.

Mr Colour lacquer C370 Azure Blue was sprayed on the


lower surfaces.

Aero Imageworks decal instructions were


scanned, scaled up to 1:48, printed and cut
into camouflage masks.
The lower fuselage, bottom of the
Vokes filter and the bottom of
the horizontal tail surfaces were
masked off with Tamiya tape.

The paper camouflage masks were


attached with small blobs of BluTack and masking tape.
This Australian Spitfire had its factory
applied Middle Stone coat repainted in RAAF
Foliage Green. I chose Mr Color 123 RLM 83
Dark Green as a fair match for this colour.

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FEATURE ARTICLE: AIRFIX 1:48 SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE MK.VB. Kit No. A05125

Aero Imageworks decals were


applied over a few glossy coats
of Future Floor Polish.

The finish looks a little stark


when all the masks are removed.

By happy chance, just as I was


sealing up my kits fuselage, A2Zee
Models announced a new 1:48 scale
Spitfire Mk.Vc resin conversion in
their Alley Cat range.
A thin wash of Tamiya X-18 SemiGloss Black mixed with water and
Future Floor Polish was flowed into
panel lines with the tip of a fine brush.

Further post-shading was applied with


heavily thinned lines of a XF-1 Flat
Black and XF-64 mixture applied with
the Testors Aztek A470 airbrush.

14

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MODELSPEC
Airfix 1:48 Supermarine Spitfire Mk.Vb.

Kit No. A05125

Accessories Used:
Alley Cat Item No. AC48050C - Supermarine Spitfire Mk.Vc Early
Style Full Span Wing Conversion (Airfix Mk.Vb)
Aero Imageworks Decals Item No. A014807 RAAF Supermarine
Spitfires in the Pacific War Part 1
Eduard 1:48 scale photo-etched Sutton Harnesss

The propeller blades were primed with white, followed by


a coat of Tamiya TS-34 Camel Yellow before the tips were
masked and the blades painted a dark black-brown shade.

Tools & Modelling Products Used:

The bright spinner is painted with Mr


Color 135 Flat Russian Green (1).

Canopy parts were masked with


Tamiya tape then mounted on a
paint brush handle before painting.

The canopy frames were sprayed


with Tamiya acrylic XF-71
Cockpit Green prior to their
camouflage coat.

Tamiya Extra Thin Cement


Revell Contacta Cement
Selleys Super Glue
Zip Kicker (super glue accelerator)
Tamiya Masking Tape
Irwin Clamps
Paints & Finishing Products Used:
Tamiya Spray Cans: Grey Primer; Fine White Primer; AS-12 Bare
Metal Silver; TS-34 Camel Yellow
Tamiya (acrylic): X-18 Semi-Gloss Black; XF-1 Flat Black; XF-2 Flat
White; XF-3 Flat Yellow; XF-10 Flat Brown; XF-14 J.A. Grey; XF-57
Buff; XF-69 NATO Black; XF-71 Cockpit Green.
Tamiya Weathering Master - Weathering Pastels Parts A.
Mr Color lacquer paints: 123 RLM 83 Dark Green; 135 Flat Russian
Green (1); C369 Dark Earth; C370 Azure Blue;
Mr Hobby Mr Color Leveling Thinner 400.
Vallejo Model Color (acrylic): 919 Foundation White; 70891
Intermediate Green; 70953 Flat Yellow; 70957 Flat Red
Testors Model Master Flat Clear Lacquer Finish
Solvaset decal setting solution
Future Floor Polish
Winsor & Newton Oil Paints: Raw Umber
High level of detail; restrained surface textures including
recessed panel lines and cowl fasteners; generally clever
engineering; lots of useful options.
Poor fitting cowl saddle; no positive location for main landing
gear legs.
RATING: 9 out of 10
Kit was purchased online from Hannants www.hannants.co.uk
Thanks to A2Zee Models for the Spitfire Mk.Vc Conversion
www.a2zeemodels.co.uk

Smaller exterior parts were


sorted by colour and attached to
boxes for painting.

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FEATURE ARTICLE: AIRFIX 1:48 SUPERMARINE SPITFIRE MK.VB. Kit No. A05125

The exhausts received a dusting of


Tamiya Weathering Pastels to suggest
lean exhaust staining.

Undercarriage parts, separate pilots entry door, pitot


tube and aerial mast ready for final assembly.

The same silver pencil was used to add chipping to the wing root area.

16

Propeller blades were chipped with the tip of a silver pencil.

Typically heavy exhaust streaks and oil stains


were sprayed onto the lower surfaces.

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The top coat is a light application of Testors


Model Master Flat Clear Lacquer Finish,
leaving a slight sheen.

This was an interesting


and an enjoyable project.

the whites were perfectly opaque. They also


responded well to Solvaset setting solution.
This particular set is out of print at the moment,
but the Aero Imageworks website is still active.
The only real downside is that their products are
eye-wateringly expensive for what you get. Still,
value is very much in the eye of the beholder.

FINISHING TOUCHES

Finishing off the model was very straightforward


with only one exception. The main landing gear
legs have no positive locating positions at all.

They are simply butted up against the staggered


mount protruding from the undercarriage
bays. The legs are quite narrow, and the
staggered join makes drilling and pinning a bit
problematic too. I wound up using super glue
and Zip Kicker accelerator to snap freeze the
legs in place.
The final touches included the wheels and
exhausts (this aircraft had flat covers on the
wheels and the heater pipe removed from
the exhausts), the open pilots entry door, the
gunsight, canopy, antenna mast and pitot tube.

CONCLUSION

This is an excellent kit. Not only is it certainly


Airfixs best Spitfire kit to date, I would rate
it the best Spitfire Mk.V currently available in
any scale.
Detail is well done, surface textures are
crisp and restrained, many useful options are
included, and fit is generally very good.
Roll on Airfix!

Aircraft Edition

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26/09/2014 13:32

KIT PREVIEW: KINETIC MODEL KITS 1:48 SEA HARRIER FA2 ITEM NO. K48041

The Editor takes


an early look at
Kinetics all-new
1:48 scale Sea
Harrier FA2.
The kit features nice surface textures.

HOVERING FIST
T

The seat detail looks great.

Excellent stressed metal effect on the blast shields.

Clear parts.

A photo-etched fret is also included.

The large colourful


decal sheet.

18

he British Aerospace Sea Harrier is a


naval short take-off and vertical-landing/
vertical take-off and landing jet fighter,
reconnaissance and attack aircraft, a
development of the Hawker Siddeley Harrier. It
first entered service with the Royal Navy in April
1980 as the Sea Harrier FRS1 and became
informally known as the SHAR.
Unusual in an era in which most naval and
land-based air superiority fighters were large and
supersonic, the principal role of the subsonic Sea
Harrier was to provide air defence of the fleet
from Royal Navy aircraft carriers.
The Sea Harrier served in the Falklands War,
both of the Gulf Wars, and the Balkans conflicts;
on all occasions it mainly operated from aircraft
carriers positioned within the conflict zone. Its
usage in the Falklands War was its most high
profile and important success, where it was the
only fixed-wing fighter available to protect the
British Task Force. The Sea Harriers shot down 20
enemy aircraft during the conflict with one lost to
enemy ground fire. They were also used to launch
ground attacks in the same manner as the Harriers
operated by the Royal Air Force.
The Sea Harrier was marketed for sales
abroad, but by 1983 India was the only operator
other than Britain after sales to Argentina and
Australia were unsuccessful. A second, updated
version for the Royal Navy was made in 1993
as the Sea Harrier FA2, improving its air to air
abilities and weapons compatibilities, along with
a more powerful engine; this version continued
manufacture until 1998.
The aircraft was withdrawn early from Royal
Navy service in March 2006 and replaced in the
short term by the Harrier GR9, now itself retired,
although the intended long term replacement is
Lockheed Martins F-35 Lightning II. *
Kinetic continues its commitment to modern jetage aircraft with its second British subject - a 1:48
scale Sea Harrier FA2.
This is only the second Sea Harrier FA2
available in 1:48 scale, the first being an Airfix
kit released in 1997, which was itself based on
the early 1980s-vintage Sea Harrier FRS.1.
This brand new
kit from Kinetic
comprises 243
parts in light grey
plastic, 16 parts
in clear and a
small photo-etched
fret. Markings for
28 aircraft are
included.
Surface detail
looks very nice,

with recessed panel lines, vents and rivets over the


airframe.
Moulding quality is high, with minimal ejector
pin circles, seam lines or sink marks. Some of the
moulding is really clever too, notably the onepiece nozzles. All four nozzles are connected by a
mechanism that should, if installed carefully, make
them all rotate to the same angle simultaneously.
Cockpit detail is nice straight from the box,
with raised detail on the side consoles and
instrument panels; and excellent moulding on
the sides of the ejector seat. Youll need to BYO
harness straps though.
The canopy is split into windscreen and
opening section. The latter features the prominent
detonation chords moulded into the top.
The stressed metal effect on the nozzle blast
shields looks great.
Optional parts are provided for open or closed
auxiliary blow in doors; open or closed air
brakes; and the control surfaces and flaps are all
offered as separate parts, allowing them to be
posed to taste. Landing gear doors may be fixed
open or closed too.
The modest photo-etched fret provides
additional detail parts including scale thickness
wing fences.
Of the 243 grey plastic parts, 104 are
dedicated to ordnance.
On the two ordnance sprues you will find AIM120 AMRAAM, AIM-9L Sidewinder and Sea Eagle
missiles plus pylons and tanks of various sizes.
Decals are designed by Crossdelta and
luxuriously printed by Cartograf. The decal sheet
is big and colourful, with two commemorative
schemes plus 26 aircraft depicted at disbandment
in 2004 and 2006.
Colour callouts are offered for Vallejo and
GSI Creos (I believe this is Gunze-Sangyo
acrylic) paints.

CONCLUSION

This is another really nice modern subject from


Kinetic. It simply blows away the hybrid 1:48
scale Airfix Sea Harrier FA2 from 1997.
Kinetics all-new 1:48 scale SHAR is well
detailed, offers many useful options and
alternative position parts, and provides a wealth
of ordnance. Engineering appears straightforward
and it should not be a difficult build.
I look forward to starting mine!
* Historical information from Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_Aerospace_
Sea_Harrier
Thanks to Lucky Model for the
sample www.luckymodel.com

Military Illustrated Modeller - November 2014

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26/09/2014 13:33

NEW in the HOW TO BUILD... series


HOW TO BUILD...
REVELL 1:32 SPITFIRE MK.IIA
The name Spitfire has now become synonymous with
an entire island people, and their battle to maintain their
freedom in the shadow of the Nazi jackboot. The very
shape and sound of the Spitfire seems to still invoke and
embody the usually reserved pride of the British person.
It is probably true to say that Reginald Mitchells beautiful
aircraft design is one of the most easily recognised and
much-loved shapes that ever took to the skies.
When actual mass production of the Spitfire ceased in
1948, over 20,000 machines had been built, and operated
by over thirty countries around the world.
This iconic series saw service with the RAF right up
until the mid-1950s. It also saw service with the Irish Air
Corps as late as 1961; a full 26yrs after the flight of the
prototype K5054.
Revell has now released an all-new 1:32 scale
Supermarine Spitfire Mk.IIa. With some minor
modifications, this model may also be built as a Mk.I
or a Mk.Va.
Over the course of five Chapters, James Hatch examines
the kit contents in detail, describes construction of the
model with lavish illustrations, and points out the areas of
the kit that may be improved and corrected.
This new book features an exhaustive step-by-step guide
to construction; plus a painting and weathering tutorial.
A number of essential reference
resources are also included.
More than 200 photos, a reference
guide, and photos of the kit sprues
are all included - a must have before
you build the model!

Only

9.95

plus p&p

ALSO AVAILABLE Visit adhbooks.com for details


PLACE YOUR ORDER NOW ON TEL: 01525 222573 FAX: 01525 222574

Revell 1:32 Spitfire Mk.IIa book


HOW TO BUILD... SPITFIRE
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p 19 Spitfire Book 043.indd 8

25/09/2014 17:17

FEATURE ARTICLE: WINGNUT WINGS 1:32 FOKKER E.II/E.III (EARLY) Kit No. 32018

Dirk Polchow builds


Wingnut Wings 1:32 scale
Fokker E.III Early Version

he Fokker Eindecker E.II entered service in July


1915 and was built at the same time as the
E.I version. Both monoplanes were based on
the Morane-Saulnier design and were fitted
with an innovative steel tube framework.
The E.II was equipped with the more powerful
100hp Oberursel engine, a copy of the French
Gnome Monosoupape. This single valve rotary
engine had the best power to weight ratio of all
German engines during WW I. The E.II also had
a larger fuel capacity and was equipped with a
reliable Spandau IMG 08.
The E.II and the later E.III and IV variants
guaranteed sovereignty over western airspace for
at least one year. The undoubtedly most important
advantage that lead to its superiority was the
achievement of the ability to fire through the
propeller. The development of a synchronization
mechanism, based on the patented interrupter gear
from Hans Schneider, lead to perpetual judicial
disputes as Richard Alexander points out in his
introduction to the Wingnuts Fokker E.II booklet.

20

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TENSIONAL
INTEGRITY

Aircraft Edition

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26/09/2014 13:33

FEATURE ARTICLE: WINGNUT WINGS 1:32 FOKKER E.II/E.III (EARLY) Kit No. 32018

INTRODUCTION

After my last build, Wingnut Wings RE.8 Harry


Tate (see MIM issue 031), I was looking for a less
time consuming but interesting project. Early on,
Wingnuts Fokker E.II/E.III awoke my particular
interest for the following challenging features. First,
wartime photos clearly show squiggles as the result
of the forming and polishing process of the cowlings.
What techniques are suitable to reproduce those
unique turned metal cowlings? Lots of early Fokker
monoplanes show a silk matte Fokker Beige over
clear-doped linen. Subtle shading and weathering
techniques will be necessary to get this fuselage to
life in a convincing manner.
It was also my intention to use self-made
masks for the fuselage bands and large crosses.
Self-painted insignias have the advantage that
weathering and colour-fading techniques can
be used in a realistic manner. This article will
therefore highlight the steps involved that have
been a new experience for me.
The last feature was the overall rigging and
especially the rigging of the cabane struts and
landing gear. With its large wingspan this
monoplane model definitely requires structural
rigging to prevent the wings from hanging down.
What material can be used and in what order
can the rigging process forge ahead to an overall
tensional integrity?
By the way: Tensional integrity or Buckminster
Fullers term Tensegrity, is structural principle
based on the use of isolated components in
compression inside a net of continuous tension
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tensegrity). So
thats what rigging is all about, isnt it?

INSIDE THE OFFICE


One of the first and most challenging steps was
painting the inner sides of the metal cowling.
The sheer number of squiggles that had to be
reproduced led me to search for economical
methods. I tried different materials like structured
foils or textiles that I wanted to use as a template
by spraying the aluminum coat with my airbrush.
I even used different materials such as stamps. In
the end the easiest method, advised by Wingnuts
Hints and Tips showed good results. As a base
coat I used Alclad Semi matt aluminum. Afterwards
I sealed the coat with Vallejo Gloss Varnish. The
squiggles were hand-painted by using Vallejo
Aluminum acrylics. Lots of patience and in my case
the help of a magnifying glass lead to a convincing
outcome. (Image 1)
I used the same method for the outer sites
of the cowlings and was able to increase the
contrast of the squiggles by rubbing some MIG
Metal Pigments into the surface after the painting
process. The work on the cockpit coaming and the
cowlings took about six hours. (Images 2, 3)
The instrument panel has been painted with
Tamiya XF 78, sealed with semi-gloss varnish
from Vallejo. The wood grain has been brushed
with sienna and umbra oil-paints. The detail
on the pulsameter has been added by a heat
stretched transparent sprue and the wiring was
done by using .2 mm copper wire. The instrument

22

1
3

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glasses were made by using Micro Kristal Klear.


