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Barry Island Pleasure Park, Barry

Archaeological desk-based assessment


November 2008
GGAT report no. 2008/067
Project no.P1284
A report for Barry Island Property Company National Grid Reference:
by Michelle Statton ST 11455 66622

GG GI
ST E R
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The Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust Ltd


Heathfield House Heathfield Swansea SA1 6EL
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

Contents Page
Summary .......................................................................................................................... 3
Acknowledgements .......................................................................................................... 3
Copyright notice............................................................................................................... 3
1. Introduction .................................................................................................................... 4
1.1 Planning history................................................................................................................ 4
1.2 Specification and methodology for study......................................................................... 4
1.3 Assessment criteria........................................................................................................... 4
2. Background..................................................................................................................... 7
2.1 Location and topography.................................................................................................. 7
2.2 Geology ............................................................................................................................ 7
2.3 Walkover survey .............................................................................................................. 7
2.4 General historical and archaeological background ........................................................ 10
2.5 Specific historical and archaeological background........................................................ 12
2.6 Review of Documentary, Cartographic and Aerial Resources: ..................................... 17
3. Archaeological Interests .............................................................................................. 20
4. Assessment .................................................................................................................... 28
4.1 Effect of the development on archaeological sites (Table 2) ......................................... 28
5. Mitigation...................................................................................................................... 36
Bibliography ................................................................................................................. 38
Websites ........................................................................................................................ 39
Cartographic sources ................................................................................................... 39
Appendix I..................................................................................................................... 40
Map Regression.............................................................................................................. 40
Appendix II ................................................................................................................... 46
Walkover Survey............................................................................................................ 46
Appendix III ................................................................................................................. 50
Aerial Photographs with Coverage of the Evaluation Area ........................................... 50
Appendix IV.................................................................................................................. 54
Gazetteer of archaeological interests.............................................................................. 54

Plates

Plate 1: View of Barry Island Pleasure Park looking northwest ......................................... 46


Plate 2: View of Barry Island Pleasure Park looking southwest ......................................... 46
Plate 3: View of Barry Island Pleasure Island looking southeast ........................................ 47
Plate 4: View of Log Flume looking northwest...................................................................... 47
Plate 5: Front elevation of 1920’s building at Barry Island Pleasure Park looking north 48
Plate 6: Front elevation of 1920’s building at Barry Island Pleasure Park looking north 48
Plate 7: Front elevation of The Dolphin café at Barry Island Pleasure Park..................... 49
Plate 8: Rear of The Dolphin café at Barry Island Pleasure Park ...................................... 49
Plate 9: OS 66/200 16th August 1966...................................................................................... 52
Plate 10: Barry Island Pleasure Park WAG 2181 30th July 1981 ....................................... 53

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Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

Tables Page

Table 1: Identified archaeological interests ........................................................................... 20


Table 2: Effect of the development on known archaeological interests .............................. 28

Figures
Figure 1: Location plan of the development area (red), study area (green) ......................... 8
Figure 2: Location of the development area (red), study area (green) and areas of
archaeological interest ................................................................................................... 9
Figure 3: Wenvoe Estate Map X, 1762................................................................................... 40
Figure 4: Parish Of Sully Tithe Map, 1846............................................................................ 41
Figure 5: First Edition Ordnance Survey Map, 1879 ........................................................... 42
Figure 6: Second Edition Ordnance Survey Map, 1900 ....................................................... 43
Figure 7: Third Edition Ordnance Survey Map, 1920 ......................................................... 44
Figure 8: Fourth Edition Ordnance Survey Map, 1936 ....................................................... 45

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Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

