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LESSON PLAN TEMPLATE

Title of lesson
Purpose (why of the lesson, where and how does it fit into the course/curriculum)

Learning outcome(s) (what will students be able to do/know by the end of the lesson)

Bridge-in (focus student attention)

Pre-test (activate and diagnose prior knowledge)

Input from you (main content: ideas, information,


concepts, principles, procedures and examples)

Guided practice (application of knowledge: classroom


activities for students, problem to solve, etc.)

Closure (recap key concepts, helps students consolidate knowledge)

Check for understanding (what questions will you ask and when to determine students understand)

Assessment (how does this lesson relate to assignments/homework/readings)

Pearl Harbor
Time: 90 minutes
Materials: DVD, tape, poster, pictures
Objectives:
1. The student will summarize reasons for U.S. entrance into WWII.
2. The student will evaluate the pros and cons of these reasons.
Setting the stage:
Show pictures of the Pearl Harbor bombing.
Discuss:
Background from homework readings
Construct:
A timeline of WWII events.
Groups:
Posting legitimate reasons for a country to go to war. Refer to textbook and previous
class notes.
Show:
Anti-Japan and anti-Germany posters and newsclips (video)
Journal:
What role did emotions play in the U.S. entrance into WWII? Defend or critique the
reasons for going to war.

Biology 5A
Spring 2013
Lesson Plan
April 3, 2013


Topic: Biological Macromolecules (proteins, lipids, nucleic acids, carbohydrates)

Student previous knowledge: Professor discussed proteins and lipids with the
students, but will discuss nucleic acids and carbohydrates in the future

My goal: Do not teach new material. Discuss proteins and lipids with the students.

First 15 min students receive quiz and must complete. During this time, I will
ensure all students are present.

1520 min Collect quizzes. Ask students about concerns regarding quiz or topics
covered in lecture.

2540 Discuss protein structure, including these key phrases: NCC, zwitterion,
peptide, peptide bond, amino acid. Show YouTube video on proteins.

4055 Discuss lipids, lipid structure, and function

5500 Open discussion for questions

Balancing equations using matrices


Learning outcomes
Students will be able to:

Set up a system of equations to solve for the coefficients in a chemical reaction


Use a matrix to solve the system
Determine the coefficients required to make the chemical reaction balanced
Explain that the reaction must be balanced in order to be in compliance with the Law of
Conservation of Mass

Teacher planning
Classroom time required
90 minutes

Materials needed
Students will need graphing calculators.

Activities
1. Distribute the Balancing Equations Using Matrices handout to students. Go over the
handout as a class.
2. Tell students that eventually in their chemistry studies, they will have ample opportunity
to balance equations. Balancing equations means writing chemical equations such that the
amount of stuff they start with in the reaction equals the amount of stuff they end up with
as a product. In other words, if they start baking bread with ten pounds of flour, they
should end up with tend pounds of bread, unless some is lost on the floor or if some of it
goes up in smoke! Remember this is the law of conservation of mass.
3. Demonstrate the following example. Tell students they can form water by combing
hydrogen gas (H2) and oxygen (O2) in the presence of electricity. The reaction looks like
this:
H2 + O2 > H2O
If they do some of the mass calculations they will find this:
2 grams of hydrogen + 32 grams of oxygen = 18 grams of water
4. Explain to students that this mass calculation shows that they started with 34 grams of
stuff and ended up with 18 grams of stuff. Remind students they just lost 16 grams of

stuff, and the law of conservation of mass says that doesnt happen! Ask students where
they think the 16 grams went.
5. Tell students they just havent balanced the equation. They might have also noticed that
there are two oxygens on the left and only one on the right. Theyll need to get things in
the correct proportions for this reaction to be balanced. The balanced reaction looks like
this:
2 H2 + O2 > 2 H2O
Explain that the equation shows that two hydrogen molecules are necessary to combine
with one oxygen molecule to form two new water molecules.
6. Next, demonstrate the math for students.
(2 2 grams of hydrogen) + 32 grams of oxygen = (2 x 18 grams of water)
Reinforce the fact that now there are 36 grams of stuff on the left and 36 grams on the
right. There are also now 4 hydrogens on the left, 4 hydrogens on the right, 2 oxygens on
the left, and 2 on the right.

Assessment
Check student responses on the worksheet.

Critical vocabulary
matrix
a rectangular array of mathematical elements that can be combined to form sums and
products with similar arrays having an appropriate number of rows and columns
system of equations
simultaneous equations containing multiple variables
chemical reaction
a process that leads to the transformation of one set of chemical substances to another
balance
equality with respect to the net number of reduced symbolic quantities on each side of an
equation
law of conservation of mass
a fundamental principle of classical physics that matter cannot be created or destroyed in
an isolated system

Comments

Density
Students will determine the density of two unknown liquids by collecting mass and volume data.
Each group of students will be given a different volume of the liquids to measure; they will
combine their data to create a graph. Using the graph students will determine the density of the
two liquids by calculating the slope of the two lines. Students will also use a graphing calculator
to determine the slope of the two lines.

Learning outcomes
Students will:

Accurately measure the volume and mass of a liquid


Graph the class data by hand and determine the slope of the lines
Graph the class data using a graphing calculator and determine the slope of the lines
Identify the slope of the lines as the density of the liquids
Identify the liquids from their respective densities

Teacher planning
Time required
50 minutes

Materials needed

2 liquids
balances
10 ml and 25 ml graduated cylinders
graphing calculators
graph paper
reference tables with densities of liquids

Pre-activities
The teacher should make sure that students can calculate density. They must also be able to
calculate the slope of a line and use a graphing calculator to input data and graph it. Teach or
review how to calculate percent error.