Especially the metal elements on the decals for the
switches came out very realistically. (Image 4)
The cockpit floor received some weathering
with pigments and different oil-painted wood
grains for the two covers. The wiring of the control
cables and especially for the rudder bar was
quite challenging. The cables popped away
in the final stage of using oil-paint. I guess that
the solvent (white spirit) softened the plastic and
cause it to break. Finally I fixed the cables directly
onto the rudder bar. The control column got some
extra wiring for the MG switch. All black parts
were treated with metal pigments. The structural
wiring of the frame was done by using 0.12 mm
fishing line. The turnbuckles were made with 0.4
mm Albion tubes. To simulate the winding the
monofilament was wrapped with 0.05 mm copper

wire. (Image 5)
The cockpit was far more complex than I
expected when I looked at that small instrument
panel at the beginning. Especially the bracing

wires and the wires under the oil pump caused


some fitting problems when the fuel tank was
positioned together with the instrument panel
between the side frames. (Image 6)

Engine Works

7
The Oberursel U.I rotary engine was a licencebuilt Gnome Delta. In fact Wingnut Wings uses
the same engine sprue as the AMV DH.2. Oil
must have spread out in large quantities and
the overall look must have been quite greasy
throughout the cylinders, the inner side of the
cowlings and on the bottom of the fuselage.
To reproduce the different materials used on
the engine, Alclad paints proved, in my view,
to have the best results. The lacquer can be
added without any primer. For shiny colours like
polished aluminum or chrome a black base coat
can increase the brightness and helps to give
some variation. So keeping this in mind, I first
painted the engine block and the cylinders in
XF-1 Flat Black. (Images 7, 8)
The next step was to paint the cylinder block
in Alclad Chrome by using a template. The
coat was polished and treated with MIG Metal
Pigments later on. Agama Burnt Metal paste was
added to the base/mounting of the cylinders
for some contrast. After studying pictures of the
E.II at the Science Museum, London, I had the
idea to simulate the burned coloured and greasy
effect on the cylinders by using yellow and

red oil paints. To create a more subtle effect,


the paints were blended by using white spirit
later on. I added ignition cables by using 0.05
copper wire. The last step was to add the decal
and to wash, using with a highly diluted mix of
black and brown oil paints. (Image 9)

The Germania and the Garuda-Type Propeller


I made two types of propeller - one Garuda-type
Feldpropeller and one Germania Propeller.
While the Germania-type was suitable for my EII
69/15 Kurt von Crailsheim, the Garuda -type was
more challenging because pictures of the original
propeller showed two very dark red-brownish types
of tropical wood (Mahogany and another type)
used for the lamination process.
This proved to be difficult to replicate because
of the minimum of contrast between the wooden
tones. I tried my best with Vallejo paints, giving
the propeller a base coat with a mix of Vallejo
036 Mahogany and 033 ochre. For the masking
I used Tamiya masking tape, cut into strips of 0.5
1.0mm. The stripes marked the outer regions of
the darker wood and the space in between was
filled with more tape. For the lighter type of wood
I used the same Vallejo mix of colours but more
033 ochre. Slight height differences between the

10

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Aircraft Edition

23

30/09/2014 12:02

FEATURE ARTICLE: Wingnut Wings 1:32 Fokker E.II/E.III (Early) Kit No. 32018

two colours due to the different numbers of layers


lead to a very convincing representation of the
real lamination process. After a coat of Vallejo
Gloss Varnish, oil paints were used for the wooden
grain. The umbra oil paint was applied undiluted
with a sponge. After waiting for about ten minutes
the grain was worked into the oil paint by using a
brush moistened with white spirit. Some black grain
was applied using the same method.
After a drying time of three days, the propeller
was sealed with Vallejo semi-gloss varnish. The
propeller hub was detailed by drilling a few
wholes around the hub. These drillings for weight
reduction are documented on the windsock file
vol. 28. (Images 10, 11, 12)

11

12

The Paintwork on the Fuselage


For the fuselage and the wings I planned to use
a bottom layer of XF-55 linen to be covered with
the requested dark yellow. Similar to my PC10
work on the Harry Tate I wanted to sand down
the paint to its base, the linen. So after applying
XF-55 this first coat was sealed with Vallejo Satin
Varnish. My next step was to mask the wing rips
and the metal tubing frame under the linen. Some
light pre-shading was followed by a brownish coat
along the masks. It was not easy to tone down this
contrast. While PC 10 has shown great saturation,
XF-60 on my German fighter wasnt that handsome.
Various steps of spraying translucent layers and
sanding followed. At last the wings responded
well to the final layers and resulted in a nice subtle
variation of the coat. (Image 13)
On historical photos the fuselage seems to
differ between shades of more or less lighter or
darker regions, analogous to canvas that has been
painted with a monochrome colour and has then
been rubbed and scratched so that the underlying
base coat comes through. I decided to get that
effect by using the Sponge technique. I used a

mixture of XF-55, white and XF-60, heavily diluted


with water and applied it with a sponge. Again
the surface was sanded down with 5000 mesh to
get a more homogeneous finish.
The next step was to add some brown to the
fuselage and repeat the process near the engine
and the cockpit where most of the dirt appears.
Tamiya smoke was used for grease on the base
tubing of the cockpit shining through the linen. A
coat of highly diluted Fokker Beige was sprayed
to make the overall effect more subtle. In sum,
Tamiya smoke was extremely useful for the grease
on the base tubing of the cockpit shining through
the linen from inside. Before spraying Tamiya
Smoke, the structure of the frame was masked
again. Finally the masks were taken off and
another light coat of smoke was sprayed on. The
technique was repeated on the wings, especially
on the wing root section. Diluted Tamiya Smoke
was also used to simulate smoke from the engine
on the linen und around the metal plates. More
weathering by us. (Image 14)

13
14

Painting the Insignia


I decided to spray the insignias and stripes on my
Fokker E.II 69/15 with self-made masks instead of
using the decals. The reason was to get some slight
variations on the colour of the stripes and to add
some weathering by sanding down the coat on the
stripes. (Image 15)
So the first step was to mask the overall region.
I used the decals as templates and marked the
places for the outer masks. Tamiya XF-2 Flat White
was sprayed on the white and yellow regions.
Afterwards the white coat was sanded down and
sealed with future. The next step was to mix the
proper colour for the yellow -beige stripe. I used a
basic mix of Tamiya Flat Yellow (XF-3) and Tamiya
XF-10 Flat Brown. Small amounts of XF-7 Flat Red
enriched the lacquer to a warmer tone. The coat
was sprayed in various intensities and the edges
of the stripe were given some Tamiya Smoke. After
a final coat of future and two hours of waiting, the
yellow region was masked. Again I used the decals
as templates and measured the varying widths of
the upper, down and side decals. A coat of Tamiya
Flat Black was sprayed on, taking care that the
saturation of the coat varies. For the crosses I used
masking tape that will fit the four ellipses that are

24

needed to spray the crosses.


The radius is easy to find: The cross decals on
Wingnuts sheet are arranged in a four square
pattern. Between the four decals are the numbers
of the decals, positioned in a circle. The middle
of the circle is the centre point for the circle that
will touch both, the left and the right hand decal.
The tape around the ellipses marks the outer four
square border of the white base for the crosses. The
ellipses were cut out by using an Olfa-Cutter. Tamiya
XF-2 Flat White was sprayed, sanded down and
sealed with future. The cross itself was painted by
using XF-69 Nato Black. XF-1 follows in inconsistent
saturation and irregular patterns. (Image 16)
For the rudder I added some turnbuckles, made
by 0.6/0.3 mm Albion tube and 0.15 mm copper
wire. For the locating pin to the fuselage I used
Albion tube of the same size. The rudder was
sprayed by using Tamiya XF-60 as Fokker Beige. I
used the hairspray method and sprayed a layer of
XF-2 Flat White over the coat of hairspray. By using
a wet brush, the underlying beige comes out on
specific, heavy exposed areas, especially towards
the outer parts of the rudder. (Image 17, 18)

15

16

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MODELSPEC
Wingnut Wings 1:32 Fokker E.II/E.III (Early).

Kit No. 32018

Accessories Used:
Gaspatch Type A buckles
Tectan Fluorcarbon Fishing Line 0,012mm/0,004in
Tools & Materials Used:

17

18

Tamiya Extra Fine Cement


Revell Contacta Professional Cement
UHU Cyanacrylat Super Glue
Harder and Steinbeck Evolution Airbrush
Dremel Multi-Tool
Brass rod and drills from 0,3mm to 1,2mm
Tamiya 10mm Masking Tape
Isopropyl Alcohol
Future Floor Finish / Klear
Copper wire, 0,20mm, 0,15mm, 0,05mm; tin-lead solder 0,5mm
Paints & Finishing Products Used:

TENSIONAL INTEGRITY
After finishing and painting all the sub-assemblies
my plan was to use structural rigging. With its large
wingspan, this monoplane model definitely requires
structural rigging to prevent the wings from hanging
down. While building Wingnuts FE2.b I experienced
that different tension of the cables easiliy result in
an unbalanced overall tension that will cause some
cables to hang down. So its highly recommended
to plan the stages of rigging, moving from the inner
wiring to the outer. Especially the rigging of the

discs will bear the cables. After studying Scotts scale


drawing of the Fokker EIII at Windsock Worldwide,
I decided to create my own, more narrow type of
turnbuckle for the undercarriage. I used 0.12 mm
fishermans Fluorocarbon Monofilament for more
stability. One eyelet made of .15 copper was put
into 0.5 mm Albion tube while the monofilament was
fixed to the other side. Copper wire, bent around a
0.3mm drill that was used to simulate the winding.
The rigging was done by using the 0.5mm

19

Tamiya Acrylics as listed in instructions paint callouts


Tamiya X-20 Thinner
Alclad II Lacquers: Alc-104 Pale Burnt Metal, ALC-105 Polished
Aluminium, ALC-111 Magnesium, ALC-112 Steel, ALC-108 Pale
Gold, ALC-110 Copper, ALC-103 Dark Aluminium
Norma Professional Oil paints: 680 translucent redbrown, 624
burnt umber,
792 ivory/black, 610 burnt Sienna, 681 English red light, 114
titanium white, blue
Schminke 50038 Medium 1 turpentine
Valleyo Model Air acrylics: 71058 Gloss Varnish, 085 Italian Red,
71057 Black, 062 Aluminum
Valleyo 100% Acrylic Resin: 70522 Satin Varnish, 70520 Matt
Varnish
MIG-Pigments: P034 Russian Earth, P23 Gun Metal, P033 Dark Mud
Microscale Products: Micro Sol, Micro Set, Micro Kristal Klear
References Used:
Windsock Worldwide Vol.28
Acknowledgements:

20
cabane struts and its counterpart, the landing gear,
require some enhancement to deal with the overall
high tension that will focus on those parts. I cut off the
kit turnbuckles and replaced them with the Gaspatch
Type A metal buckles. 0.4 mm holes were drilled
into the cabane struts and the turnbuckles were fixed
with Cyanoacrylate. 0.05 copper wire was wrapped
around the junction between the buckles and the struts
to minimize the difference between the struts and the
turnbuckles diameter.
The control cable pulley is scratch-built by using
bent 0.5 mmm Albion Alloy tube and two disks
made of evergreen sheets. The junction between the

22

21

Albion tube to fix the monofilament on the eyelets of


undercarriage and the turnbuckles. (Image 19)
The monofilament was glued to the points near
the cockpit. Again 0.05 copper wire and Albion
tubes were used for the turnbuckles. The buckles
were pre-painted in their colour code (right-wing
in red, left-wing in green, center-struts in blue)
while the rest of the turnbuckles were painted after
the rigging was done. The monofilament was led
through the corresponding turnbuckle of the landing
gear and was fixed in the outer hole of the wing.
I tensioned the monofilament by using a heavy
soldering tweezers. The turnbuckles were secured
with superglue.
All this was a very time consuming process and I
hoped that the later structural rigging on the upper
side of the wing would correspond to the tension on
the downside.
It was very important to plan the stages of rigging
because, after completing the top side rigging,
the plane cant be laid on its back anymore. First
I added the control cables for the rudder and the
elevators by fiddling a piece of bended copper wire
through the whole and fixing the monofilament on the
end of the wire with Cyanoacrylate. (Image 20)
After the plane was turned on its carriage, the
monofilament went down a little bit due to the

Many thanks to the forum members on ww1aircraftmodels.com for


their support
Postscript: My Fokker E II came 1st on Euro Model Expo in Heiden,
Germany 2014

weight of the wings. For the rigging of the upper


side, the tips of the wings were placed on acrylic
paint pots. The fuselage and landing gear had no
contact with the workbench. This caused the wings
to bend upwards and let the bottom monofilament
gets its tension back. The upper rigging was
prefixed and clamps with some extra weight kept
the monofilament tight. All upper monofilaments
were fixed with Cyanoacrylate step by step. After
the Fokker was put back on its carriage again, the
tension was evenly spread throughout the under and
upper side of the wing. (Image 21, 22, 23)

23

Aircraft Edition

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26/09/2014 13:34

SHOW REPORT: THE AUSTRALIAN MODEL EXPO 2014

Jason Hudson. Stunning 1:48 scale US Navvy


HH-60 Rescue Hawk secured him a 1st place in
the Rotary Wing Aircraft category.

AUSTRALIAN MODEL
EXPO 2014-09-14
Rene de Koning presents an illustrated report
on the varied winners at this years Australian
Model Expo.

xtraordinary is the only way to describe this


years Australian Model Expo, which was held
over the weekend of the 7 9 June, 2014.
The competition attracted a record
breaking 718 entries from 247 competitors, 61
of whom were first timers. These figures are the
highest ever recorded in the events 31 year
history. The general consensus was that there were
a lot of great models on show this year, which
clearly demonstrates that the hobby of plastic
scale modelling is alive and well.
A greater number of clubs also attend this year,
31 in total, which pushed the number of models
on display to well over 2000.
Because of the large number of competition

entries some of the categories were almost


bursting at the seams, with Large Scale
Aircraft, Gundam & Mecha, Sci-fi and
Dioramas being the standouts.
Mark Carlisle won the Best of Show award
for The Khastripede, a much admired and superb
piece of work, which caused a real stir amongst
the Gundam/Mecha boys.
Saying that the 2014 Australian Model Expo
was a huge success would be an understatement,
and is a real testament to the hard working
volunteers who make this show happen each year.
For more photos and information go to
www.modelexpo.com.au

Mark Carlisle produced this magnificent looking Sgt Connor figure which took out
1st place in the Sci-fi, Movie, Fantasy-Single Figure, Bust or Creature category.

26

Military Illustrated Modeller - November 2014

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26/09/2014 13:35

Stuart Coleman. Impressive 1:72 Airfix


Short Stirling placed 1st in the Small
Scale Aircraft-Modified category and
also won the Best Airfix award.

Jason Steinwedel. Fine example


of the 1:48 Airfix Gloster Javelin
FAW 912 won 1st place in the
Medium Scale Aircraft-Jet or Rocket
Propelled category.

Mark Carlisle. Beautifully painted Templar Knight won


him a 1st in the Historical Figures-Small category.

Fazz James. Produced this stunning 1:24 Buck


Baker 1956 Chrysler 300B which won 1st in the
Cars Medium-Competition category, the Best Mobeus
award as well as the Bill Hamer Automotive
Modelling Excellence award.

Dan Moore. Incredibly good looking 1:35 Bronco Sdkfz 6/3 Diana won 1st in the Vehicles
& Equipment-Large category.
Ray Thorpe. 1:48 Tamiya Tiger
1 Early secured him 1st in the
AFVs, Vehicles & EquipmentMedium category.

Shane Richmond. Klingon Bird of Prey deservedly


placed 1st in the hotly contested Sci-fi, Movie,
Fantasy-Vehicles & Equipment category.

Aircraft Edition

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26/09/2014 13:35

SHOW REPORT: THE AUSTRALIAN MODEL EXPO 2014

Kosta Heristanidis. 28mm Afghan Guerrilla Army


won 1st in the Wargaming Armies category.

Patrick Navascues. Built this great looking Tom


Mongoose McEwens dragster which placed 1st in
the Cars Large-Including Competition Cars category.

Jason Woollett. Beautifully finished


Bedford OSB Recovery Truck placed
1st in the Trucks & Commercial
Vehicles over 3 Tonne category.

Graham Davies. Built this amazing


Ebony 1927 Ford Model T and it was
a well deserved 1st place winner in
the Scratchbuilt category.