Summary
The Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust, Projects Division (GGAT Projects) have
undertaken an assessment of the archaeological effects of a proposed development at Barry
Island Pleasure Park, Barry. The assessment reviewed information held by the regional
Historic Environment Record (HER) and the National Monuments Record (NMR), as well as
cartographic and documentary sources. Aerial photographs were examined and a site visit
conducted.
The Pleasure Park itself has, since its establishment in the 1920’s, been key to the distinctive
character of Barry Island. In a cultural historical context it may be regarded as an icon for
leisure and tourism in South Wales and as such, it is recommended that the fairground and
associated structures have a Level Two building survey, undertaken prior to, as well as during,
the dismantlement and clearing of the site.
A total of 81 sites of archaeological interest where identified within the study area. The Chapel
of St Barruch is located 0.37km East of the development area and is classified as a Scheduled
Ancient Monument (GM120).
It is clear that there is a strong potential for buried remains of prehistoric and medieval
character in the development area, especially on the eastern side where previous excavations
have discovered numerous worked flint and flakes, in addition to a structure of medieval date. It
is difficult to assess the rest of the site; it is possible that some modern remains maybe
encountered, such as the remnants of former fairground rides and structures.
Whilst the overall potential for further medieval and prehistoric remains is high, the extent to
which they are intact is unclear. The survival condition is reliant on a number of at present,
unknown factors, including the depth of the Aeolian deposits and the impact of previous
excavation, quarrying and building within the development area.
It has been recommended that an archaeological evaluation consisting of trenching and test
pitting be carried out, to a design approved by the archaeological advisors to the LPA, to
assess and record the survival and condition of any sites of archaeological interest. The
completed evaluation would clarify the condition of the archaeology and the measure of
mitigation necessary.

Acknowledgements
The project has been managed by Richard Lewis BA MIFA; the report was researched and
prepared by Michelle Statton of GGAT Projects. The illustrations were prepared by Paul Jones
(Senior Illustrator of GGAT Projects). The author is grateful to the staff of CADW, the
RCAHMW, and the Glamorgan Record Office, for their help and assistance during this project.

Copyright notice
The copyright of this report is held by the Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust Ltd, who
have granted an exclusive licence Barry Island Property Company Ltd and their agents enabling
them to use and reproduce the material it contains. Ordnance Survey maps are reproduced
under licence (AL10005976), unless otherwise stated. Annotations are GGAT copyright.

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Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

1. Introduction
1.1 Planning history
Asbri Planning Ltd are acting on behalf of The Barry Island Property Company Ltd in providing
an outline planning application for the mixed use redevelopment of Barry Island Pleasure Park.
The redevelopment comprises residential apartments, commercial floor space (to include a
cinema and arcade), and associated parking. The Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust,
Projects Division (GGAT Projects) have been commissioned to undertake an archaeological
desk-based assessment to inform on the impact on the archaeological resource by the proposed
redevelopment of Barry Island Pleasure Park, Barry, Glamorgan.
1.2 Specification and methodology for study
The assessment comprises a review of existing information about the archaeological resource of
an area 197m² on which Barry Island Pleasure Park currently operates. The study area is
centred on NGR ST 1145566622 and is outlined in green in Figure 1. The assessment is
intended to conform to the Institute of Field Archaeologists’ Standards in British Archaeology:
Archaeological desk-based assessments.
Information recorded on the regional Historic Environment Record (HER) and National
Monuments Record (NMR) was assessed. Cartographic and documentary sources were studied,
along with relevant published information. Current Listed Building data and information on
Scheduled Ancient Monuments and registered landscapes was obtained from Cadw.
Collections of aerial photographs held by the Central Register of Air Photography for Wales
(CRAPW) were examined and additional information requested from the Royal Commission on
the Ancient and Historical Monuments of Wales (RCAHMW). A site visit was made on 13th
October 2008.
1.3 Assessment criteria
The archaeological sites within the study area are categorised in accordance with the only
available criteria that are nationally agreed; these are set out in the Department of
Transport/Welsh Office/Scottish Office Design Manual for Roads and Bridges paragraph 3.4
Vol. 11 Section 3 Part 2 (Cultural Heritage).
 Category A: national importance
 Category B: regional importance
 Category C: local importance
 Category D: low importance
To these an additional category has been added
 Category U: unknown
The assessment of the importance of individual sites is essentially a subjective exercise based
upon the experience of the project team. The importance of certain sites will be implied by
their status within the statutory framework. Scheduled Ancient Monuments will always be of
national importance; Listed Buildings will be of at least regional importance. Values assigned
to other sites are given both in relation to their individual importance and to their context within
the wider landscape.
The condition of individual sites and the general overall condition of surviving remains has
bearing on the value of the sites themselves and on the value that they impart within a wider
landscape context. The condition of sites is recorded following the system used by the GGAT
HER, using the following criteria:
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Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