Activities
1. Begin the lesson by demonstrating how to calculate the density of a liquid.
2. Also explain how to accurately measure mass and volume of a liquid.
3. Review how to determine the slope of a line from a graph and on the calculator.

4. Begin the lab with a discussion. Explain to students that the density of a substance can be
determined by obtaining the mass of a specific volume of that substance. This provides a value of
density based on one trial or one set of experimental data. A more accurate density can be
obtained by multiple trials. Then the data can be graphed. The slope of the graph will provide a
more accurate value of density.

Tell students that each lab team will obtain one set of data, both mass and volume, for
one of two liquids. Then the class data will be pooled so that a graph of each liquid can
be prepared. Since the final results depend on each lab team, you must be very careful in
all measurements.
Remind students that the mass of the liquid depends on the amount or volume of the
sample. Therefore the volume is the independent variable in this experiment. The mass is
the dependent variable. The slope of a graph is best determined by selecting points that
are further apart on the graph. Slope (m) equals a change in y divided by a change in x or
m = y/x.
Explain that the calculator provides a quick way to determine the slope of a graph. The
class will determine the slope of the data for Liquid A and B during this lab.
Experimental data is never perfect. Therefore, the lines will not be perfectly straight. The
calculator can be used to determine the best-fit line and allow you to more clearly see the
points that are not on the slope.
Wrap up the discussion by emphasizing that every pure substance has its own unique
value of density. Density is considered to be an intensive property, and can be used to
identify a substance.
5. Ask students to complete the pre-lab questions on the lab sheet. Before beginning the lab, go over
the questions as a class to ensure everyone has the correct responses. Students will be answering
the following questions:
o In what units should density be recorded in this lab?
o For correct graphing, on what axis should the independent variable be placed?
o What specific variable will be graphed on the x-axis in this lab?
o What specific variable will be graphed on the y-axis in this lab?
o How is the slope of a line calculated?
o Which gives more accurate results: one trial or repeated trials of lab measurement?
6. Have students collect and accurately record mass and volume data for the two liquids.
7. Students should write their data on the board or overhead for all to copy.
8. Once all data is collected the students should complete the post-lab questions.
9. The teacher should use the class data to determine the slope of the two lines of data provided by
the students for checking their answers later.

Assessment
Check the answers to the post-lab questions.

Critical vocabulary

density
a measure of how much mass is contained in a given unit volume (density = mass/volume)
slope
the rate at which an ordinate of a point of a line on a coordinate plane changes with respect to a
change in the abscissa; the tangent of the angle of inclination of a line, or the slope of the tangent
line for a curve or surface
line of best fit
a straight line used as a best approximation of a summary of all the points in a scatter-plot

The position and slope of the line are determined by the amount of correlation between
the two, paired variables involved in generating the scatter-plot. This line can be used to
make predictions about the value of one of the paired variables if only the other value in
the pair is known.
mass
a property of matter equal to the measure of an objects resistance to changes in either the speed
or direction of its motion

The mass of an object is not dependent on gravity and therefore is different from but
proportional to its weight.
volume
the magnitude of the three-dimensional space enclosed within or occupied by an object,
geometric solid, etc.
linear regression
the relation between variables when the regression equation is linear, e.g., y = ax + b
list
a series of numbers
stat plot
a feature on the graphing calculator used to plot statistical data stored in lists
percent error
the percent of difference between two values is the ratio of their absolute difference to the
magnitude of the accepted value, expressed as a percent

It quantifies the accuracy of a measurement.


(measured value - actual value)/actual value 100%

Comments

Lesson Plan

WK
0

DATE
F
9/24

WRITING ASSIGNMENT DUE

READING ASSIGNMENT DUE

F 9/24 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES


Review Syllabus (15-20 minutes)
Introduce English 1A course
Discuss Your Expectations about attendance, participation, proper conduct incl. plagiarism
Introduce essays 1-4 and metacognitive reflections.
Explain SafeAssignment and Writing Packet (includes AWS and GW)
Ice Breaker (25-30 minutes)
Reflection #1 (1) or #6 (12) to discuss attitudes about writing
Preview Writing & Reading HW (5 minutes)
Explain how much they need to write
Tell them what to bring to class or post on Blackboard
1

M
9/27

Analysis
Brandt (19-22): think about questions in
the margin.
Write a paragraph responding to Learn
About Brandts Writing Process (22)
GW
Choosing an Event to Write About (4243)

Essay #1
Remembering an Event (Ch. 2)
Introduction (14-16)
BF (17-18)
Purpose and Audience (18)
Brandt (19-22)
Brandts WW (57-62)

M 9/27 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES


Introduce Ch. 2: Remembering an Event essay (40 minutes)
Display and read aloud, discussing briefly: Writing Assignment, Purpose & Audience, and Basic
Features
Display Brandt essay, read aloud, and discuss marginal questions
Introduce Guide to Writing thru Brandts Writer at Work (57-62)
Explain what needs to be included in Writing Packet
Review GW
Discuss criteria for Choosing an Event (42)
Round robin ideas for events
Preview Writing & Reading HW (5 minutes)
Explain how much they need to write
Tell them what to bring to class or post on Blackboard
1

W
9/29

Analysis
Write responses to all three Dillard AWS
activities (26-27)

Essay #1
Remembering an Event (Ch. 2)
Dillard (22-25)