Callum MacDonald. Great looking RAN


Harbour diorama won him a 1st in the
Military Dioramas category.

p 26-28 Australian Model Expo 043B.indd 28

26/09/2014 13:35

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25/09/2014 17:17

FEATURE ARTICLE: HK MODELS 1:32 DORNIER DO 335B-2 Kit No. 01E07

THE

PFEIL FILE

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HK Models 1:32 Dornier Do 335B-2 test shot


lands at MIM, and James Hatch gets stuck
straight into it.

as there any aircraft as unorthodox


and unconventional in appearance as
the Dornier Do 335? Of course there
was, but the Do 335 was to be a massproduced fighter-bomber aircraft that would have
entered regular service. What made this aircraft
an interesting proposition was its configuration.
This was indeed a two-engine design, but of
course was of push-pull design. That in itself may
make the aircraft sound like a non-starter, but
the Do 335 was arguably one of, or THE fastest
piston-engine aircraft that ever saw service as the
layout eliminated the traditional drag element from
a two engine aircraft.

A NEW MACHINE

It was also highly versatile. Conceived from the


outset as a multirole machine, this adaptable
design could be used as a straight fighter aircraft,
and also as a night-fighter, complete with a
second, tandem crew position that gave the Do

335 its distinctive hump back appearance for


this specific version. Bombs could be carried in
an internal bay, and if you required a heavyfighter, then this was possible by mounting two
Rheinmetall-Borsig MK103 cannon in pods
protruding from the wing leading edge. To
compensate for the removal of wing fuel tanks, an
auxiliary tank could be fitted into the bomb bay.
The possibilities seemed quite endless.
The Dornier Do 335 was also a robust and
highly manoeuvrable machine, and one that could
still cope with a rear engine failure. It was also
one of the few aircraft with an ejection seat that
saw service in World War Two. If this was to be
activated, the rear propeller and upper vertical
fin would be ejected by means of explosive
bolts, followed by the canopy itself and, with any
luck, the pilot! Another unusual feature of the Do
335 was the cruciform tail layout. A downward
pointing fin was included which would hopefully
negate any rear propeller damage that might
result in an awkward take-off or landing.
First flown in 1943, the project itself wasnt
without its problems. Whilst the aircraft was

inherently stable on both the ground and in the


air due to the rear engine resting not too far
behind the centre of gravity (with the prop being
driven by a long, extended shaft), it did suffer
from some technical problems which were never
to be overcome. The rather substantial looking
undercarriage was one Achilles Heel, with a
weakness that was to cause numerous accidents.
After test flights had been finalised, and the
aircraft ordered into general production, no more
than 37 of them were finished by the end of the
war. Destruction of factories was a serious factor
in the lack of finished machines, and also Ernst
Heinkel ignoring orders to produce the Do 335,
by cancelling his own He 219. After the war,
captured examples of the Pfeil were whisked
away by the Allies, with the French actively using
a number for themselves. Today, only one machine
survives and is on display at the NASM, USA.

HIGH HOPES

Now and again, there is a subject that is tackled


by a model company, and it immediately starts
flurries of discussion across the various online
modelling forums. Earlier this year, one such buzz
was started by the news that HK Models were
going to tackle one of the modellers veritable
Holy Grail subjects. This of course was the
muscular and menacing-looking Dornier Do 335
Pfeil (Arrow). Until now, the only large scale
option for the builder was a vac-form kit, and if
you didnt want that, there was always the 1:48
Tamiya version. As excellent as it is, its certainly
not going to bang on the doors of the large scale
guys and gals.
My build of this model is from a test shot. That
needs to be remembered as we progress through
this project. As Im in regular contact with HK, I
managed to source the corrected canopy sprue
that well see much later on. Some things that
you will see me tackle may not necessarily be
applicable to the final release. That aside, this
was just too tempting not to build. My test shot
was packed into a Gloster Meteor box. Yes, the
sprues do fit in there, but its a tight fit, and the
final release will have a box slightly bigger than
this, and also a small fret of photo etch parts.
My kit also initially lacked decals and
instructions, although I did work from a printed
PDF that did show assembly, albeit without
part numbers anywhere! Decals arrived late in
construction and the option I build is therefore
one of the schemes. This mightily impressive
model comprises of fourteen plastic sprues and
hundreds of parts. It does appear that HK Models
have been sponsored to produce as many slidemoulded parts as they can. Again, well look at
those as we progress with construction.

IN THE FLESH

Typically, work starts in the cockpit, and I have


to say that this looks very impressive straight
out of box. I can only imagine what the likes
of Eduard may do for this release. The cockpit
is based around a tub which has a missing

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26/09/2014 13:36

FEATURE ARTICLE: HK MODELS 1:32 DORNIER DO 335B-2 Kit No. 01E07

Detail extends all the way through the rear


fuselage, and straight on through to the rear
propeller bearing housing.

The model fits together so beautifully


without glue that I just couldnt resist
a quick test fit of the main fuselage
parts and internals.

I wasnt a fan of the included foot


pedals. They seemed almost 1:48 in
scale. I opted to use some spare PE
parts from an Eduard set that I had.
These were mounted on 1mm ABS rod
from E.T. Models.
No foot bars were
moulded onto my test
shot, so I used a little
aluminium tube from
Albion Alloys. Surprisingly,
I cut them to the correct
length first time!

The RLM66 colour was brought to life with a few Luftwaffe placards from Airscale.
RLM66 was used to paint the remainder of the interior. Things look pretty dark here at the moment.

rear wall. That wall is actually sloped, and is


moulded with integral ejection seat rails and
other detail. My first job was to remove all of the
parts pertaining to the cockpit. Remember, parts
numbers dont matter here, so the plastic is at my
mercy. I decided first glue should be directed at
the pilots ejector seat. HK Models have moulded
the armrests in the stowed position (folded back).
This looked a little odd to me, and I wanted them
in the deployed position. Using my RB Productions
razor saw, the arms were sawn from the chair and
the mating surfaces cleaned up. They were then
reinstated in the new position, using a drop of CA
for extra strength.
This ejector seat had bracing frames attached
for the pilot to sit his feet on, in case of needing
a quick escape. Despite the instructions showing
a horizontal foot bar between the frames, it
wasnt on the plastic parts. I used a little Albion
Alloys aluminium tube for this. This also very

32

much reinforces this area. I fitted the headrest and


bracket, but decided to leave the cushion until
later in the painting stage.
I found the rudder pedals in this kit are almost
verging on 1:48 scale, so I decided to replace
them with photo etch parts, and to support them
on a couple of short lengths of plastic rod. For the
pedals, I used some Eduard spares that I had left
over from another kit. These would be attached to
the cockpit later. Theres not too much assembly
needed within the cockpit. A small trim wheel is
fitted to the sidewall and a small button/box unit
is fitted to the opposing side console. Moulded
detail is excellent throughout, with no soft detail.
Photographs of the Dornier cockpit seemed to
show some sort of lifting handle on the starboard
console. I made this from a little plasticard and
wire, and then painted it bright Vallejo red.
One area that did concern me was the space
to the rear of the instrument panel. On the real

aircraft, you would see the back of the instruments,


and their wiring. All my test show supplied was
the actual panel, with what looks like an insert for
a film or PE detail sheet. My first task was to paint
the instrument panel. Colour photos show this as
RLM66, the same as the cockpit interior. I decided
to follow suit here and do the same and then seal
things with a brush coating of Klear. Details were
then applied with both Vallejo and Tamiya paints,
using a 5x0 brush and a toothpick. At this point,
I also assembled the two-part control column, and
progressed to paint the entire cockpit in Gunze
RLM66. This applies to the forward interior area
of the fuselage halves. This was one cockpit that
wouldnt really benefit from any colour modulation
techniques, solely due to layout and very little real
estate in terms of open space. I would give a little
depth to this later, using pastels. After painting the
cockpit, it was given a couple of glossy coats of
Klear. I prefer to paint small detail after a Klear

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Im a huge fan of the laser-cut HGW seatbelts, so I needed no encouragement to use a set in this build. I
opted for the Late type that replicate the green Orlon material that was occasionally seen around this time.

As the rear of the instrument panel is easily seen when the


model is built, I added short pieces of ABS rod and lead wire
to replicate the rear of the instruments themselves. A little
time consuming, but well worth the effort.

With the cockpit now airbrushed in flat varnish, a little Tamiya Weathering Pastel was
carefully brushed to soften the appearance of the larger expanses of RLM66 paint.

coat as any accidental excess can be removed


with a cocktail stick if you are very quick.
At this point, I painted the detail on the side
consoles and internal fuselage wall, using a
combination of Vallejo and Gunze/Metallic paints.
Anyone who knows will most certainly know that
I love the Airscale series of cockpit decals. To this
end, I applied the numerous instruments to the
instrument panel (punching them out first), and
also sprinkled a number of placards and other
detail decals over the interior and instrument
panel. With all this complete, a final misting of
Klear was applied and when dry, Mig Productions
Dark Wash was added to the detail, as a pinwash.

SET THE CONTROLS..

Now to tackle that instrument panel rear area.


My first task here was to make a plasticard insert
which was the same shape as the recess to the

If you scrunch up the seat belt material, you can manipulate it easier
and make it look far more natural when you position the belts.

Using Vallejo paint, thinned with a little water, the interior of the cockpit is now brought vividly to life.
It pays to use a small brush and a lot of patience here.

With the MK108 cannon added to the forward bulkhead,


the instrument panel was also final positioned.

rear of the IP. After a coat of RLM66 and some


Klear to give it a glossy finish, the insert was
glued to the rear of the instrument panel. With
this cut out, it was then airbrushed with RLM66
and then sealed with Klear. Using the excellent
Airscale range of instrument decals, I carefully
applied each one to the plasticard, making sure
it lined up with the hole in the instrument panel.
Once I had painted the various gauge bezels
on the front, using Vallejo paints, I fitted the
instrument face I had just made. Short lengths
of ABS plastic rod from ET Modeller, were now
attached to the rear of the panel, to simulate
the backs of the instruments themselves. I drilled
a small hole into each one and then inserted
lengths of lead wire into them to represent the
cabling. With all this complete, this area was also
airbrushed in RLM66.
One area that needed attention was the
switch box on the port fuselage wall. Whilst the

Although you dont really


see much wiring when
the model is complete,
the engine bay wiring
was painted in Vallejo
Black, and Mr Metal
Color Brass was used for
the connectors.

production kit has detail moulded here, the test


shot does not. Using an RP Toolz Punch & Die set,
I made around 20 small styrene discs that I added
to the switch box. This would then be painted
black, and Airscale decals used to create the
stencil data above the switches.
Thankfully, HK Models dont mould seatbelts
to their kits. I think that approach generally looks
awful. They do supply a PE fret with the harness
straps, however, my test shot didnt have those
parts, so I opted to use the excellent HGW Late
Luftwaffe set. This laser-cut approach with PE
buckles is probably the most realistic way to
replicate this focal point of the cockpit. I also
decided not to use the standard beige set, but
the green Orlon belts that started to creep in at
the wars end. If nothing else, it offered a little
variety. Once assembled, these were installed with
CA and then given a gloss varnish coat before a

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26/09/2014 13:37

FEATURE ARTICLE: HK MODELS 1:32 DORNIER DO 335B-2 Kit No. 01E07

As this was a test shot, the side console wasnt yet moulded with switches. I added these using plasticard
and my trusty RP Toolz Punch & Die set.

Many bay areas on Luftwaffe machines were painted in RLM02. The Do 335 was no
exception. Here, the nose wheel bay gets to sample the solvent.

For the detail painter, this


model is a dream. It really pays to
take your time and detail every last
wire and pipe in this area. I mostly used
Vallejo paint, with a Tamiya homebrew
mix used for the compressed gas bottles.

A little last paintwork and assembly before

Numerous interior parts


were painted using the colour
modulation technique. Here you
see the parts during that process.

The completed nose wheel bay


shows an incredible depth of
detail. You really shouldnt have
to add anything else in this area.

.applying pastels to accentuate


the open and raised areas within
the nose bay.

wash was applied to them. Any excess was then


removed with a cotton bud.

PAINT BOX

The entire cockpit was then airbrushed with Gunze


acrylic H20 Flat Clear, thinned with Mr Levelling
Thinner. This imparts a very slight sheen to the
model, without a dull, monotone finish. When dry,
Vallejo Sky Grey was dry-brushed over the interior
before it was finally assembled. As I wasnt going
to display the fuselage fuel tanks, I left the one
that I had connected to the rear of the pilots seat
bulkhead, unpainted. This also applied to the main
fuel tank that would sit in that same chamber.
Theres no denying that this model is seriously
detailed. The great news is that you dont have to
wrestle with a ridiculous parts-count to achieve this
though. A good example of this is the nose wheel
bay. This is basically built as a box (four sides and
a floor) with just four compressed gas tanks that
fit onto the rearmost bulkhead. If you are a detail
freak, then your paintbrush will be very busy here!
I airbrushed the interior walls of the gear well in
Gunze H79 RLM02, and then added shade and

34

light with the colour-modulation technique. A final,


thin coat of RLM02 was misted over the parts in
order to blend the shades together, followed by a
protective coat of Klear. Using a combination of
Vallejo paints, thinned with water, and Mr Metal
Color 218 Aluminium.219 Brass, the interior
detail was brought to life. You will need a very
fine brush when working in this area. I made my
own mix of blue for the compressed gas tanks and
then airbrushed the aluminium straps onto them,
and the red identification band. It pays to take
your time in this area.
The first real indicator of just how big this model
will become is when you plug the rear engine/
fuel tank deck onto the part that forms the nose
wheel well. Theres no doubt that the Do 335 was
certainly a large aircraft. That deck also forms
the ceiling of what is a very reasonably detailed
bomb bay. Of course, the B-2 variant didnt
carry a bomb, so this bay was used to house an
auxiliary fuel tank, making up for the tank space
lost in the wings, so they could accommodate
the MK103 cannon. My first task was to paint
the engine bay and bomb bay parts (including

bulkheads) in RLM02 and colour modulate them


as I did with the nose wheel well. To do this, you
simply darken the base colour and shade the
edges and corners of the part, as well as around
raised detail. You follow this by lightening the
base colour and misting this over the open and
raised areas. Finally, a thin coat of RLM02 is
airbrushed over these to make it look more natural
to the eye.

OUTSIDE THE WALL

Some detail that represented pipework on the bomb


bay walls, was moulded flat, so I added lead wire
to these and made them look more 3D. Its possible
these will be changed in the final release. Using
masking tape, cleats were added to the pipework.
Apart from the main, moulded pipe that was painted in Vallejo Black, the new pipework was handbrushed with Vallejo Grey Green, with the cleats
painted in Mr Metal Color Aluminium.
I did find painting the very fine pipe on the
bay ceiling to be very difficult, so I cheated.
Here, I used lead wire, fixed with CA. Vallejo Sky
Grey was used to paint the plumbing which sits

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Test fitting the forward bulkhead and instrument panel


highlights more click-fit perfection.

Gun breeches are added to the upper weapons bay, with these
and the associated hardware being painted in Dark Iron, and
then buffed to a sheen.

The completed module. Here you see the cockpit now sat atop
the nose wheel bay.

My build of this
model is from a test
shot. That needs to
be remembered as
we progress through
this project.
RLM02 painting continues in the aircrafts bomb bay. Again,
colour modulation was used to highlight and contrast the
various moulded elements.

Bulkhead detail painting was done with Mr Metal Color Brass and Aluminum,
and a pin wash of Mig Dark Wash was then applied.

Lead wire was used to add the various lengths of plumbing in the
bomb bay. I followed the lines of the flat moulded detail. Cleats were
added using masking tape.

Vallejo and Aluminium paint was used to detail most of the additional
work, with Brass used for various connectors. When complete, pastels
were used to add light to the final matt finish parts.