 Intact: the site is intact


 Near intact: the site is nearly intact
 Damaged: the site has been moderately damaged
 Near destroyed: the site has nearly been destroyed
 Destroyed: the site has been destroyed
 Restored: the site has been restored
 Moved: the site has been moved (usually finds)
 Not known: the condition of the site is not known
For the purposes of desk-based assessments, rarity is assessed at regional level only. The
following criteria are used:
 High: very few sites of this type are known
 Medium: the site is not unusual, but cannot be considered common
 Low: the site is quite common
Group association is where a connection between sites within the landscape can be
demonstrated. These will usually be of the same period, but may include groups where the
presence of an earlier site or sites has led to the formation of a later complex, or where an
earlier site or sites can be shown to have acquired importance as part of a later complex. The
criteria are as follows:
 High: the site forms part of an interconnected complex occupying a clearly definable
landscape where little or no fragmentation has occurred
 Medium: the site is part of an interconnected complex, which is either limited in scope or
badly fragmented
 Low: there are few or no other sites, which are associated
Historical association is where there is a link between the site and known historical or cultural
persons or events. Prehistoric sites, which are by definition before historical evidence, cannot
have any contemporary historical association, but they may acquire later associations. For the
Roman and Early Medieval periods, where survival of historical evidence is poor and patchy,
any contemporary documentation at all will be important. Two classifications are given for
historical association, one reflecting the certainty of the identification, and the other its
importance. Only sites with certain or possible association can be assessed for importance, and
historical association can only increase the importance of a site; the absence of it will never
decrease its importance.
Historical association- identification
 Certain
 Possible
 Unknown
Historical association- importance
 High
 Medium
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Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

 Low
The assignment of values to identified interests requires consideration of the reliability and
accuracy of the source data, ranging from fully-recorded features seen in open excavation to
antiquarian comments on finds of note from a poorly-defined location. The confidence with
which the values have been assigned is noted, using the following criteria:

 High: existing information is reliable and detailed


 Medium: existing information is apparently reliable but limited in detail
 Low: existing information is too limited to allow its reliability to be assessed
The effect of the proposal on the archaeological resource has been assessed using the following
criteria:
 Severe: total loss
 Major: significant loss, likely to result in a reduction of value of the surviving site
 Minor: loss unlikely to result in a reduction of value of the surviving site
 None: no identifiable effect
 Beneficial: development will protect, preserve or enhance the site better than if the
development did not occur

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Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