GW
Describing the Place (44)
Recalling Key People (44)
W 9/29 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES
Review Dillard
Autobiographical Significance (20-25 minutes)
Go over AWS to clarify the two different perspectives autobiographers represent in their writing:
Telling (including remembered feelings and thoughts at the time of the event, and present perspective
looking back on the event) and Showing (selection of details to create a dominant impression). Ask
about relation between remembered and current feelings and thoughts.
Ask about how telling and showing work together and where, if anywhere, there is tension between
them or silences and gaps.
Comparison Follow-up: Ask about Brandts use of telling and showing, as well as remembered vs.
current feelings and thoughts.
Vivid Description of People and Places (20-25 minutes)
Go over AWS: ask about relative amount of naming and detailing they found. Connect to dominant
impression that showing creates thru careful word choices
GW Follow-up: Round robin an example of descriptive language they generated for the place and
people. Ask about the dominant impression they are trying to create with the description
Review GW (5-10 minutes)
Continue round robin of ideas for events
1

F
10/1

Analysis
Ellis AWS (31-33)

Essay #1
Remembering an Event (Ch. 2)
Ellis (28-30)

GW
Shaping the Story (44)

F 9/29 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES


Option (5 minutes)
Begin with Making Connections: Intimacy (30-31)
GW Follow-up: Briefly ask if the event theyve chosen involves a problem in a relationship such as
intimacy
Review Ellis
A Well-Told Story (20-25 minutes)
Go over AWS: ask where they find the climax (or climaxes) in Ellis
Comparison Follow-up: AWS paragraph 2 describes dramatic structure in Dillard and Brandt. Small
groups: outline pyramid in Dillard & Brandt. Evaluate effectiveness of the dramatic structures of these 3
essays
GW Follow-up: Ask for volunteers to discuss what they wrote in response to Shaping the Story
activities: Explore a Revealing or Pivotal Moment (44) and/or Reflect on the Conflict and Its
Significance (44)
Autobiographical Significance (20-25 minutes)
Go over AWS writing.
Comparison Follow-up: AWS paragraph 1 gives examples from Dillard and Brandt. Could ask them to
find other examples
Analyzing Visuals (33) (5-10 minutes)
If you want to encourage students to include visuals in their essays, discuss Elliss choice of a

photograph and how it reinforces, adds to, and/or undercuts the dominant impression of his father in his
essay.

M
10/4

Analysis
Shah AWS (36-37)

Essay #1
Remembering an Event (Ch. 2)
Shah (34-36)

GW
Creating a Dominant Impression (44-45)
Reflecting on Events Autobiographical
Significance (46)
Testing Your Choice (45)
Defining Your Purpose and Audience
(47)
Considering Your Thesis (47)
M 10/4 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES
Review Shah
A Well-Told Story (20-25 minutes)
Go over AWS: ask where they find examples of dramatized and summarized dialogue in Shah.
Comparison Follow-up: AWS gives examples of each kind of dialogue in Dillard and Brandt. Could
ask them to find examples of the two kinds of dialogue in Ellis.
Discuss why these writers chose to dramatize some dialogue and summarize other. Evaluate
effectiveness.
Autobiographical Significance (20-25 minutes)
Go over AWS. Note that the first activity refers to the comparisons in the preceding A Vivid
Description of People and Places.
Use to reinforce the idea that Remembered Event essays tend to convey significance implicitly
(through word choice in descriptions and in remembered/present feelings & thoughts) rather than
explicitly through a tagged on moral.
GW Follow-up: Ask what they discovered about how their understanding and/or feelings have
changed Connect this idea to Purpose and Audience and Thesis (47)
2

W
10/6

GW
Refining Your Purpose and Setting Goals
(47-48)
Outlining Your Draft (48-49)
Writing the Opening Sentences (49)

Essay #1
Remembering an Event (Ch. 2)
Working with Sources (50-52)

W 10/6 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES


Review GW: Defining and Redefining Your Purpose (5-10 minutes)
Round robin Setting Goals questions (47-48)
Option 1 (30-35 minutes)
A Collaborative Activity: Testing Your Choice (45)
Use their Outline and Opening Sentences to (p)rehearse how they will tell the story
Add more explicit questions about the story structure, presentation of people and places, and use of
remembered and present perspectives to convey significance.
Option 2 (30-35 minutes)
Use their Outline and Opening Sentences plus their GW invention writing to have them begin drafting
the essay.

(Extra time) (5 minutes)


Preview the Critical Reading Guide (52-53)
Briefly discuss Working with Sources

F
10/8

Essay #1 Remembered Event


Rough Draft Due
Bring in complete draft to class for
workshop

Essay #1
Remembering an Event (Ch. 2)
A Sentence Strategy (49-50)
Critical Reading Guide (52-53)

F 10/8 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES


Draft Workshop using the Critical Reading Guide (52-53) (40-45 minutes)
Introduce Revising (53) (5-10 minutes)
Stress how they can use the critical reading comments
Suggest they outline their drafts
Review Troubleshooting Your Draft (54)
Explain how to turn in Essay #1 (5-10 minutes)
SafeAssignment
Print-out revised, final draft
Writing Packet
3

M
10/11

Essay #1 Remembered Event


Due Today:
Use Troubleshooting Your Draft (54)
and Editing and Proofreading (56-57) to
help you revise and edit draft
Submit the final revised essay to
SafeAssignment by beginning of class
period
Bring hard copy to class
Bring complete GW packet