Here you can see the assembled bomb bay, with this module now
connected to the forward cockpit/nose wheel section. I have also
added the wing spar part too.

under the fuel tank rack. HK also moulded some


superb hydraulic detail on the forward bomb bay
bulkhead, and this was painted in Aluminium.
Using Mr Metal Color Brass, the various connectors
on the pipework were now painted, and the whole
interior area was sealed with Klear. Following this,
I applied a pin wash to the various detail areas,
using Mig Dark Wash. I also did this in the forward
nose wheel well too, and left to thoroughly dry
before remove any excess with a cotton bud.
With the main paintwork complete, all interior
parts were airbrushed with Gunze H20 Flat
Clear. Before I assembled anything, I used Tamiya
Weathering Pastels and applied a little light sand
pigment to the open areas of both bomb and
nose wheel bays. Never use the wand applicator
in these sets. They are poor. Instead, use a nice
soft, flat brush and gently apply the pigment. I find
this really brings everything to life and adds real
visual interest.
Assembly time! Both the nose wheel bay and
bomb bay were now finally assembled using
Tamiya Extra Thin Cement, and the cockpit tub was
fitted to the upper side of the nose wheel bay. I also

connected the rear bomb bay floor to the forward


nose wheel module, using the rather nifty Lego
block style connection point. Onto that location
also now fits the stubby, but robust wing spar. My
test shot varies from the production kit, as I needed
to be careful which way round this was fitted due
to curvature of the fuselage. The final kit has two
different-sized plugs, so problem solved!
The main fuel tank comprises just two parts. I
assembled this simply to show the detail supplied in
this kit. As I was going to glue the spine, no paint
was used here. As I mentioned, the bomb bay of
this aircraft was taken over with a compensatory
fuel tank. This is again another two-piece assembly
and once I had glued it and removed the seams,
it was given a coat of Tamiya XF-85 Rubber Black,
which properly mimics the colour that this fuel
bladder would have been. Once dry, I masked
off the tank and airbrushed the straps in Mr Metal
Color Aluminium. A coat of Klear was used to seal
everything, prior to a pin wash of Mig Dark Wash.
H20 Flat Clear was finally airbrushed over the
tank, and the tank seated into the bomb bay.

INTERSTELLAR OVERDRIVE

The Do 335 layout was very unusual for a fighter


plane. Twin-engine aircraft, by their very nature,
are prone to parasitic drag due to the wing
mounted nacelle layout. Not the Do 335 though.
Both engines were arranged inline, in a pushpull format, and were beautifully enclosed in that
fuselage which ran from slender at the front, to
quite deep near the tail. Of course, HK Models
provide not one, but two fully detailed DaimlerBenz DB603 engines for this release, which may
be displayed through open cowls. I opted to open
one cowl on each side of my model, so I would
need to paint and detail both engines in full.
Unsurprisingly, there are two engine sprues in
this release, and a single accessory sprue that
contains pipework and engine bearers etc. Both
engines themselves are almost identical, apart
from the gear reduction housing at the front, and
some pipework. The forward engine has a thick
pin that protrudes from the reduction housing, and
plugs into the cowl radiator area. Pipework on
the underside also runs to this same place. Engine
construction was very straightforward, and most

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FEATURE ARTICLE: HK MODELS 1:32 DORNIER DO 335B-2 Kit No. 01E07

Here you can see the assembled bomb bay, with this module now
connected to the forward cockpit/nose wheel section. I have also
added the wing spar part too.

Here you can see the assembled bomb bay, with this module now connected to the
forward cockpit/nose wheel section. I have also added the wing spar part too.

Both fuel tanks are very simple to build,


but offer the modeller a lot of detail.

The finished result. Simple,


but effective.

Despite not building the model so you will


see the fuel tanks for the purpose of this
build, I have added them so you can see
how things will generally look in this area.

As my kit had no PE parts, I used a small piece of Eduards mesh on the face
of the rear engine intake area.

After painting the bomb bay fuel tank in Rubber Black, it was masked
and then the securing strips airbrushed with Mr Metal Color Aluminium.

The rear intake was then assembled and connected to


the rearmost fuselage bulkhead.

Not one, but TWO engines! The only real


difference between the base units is that the
forward one was filled with dust-shot lead, so as
to prevent this model being a tail-sitter.

36

Both engines are now basically complete. The only


difference that you can see is that the engine furthest
from camera has a protrusion on the gear-reduction
housing. This is to fit the nose cowl ring and radiator.

RLM02 was used to paint the whole assembly. As you really cant
see much in this area when complete, I didnt bother with any shading
or weathering.

Both engines are given a base coat of Tamiya Semi Gloss Black,
before being sealed with Klear to protect the paintwork.

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Oil tanks and engine bearers are now


fitted to the engines, as well as other
small sections of pipework.

The first engine to be installed to the Do 335 is the rear engine,


which is then also plumbed-in with additional lengths of pipe.

A view of the engine, alongside the rest of the interior of this


model. You get a lot of model and detail for your money.

Having fit the port side fuselage, I sealed the gap


around the protruding cannon, and then proceeded to
fill the forward chamber with lead-shot. You will get
two cast weights in the production kit. Epoxy was
used to seal the lead in, and also behind the
Blu-Tak, once it had been removed.

Both fuselage sides are now fitted.


Overall, this was a very easy task,
with no problems encountered. Just
glue section by section to ensure
everything lines up.

things snapped cleanly into place without any


glue, but of course, it was added! Being a test
shot, I never received the cast nose weights, as
they simply werent available. Instead I opted to
fill my forward engine with lead shot. This stuff,
better known as dust shot is very fine, and I
poured this into the top of the engine and then
sealed it in by adding the upper lid.
With the engines built, they were given a good,
dense coat of Tamiya X-18 Semi Gloss Black,
and then a protective coat of Klear. I find Tamiya
paints a little fragile without something to seal it,
and of course, I like to apply a gloss coat before
I paint details. Detail painting was done with Mr
Metal Color paints, and the engine bearers were
painted in RLM02, as was pretty much standard at
that time. With the engines themselves complete,
they were given a light coat of Klear, and a pin
wash of Mig Dark Wash. H20 Flat Clear was
then very finely misted over the engines before
they were dry-brushed with Vallejo Sky Grey. The
side oil tanks were then airbrushed in Aluminium,
sealed with Klear, placard decals applied, and
then finally a pin wash of Mig Dark Wash was
added. I had a little trouble mounting these to the
engines, as the connecting pins werent on this
test shot. The engine bearers were given a coat of
Klear also, before a wash was applied, and they
were fitted to the engines.
Whilst I couldnt yet fit the nose engine, I did
need to fit the rear one to the engine bay deck.
With the engine in situ, the various pieces of
plumbing were added, connecting the engine to
both the deck and the rear bulkhead. I airbrushed
the rear engine prop shaft transmission rod in
Alclad Magnesium, and shaded it with Alclad
Airframe Aluminium. This was also then sealed
with Klear before being given a dark pin wash.
The Do 335 has a rear under-fuselage intake,
rather like the P-51 Mustang, and now this was
also assembled. I opted to use some Eduard photo
etch mesh on one of the grilles. The kit, however,
will come with a PE part of its own. These were
painted in RLM02 and given no further treatment
as you can barely see anything in here when this
section is installed.
The time had come to seal the interior sections
in between those large fuselage halves. This went
without any trouble whatsoever. One side of the
interior module has locating pins that seat into the
fuselage. Once installed and lined up, the other
side just pops on with no problem. I still took my
time here, ensuring all glued joints were cured
before I progressed. You also need to install the
rear prop shaft at this point, as it runs through
several bulkheads and does actually protrude at
the rear. Before I could close the fuse, I wanted
to add a little more lead shot into the cavity in
front of the cockpit/behind the engine bulkhead.
Firstly, I sealed up the outside of the bulkhead
with Blu-Tack, around the protruding MK108 nose
cannon, and then I poured more lead shot into
here. Closing the fuselage was a breeze. This was
done in stages, using Tamiya Extra Thin Cement.
When fully cured, any seams were removed with
sanding sticks and sponges. I had to reinstate a
little scribed/rivet detail on the underside of the
intake scoop. With the nose of the model pointing
upwards, I removed the Blu-Tack seal from around
the cannon, and dribbled a little epoxy in there,
and left it to set.
The whole model was about to take on more
of its characteristic shape now as I attached the
single piece spine. Care was taken here, and
gluing done in stages. It actually fit superbly, with

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FEATURE ARTICLE: HK MODELS 1:32 DORNIER DO 335B-2 Kit No. 01E07

Before I could fit the forward engine, I needed to paint the


interior of the cowl, cowl flap area and also the radiator.

A simple click fit installed the owl ring to


the radiator. The forward engine was now
installed and left to thoroughly dry.

The main gear wheel bays dont require much construction, and here
you also see the wing-spar boxes in situ. These are a push-click fit.

The main gear wheel bays dont require much construction, and here
you also see the wing-spar boxes in situ. These are a push-click fit.

Wheel bays are colour modulated using RLM 02

.as are the interior of the various bay doors and undercarriage parts.

Things really start to take shape when the


upper spine and both rudders are installed.
Again, you can see how good the fit of this
model really is.

In order to maximise mould use, HL designed the leading edge of the


model, complete with cannon housings, as separate parts.

Mig Dark Wash was used here due to its depth of colour.

only a small gap in one area at the rear. I put this


down to not quite aligning things properly at the
tail section. With the spine now located, it was
time to give the Pfeil its nose. Before I decided to
fit this, the engine cowl ring parts had their interior
and radiator parts painted and then assembled
before progressing further. I decided to use the flap
set which was moulding in the open position. The
engine glued in perfectly. There are three central
locating points which are quote heavy duty, and the
more petite mounting points for the engine bearers.
With the weight here being at the forefront of my
mind, I decided to leave the nose to cure overnight.
This was my first visual on just how large this model
really was.
To say this model has been thoughtfully
designed, and with clever engineering, is
something of an understatement. The wings are
another perfect of example of this. To accommodate
the stubby fuselage wing spar, the first thing I need
to do here is to fit a locating box into the upper
panel of each wing. These fit with a squeak..

38

it really is that perfect, and the numerous stand


offs/pins place the box into the optimum position
without you needing to test fit to the fuselage. With
the wheel bays constructed, I spray these with
RLM02, and again modulate the colour here as
I did in the nose wheel and bomb bays. A little
detail in these areas needs a splash of Mr Metal
Color Aluminium, and after a coat of Klear, a dark
pin wash is added to all raised detail.
At this stage I also painted the various
undercarriage parts after partially assembling them.
For this I used RLM02, with Metal Color Aluminium
for the compression strut and hydraulic cylinder.
Again, a dark wash was used to highlight the detail
here. Once everything had been given a coat of
Flat Clear, Tamiya Weathering Pastels were again
used to accentuate the raised and open areas of
both the undercarriage and wheel bays. I also took
the opportunity to paint, modulate and apply pastel
to the remaining parts which required this, such as
the inside of the wheel bay doors and bomb bay
doors. Alclad Airframe Aluminium was used to

paint to the interior of the engine bay cowls. Some


careful shading was lightly applied using Tamiya
Smoke, with all paintwork being sealed with Klear.
HK Models has designed this kit so there are no
join lines to eradicate along the leading edge of
the wing. Yes, there is a faint mould seam line, but
the actual forward connecting point of the wing lies
to the rear of the underside first panel line. Genius!
Of course, there are no rear joints to remove
because thats where the landing flap and aileron
sit. What about the wing tip, I hear you ask.
No joins there either, as this part is entirely slide
moulded. This kit provides an extended wingtip for
the M13 version, but Im using the shorter, M14
type. I had to thin the protruding tab at the end of
the wing a little and then the tip fit perfectly all the
way around, with zero gap or putty needed.

THE GUNNERS DREAM

Now those wing leading edge inserts could


have caused all sorts of problems if they werent
properly designed, but they fit beautifully after

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Many things on this model are click fit, including


the superbly fitting stabilisers and elevators. The
tip part is attached once the elevator is in place.
A final pass with Tamiya Weathering Pastels, and the gear bays now come
to life.
Clever use of slide mould technology means that there wont
be any pesky seams to remove. Just add the leading edge
strip, and youre ready to go!

Despite the muzzle being moulded open,


the other holes on this part needed opening
out. I used a 1mm drill bit.

I wanted to give the interior of the engine bay doors a


slightly different look, so for this I used a combination of
Alclad Airframe Aluminium and Jet Exhaust.

about 30 seconds of fettling with a sanding stick.


Being a test shot, there was a small amount of
plastic I needed to remove from a corner. This
was just a result of the tool not being absolute.
Once done, the inserts fit exactly, with all joints
being hidden as panel lines. Did I say how much I
love this kit? Those inserts are also slide moulded,
to incorporate those massive pods to house the
MK103 cannon. Before I added those, I installed
the cannon within them. You dont see these at all
when assembled, so I opted to paint the cannon
barrels after the main painting stage.
As the painting stage approached, I added
various small parts such as the underside intake
scoop, upper forward engine cowl and starboard
cowl, and also the port side rear engine cowl.
Both upper and lower rudders and elevators were
now assembled. In the spirit of the slide-moulding
fest that this model is, the elevators were
moulded as single piece, hollow parts, as were
the ailerons and landing flaps. These are then
capped with a forward, curved strip. Again, no

glue seams to remove. Remarkable. These new


assemblies were now fitted to the model. Youll
notice I havent actually glued on the wings. Nor
will I. These plug with 100% positivity to the
fuselage. There are no gaps to fill and the fit is
totally secure. I opted to apply the pre-shading
to the model without these attached, as it surely
makes things easier to handle.
With all the smaller parts fitted to the model,
the canopy was attached and masked off, and all
orifices filled with a combination of masking tape,
and soft grey foam from Eduards resin releases.
As I was to use the revised canopy with integral
blisters, the redundant test part was tacked into
place with Micro Crystal Clear. This would simply
protect the interior during the painting phase. No
primer here at all. Instead I spray Tamiya XF-1 Flat
Black over all panel lines and key structural joints.
Before I forget, now is the time to spray RLM66
over the canopy areas, so the interior frame colour
will match the cockpit.

Having no instructions meant that sorting the


exhausts into their respective place took some
hours. Here they are ready to receive their
base coat.

GREEN IS THE COLOUR

As I had no instructions or scheme sheet, the


camouflage pattern was referenced online, and I
based my own layout on the excellent 1:48 model
built by Chris Wauchop about 10 years ago. This
is to be seen on Hyperscale. There is also some
debate as to exactly what colours were used on the
Do 335 camouflage, be it RLM70/71, or perhaps
RLM81/82, RLM81/83, or even RLM82/83.
The first set of colours can be totally discredited,
and information that had been researched by a
Dornier employee seems to categorically show that
that the colours were RLM81 and RLM82, with an
underside of RLM76. The Gunze shades do seem
to pretty much confirm this when you look at the
restored example at the NASM.
My first job is to apply Gunze H417 RLM76
to the underside areas. I thin this 50:50 with Mr
Levelling Thinner and ensure I apply this evenly.
Towards the end of spraying, I thin this further and
concentrate on making sure that the pre-shade
starts to look more organic, and less prescribed.

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FEATURE ARTICLE: HK MODELS 1:32 DORNIER DO 335B-2 Kit No. 01E07

It must blend subtly into the surrounding paint,


and at the same time, not look even. Its all a
matter of practice, but I find that scribbling the
last application in a random manner does give a
very reasonable result.
I used a combination of masking tape and
thinly rolled Blu-Tack to mask off the lower
surfaces of the model. Using a medium pencil,
I gently marked the rough positions of the
camouflage demarcation, and then proceeded to
apply the lighter colour first. In this case, it was
Gunze H422 RLM82. This was applied again
so that just the correct level of pre-shade was still
visible, adjusting the finish with misted coats at
the end of this stage. Once dry, masking tape
was used to mask off the hard-edged scheme,
with Blu-Tack used for upper and lower surface
demarcation. Gunze H421 RLM81 was then used
to complete the basic scheme. During the main
painting phase, I took pains to ensure that all
separate engine panels, bay doors etc. were all
completed in the correct scheme colours. I hate
finishing a scheme, only to find I need to fire
the airbrush up again and spray more scheme
colours that I missed. It was here that I also
airbrushed the starboard side front engine panel
in Alclad Airframe Aluminium. This was done to
replicate some of the field-repairs you see in some
late war Luftwaffe photos. Whilst not absolutely
authentic to the machine I was later to model, I
allowed myself this little bit of artistic licence. A
mask made from a punched post-it note was used
to protect the cannon fairings whilst I airbrushed
the protruding barrels in Gunze 214 Dark Iron.
When dry, this was buffed to a metallic sheen. As
an aside note here, before I added the muzzles
to the barrels, I opened up the various holes in
the side of them with a 1mm micro drill bit. This
adds quite a lot to the overall appearance.
Whilst waiting for paint to dry, I assembled the
prop/spinner sections. Normally, you would need
to remember that you have a pusher prop here,
and not to mix them up, but HK have designed
this so you really cant mix and match the prop/
spinner parts. Once assembled, Gunze H65
RLM70 Black Green was used airbrush everything
on show. Now, Klear was used to spray the entire
airframe and the other smaller, schemed parts.