2. Background

2.1 Location and topography


Barry Island was originally a peninsular extending westward from Sully; it became fully
isolated at the end of the Bronze Age (Beaudette and Beaudette 1984, 24-25). In the 1880’s the
island was reconnected to the mainland by the building of the docks. The development area is
centred on NGR ST 1145566622 in a levelled area enclosed by Friars Road to the south, Paget
Road to the west, and Station Approach to the north and east (Figure 1).
2.2 Geology
As part of the southerly region of the Vale of Glamorgan, Barry Island is comprised of a varied
solid geology that includes, Carboniferous Limestone, Triassic Keuper Marls, later Triassic
Rhaetic Conglomerates and Jurassic Lias Limestone. Many of the Triassic deposits on the
Island have been eroded away leaving the Carboniferous Limestone exposed (Beaudette and
Beaudette 1984, 17).
Barry and Barry Island are not included in the ‘The Soil Survey of England and Wales’ due to
their urban aspect. However, a number of factors suggest that soil development on the Island is
likely to have been restricted. Brown earth soils typically develop under forest cover and the
exposed nature of the Island may have affected this development process, with salt spray
potentially acting as a further detrimental factor.
The island has been subject to the laying down of significant Aeolian deposits throughout the
last 2000 years. The windblown sands on Barry Island can, broadly speaking, be divided into
two distinct phases, with parallels for both along the coast (Beaudette and Beaudette 1984, 27-
28). The first deposit, which measures to a maximum depth of 0.45m, dates to the later
prehistoric period. The thickness of the second layer is significantly variable, ranging from
1.5m approx to 6m approx, and it was this deposit that was found by the antiquarian John
Storrie (1896) to seal the medieval remains on the island.
The proposed development site has been identified as an area particularly affected by the
inundation of sand (Beaudette and Beaudette 1984, 10). The records from the excavation of a
medieval site in the western half of the development area in the late 19th century failed to detail
the depth of the sand deposited there at that time. The eastern half of the area has since been
subject to quarrying (see 1st edition OS map), before the whole site was levelled in order to
accommodate the building of the fairground in 1923. The depth of the sand deposits is crucial
to the likely survival of any buried remains in the area.

2.3 Walkover survey


A walkover survey was conducted on 13th October 2008. The area was photographed; all sites
previously identified from a search of the regional Historic Environment Record (HER) and
National Monuments Record (NMR) were visited in order to assess their current condition. A
sample of photographs taken illustrating the current condition of the archaeological interests
and the site in general can be seen in Appendix II.

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Barry Island Amusement Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

Based on the 2005 Ordnance Survey 1:25000 GRID


Explorer 151 map with the permission of The
Controller of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office, ©
Crown Copyright, Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological N
Trust Ltd, Licence number Al10005976

0 1.00 2.00 3.00km

Figure 1. Location plan of the development area (red), study area (green)
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Barry Island Amusement Park: archaeological desk-based assessment
Key
Sites and Monuments of
archaeological interest

LB15893/14105
LB15888/LB15889/ 01007s
LB15890/LB15891 02300s/02301s/
LB13468/33739

01005s
01006s
9180
LB15509

41426/03015s 308595/LB34234
41428 LB16562

3212

00565s 97242s
91514

00999s 14079s 00970s


41437 308857
00889s
14080 406806
02710s 02204s
00967s LB15894/
03016s/41427 404879
02705s 00577s 00564s 00555s 03832s/03805s/
00567s
00564s 00553s/94570/ LB15895
GM120/03834S
00554s/LB1001 34236
02281s/LB13455
02711s 32744s/LB1002 02967s
00581s

02712s 02252s/LB13456 00556s/32331


02251s/LB13455/18692
00549s 00568s
00542s

02991s 00562s/24496/300875 02018s

01398s 02713s
00560s/300879 02714s 02025s
00561s/300878 00559s/300876/03828s
00558s/300877 01696s
00570s 00557s/300880
02992s
00991s
GRID

0 1.00km
Based on the 2008 Ordnance Survey 1:5000 Landplan map with the
permission of The Controller of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office, © Crown Figure 2. Location of the development area (red), study area (green) and areas of archaeological interest
Copyright, Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust Ltd, Licence number
Al10005976
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Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