Essay #2
Writing Profiles (Ch. 3)
Intro (64-65)
BF (67-68)
Purpose and audience (68-69)

M 10/11 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES


In-class writing (30-35 minutes)
Reflecting on Your Writing (62-63)
Introduce Ch. 3: Writing Profiles essay (15-20 minutes)
Introduce the Writing Assignment (99), Basic Features (67-68), Purpose & Audience (68-69)
Go over list of on-campus profile subject suggestions on iLearn website
Preview Criteria for Choosing a Profile Subject
Stress importance of choosing a subject and getting permission by next class meeting (see
homework).
3

W
10/13

Analysis
Cable (19-22): think about questions in
the margin.
GW
Choosing a Subject to Profile (101-103)

Essay #2
Writing Profiles (Ch. 3)
Cable (69-73)

Checking that you Can Do the Field


Research (103)
Getting Permission for Your Role (103)
W 10/13 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES

Review Cable (69-73) (30-35 minutes)


Read aloud the essay and discuss their responses to the marginal questions.
Introduce the BF: Detailed Information about the Subject by having students re-examine the
description of each room (reception, lobby, chapel, show room, embalming room).
o What is the dominant impression you get of each room?
o What details does Cable use to establish the impression in each room? Find examples of the naming
and detailing (such as musty, dim chapel vs. bright, polished display room).
Introduce the BF: A Perspective on the Subject by discussing paragraphs 9, 18-21, and 24. Discuss the
questions in the margin.
Comparison Follow-up (5-10 minutes)
Ask what aspects of Cables Profile remind them of the Remembered Event Essays they just read and
wrote.
o Dominant impression created by the word choice and details of the description of places and
people
o Cables sharing of his remembered thoughts and his present perspective
o Where do they see significance in Cables essay, maybe not autobiographical but cultural?
Review GW (15-20 minutes)
Ask volunteers to describe the subjects theyve chosen and who they think they could interview at the
site.
Stress time commitment required for interviewing and observing and the need to first get permission.
Show them Setting Up a Tentative Schedule (105).

F
10/15

Analysis
Edge AWS (78-80)
GW
Setting up a tentative schedule (105)
Exploring Your Preconceptions (104)
Collecting Information from Field
Research (106-107 and 716-19). Bring to
class notes and write-ups from your
observations and interviews.

Essay #2
Writing Profiles (Ch. 3)
Edge (74-77)
Cable WW (120-4)

F 10/15 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES


Review Edge
Detailed Information about the Subject (10-15 minutes)
Go over AWS: ask about different senses that Edge draws on in his description. What metaphors and
similes have the students identified? What dominant impression of pig lips does Edge build through
his description?
A Clear Organization Plan (5-10 minutes)
Go over AWS: Ask volunteers to read aloud their written response. Ask students about relative merits
of narrative frame as employed by Edge. What does the narrative add to the topical paragraphs?
A Role for the Writer (5-10 minutes)
Go over AWS: ask where they see spectator and participant roles.

Ask what the participant role contributes to the profile.


Comparison Follow-up: Ask about role(s) Cable adopts.
GW Follow-up: Discuss the role they can adopt in researching their subject. Challenges of writing as
an insider for outsiders.
A Perspective on the Subject (10-15 minutes)
Go over AWS: Discuss their ideas about the perspective Edge conveys and where in the essay they
see it most clearly.
Ask about the cultural and class contexts and Edges subject position in relation to the other patrons
described in paragraph 1.
Review GW: Discuss Field Research (10-15 minutes)
Ask volunteers to describe the subjects theyve chosen and report on their field research so far.
Go over Cables WW: Interview Notes and Write-up
Point out Cables two column approach to the interview write-up (subjective description and
information such as quotes and key words)
Discuss move from notes to final product: what does or does not make it into the final essay? Why?
Point out, for instance, vague description of Deaver as weird-looking (121) vs. more specific
portrait in para. 5 (70).
Connect to Edges interviews and their own experience interviewing.
Preview Homework for next class
Students who have not chosen a subject should do so by next class.
Everyone should make an observational visit, take detailed notes, and bring them to the next class.

M
10/18

Analysis
Orlean AWS (87-89)

Essay #2
Writing Profiles (Ch. 3)
Orlean (81-86)

GW
Continue Collecting Information from
Field Research (106-107 and 716-19).
Bring to class notes and write-ups from
your observations and interviews.
W 10/20 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES
Review Orlean
A Role for the Writer (5-10 minutes)
Go over AWS: authors role (89)
Comparison Follow-up: Ask students to compare Orleans role in her essay to Cables and Edges.
GW Follow-up: Go over Getting Permission For Your Role (103) and Using Your Role (110)
A Perspective on the Subject (10-15 minutes)
Go over AWS: Orleans introduction of Biff and her conclusions about his retirement per exercise
(89)
Discuss Orleans use of anthropomorphism (87) How does her use of anthropomorphism give us
clues about Orleans perspective on her subject? (Be prepared to discuss as well Orleans use of
titillating language, her insistence on Biffs reproductive function, and the Truesdaless investment in
parenting and dynasty.)
A Clear Organizational Plan (10-15 minutes)
Go over AWS: Discuss Orleans topical organization.
Small groups to compare the topics they found.
Discuss with everyone how different readers may notice different topics. Ask how writers can
foreground the topics they think are most important (the ones they want readers to take away with
them).