SHEEP

I was planning to use masks on this model, and


perhaps go with something a little unusual, but
as the Klear was literally drying, the postman
delivered a production standard Do 335 directly
from HKM. Inside was not one, but TWO decal
sheets! That was fortuitous. HK are now using
Cartograf to produce their decals, and as a
result, these are far nicer than sets weve seen
in previous releases. A full set of stencils is also
provided. It was now I more of less decided to
follow the flock and apply a very well-trodden
scheme instead. To apply the decals, I used
Mr Mark Setter. Rivet detail and some panel
lines are very refined, so I had to ensure the
decals properly conformed. I neednt have had
any worries in that respect, as they behaved
beautifully. Whilst HKM provided the underside
decals in parts so as to make the codes easier
around the wheel bays, the same cant be
said for the rear fuselage codes and crosses.
These had to be carefully measured against the
separate engine panels and fuselage, and cut
accordingly. It was time-consuming and a little
frustrating, but it worked.
The decals were left overnight to properly

40

Wing assembly is
straightforward.
These are seriously
solid when built.

The landing flaps are set to be slightly dropped. Here you can
see the main gear bays, sans undercarriage.

The Do 335s cruciform tail is clearly seen here. Fit is excellent.


The small sliver of plasticard is stopping the elevator drooping
while I ensured the tail angles were correct.

Almost forgot! After masking the surrounding area, the wing


leading edge light was airbrushed in Airframe Aluminium.

After a coat of Airframe Aluminium, a lightly misted coat of


Tamiya Hull Red is applied.

As I was going to use the production kit main hood, only the forward
windscreen was permanently secured, then masked before spraying. The
test shot hood was then temporarily tacked into place with Crystal Clear.

A combination of soft grey foam and masking tape was used to protect
the pre-painted areas from the next stages.

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Tamiya XF-1 Flat Black was now


airbrushed around the various panel
lines, corners, and main raised detail.

MODELSPEC
HK Models 1:32 Dornier Do 335B-2. Kit No. 01E07 (test shot)
Accessories Used:
Airscale Placard decals
Airscale Luftwaffe Instrument decals
HGW Late War Luftwaffe Seatbelt (Green)
Tools & Modelling Products Used:

RLM76 is the first colour to be applied. The first coats are light, and
thinned 50:50. Later coats are much thinner and allow for control of
the final visual effect.

I used a pencil to lightly mark the camouflage areas, then free-handed


RLM82 into the appropriate place. Care is again taken to leave the
correct amount of pre-shade still showing.

Swann Morton Scalpel with blades 11 & 15


Iwata HP-C Plus Airbrush
RB Productions Razor Saw
RB Productions Rivet-R
Tesa Masking Tape
Micro Drill Set
Lindstrom Electronics Side Cutters
Six Inch Steel Rule
Wilder modelling Tweezers
Tamiya Extra Thin Cement
Scotch CA
Mr Mark Setter
Micro Kristal Klear
Lead wire, various thicknesses
Evergreen plasticard
Albion Alloys stick sanders
MDC sponge sanders
Paints & Finishing Products Used:

This particular Luftwaffe camouflage is hard-edged, so for this,


masking tape was applied directly to the models surface.

I wanted to add a little something unusual to an otherwise austere


scheme. Alclad Airframe Aluminium was airbrushed onto one of the
engine cowls, to represent a later, replaced part.

Mr Metal Color 218 Aluminium, 219 Brass, 214 Dark Iron


Gunze H12 Flat Black, H343 Soot, H11 Flat White H20 Flat Clear,
H417 RLM76, H421 RLM81, H422 RLM82, H65 RLM70
Tamiya XF-1 Flat Black, XF-52 Flat Earth, XF-85 Rubber Black, X-19
Smoke, XF-8 Hull Red
Mr Levelling Thinner
Alclad Airframe Aluminium, Magnesium
Vallejo Black, Yellow, Red, Brown, Sky Grey
Mig Dark Wash
Johnsons Klear
Tamiya Weathering Pastels
Prismacolour silver pencil
Uschi van der Roste Dark Iron pigment
AK-Interactive Dark Brown Wash (AK045)
Mig Productions Dark Wash
References Used:
Camouflage of the Do 335: A Critical Re-evaluation, by Michael
Ullmann (Hyperscale)
Dornier 335, 435, 635 by Manfred Griehl
Dornier Do 335 Pfeil, Schiffer Military History, by Heinz J. Nowarra
(ed. note and inspiration from Pink Floyd!)
Superb detail; excellent surface textures; good fit.
Nothing worth mentioning!

RATING: 9.5 out of 10

Thanks to HK Models for the test shot sample


The only tricky area to decal was the rear engine cover. A sharp scalpel was needed
to carefully dissect the decals, and of course, precise measurement was required.

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FEATURE ARTICLE: HK MODELS 1:32 DORNIER DO 335B-2 Kit No. 01E07

A Post-It note was used to mask the cannon pod, allowing for safe
airbrushing of the barrel with Dark Iron. This was then buffed to a
metallic shine.

conform, and the next day, I sealed them with


Klear before later applying a panel line wash
of AK-Interactives Dark Brown Wash for Green
Vehicles (AK045). This colour was less stark than
the Mig Dark Brown wash that I normally use.
I still wanted to retain the austere aspect of the
scheme carried by this bird, and not break it
up with anything too harsh. The AK wash was
perfect, and was applied on both upper and
lower sides. I also gave a semi-liberal coat to
the centre of panels and not just panel lines.
When dry, the excess was removed with cotton
buds, and the wash on the panel areas acted as
a sort of filter, creating a much more pleasing
appearance to the two colours used. The wash
also randomly stained the rivets too, creating
another subtle change in the overall appearance.
I added a little weathering to the underside of
the model and the various doors, using heavily
thinned Tamiya XF-52 Flat Earth. I used a fairly
low pressure here too, allowing for more overall
control. On the upper surfaces, I used a fairly
well diluted Tamiya X-19 Smoke, accentuating
key panels slightly, and adding some shadows.
One weak part of the kit are the moulded,
solid barrels for the forward cowl guns. These
were replaced with Albion Alloys aluminium
tubing, and then slid through the cowl and into

42

As well as adding wash to the panel lines, it was also applied randomly
to the panel areas too. The aim here is to partially stain the remainder of
detail, and create a filtered effect on the scheme. Excess was removed with
a cotton bud.

the weapons chamber.


Theres no need to worry about the strength
of the undercarriage, even on this heavy model.
These were now located into their very tight
sockets and a drip of Tamiya cement allowed to
wick around the connection. All undercarriage
doors were now fitted. For the wheels, I used
Tamiya XF-85 Rubber Black. Using a compass
cutter to make my own masks, I masked off the
wheel, leaving only the hubs exposed. Instead
of airbrushing a different colour, I opted to use
the paint as a base for applying some Uschi van
der Rosten Dark Iron metallic pigment. This gave
an excellent appearance, and applying it with
a cotton bud created areas of shine and shade.
With a little Vallejo red paint, I brushed the tyremovement marks on the junction between tyre
and hub. The wheels were then attached to the
undercarriage.
My favourite overall varnish if Gunze H20 Flat
Clear. Thinned with Levelling Thinner, it gives
an excellent finish to the whole model, with a
very slight sheen being imparted. Its now that
the panel shading etc. can properly be seen. If
youve never tried a Prismacolor silver pencil for
your chipping effects, you really should. They
are excellent. I use the pencil to create a little
weathering in key areas, such as pilot walkway,

To create subtle chipping effects that you can gradually build


up, a silver Prismacolor pencil is a perfect solution.

access plates, fasteners, and a little around the


corners of some removable sections such as
engine panels etc. I also create a faint, random
fleck over the airframe, which resembles small
scratches.

THE LAST FEW BRICKS

Before final assembly of the model, I need to


add the exhaust staining. For this, I use a base
of Tamiya XF-52 Flat Earth, heavily thinned, and
then I continue with Gunze H343 Soot. I extend
this to the edges of the brown area, without totally
eliminating it. There arent too many examples of
how Do 335 exhaust stains actually looked, so I
went mostly with my own imagination.
Final assembly is simply plugging the wings to
the fuselage and adding the engine panels in their
open position. These are held up with metal poles,
which I painted in Gunze 218 Aluminium. The
pitot and radio loop were airbrushed in RLM81.
For the loop itself, I used copper wire, fastened to
the base of the kit part. The part itself was shortshot and required this simple fix.
My sincere thanks to HK Models for the test
shot, and also to Arrow Wolf Models for the
seatbelts. Thanks also to Uschi van der Rosten for
sending the metal pigments out for evaluation.

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Uschi van der Rosten Dark pigment was


applied over the Rubber Black paint that I
applied to the tyre hub areas. This gives a
nice, subtle shine to the hubs.

I wanted more realism for the 335s upper


gun deck barrels. I replaced the kit parts
with aluminium tubing from Albion Alloys.

The Dornier Do 335 was also a robust and


highly manoeuvrable machine, and one that
could still cope with a rear engine failure.

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FEATURE ARTICLE: KITTY HAWK 1:48 MIG-25PD FOXBAT. Kit No. 80119

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SPEED
DEMON
Kamil Feliks Sztarbala wrestles with the new
Kitty Hawk 1:48 scale MiG-25PD Foxbat.

ithout doubt, the MiG-25 deserves to be


hailed as one of the symbols of the Cold
War. Therefore, its hard to understand
why the simplified Foxbat kit from Revell
was the only game in town in 1:48 scale, for
almost 40 years. However, this had changed in the
autumn of 2013, when Kitty Hawk released the long
awaited model of this famous Soviet interceptor. Did
the Chinese designers rise to the challenge?

FIRST LOOK

The large box is tightly packed with grey plastic


sprues. Interestingly, even though the size of rear
fuselage halves may be a hint, you will certainly be
surprised how huge the finished kit actually is.
On the face of it, the kit looked like it should have
been a pleasure to build. Unfortunately, it wasnt.

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FEATURE ARTICLE: KITTY HAWK 1:48 MIG-25PD FOXBAT. Kit No. 80119

At first sight, the parts look promising. The surface detail is crisp and rich. The exhaust nozzles also make a
good first impression.

The photo-etched fret basically includes all of what you would expect from a Zoom sheet of the type
which Eduard would release. Worth noting is that since the main landing gear legs are rather fragile,
considering the weight of the completed kit, the manufacturer provides us with two steel rods which
will reinforce the entire sub-assembly. The latter are correctly bent, and supplied in two different
colours, so as to prevent any mistakes during construction. Another welcome addition is a large ball
bearing intended for weighting down the kit nose. If we forget about this, our Foxbat will certainly
end up being a tail-sitter.

ASSEMBLY

Construction began with the cockpit. I decided to improve it with


Quickboosts resin ejection seat and a pilot figure. Although the latter
was said to be designed for the Kitty Hawk kit, it required quite a lot
of adjustment to make it fit correctly.

I then focused on the rear part of the fuselage. A number of clamps


had to be used to fit the main landing gear bays properly.

The assembled cockpit was mounted within


the fuselage unit, together with the nose
wheel bay. These went together without
any problems.

The section which attaches to the front of the cockpit tub, is the
one which needs to carry the ballast. As I was worried that the
ball bearing would eventually fall out if I simply glued it with C.A.
adhesive, I fixed it within a rack, made from a piece of kit sprue and
lengths of vinyl masking tape.

To attach the air brake in the closed position, I had to


fill the resulting gaps with thin strips, cut from 0.25 mm
styrene sheet.
I also drilled the mounting hole for starboard horizontal stabilizer, as
this had been blocked up in my kit. Im not sure whether this defect
was accidentally created during the moulding of my specific kit, or
whether it is a common issue of all Foxbat kits from Kitty Hawk;
possibly caused by bad design of the mould.
To put the fuselage halves together, I firstly had to deal with the engines.
Sadly, theyre a rather weak point of this model. Although they look very
nice at first glance, they arent free of errors, the biggest being that the
exhaust nozzles are not suitable for the MiG-25 variants depicted by this
kit. Regardless of whether we want to correct all of the designers mistakes
or not, first we have to fit the exhaust tubes to the fuselage. This required
removing small wedges of plastic from their ends.

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The exhaust tubes were also way too long, so I


reduced their size by nearly half.

This forced me to slightly modify the afterburner rings


and engine turbine blades, adjusting them to the
reworked exhaust tubes and fuselage interior.

The engine turbine blades and inner surfaces of the exhaust tube were
sprayed with Mr.Metal Color MC214 Dark Iron

Next, I airbrushed a mist of Mr.Color C321


Light Brown over the interior of the exhaust
tubes, in order to reproduce their distinctive
discolouration.

whilst the afterburner rings were


given a layer of Mr.Color C66 Bright
Green, mixed with a little MC214
Dark Iron.

To emphasize the construction and shape of the inner sides


of the exhaust tubes, I applied AK-Interactive AK045
Dark Brown Wash, and later dry brushed the edges with
Vallejo 70.883 Silvergrey.

The nozzles also required some surgery.


I began by cutting off parts of the inner
nozzle petals.

Afterwards, each one was trimmed and glued together. The


wedge which I had made from a piece of styrene sheet, visible on
the photo, turned out to be redundant. I later removed it.

Since the enamel wash would damage the surface which was painted
with metalizer, the engine turbine blades were washed with waterbased
Lifecolor Tensocrom TSC208 Smoke.
I then reduced their length,
using a rotary tool.

The outer nozzle petals had to be


assembled prior to any adjustment being
made, as this area had been divided into a
number of parts by the kits designers.

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FEATURE ARTICLE: KITTY HAWK 1:48 MIG-25PD FOXBAT. Kit No. 80119

To ensure that the nozzle petals would fit the exhaust


tubes correctly, I slightly modified their connecting point.

Once Id attached the rings which I made from 1 mm tin wire, to the
ends of exhaust tubes, the nozzles were ready for further assembly.

Despite this, I had to use clamps, physical force and a lot C.A. adhesive to
complete the rear fuselage. The C.A. glue was also employed as putty.

The modification of the nozzles made it necessary to correct


the shape of the fairing for the parachute housing. I used
Magic Sculp two-part epoxy putty for this purpose.

The biggest number of errors in this kit centred around the


air intakes. According to Kitty Hawk, the variable intake
ramp should work as a protective intake cover, as with
the MiG-29 and a few other Soviet aircraft. This is not
actually true. The kit designers forgot about reproducing
the intake trunking too. My first step on the road to
dealing with these issues was to correct the profile of the
front parts of the intakes. For this, I used accurately cut
pieces of 0.5 mm styrene sheet.

but it turned out that it was more convenient to


attach them to the rear fuselage. The entire process
required using only a little filler, and a few minor
adjustments with a file.

Next, I put the intakes together,


and dry-fitted them to the forward
fuselage. The instructions suggested
to glue the intakes to the latter
The resulting large gaps between the
forward fuselage unit and the intakes
were easy to deal with. I only had to
glue a few styrene strips to each side
of the forward fuselage, and sand
them to the proper thickness.

48

The large rear fuselage halves had rather thin walls, and were
slightly warped. Therefore, I glued a few strips of styrene sheet
into the lower half, which would make alignment and connection of
both of sides easier.

The small gap on the spine was also


filled with a thin piece of styrene sheet.

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Next, I glued them in accordance with the reference photos, ignoring the incorrect
assembly guide

and produced the final shape of the front parts of the


inner intake roofs, using pieces of 0.25 mm styrene sheet.

As I had changed the width of the intakes, I had


to adapt the intake ramp parts accordingly.

The wing assembly also didnt go


very smoothly, due to rather strange
breakdown of parts. Whats even
worse, the separate wingtips were of
a different thickness to the main wing
section. Firstly, I glued them together
and filled all the gaps with plenty of
C.A. adhesive.