GW Follow-up: Review Observating and Interviewing (20-25 minutes)


Use small group or round robin to share important details and impressions theyve discovered during
observational visits and interviews.
Discuss challenges of observing and interviewing, including procedure.
4

W
10/20

Analysis
Coyne AWS (95-96)

Essay #2
Writing Profiles (Ch. 3)
Coyne (90-94)

GW
Continue Collecting Information from
Field Research (106-107 and 716-19).
Bring to class notes and write-ups from
your observations and interviews.
Developing a perspective (108)
W 10/20 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES
Review Coyne
Detailed Information about the Subject (15-20 minutes)
Go over AWS: What sort of physical details of people or the places does Coyne include? Point out the
mothers interest in physicality and sensory interaction with children, esp. olfactory and tactile.
Introduce anecdotes and discuss exercise that analyzes the interactions between Ellie and Stephanie
(95)
Use discussion of anecdotes to segue into analysis of Coynes Organizational Plan (narrative)
A Clear Organizational Plan (10-15 minutes)
Go over AWS: Discuss Coynes narrative organization.
Comparison Follow-up: Compare the effectiveness for their given topic, purpose, and audience of
Coynes narrative organization and Orleans topical plan. Note places where topics are presented
through Coynes narrative and Orlean uses narrative to present certain topics.
A Perspective on the Subject (15-20 minutes)
Go over AWS: Introduce scenario (para. 11) and rhetorical questions (para. 15). How do these
strategies suggest perspective? How effective are these rhetorical strategies?
GW Follow-up: Turn to Developing a Perspective (108). Differentiate between focusing on place,
activity, and person/group.
Comparison Follow-up: Review Perspective in Cable (69-73), Edge (74-77), and Orlean (81-86)
essays. What are some of the diverse strategies that the authors use to convey perspective? Connect
the basic feature of perspective in profile to significance in remembered event. How are they similar
and different?
Review GW (10-15 minutes)
Use small group or round robin to discuss the perspective theyre developing.
4

F
10/22

Review GW

GW
Defining your Purpose for Your Readers
(108)
Considering your Thesis (108)
Refining Your Purpose and Setting Goals
(109)
Outlining Your Draft (110-111)
Writing the Opening Sentences (111)

Essay #2
Writing Profiles (Ch. 3)

Defining your Purpose for Your Readers (108). Who are Coynes intended readers? How does she try
to make her perspective on this subject interesting to her readers? Who are your intended readers and
how can you make your perspective interesting to them?
Considering your Thesis (108). Discuss how Profile essay theses(like Remembered Event theses)
should focus less on asserting an explicit idea and more on conveying a perspective through a
dominant impression
Outlining Your Draft (110-111). Have each group outline one of the profile readings and report.
And/or organize a workshop where each student explains his/her plan to a small group and gets a
response.
Writing the Opening Sentences (111). Have each group analyze one readings introduction strategies
and report. And/or round table the students opening sentences and evaluate their effectiveness in
capturing readers interest.

M
10/25

GW
Defining your Purpose for Your Readers
(108)
Considering your Thesis (108)
Refining Your Purpose and Setting Goals
(109)
Outlining Your Draft (110-111)
Writing the Opening Sentences (111)

Essay #2
Writing Profiles (Ch. 3)

M 10/25 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES


Review GW
Defining your Purpose for Your Readers (108). Who are Coynes intended readers? How does she try
to make her perspective on this subject interesting to her readers? Who are your intended readers and
how can you make your perspective interesting to them?
Considering your Thesis (108). Discuss how Profile essay theses(like Remembered Event theses)
should focus less on asserting an explicit idea and more on conveying a perspective through a
dominant impression
Outlining Your Draft (110-111). Have each group outline one of the profile readings and report.
And/or organize a workshop where each student explains his/her plan to a small group and gets a
response.
Writing the Opening Sentences (111). Have each group analyze one readings introduction strategies
and report. And/or round table the students opening sentences and evaluate their effectiveness in
capturing readers interest.

W
10/27

Essay #2 Profile
Rough Draft Due
Bring a complete draft to class for
workshop

Essay #2
Writing Profiles (Ch. 3)
Using Your Role (119)
Working with Sources (112-113)

W 10/27 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES


Draft Workshop using the Critical Reading Guide (114-115) (40-45 minutes)
Introduce Revising (115) and Editing and Proofreading (118-120) (15-20 minutes)
Suggest they outline their drafts
Preview Troubleshooting Your Draft (116-117)
Remind them how to turn in Essay #1 (5-10 minutes)

SafeAssignment
Print-out revised, final draft
Writing Packet
5

F
10/29

Essay #2 Profile Due Today


Use Troubleshooting Your Draft (116117) and Checking the Punctuation of
Quotations ((118-119) to help you revise
and edit draft
Submit the final revised essay to
SafeAssignment by beginning of class
period
Bring hard copy to class
Bring complete GW packet

Essay #3
Ch. 4: Explaining a Concept
Introduction (126-129)
BF (129-131)
Purpose and audience (131)

F 10/29 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES


In-class writing (30-35 minutes)
Reflecting on Your Writing (124-125)
Introduce Ch. 4: Explaining a Concept essay (15-20 minutes)
Introduce the Writing Assignment (160), Basic Features (129-131), Purpose & Audience (131)
Go over list of subject suggestions on iLearn website
Discuss Criteria for Choosing a Concept to Write About (162)
Go through list of academic disciplines (162-163), asking students to add concepts to the list, and to
add other disciplines and their concepts. Or ask students to list concepts in sports, music, technology,
or other areas theyre familiar with. Reassure them about the term concept by helping them recognize
that they are already knowledgeable about many different concepts.
Begin exploring the various kinds of purpose and audience for concept explanations by identifying
different texts and contexts in which people learn concepts (131).

M
11/1

Analysis
Ngo (132-135): think about questions in
the margin.

Essay #3
Ch. 4: Explaining a Concept
Ngo (132-35)

GW
Choosing a Concept to Write About
(162-163)
Gaining an Overview of the Concept
(164)
M 11/1 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES
Introduce Ch. 4: Explaining a Concept
Perhaps read aloud Ngo essay and discuss marginal questions to introduce the BF (132-35)
Comparison Follow-up: Point out Ngos use of anecdote to open the essay. Connect anecdote to the
narrative strategies in Event and Profile. Talk about the anecdote in terms of Ngos purpose and
audience for his Concept explanation.
Spend some time discussing Ngos use of Cueing strategies: thesis, forecast, topic sentences, logical
transitions. Compare to the Cueing strategies in Event and Profile. Introduce Ch. 13: Cueing the
Reader Exercise 13.2 (602) to discuss Ngos essay and how this essay uses/does not use Forecasting
effectively.
Stress Ngos use of library and Internet research as well as his use of academic citation, again in
contrast to Event and Profile.

Review GW
Round robin concepts and apply criteria
Ask what they discovered doing preliminary research (Gaining an Overview activity)
6

W
11/3

Analysis
Toufexis AWS (140-42)

Essay #3
Explaining a Concept (Ch. 4)
Toufexis (136-40)

GW
Focusing the Concept (165)
Testing Your Choice (165-166)
W 11/3 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES
Review Toufexis
A Focused Explanation of the Concept (140-141)
Go over AWS: Ask how Toufexis focuses her explanation and engage readers.
Comparison Follow-up: Compare Toufexis opening strategy and tone to Ngos in the context of their
different kinds of audience and purpose.
GW Follow-up: Round robin their concepts, asking what they discovered in the Gaining an Overview
of a Concept and Focusing the Concept activities. Help them sharpen the focus and understand why
focusing a concept is important.
A Readable Plan (141)
Go over AWS: Highlighting where Toufexis takes up each topic she forecasts could be done as a small
group activity.
Comparison Follow-up: Note that Ngo and Toufexis are writing for different audiences (college class
and popular magazine), but they both use explicit cueing. Why does this genre (in contrast to the
others theyve studied so far) seems to need these kinds of cueing.
Appropriate Explanatory Strategies (141-42)
Review writing strategies that are the building blocks of explanatory Concept essays: defining,
classifying, dividing, comparing and contrasting, narrating, illustrating, and reporting known causes
and effects. Point out the Part III chapters.
GW Follow-up: Point out Considering Explanatory Strategies (166-167) theyll be doing for next
class.
Smooth Integration of Sources (142)
Describe Toufexiss sources and how she establishes authority even though she doesnt include
academic forms of citation. Compare with Ngos essay, and explain why the students will be expected
to use academic style.
GW Follow-up: Connect discussion of Toufexiss research and sources to Gaining an Overview
activity on Doing Research and Doing a General Internet Search (164), which they have already done,
and Doing In-Depth Research on Your Focused Concept (166), which they will do for next class.
Collaborative Activity: Testing Your Choice (166)
You might need to model how students can explain briefly how they are thinking of focusing their
concept in the context of their purpose and audience.
You could also ask the listeners to suggest what kinds of visuals might help them with the concept.
6

F
11/5

Analysis
Friedman AWS (146-47)
GW
Focusing the Concept (165)
Considering Explanatory Strategies (166)
Sentence Definitions 16.2 (641)
Extended Definitions 16.4 (643)

Essay #3
Explaining a Concept (Ch. 4)
Friedman (143-45)
Ch. 16: Defining (639-46)

F 11/5 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES


Review Friedman
Option
Begin with Making Connections: Temperament (145)
GW Follow-up: Briefly ask if the Concept theyve chosen is related to temperament
A Focused Concept
Go over AWS: Ask how Friedman creates a sense of focus on his concept
AWS Follow-up: Appropriate Explanatory Strategies (146-47) describes the importance of providing
definitions in Concept essays. Possibly use groups to explore how Friedman uses definitions. Go back
to Ngos Concept essay and compare/contrast use of definition. Evaluate effectiveness of synonyms
and/or anonyms in Friedmans and Ngos essays
GW Follow-up: Ask for volunteers to discuss what they wrote in response for Focusing the Concept
(146) and what kinds of explanatory strategies Friedman uses. What kind of explanatory strategies
might the students use in their own essays to create a focused explanation of the concept? How might
such explanatory strategies help create a sense of purpose?
Smooth Integration of Sources (147)
Go over AWS: Lead analysis of Friedmans paragraphs 5 and 8. Invite responses to question about
why Friedman does not include information about his sources in other paragraphs, and ask what effect
that lack of citation might have on readers in a variety of rhetorical situations.
Preview Next Class Comparison Follow-up: The Friedman activity refers to Ngos use of summary
and paraphrase. The next class is scheduled to look closely at Ngos WW (181-182 ) and also Working
with Sources (172). You could also bring up these matters today or alert students to the coming
discussion.
Review Ch. 16: Defining (639-46)
Have students share sentence definitions from 16.2 (641)
Have students share extended definitions from 16.4 (643)
7

M
11/8

Analysis
Kluger AWS (156-58)
GW
Testing Your Choice (165)-166)
Defining Your Purpose for Your Readers
(167)
Doing In-Depth Research on Your
Focused Concept (166)

Essay #3
Explaining a Concept (Ch. 4)
Kluger (148-55)
Working with Sources (172)
Ngos WW (181-82)

M 11/8 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES


Review Kluger
Option
If you have time, consider beginning with Making Connections: Community Morality (155). Can be
modified as whole class discussion to save time.
Appropriate Explanatory Strategies (157)
Go over AWS: What kinds of examples does Kluger use to explain his concept? Are such examples
effective? Why or why not?
Use to reinforce the idea that Concept essays tend to use illustrative examples to explain a concept.
Question you may want to ask: How do Toufexis and Friedman use examples in their Concept essays
and how do such examples differently explain the different authors respective concepts?
GW Follow-up: Use round robin or small groups to have students try out an example of their concept.