To hide the lack of intake trunking, I had to scratch build the FOD covers. These were
built from pieces of 1 mm styrene sheet, lengths of profile strip, and brass wire.

The surface around the joint area was


thinned with coarse sandpaper and
smoothed with polishing sponges. During
this process I progressively switched to
higher grade grits, beginning with 80
and finishing with 220.

The rivet lines were


rescribed with the Rivet-R
tool from RB Productions.

Afterwards, I had to recreate


the surface detail. To smooth the
edges of rescribed panel lines and
dissolve the remaining plastic dust,
I painted them with a little Tamiya
Extra Thin glue.

I also improved the


simplified aileron
actuators

On the face of it, the kit


looked like it should have
been a pleasure to build.
Unfortunately, it wasnt.
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FEATURE ARTICLE: KITTY HAWK 1:48 MIG-25PD FOXBAT. Kit No. 80119

and removed the redundant bulges from the both sides of the starboard fin bases.
shortened the fences which were slightly too long

Construction of the fins was almost trouble-free, although the


rather average part fit resulted in wide gaps Unfortunately,
once Id attached the fins and fin root fillets, wide gaps still
existed at both joints.

I decided to fill the gaps with Magic Sculp. I formed a few rolls of the
putty, and embedded them into the gaps, using a metal spatula.

Before it cured, Id removed the redundant putty with a cotton bud,


dampened with water.

The huge main wheels are another distinctive feature


of the MiG-25. As you may expect, the Kitty Hawk
designers designed these badly too, providing us with
tires with voids on the sides, instead of recreating the
characteristic raised radial ribs on the sidewalls. To
correct this, I glued lengths of 0.2 mm tin wire into
the voids.

The wiring and hydraulic lines on the landing gear legs were
reproduced with lengths of tin wire of various thicknesses.

Meanwhile, I also completed


the external stores and other
sub-assemblies. The kit was
ready to receive some paint.

Since the pitot tube


supplied with the kit
was too thick, and
suitable only for the
early MiG-25P, I scratch
built its replacement
from Griffon Models
brass tubing.

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PAINTING

Firstly, I had to deal with the cockpit. I began by spraying an even layer
of Mr.Color C72 Intermediate Blue. Next, I airbrushed a mist of heavily
diluted Mr.Hobby H41 Pale Green in such way that the previously applied
blue colour still showed through it, especially in the recesses and corners.
The details were brought out by applying a wash of AK-Interactive
AK071 Blue Filter for Panzer Grey. To finish the instrument dials, I
applied dense Van Dykes Brown oil paint over the relevant panels, and
removed the excess with a paper towel.

I then mounted the ejection seat with pilot and other remaining
details, which had been separately painted.

Once Id masked off the clear parts, I primed the kit


with Mr.Color C8 Silver. My ainting style requires quite
complex pre-shading and pre-lighting. Panel lines and
chosen detail demarcation were darkened with heavily
diluted Tamiya XF-63 German Grey, whilst white paint
was mostly airbushed along the rivet lines.

Of course, I didnt forget to paint the inner side frames of the


canopy, which would be clearly visible after closing the cockpit.

Some chosen areas received a transparent layer of Zinc Chromate Yellow


from Mr.Color range. This worked as the base for the discolouration that
I will recreate during the next stages.

The afterburner area, and a large adjacent


area on the underside of the rear fuselage,
should wear a natural metal finish. I advise
you to check some reference photos before
painting this, because the scheme included in
the kit is wrong in this respect. To alter these
surfaces, I applied a filter made from heavily
diluted Mr.Color C8 Silver. The final touch was
to apply Chrome Polishing Powder from Uschi
van der Rosten.

Next, I masked off the NMF surfaces, and finished the pre-shading stage
by emphasizing some chosen areas with Mr.Hobby H94 Clear Green and
Tamiya X-23 Clear Blue, both heavily diluted. I also added some streaks
which were mostly applied in accordance with the direction of the airflow.
The discolouration effect of the base camouflage colour was achieved by
airbrushing transparent layers of Mr.Color C334 Barley Grey and C69 Off
White. I sprayed irregular, meandering lines and small patches of both paints,
subsequently switching from one to another.

I then painted the landing gear bays, stripes on the fin edges and anti-glare
panel, using Tamiya tape for masking the adjacent areas. Worth noting is
that both the fin stripes and anti-glare panel should be given a dark gray
colour, although the instructions suggest painting them green. The landing
gear bays were gray on the real aircraft.

The decals required a lot of Microscale setting solution, and a few hours
to conform to the recesses of the model surface.

To accentuate the details and darken the panel lines of the camouflaged
areas, I applied a wash of AK071 Blue Filter for Panzer Grey

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FEATURE ARTICLE: KITTY HAWK 1:48 MIG-25PD FOXBAT. Kit No. 80119

whilst the NMF surfaces were washed with Van Dyke Brown oil paint.

Afterwards, I focused on the exhaust nozzles. My first step was to prime them
black. Next, I airbrushed a mist of heavily diluted green paint over the inner nozzle
petals. The outer petals were rubbed with Steel Polishing Powder from Uschi van
der Rosten. This allowed me to attach them to the exhaust tubes.

The FOD covers were painted red, given a wash, and mounted within the air intakes.

The tyres were painted with Lifecolor UA733 Tire Black.

I then reproduced some subtle scratches and damage of the paint


layer on the edges of chosen panels and hatches with a fine brush.

ADDITIONAL WEATHERING AND FINISHING TOUCHES


Far Left: The overall dirt applied to the whole airframe
was recreated by airbrushing mists of heavily diluted
AK082 Engine Grime and AK074 Rainmarks
for NATO Tanks enamels. The excess enamel was
removed, or distributed by rolling a cotton bud, slightly
dampened with white spirit, over the surface. To add
more volume to the effect, I sprayed another mist
of AK082 Engine Grime over chosen areas. Next, I
reproduced the vertical streaks on the fuselage sides,
using AK093 Interior Wash and a long bristle brush.
Left: The rich staining on the underside of the rear
fuselage was developed quite spontaneously. I
progressively applied AK084 Engine Oil, AK045 Dark
Brown Wash and AK2039 Kerosene Leaks over
surfaces that were dry, or previously dampened with
white spirit, and then formed the shape of the stains
with a brush. Once the enamels had dried, I removed
their excess from some chosen areas with a cotton bud,
dampened with white spirit.

Far Left: Additional stains and streaks were painted


with a very fine brush with long bristles. For this
purpose, I mixed AK025 Fuel Stains with AK075
Wash for NATO vehicles and AK045 Dark Brown
Wash in different ratios.
Left: Tamiya Weathering Sticks, mixed with a little
water, were used to recreate the mud on the wheels.
By blowing the mixture off a brush, I added some dirt
to the fuselage areas near the landing gear.

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I then discoloured the exhaust nozzles using blue and gold pastels from
Tamiyas Weathering Master sets. Afterwards, I airbrushed a little AK075
Wash for NATO vehicles inside the nozzles.

The underbelly fuel tank was misted with heavily diluted AK017 Earth
Effects and AK082 Engine Grime.

Once they had dried, I created numerous streaks with a long bristled brush,
dampened with AK2039 Kerosene Leaks.

The completed model. The weathered


and heat-effected bare metal tail end
really adds interest.

Lower surfaces showing off all that ordnance!

Kitty Hawks Foxbat is not


without its challenges, but all
that extra work is worthwhile.

A view from the top.

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TECH GUIDE: Eduard 1:48 Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-6 Kit No. 8268

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step-by-step guide

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STEP 1 INSPIRATION

Every project has to start with inspiration.

Several decades ago, I obtained a War Eagle decal sheet with eight marking options for
Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-14s. This was my source of inspiration for the paint job.

Anders takes up the story of how he constructed this attractive profile based on a partial photograph
showing the fuselage from the canopy forward:

There has been much research since the decal sheet was released in 1990, and the presentation
is not up to the standard that we would expect today. Even so, some of the subjects were very
interesting to me, in particular the aircraft Black 253. I was intrigued by the unusual three-digit
number in combination with JG 53s Pik-As badge; and by the instructions suggestion that this aircraft
was finished in RLM 81 Brown Violet and RLM 83 Dark Green. I happened to be chatting to artist Anders
Hjortsberg, about this aircraft and I agreed with his conclusion that it was really most likely painted in
the standard mid-war colours of RLM 74 Grey Green and RLM 75 Grey Violet on the upper surfaces.

The photo of Black 253 shows a JG 53 Ace of Spades emblem on the nose but the JG 53 never used
that kind of three digit numerals, which is typical of a training unit. That leaves two options - either an
aircraft delivered to a training unit had received a replacement engine cowling from a JG 53 aircraft or
a JG 53 aircraft was passed on to training unit. The profile was created with the latter assumption in
mind, retaining the black fuselage band of JG53 and a presumably a painted out tactical number. The
camouflage and detail of the rest of the aircraft is based on a late Erla built Bf 109 G-14.
I was happy to draw further inspiration from Anders very attractive profile, so I was ready to go.
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TECH GUIDE: Eduard 1:48 Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-6 Kit No. 8268

STEP 2 PREPARATION
After the model is built, it is
well worthwhile to spend a few
minutes checking for any gaps,
seam lines, sink marks or other
imperfections. I have filled a
slight step at the bottom of the
fuselage where it meets the
wing with Milliput White TwoPart Epoxy Putty.

You can see a few smears of


putty at the wing root and
where I gouged out some plastic
on the spine. The cockpit was
masked with Tamiya tape before
painting got underway.

STEP 3 BASE COLOURS


A. All paints were applied
with my Testors Aztek
A470 airbrsh. Normally, I
would start with a primer
coat, but this time I was
using Mr Hobby lacquer
paints, so I thought that
this durable coat could
double as the base. The
entire model was sprayed
with Mr Hobbys Mr Color
117 RLM 76 Light Blue,
thinned with around 70%
Mr Colour Leveling Thinner
400. This thin mixture
sprayed beautifully smooth
and dried very quickly to
a tough finish. The bottom
of the tail planes and the
fin/rudder were masked
with Tamiya tape before
the upper surface coat of
Mr Color 37 RLM 75 Grey
Violet.

C. The Mr Color RLM 75 was


mixed with RLM 76 Light Blue to
obtain a paler shade, which was
used for disruptive weathering
mottles and patches.
B. The first coat of the RLM
75 upper surface colour.
Demarcation lines have
been sprayed freehand.

D. The same process was used when


applying the darker upper surface
colour Mr Colour 36, RLM 74 Grey
Green. Once again the demarcation
was sprayed without masks, and
a paler version of the colour was
sprayed over the neat shade in this
case a mix or RLM 75 Grey Violet
and RLM 74 Grey Green. The fuselage
sides have also received a fresh coat
of RLM 76 Light Blue, with some
unfortunate overspray!

STEP 4 MOTTLING
A. The pale RLM 75 mix was used
to add the first layer of mottling
and streaks to the fuselage sides
and vertical tail planes. The key to a
convincing mottle is layers. Never be
afraid to spray, overspray and respray!

C. RLM 76 Light Blue was now sprayed over the initial mottle,
especially around the middle strip of the rear fuselage. Once
again, the RLM 76 has left a very fine mist of overspray on
the darker colours of the fuselage spine.

56

B. Next, a mottle of the


mid-mix of RLM 74 and
75 was sprayed over
the top of the first layer.
It does not look too
convincing yet.

D. A fresh batch of pale RLM 74


and 75 were sprayed along the
demarcation lines to eliminate the
light blue overspray.

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STEP 5 SPECIAL MARKINGS

A. The overpainted fuselage number was represented by a patch of RLM


74 Grey Green. The fuselage band was marked out with a thin strip of
Tamiya tape on each side.

B. The thin boundary was supplemented with broader strips of paint


to protect the surrounding camouflage from the black coat to come.
Note that the mottle on the fin and rudder has been oversprayed and
refined here too.

C. Black is black? Well, not always. Pure black would be very stark in
this scale, so Tamiya XF-1 Flat Black was mixed with Dark Grey to take
the edge off.

D. With the masking tape removed, the overall scheme


starts to reveal itself. Now we are ready for decals.

STEP 6 DECALS

The old War Eagle decals performed perfectly over three thin
coats of glossy Future floor polish. National markings and
stencils are from the Eduard kit. They were totally trouble free
in application and responded well to Solvaset decal setting
solution, but both the upper wing crosses and the fuselage
crosses are slightly oversized.

An EagleCal decal was used for the spinner spiral. I used LOTS
of setting solution to get this to settle down. I find this one of
the scariest jobs in modelling, but if you hold your nerve you
should come up with a good result.

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TECH GUIDE: Eduard 1:48 Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-6 Kit No. 8268

STEP 7 - FINISHING TOUCHES

Eduards wheels are


thoughtfully split into
inner and outer hubs with
separate plastic tyres. This
makes painting much easier.

The canopy and aerial mast were drilled and pinned with copper wire
to reinforce this potentially fragile join. The canopy has been masked
with the sheet included in the Eduard Royal Class Bf 109 G release.

The model received an overall flat coat but some


silvering remained between the arms of the wing and
fuselage crosses. This was probably as a result of my
own haste rather than any fault of the decals.

The canopy parts were masked from the inside too (to avoid
overspray) before receiving a coat of Tamiya XF-63 German
Grey, representing the RLM 66 Black Grey canopy framing.

The fit of the wheel parts is perfect,


and the gear legs fit well too.

After a few unsuccessful attempts at slicing and adding spots of decal


solvent, I eventually bit the bullet and resprayed the offending areas.

At this stage I also added a thin panel


line wash, and sprayed a very thin mix
of Tamiya XF-1 Flat Black and XF-64 Red
Brown on the main surface features as
well as in horizontal streaks.

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STEP 8 COMPLETE!

Detail parts and sub-assemblies


such as the canopy, the propeller
and the landing gear were
added to complete the model.

Much of the mottling is hidden by the markings, but we


all know the work that has gone into the paint job!

EDUARDS GUSTAV - ONE VIEWPOINT

Regardless of the detail and dimensional concerns


mentioned earlier, I think that Eduards 1:48 scale
Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-6 is still a very nice kit.
It simply blows the opposition away in terms
of surface textures, level of detail and included
options. The Cartograf decals are also a cut above
the rest of the pack. Engineering is sensible, and
I can confirm that the model is a fast build with
excellent fit. In these respects, Eduards Gustav is
every bit as good as their recent Spitfires.
Yes, there are a number of detail accuracy
issues and the kit does appear to be oversized.
These issues will be a game-breaker for some, and
irrelevant to others. It really is up to the individual
modeller to make up his or her own mind.
I do know that I will be building a bunch of them!
Thanks to Eduard for the sample www.eduard.com

Luftwaffe camouflage can be one


of the most complex painting tasks
for any modeller, but it can also be
one of the most satisfying.

MODELSPEC
Eduard 1:48 Messerschmitt Bf 109 G-6

Kit No. 8268

Paints and Finishing Products Used:


Testor Aztek A470 Airbrush
Mr Hobby Lacquer Paints - Mr Colour 36 RLM 74 Grey Green; 37
RLM 75 Grey Violet; 117 RLM 76 Light Blue.
Tamiya Acrylic Paints XF-1 Flat Black; XF-64 Red Brown; X-25
Clear Green; X-27 Clear Red.
Future Floor Polish
Excellent detail and fit; fine, crisp surface features.
The grainy and high contrast photo
seems to be the only image of this
aircrat that is available. Anders
extrapolated other features that
were typical of late-war Erla-built
Gustavs.

Dimensional and detail accuracy problems. Main landing gear


legs need to be raked forward a few more degrees.
Rating: 8 out of 10
Thanks to Eduard for the sample www.eduard.com
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MILITARY ILLUSTRATED MODELLER INDEX


ISSUES 1 15

A detailed listing of all the articles in the Military and Aircraft Editions
of Military Illustrated Modeller, compiled by Dominic ODonnell.

AIRCRAFT EDITION
Subject
Albatros D.II
Avro Lancaster Models
BAe Hawk
Cessna A-37 Dragonfly
Dassault Mirage 2000B/N/D
Dassault Mirage IIIO
De Havilland Sea Venom FAW.21
Douglas SBD-3 Dauntless
Fiat G.91Y Yankee
Fieseler Fi 103 Re4
Flakpanzer IV Wirbelwind
Focke-Wulf 189 A-1 Nachtjager
Focke-Wulf Fw 190 D
Focke-Wulf Fw 190 D-9
Focke-Wulf Ta 152 C
Focke-Wulf Ta 152 C-0
Focke-Wulf Ta 152 H
Focke-Wulf Ta 152 H-1
General Dynamics F-111C
General Dynamics F-16C (block 25/32)
Gloster Gladiator
Gotha G.IV
Grumman A-6E Intruder
Grumman C-2 Greyhound
Grumman C-2A Greyhound
Grumman C-2A Greyhound
Grumman F-14A Tomcat
Grumman F6F-3 Hellcat
Grumman F6F-3 Hellcat
Grumman S-2E/S-2G Tracker
Grumman S-2E/S-2G Tracker
Grumman S-2G Tracker
Handley Page Halifax B. Mk.I/II, GR.II
Handley Page Halifax B. Mk.I/II, GR.II
Hawker Hurricane Mk.1
Hawker Hurricane Mk.1
Hawker Hurricane Mk.1
Hawker Sea Fury
Hawker Seahawk
Heinkel He 111 P-1
Heinkel He 162 A-2/Ford Staff Car

60

Article
Esebecks Albatros
A Night Flight Down Memory Lane
Red Arrows Hawk
Super Tweet Revisited
Mirage In Blue
Delta Down Under
Sea Venom FAW.21
Midway Dive Bomber
A Yankee in Mediterranean Colours
Failure is not an Option
Reap the Whirlwind
Twin Boom Night Fighter
Big Tail Dora
Derelict Dora
End of the Line
Focke-Wulf Fighter Finale
JG301 Wild Sau
High Flyer
New Pig on the Block
Look at Me
Winter Gladiator
The White Ghost
SWIP Intruder
The Greyhound & Me
Slingshot Cargo Truck
Gargantuan Greyhound
Seventy Second Tomcat
That Hellcat Grin
Helluva Cat ! Building Eduardd Itty Bitty Kitty
Mainstream Stoof
Eyes of the Fleet
S-2G Tracker Walk Around
Magic Halifax Part One - Construction
Magic Halifax Part Two - Completion, Painting & Markings
One of The Few - Part 1
Battle of Britain Stalwart
One of The Few - Part 2 - Earning My Wings
Dutch Frankenfury
Cold War Seahawk
Big Blitz Bomber
Behind the Hanger Door- Somewhere in Germany, April-May 1945

Nationality
German
British
British
USA
French
Australian
British
USA
Italian
German
German
German
German
German
German
German
German
German
Australian
USA
Finnish
German
USA
USA
USA
USA
USA
USA
USA
USA
USA
Australian
British
British
British
British
British
Dutch
British
German
USA

Manufacturer
Eduard
Tamiya
Revell
Encore Models
Kinetic
High Plains
Cyber-Hobby
Accurate Miniatures
ADV Models
Bronco
Dragon
Great Wall Hobbies
Eduard Profipac
Tamiya
Pacific Coast Models
HobbyBoss
na
Zoukei-Mura
HobbyBoss
Tamiya
Silver Wings
Wingnut Wings
Kinetic
na
Kinetic
Kinetic
HobbyBoss
Eduard Profipac
Eduard
Kinetic
Kinetic
na
Revell
Revell
Pacific Coast Models
Italeri
Pacific Coast Models
Hobbycraft/Trumpeter
HobbyBoss
Revell
Tamiya

Scale
1/48
1/48
1/32
1/48
1/48
1/72
1/72
1/48
1/48
1/35
1/35
1/48
1/48
1/48
1/32
1/48
na
1/32
1/48
1/48
1/32
1/32
1/48
na
1/48
1/48
1/72
1/72
1/72
1/48
1/48
na
1/72
1/72
1/32
1/48
1/32
1/48
1/72
1/32
1/48

Type
Build
Review
Preview
Preview
Build
Build
Preview
Build
Preview
Technique
Build
Preview
Preview
Build
Build
Preview
Profile
Build
Build
Build
Build
Build
Preview
Reference
Preview
Build
Preview
Preview
Build
Preview
Build
Reference
Build
Build
Build
Preview
Build
Build
Preview
Preview
Build

Author
Gary Edmundson
Brett Green
MiM
Brett Green
Mick Evans
Mick Evans/Glen Porter
MiM
Gary Edmundson
Brett Green
Brett Green
Roman Volchenkov
Luke Pitt
Brett Green
James Davies
Brett Green
Brett Green
Virgil O Neill
Chris Wauchop
Mick Evans
Dave Aungst
Harvey Low
Jeroen Veen
Brett Green
Rodger Kelly
Brett Green
Mick Evans
Phil Parsons
Brett Green
Rafe Morrissey
Brett Green
Jeroen Veen
Brett Green
Brett Green
Brett Green
Brett Green
MiM
Brett Green
Ian Robertson
Glen Porter
Brett Green
Joaquin Garcia Gazquez

Issue
15.08
15.15
1.04
7.10
3.09
15.10
15.13
9.09
15.09
13.14
14.01
5.11
3.08
11.11
7.04
7.05
5.03
5.02
9.07
13.10
13.09
9.08
11.08
15.01
9.05
15.02
15.05
7.08
11.09
3.01
13.02
13.01
11.05
13.13
3.06
9.00
9.04
5.04
5.01
7.01
9.06

Date
Jul-12
Jul-12
May-11
Nov-11
Jul-11
Jul-12
Jul-12
Jan-12
Jul-12
May-12
Jun-12
Sep-11
Jul-11
Mar-12
Nov-11
Nov-11
Sep-11
Sep-11
Jan-12
May-12
May-12
Jan-12
Mar-12
Jul-12
Jan-12
Jul-12
Jul-12
Nov-11
Mar-12
Jul-11
May-12
May-12
Mar-12
May-12
Jul-11
Jan-12
Jan-12
Sep-11
Sep-11
Nov-11
Jan-12

Page
44
66
22
47
48
50
57
50
49
66
6
63
46
46
26
34
16
8
40
48
42
42
39
6
26
12
33
40
40
6
10
6
18
54
32
4
16
18
6
6
28

Military Illustrated Modeller - November 2014

p 60-62 mim index 043B.indd 60

26/09/2014 13:50

Subject

Article

Nationality

Manufacturer

Scale

Type

Author

Issue

Date

Page

Heinkel He-219 Uhu


HH-60H Rescue Hawk
Il-2 Shturmovic
J-20 Mighty Dragon
Junkers Ju 88 A-4
Kawasaki Ki-61 Hein
McDonnell F3H-2 Demon
MD Helicopters MH-6
Messerschmitt Bf 109 E-1
Messerschmitt Bf 109 E-4
Messerschmitt Bf 109 E-4/B
Messerschmitt Bf 109 E-4/B
Messerschmitt Bf 109 F
Messerschmitt Bf 109 F-4/Trop
Messerschmitt Bf 109 F-4/Trop
Messerschmitt Bf 110 G-4
Messerschmitt Bf 110 G-4
MiG-21BIS
MIG-21MF
MIG-21MF
misc
Mitsubishi A6M3/3a Zero
Mitsubishi A6M5 Zero
na
Nakajima Ki-44-II Tojo
North American B-25J Mitchell
North American B-25J Mitchell
North American B-25J Mitchell
North American FJ-4 Fury
North American P-51-D Mustang
North American P-51D Mustang
Northrop F-5E Tiger II
Northrop P-61 Black Widow
Northrop P-61 Black Widow
Northrop P-61 Black Widow
Northrop P-61A Black Widow
Pfalz D.XII
Polikarpov I-16
Propellers
Propellers
R.A.F. FE2b
R.A.F. FE2b
Republic F-84E Thunderjet
Republic P-47 Thunderbolt
Roland D.Via
Roland D.Via
RQ-4B Global Hawk
Rumpler C.IV
SAAB 32 Lansen
Shorts Tucano T.1
Sukhoi Su-24M Fencer D
Sukhoi Su-25 Frogfoot A
Supermarine Spitfire
Supermarine Spitfire Mk.XII
Supermarine Spitfire Mk.XVI
Supermarine Spitfire Mk.XVIe
TBD-1 Devestator
Vickers Valiant
Vought F4U-1 & F4U-1a Corsair
Yokosuka MXY-7 Model 11 Ohka

A Night Owl Dressed in Green


Rescue From Behind Enemy Lines
Stalins Arrow - Part One - Building the Test Shot
Any Colour you want, as Long as its Black
Junkers Gem
Turning Japanese
Top Demon
Tow Missile Defender
First Emil
Emil Four
Blitz Jabo - Part One - Construction
Blitz Jabo - Part Two - Painting & Markings
Defending Fortress Europe
The Star Of Africa
Colour Profile
Nocturnal Nemesis
Colour Profile
Cold War Fighter
The Last Word
Mikoyens Masterpiece
The Next Big Thing
Solomons Zero
From Zero to Hero
Stars & Bars
Tachiarai Tojo
Big Beautiful Bomber
B-25J Mitchell Walk Around
B-25J Mitchell Walk Around
Triple Fury
Mustang Magic
Dallas Pony
Agressor Snake
P-61 Black Widow
Nocturnal Nemesis - Part One - Construction
Nocturnal Nemesis - Part Two - Painting & Detailing
Glass Nose Widow
XII O Clock High
A Rat on Skis
Props for Props: 10 Steps to a Beautifully Weathered Propeller
Props for Props Part 2: World War One Wooden Propellers
Masterton FE.2b
The Fighting Fee
Big Thunderjet
Thunderbolts of the Hell Hawks
Confessions of a Biplane Naif Part 1
Lozenge & Struts & Rigging- Oh My Part 2
Global By Remote
Two Seats Fit for a Kaiser
Northern Cold War Warrior
Black to Basics
Eastern Block Swinger
A Wolf in Frogs Clothing
The Best Laid Plans
Griffin Spitfire
Sweet Kiwi Sixteen
Low Back Spitfire
Stop Press - Great Wall Hobbys 1:48 TBD-1 Devestator
The First of the Vees
Modelling The Black Sheep VMF-214
Cherry Blossom

German
USA
Russian
Chinese
German
Japanese
USA
USA
German
German
German
German
German
German
German
German
German
Various
Various
East German
misc
Japanese
Japanese
USA
Japanese
USA
USA
USA
USA
USA
USA
USA
USA
USA
USA
USA
German
Russian
misc
misc
British
British
USA
USA
German
German
USA
German
Swedish
British
Russian
Czech
British
British
New Zealand
British
USA
British
USA
Japanese

Tamiya
Skunkmodels Workshop
Tamiya
Trumpeter
Revell
Hasegawa
HobbyBoss
Academy/Hasagawa
Eduard
Eduard
Eduard
Eduard
Revell
Hasegawa
na
Eduard
na
Eduard
Eduard
Eduard
misc
Tamiya
Tamiya
na
Hasegawa
Wingscale
na
Hasegawa
HobbyBoss
Tamiya
Tamiya
AFV Club
na
Great Wall Hobbies
Great Wall Hobbies
Great Wall Hobby
Wingnut Wings
Eduard weekend
misc
misc
na
Wingnut Wings
HobbyBoss
na
Wingnut Wings
Wingnut Wings
Skunkmodels Workshop
Wingnut Wings
Tarangus
Alley Cat
Trumpeter
Trumpeter
misc
Airfix
Tamiya
Tamiya
Great Wall Hobbies
Airfix
Tamiya
FineMolds

1/48
1/48
1/48
1/72
1/32
1/32
1/48
1/48
1/48
1/32
1/32
1/32
1/32
1/32
1/48
1/48
na
1/48
1/48
1/48
1/32
1/48
1/72
na
1/32
1/32
na
1/72
1/48
1/32
1/32
1/48
na
1/48
1/48
1/48
1/32
1/48
misc
misc
na
1/32
1/32
na
1/32
1/32
1/48
1/32
1/48
1/48
1/48
1/32
1/48
1/48
1/32
1/32
1/48
1/72
1/48
1/48

Build
Build
Build
Preview
Preview
Build
Preview
Build
Build
Preview
Build
Build
Build
Build
Profile
Build
Profile
Preview
Preview
Build
Comment
Build
Preview
Reference
Build
Preview
Reference
Build
Build
Preview
Build
Build
Reference
Build
Build
Preview
Preview
Build
Technique
Technique
Reference
Build
Preview
Review, Book
Build
Build
Build
Preview
Preview
Build
Build
Build
Preview
Preview
Build
Preview
Preview
Preview
Build
Build

Ian Robertson
Mick Evans
Brett Green
Phil Parsons
Brett Green
Chris Wauchop
Brett Green
Dave Aungst
Brett Green
Brad Fallon
Brett Green
Brett Green
Chris Wauchop
Chris Wauchop
Richard J. Caruana
Ian Robertson
Virgil O Neill
Brett Green
Jennings Heilig
Brett Green
Brett Green
Joaquin Garcia Gazquez
Brett Green
Jennings Heilig
Ian Robertson
Jeroen Veen
Brett Green
Ian Robertson
Mike Robertson
Brett Green
Chris Wauchop
Dave Aungst
Brett Green
Brett Green
Brett Green
MiM
Brett Green
Werner Scheibling
Rafe Morrissey
Dave Johnson
Dave Johnson
Dave Johnson
Brett Green
MiM
Brett Green
Brett Green
Mick Evans
Rob Baumgartner
Brett Green
Marcus Nicholls
Mick Evans
Mick Evans
Brett Green
MiM
Dave Johnson
Brett Green
Brett Green
Brett Green
Rafe Morrissey
Tony Bell

1.05
5.08
15.03
13.11
11.10
3.04
13.12
7.13
13.03
13.08
9.10
15.14
11.06
1.07
1.08
3.02
3.03
11.02
1.01
1.02
5.12
7.12
13.04
15.06
13.05
1.10
9.02
9.03
11.07
5.07
15.07
3.07
7.02
7.03
11.12
15.12
7.07
7.09
5.05
7.06
11.03
11.04
9.01
15.11
1.11
3.10
1.06
11.01
13.06
5.09
13.07
7.11
3.11
1.03
5.06
1.09
11.13
5.10
3.05
15.04

May-11
Sep-11
Jul-12
May-12
Mar-12
Jul-11
May-12
Nov-11
May-12
May-12
Jan-12
Jul-12
Mar-12
May-11
May-11
Jul-11
Jul-11
Mar-12
May-11
May-11
Sep-11
Nov-11
May-12
Jul-12
May-12
May-11
Jan-12
Jan-12
Mar-12
Sep-11
Jul-12
Jul-11
Nov-11
Nov-11
Mar-12
Jul-12
Nov-11
Nov-11
Sep-11
Nov-11
Mar-12
Mar-12
Jan-12
Jul-12
May-11
Jul-11
May-11
Mar-12
May-12
Sep-11
May-12
Nov-11
Jul-11
May-11
Sep-11
May-11
Mar-12
Sep-11
Jul-11
Jul-12

24
48
17
52
45
18
53
58
16
41
54
58
28
36
46
8
16
5
6
10
66
52
28
34
30
50
8
10
36
40
36
40
8
12
56
56
38
42
26
36
6
8
6
54
54
52
34
4
37
52
38
48
66
20
28
48
66
62
26
28

Article
Amtrac Recovery
Euro Militaire 2011
Scale Modelworld 2011
Nuremberg Toy Fair 2012
Dioramas You Must Build Before You Die
Chips with Everything
Identity Crisis
Getting Grizzly with It

Nationality
USA
UK
UK
Germany
misc
Iraqi
Iraqi/USMC
German

Manufacturer
na
misc
misc
misc
na
na
Dragon
Dragon

Scale
na
misc
misc
misc
na
na
1/35
1/35

Type
Reference
Show
Show
Show
Reference
Reference
Build
Build

Author
Mike Mummey
MiM-AFV
MiM-AFV
MiM-AFV
Marcus Nicholls
MiM
Fran Vazquez
Gary Kwan