Smooth Integration of Sources (157)


GW Follow-up: Review Working with Sources (172) to discuss descriptive verbs to characterize
sources.
Comparison Follow-up: This activity refers to Ngos use of summary and paraphrase. You can get
even more specific by going over the Writer at Work (181-182).
Also turn students attention to Ch. 24: Using Sources (755-94), specifically Quoting, Paraphrasing,
and Summarizing (756-764)
Analyzing Visuals (158)
You can spend a few minutes on this activity to discuss Klugers of scenarios as visual illustrations. If
you did not discuss Toufexis use of a flowchart (142), you can discuss both Analyzing Visuals
activities now.
GW Follow-up: Visuals can be particularly helpful in explaining abstract concepts (for example, using
a flowchart to help explain a process). You could round robin students concepts and explore what
kinds of visuals might be most helpful
7

W
11/10

GW
Refining Your Purpose and Setting Goals
(168)
Outlining Your Draft (169-70)
Writing the Opening Sentences (170)

Essay #3
Explaining a Concept (Ch. 4)
Planning and Drafting (168-72)
A Sentence Strategy (170-71)

W 11/10 Classroom Activities

F
11/12

Essay #3 Concept
Rough Draft Due
Bring a complete draft to class for
workshop

Essay #3
Explaining a Concept (Ch. 4)
Critical Reading Guide (173-174)

F 11/12 Classroom Activities


Draft Workshop using the Critical Reading Guide (173-174) (40-45 minutes)
Introduce Revising (174-179) and Editing and Proofreading (180-181) (15-20 minutes)
Suggest they outline their drafts
Preview Troubleshooting Your Draft (175-177)
Remind them how to turn in Essay #3 (5-10 minutes)
SafeAssignment
Print-out revised, final draft
Writing Packet

M
11/15

Essay #3 Concept Due Today


Use Troubleshooting Your Draft (175177) and Checking the Punctuation of
Quotations (180-181) to help you revise
and edit draft
Submit the final revised essay to
SafeAssignment by beginning of class
period

Essay #4
Finding Common Ground (Ch. 5)
Introduction (184-187)
BF (188-190)
Purpose and audience (190-191)

Bring hard copy to class


Bring complete GW packet
M 11/15 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES
In-class writing (30-35 minutes)
Reflecting on Your Writing (182-183)
Introduce Ch. 4: Finding Common Ground
Discuss briefly: Writing Assignment, Purpose & Audience, and Basic Features.
Note that all the Finding Common Ground example readings in this chapter are student essays because
this is not a genre people are doing often nowadays. Most published writing (and oral discourse) that
compares different positions and arguments on a controversial issue has an agendataking a side or
staking out an alternative position. Discuss with students why this may be so: Why dont
commentators try to put their own views aside and objectively represent the argument or try to find
points of agreement as well as disagreement?

A Collaborative Activity: Practice Finding Common Ground


I encourage you to use this small group activity to help students get a grasp on this genre by trying it
out. Underscore that their task is to identify the positions (and central arguments) people ordinarily
take on the issue. They should not reveal their own position or evaluate others positions. The key
and the hard part--is to try to identify concerns, values, priorities that people with opposing positions
may actually share.

W
11/17

Analysis
Bernard (191-194): think about questions
in the margin.

Essay #4
Finding Common Ground (Ch. 5)
Bernard (191-194)

W 11/17 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES


Bernard (191-194)
Read essay aloud and discuss marginal questions as a way to introduce the BF, particularly A Probing
Analysis and A Fair and Impartial Presentationthe most challenging basic features.
Note the Writer at Work in this chapter is not keyed to the first annotated reading, but to the second
reading by Mae.
Assign and walk them through the HW: Mae (195-196) and Learn About Maes Writing Process
(198) which requires students to read the two position papers that Mae writes about and also
introduces them to the central work of the genre: Using the Criteria for Analyzing the Essays (216217) to annotate and chart their annotations.
Preview GW
Quick walk through of the Appendix: Two Debates (243-263) which includes the argument essays
they will use to write their own Common Ground essay.
You may either assign one of the debates or you could allow them to choose a debate from the two in
the Appendix. Note that they will need to choose two essays to write about in the debate.
8

F
11/19

Analysis
Mae AWS (198-200)
Learn About Maes Writing Process
(198)

Essay #4
Finding Common Ground (Ch. 5)
Mae (195-196)
WW (including the two position
essays by Bagaric and Clarke, and by
Johnson) (232-241)

F 11/17 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES


Review Mae
Option 1
Begin with the Maes WW to see the two argument essays Mae analyzed and wrote about before
looking closely at Maes Common Ground essay and the AWS.
Option 2
Begin with Maes AWS without first looking at the two argument essays Mae analyzed and wrote
about.
Talk about her purpose and audience. Common Ground essay writers can expect their readers to be
somewhat familiar with the issue, but they need to assume readers have not read these particular
position papers or analyzed them closely. Writing in academic contexts, however, puts writers in a
double bind: they have to write with authority to instructors who are more authoritative on the subject
than they are. You might want to discuss this challenge.
A Probing Analysis
Go over AWS: analyzing paragraphs 4-9.
Focus on the idea in the opening paragraph that Common Ground essay writers dont try to cover
every argument, but focus on the most important points of disagreement and try to unpack the
arguments to identify the Motivating Factors for disagreement and those that might make agreement
of some kind possible. This is by far the most challenging task for students in this genre.
Comparison Follow-up: Compare to Bernard, paragraph 6.
A Fair and Impartial Analysis
Go over AWS: Discuss the challenge of presenting fairlyif not objectivelyarguments with which
you disagree. Is it really a worthwhile goal? Why or why not?
GW Follow-up: You might be able to use this question as a segue to their HW analyzing argument
essays in one of the debates. You could round robin their views on the issue being debated and ask
about their own sense of the importance and difficulty of representing fairly views with which they
disagree.

M
11/22

GW
Analyzing the Essays (216-217): Choose
two of the essays in the assigned debate
and annotate them using the Criteria for
Analyzing the Essays. Then Fill in the
Chart with your Annotations (see 218).

Essay #4
Finding Common Ground (Ch. 5)
Read the argument essays in the
assigned debate in the Appendix

M 11/22 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES


Review GW
Determine which argument essays in the debate they chose..
Use small groups to have students compare their Annotations and Annotations Charts.
Focus on analyzing the Motivating Factors (see Criteria for Analyzing the Essays) in the argument
essays. These help read get some sense of where to locate the most profound disagreement and
potential for agreement.

W
11/24

Analysis
Alexander AWS (206-209)

Essay #4
Finding Common Ground (Ch. 5)
Alexander (201-206)

GW
Exploring Points of Agreement and
Disagreement (219)
Researching the Issue (219-220)
Thinking about Your Readers (217)
W 11/24 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES
Review Alexander
An Informative Introduction to the Issue and the Opposing Positions
Go over AWS: Ask students how Alexanders analysis on paragraphs 8-10 depends on her
introduction of adequate yearly progress.
Comparison Follow-up: Quick review of the opening strategies of the other essays.
A Fair and Impartial Analysis
Go over AWS: This activity can be looked at quickly and still be very helpful because it raises
awareness of the role word choice plays in rhetoric, and particularly in creating ethos.
A Readable Plan
Go over AWS: You could take this opportunity to discuss why explicit cueing is so important in an
essay like this.
Comparison Follow-up: Remind students of the Bernard essay analysis and his use of cueing.
Review GW
Exploring Points of Agreement and Disagreement (219): You could have students share their list with
other students working with the same argument essays. Consider posting one or two student analyses
to explore how they could be used as part (or as the basis) of the rough draft.
Preview HW Assignment
No class Friday, Thanksgiving holiday.
Have students finish planning and outline their Finding Common Ground essay.
9

F
11/26

No Class Thanksgiving Holiday

No Class Thanksgiving Holiday

GW
Defining Your Purpose for Your
Readers (220)
Formulating a Tentative Thesis
Statement (220)
Refining Your Purpose and Setting
Goals (221-222)
Outlining Your Draft (222-224)
Writing the Opening Sentences (224225)

10

M
11/29

Outline Due
Bring a detailed outline to class for
workshop

Essay #4
Finding Common Ground (Ch. 5)
A Sentence Strategy (225)
Working with Sources (225-226)

M 11/29 Classroom Activities


Review GW
Outlining Your Draft (110-111). Organize a workshop where each student explains his/her plan to a

small group and gets a response.


Writing the Opening Sentences (111). Have each group analyze one readings introduction strategies
and report. And/or round table the students opening sentences and evaluate their effectiveness in
capturing readers interest.
Go over A Sentence Strategy and Working with Sources
10

W
12/1

Essay #4 Common Ground


Rough Draft Due
Bring a complete draft to class for
workshop

Essay #4
Finding Common Ground (Ch. 5)

W 12/1 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES


Draft Workshop using the Critical Reading Guide (227-228)
Introduce Revising (228) and Editing and Proofreading (231-232)
Suggest they outline their drafts
Preview Troubleshooting Your Draft (230) and Editing and Proofreading (231-232)
Remind them how to turn in Essay # 4 Finding Common Ground
SafeAssignment
Print-out revised, final draft
Writing Packet
Important Note: Options
You can decide whether to have students hand in
Option 1: the revised Essay #4 and Reflection for Friday 12/3, the last day of class,
Option 2: the revised Essay #4 and Reflection for Monday, 12/6, (11:30 am to 2:30 pm) in your office, the
day the final is scheduled.
Option 3: the revised Essay #4, its Reflecting on Your Writing, and the Final Reflection Essay on a day
of your choice during Finals Week.
Remember: final grades must be posted by Tuesday, 12/14, and you have to consult with me about your
final grades on Monday, 12/13, before you can post your grades.
10

F
12/3
F 12/3 CLASSROOM ACTIVITIES

If they turn in Essay #4 Finding Common Ground today, have them write Reflecting on Your Writing
(242)
If you give them more time to finish drafting Essay #4, you could have another draft workshop.
Assign Final
Make clear when and where it needs to be turned in.