Issue
6.07
8.01
10.01
12.01
12.10
6.09
8.05
12.09

Date
Oct-11
Dec-11
Feb-12
Apr-12
Apr-12
Oct-11
Dec-11
Apr-12

Page
36
6
6
6
66
52
24
58

AFV EDITION
Subject
AAV-7 A1 RAM/RS
AFVs
AFVs
AFVs
Behind the Scenes Maintenance
BMP APC
BRDM-3
Brummbar Sd.Kfz.166

Aircraft Edition

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61

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MILITARY ILLUSTRATED MODELLER INDEX


ISSUES 1 15

Subject

Article

Nationality

Manufacturer

Scale

Type

Author

Issue

Date

Page

BT-42
BT-42
Buffalo MPCV

Finnish Fill-In Part.1


Finnish Fill-In Part.2
Buffalo Soldier; General Dynamics
Awesome Mine Protected Clearance Vehicle
Canadian Club
Sand Blasted Challenger
Mr Churchills Tank
A Cruiser Tank At The Eastern Front
Comet Loses Its Sparkle
DVD Review- Reference & Technique Guide
Basic Training Part 5
A Little Touch of Humanity
Dioramas You Must Build Before You Die
Dioramas You Must Build Before You Die
One Shot Weathering
Panthers Rare Breed
Gorkovsky Automobilny Zavod - The GAZ 69
Like a DUKW to Water
Basic Training Part 1
Oop! Stuck In the Mud, Budapest 1945
Israeli M4A1 76MM(W) M1 Super Sherman
Show your Colours; a Harlequin Sherma at Metula
Basic Training Part 3
Day of the (MWMIK) Jackal
Normandy Jagdpanther
Jagdpanzer IV L70 Disk-Camo
The Little Red Devil
Tamiyas 1:48 JS-2, A Recipe For Stress Free Modelling
All Hail the King
Automitrailleuse Tres Elegant
Scouts Honour
Medium, Well Done
Maz Hysteria
Buiding a Resin Kit Pt.1- Waste Resin Cleanup
Buiding a Resin Kit Pt.2- Straightening & Assembly
Buiding a Resin Kit Pt.3- Painting Time
Boneyard Bonanza
Behind the Front Lines- Scenes From Post D-Day Normandy
One-Shot Weathering
Resplendent Rhinoceros
Sponge? Its a Piece of Cake
The Perfect Tracks
Green & Brown or Green & Brown
The Four At War
Universal Panzer
I Could Do It with a D
If Its Russian & Ugly, Build It
Basic Training Part 2
New Production Vehcle
at the Fall of the Reich
One-Shot Weathering
Roll Out the Barrels
DANA International
Mortar This Than Meets The Eye
Dial M for Marder
Sturminfanteriegeschutz at Stalingrad
Stubborn Emil
Wilder at Heart
Variation on a Theme
Iraqi Army Type-69 II
Pershing the Edge of the Envelope
A Challenger for the King Tigerss Throne
Riddle of the Sands
Basic Training Part 4
Paws for Thought
Lil Baby Panther
The Mighty One
Dioramas You Must Build Before You Die
Weld-Done Effects
Bunderswehers Dwarf Leopard
25 Armour Modelling Items

Finnish
Finnish

Tamiya
Tamiya

1/35
1/35

Build
Build

Marcus Nicholls
Marcus Nicholls

6.06
8.06

Oct-11
Dec-11

30
30

USA
Canadian
British
British
German
British
na
misc
misc
misc
misc
misc
German
East German
USA
misc
German
Israeli
Israeli
misc
British
German
German
German
Polish
German
French
Swedish
USA
Serbian
USA
USA
USA
German
misc
misc
German
misc
na
German
German
German
German
Polish
misc
German
Russian
misc
German
Czech
German
German
German
German
Russian
Iraqi
Iraqi
USA
USA
Iraqi
misc
German
German
Russian
misc
misc
German
misc

Bronco
AFV Club
Trumpeter
AFV Club
Bronco
Bronco
na
various
misc
na
na
misc
Cyber-Hobby
Bronco
na
various
Darius Miniatures/Alpine Miniatures
na
Dragon
various
Accurate Armour
Dragon
Dragon
Tamiya
Tamiya
Tamiya
DES
Dragon/Revell
Dragon
Trumpeter
Verlinden Productions
Verlinden Productions
Verlinden Productions
misc
na
misc
Dragon
misc
Friumodel/Blacken-it
Dragon
na
Tristar
Dragon
Dragon/Scratch
various
Cyber-Hobby
Mig Productions
misc
Dragon
HobbyBoss
Brach Models
Revell
Dragon
Trumpeter
Dragon
Tamiya
Verlinden/Tamiya
Tamiya
HobbyBoss
na
various
AFV Club
HobbyBoss
Trumpeter
na
misc
Revell
Various

1/35
1/35
1/35
1/35
1/35
1/35
na
na
misc
na
na
na
1/35
1/35
na
na
1/35
na
1/35
na
1/35
1/35
1/35
1/48
1/48
1/16
1/35
1/35
1/35
1/35
1/35
1/35
1/35
na
na
misc
1/35
misc
na
1/35
na
1/35
1/35
1/35
na
1/35
1/35
misc
1/35
1/35
1/35
1/35
1/35
1/35
1/35
1/35
1/35
1/35
1/35
na
na
1/48
1/35
1/35
na
na
1/35
na

Preview
Build
Build
Build
Build
Build
Review
Technique
Reference
Reference
Reference
Technique
Build
Build
Reference
Technique
Build
Reference
Build
Technique
Build
Build
Build
Build
Build
Build
Build
Build
Build
Build
Technique
Technique
Technique
Reference
Reference
Technique
Build
Technique
Technique
Build
Reference
Build
Build
Build
Technique
Build
Build
Technique
Build
Build
Build
Preview
Build
Build
Build
Build
Reference
Preview
Build
Reference
Technique
Build
Build
Build
Reference
Technique
Build
Technique

Marcus Nicholls
Jason Bobrowich
Zachary Sex/David Coyne
Eelke Warrink
Lars Richter
Jari Hemila
Adam Wilder
MiM
MiM
Marcus Nicholls
Marcus Nicholls
Marcus Nicholls
Andy Gulden
Lars Richter
MiM
MiM
Carl Startin
Zachary Sex
Zoltan Csome/Peter Horvath
MiM
Marcus Nicholls
Angus Creighton
Angus Creighton
Pat Johnson
Marcus Nicholls
Staf Snyers
Stan Spooner
Sven Young
Rob Ferreira
Zachary Sex
MiM
MiM
MiM
MiM
MiM
Marcus Nicholls
Kristof Pulinckx
Marcus Nicholls
Marcus Nicholls
Angus Creighton
MiM
Angus Creighton
Mike Kirchoff
Marcel Jussen
MiM
Takahiro Sumitomo
Mario Eens
MiM
Angus Creighton
Marcus Nicholls
Marcus Nicholls
MiM
Angus Creighton
Angus Creighton
Adam Wilder
Marcus Nicholls
MiM
MiM
Martin Kovac
MiM
MiM
Lester Plaskitt
Mig Jiminez
Lars Richter
Marcus Nicholls
MiM
Marcus Nicholls
Marcus Nicholls

14.02
14.06
10.02
2.07
10.10
10.05
8.11
10.03
6.12
8.12
10.12
4.01
10.06
4.09
8.10
2.03
14.04
8.08
14.05
6.03
4.08
6.04
8.04
2.06
14.08
8.02
2.05
6.02
6.05
4.03
2.10
4.11
6.11
10.09
14.07
6.01
12.06
10.11
8.09
12.04
4.02
10.04
6.10
2.09
4.04
2.11
12.08
2.12
2.04
2.02
10.08
4.06
14.03
4.05
6.08
12.07
10.07
2.01
12.05
4.12
8.03
4.07
8.07
12.02
14.09
12.03
4.10
2.08

Jun-12
Jun-12
Feb-12
Jun-11
Feb-12
Feb-12
Dec-11
Feb-12
Oct-11
Dec-11
Feb-12
Aug-11
Feb-12
Aug-11
Dec-11
Jun-11
Jun-12
Dec-11
Jun-12
Oct-11
Aug-11
Oct-11
Dec-11
Jun-11
Jun-12
Dec-11
Jun-11
Oct-11
Oct-11
Aug-11
Jun-11
Aug-11
Oct-11
Feb-12
Jun-12
Oct-11
Apr-12
Feb-12
Dec-11
Apr-12
Aug-11
Feb-12
Oct-11
Jun-11
Aug-11
Jun-11
Apr-12
Jun-11
Jun-11
Jun-11
Feb-12
Aug-11
Jun-12
Aug-11
Oct-11
Apr-12
Feb-12
Jun-11
Apr-12
Aug-11
Dec-11
Aug-11
Dec-11
Apr-12
Jun-12
Apr-12
Aug-11
Jun-11

12
40
10
46
56
24
64
16
62
66
66
6
30
46
62
18
22
52
30
16
32
18
18
34
52
8
28
8
24
10
60
60
60
52
46
6
30
62
56
18
8
18
54
54
18
62
52
64
20
10
42
24
16
20
42
40
38
6
24
62
16
26
42
10
66
16
52
52

Centurion Mk.11R
Challenger 2 Up-Armoured
Churchill Mk.III
Cruiser Tank A13
Cruiser Tank A34 Comet
Dealing with Photo-etch
Detailing
Dioramas
Dioramas
Dioramas
Exhausts/Rust
FlaK Panther
GAZ 69
General Motors DUKW
Getting & Finishing parts off sprues
Hetzer/Officer Vignette
IDF M1 Sherman
IDF M50 Super Sherman
Installation of Photo-etched Parts
Jackal 1 APC
Jagdpanther
Jagdpanzer IV
Jagdtiger
JS-2
King Tiger
Laffy 80AM
M3 Scout Car
M4A2 Sherman
Maz 537 / T55
Military Fork Truck
Military Fork Truck
Military Fork Truck
misc
misc
Mud
Nashorn Sd.Kfz.164
Paint Chipping with sponge
Painting Tracks with Blacken It
Panther G Late Production
Panzer IV
Panzer IV ausf. D
Panzer IV Ausf. D Up-gunned
Polish Army WZT-SU
Preparation for Photoetched Parts
Rheinmetall Neubaufahrzeug
Russian Scrounger with Panzerfaust
Rust
Sd.Kfz.7/1 Flakvierling
ShkH DANA vz.77
Somua MCG
SPz Marder 1 A5
StulG 33b
Sturer Emil
T-34/85 UTZ Mod.1944
T-55 Enigma
T-69 (conversion)
T26E4 Super Pershing
T26E4 Super Pershing
T55 Enigma
Texturing & Photo-etched Details
Tiger 1
VK.1602 Leopard
Voroshilovetz
Welcoming the Liberators
Weld Seams On AFVs
Wiesel 2 LeFlaSys Ozelot
You Just Cant Live Without

62

Military Illustrated Modeller - November 2014

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p 63 PocketmagsNEW 043.indd 8

25/09/2014 17:20

For the serious Modeller


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25/09/2014 17:19

modeller Next Issues


military illustrated

ISSUE No.043 November 2014

Aircraft Edition - Brett Green


AFV Edition - Marcus Nicholls
Publisher;
Alan Harman
Graphic Design;
Alex Hall,
Colin Trundle
Advertising Manager;
Gareth Liddiatt
Advertising Assistant;
Joe Brown
Office Manager;
Paula Gray
Administration Manager; Hannah McLaurie
MIM Website;
ADH Web Team
Editors;

Printed by;
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Military Illustrated Modeller


Issue 44 - AFV Edition

STUKA ZU FUSS, HOTCHKISS STYLE!

Trumpeters 1:35 German 28cm Wurfgert


40 Auf G.W H39 in detail

on sale 20 November, 2014

S CLUB HEAVEN!

An early Trumpeter 1:35 kit, the Swedish


S103 S Tank, gets some detail upgrades

Distributed by;
Seymour Distribution
2 East Poultry Avenue, London, EC1A 9PT
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VAMPIRES ON THE
NIGHT SHIFT

WW2 infrared operations


in 1:35

Military Illustrated Modeller is published


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Illustrated Modeller is accurate, the publishers
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Military Illustrated Modeller


Issue 45 - Aircraft Edition
on sale 18 December, 2014

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LOCKHEEDS FLYING COFFIN PT.2

Marcus Nicholls paints and weathers the new


1:32 scale F-104 G Starfighter from Italeri.

SPITFIRE REFRESHED

Brett Green builds and improves the brand


new 1:32 scale Revell Spitfire Mk.IIa.

GREEN ZEKE

Airfixs 1:72 A6M2 Zero


by Tomasz R. Lubczy ski.
n

MEET THE FOKKERS


ADH Publishing 2014

Three 1:32 scale Wingnut Wings


Fokker D.VIIs by Leo Stevenson

...AND MORE!
Aircraft Edition

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65

26/09/2014 13:51

Tailpiece
BLAST FROM THE PAST
REVELLS 1:32
JUNKERS JU 88 A-1

Can it really be nearly six years? The Editor takes a glance back at his
2008 build of Revells impressive 1:32 scale Junkers Ju 88 A-1.

built Revells 1:32 scale Junkers Ju 88 A-1 as soon


as it was available in late 2008. The kit comprises
around 255 parts in pale blue-grey plastic, 26
parts in clear and markings for three aircraft.
The quality of the mouldings is excellent. Texture
of the plastic is satin. Surface detail is by way of
fine and crisply recessed panel lines with selected
rivets and raised features as appropriate. All the
surface detail is consistently rendered with no fading
or soft lines in evidence. A number of dials on the
instrument panel suffer from fairly prominent sink
marks but these are the only moulding imperfections
that I found on visible surfaces.
The cockpit area is wonderfully fitted out. Nearly
half of the total kit parts make up the front office around 125 pieces in all. The seats, their mounts,
radios, instruments, quadrants, guns, ammunition,
oxygen bottles, sidewalls and rudder pedals are all
realistically detailed. The pilots seat assembly alone
comprises 12 parts. Revell even supplies an optional
flare pistol to place on one of the seats if desired.
The only omissions are the seat harnesses. In this
large scale you really will need to add these. The
dedicated superdetailer may also wish to add cable
bundles to the rear of the instrument panel too.
The dials on the instrument panel are represented
by flat disks.
The rear cockpit bulkhead extends well beyond
the fuselage sides to form the front of a stout wing
spar. The mid-fuselage bulkhead completes this spar.
The wings fit securely with the dihedral firmly set
thanks to this thoughtful piece of engineering.
The horizontal tailplanes are also mounted on two
sturdy spars.
Exterior detail is as well executed as the cockpit.
All control surfaces, including the flaps, are separate.

66

The mounts for the flaps, ailerons and dive brakes


need some minor surgery before repositioning.
The unique early-style tailplanes and wing tips
are separate parts too, hinting at the later Ju 88
A-4 that followed.
The rear of the cockpit gondola may also be
posed open.
Engine nacelles are simply broken down into
two halves. Cowl flaps are moulded closed as
part of each cowling half. Each exhaust section is
supplied as a single strip. This simplifies assembly.
The ends of the exhaust stacks are solid. In this
large scale it would be worth spending a little
extra time drilling these out. Engine instruments
are supplied for the inboard half of each nacelle,
along with the clear covers.
Surprisingly, the kit does not include the wingmounted ETC bomb racks that were almost
universally fitted.
Clear parts are beautifully presented. They are
crisp, thin and clear. Canopy framing is suitably
fine. The main canopy comprises six clear parts, so
some care was needed to avoid smudging these
parts with adhesive.
Decals are in regsiter and colours look good. Full
stencil markings are also provided.
As is the case with all Revell GmbH models,
Hazenkreuze decals are not supplied. These will
have to be sourced from the spares box or from
after-market decal sheets.
The model was a pleasure to build and very
impressive when finished. Revells 1:32 scale Junkers
Ju 88 A-1 remains one of the best large-scale
Luftwaffe offerings that we have seen to date.
This model features in two detailed articles across
Tamiya Model Magazine Issues 162 and 163.

Cockpit components awaiting assembly. Everything here is straight


from the box except the handles for the ammo bins and the harness
and toe straps.

Lots of masking!

Revells 1:32 scale Ju 88


A-1 alongside Eduards
1:32 scale Bf 109 E-1.

Military Illustrated Modeller - November 2014

p 66 Tailpiece 043.indd 66

26/09/2014 13:52

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