2.4 General historical and archaeological background


Prehistoric (up to AD43) and Roman AD43 – 410
The earliest human activity in Barry, evidenced by small flint tools found at Friars Point and
Coldbrook Fach, dates to the Mesolithic and Neolithic periods. An albeit tentative suggestion
has been made that a settlement site may have been located beside a marshy lake in what is now
Biglis Moors (Lewis 2006, 18), on the basis that hearths, waste flints and microliths have been
discovered in the immediate vicinity.
Excavation at the Atlantic Trading Estate (ATE) on Bendricks Point, Sully, has revealed further
settlement of prehistoric date. A large flint assemblage recovered from the area clearly denotes
Mesolithic activity; whilst roundhouses, stake built structures and fence lines with supporting
artefactual evidence attests to continuous occupation of the site throughout the Bronze Age.
Nearby at Cadoxton Park considerable quantities of Iron Age pottery have been recovered. A
possible early Iron Age Farmstead, dating to the 4th century BC, was uncovered during the
construction of the College of Further Education off Colcot Road (Dowdell 1984, 41); and
smaller late Iron Age settlements are known to have existed at Biglis, Whitton and Llandough
(Dowdell 1984, 40).
Small-scale occupation is the strongest represented in Barry during the Roman period. There
was a farmstead at the site of Barry Castle and a larger nucleated settlement was situated in the
Victoria Park area of Cadoxton. The late Iron Age settlements at Biglis, Whitton and
Llandough, also continued to be occupied during the Roman period, with the wooden structures
at the latter two eventually being replaced in stone.
Situated approximately 1.5km west of the development area on Cold Knap point is a more
substantial Roman site, which was occupied from approximately the late 1st century AD to the
late 4th century. The principal structure at Cold Knap dates to the late 3rd century AD. It is a
sizeable rectilinear courtyard structure with 22 rooms. However it was never fully completed,
and was destroyed within a short time of being built. The absence of any baths, hypocaust,
water supply, or domestic quarters suggests that the building was intended for official use; most
likely, given its proximity to the harbour in conjunction with naval activity (Newman 1995,
151; Dowdell 1984, 48).
Found in 1889 the Sully Roman hoard comprised gold, silver and bronze coins as well as a
number of gold rings. The coins date to AD 211-296, roughly the same time as the building
work at Cold Knap would have been ongoing; they also match the description of the coins
rumoured to have been found with burials at the Atlantic Trading Estate. Certainly, the presence
of human remains with the hoard strengthens the likelihood of a connection between the hoard
and the possible cemetery.
During the 1980’s 45 east-west orientated skeletons were excavated at the ATE; radiocarbon
analysis dates them to between AD 240 and 890. The absence of grave goods and coffins does
not correlate with the alleged burials exposed in 1930’s; but they are yet further evidence of
continuous settlement in the region during the Roman period, as well as after it (Sell 1996, 21).

Early Medieval (410 to 1066)

The archaeological and documentary evidence for the early medieval period in Wales is
generally sparse. By contrast in Barry, in addition to the early medieval burials at the ATE,
there are known settlement sites at Cold Knap and Cwrt-yr-ala, near Dinas Powys. Excavations
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Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

at the latter site, during the 1950’s, revealed evidence of a multiphase fortified settlement dating
from 5th to the 7th century AD1.
At Cold Knap there are the remains of a round cornered building constructed over the central
courtyard and veranda of the late 3rd century mansio. Radiocarbon analysis has dated this
structure to AD 780 – 1045/1155, but there are no definite finds to support this date. It has been
suggested (Lane 1988, 77) that an early medieval date could be ascribed just as easily as a
Roman one to some of the less diagnostic finds, like the whetstone found in one of the rooms
which was possibly reoccupied. More conclusively food debris has been found in post-roman
contexts, and animal bone from one of the reoccupied rooms gave a radiocarbon date of AD
600-860. Further radiocarbon dates from samples taken elsewhere in the building have given
another possible phase of occupation as the 6th or 7th century.
Medieval (1066 to 1485), Post-medieval (1485 to 1901) and Modern (1901 to present)

The name Barry is thought to have been in use since the 11th century and possibly even earlier,
but its origins are unclear; the name could have been derived in at least one of three ways.
Linguistically, there are two options, the Welsh for hill or rise, is ‘bar’ and likewise, the Old
Norse for border or shore is ‘bar’, whilst ‘ey’ means island (Pierce 1968, 2-6 cf. Knight 1981,
31). However, according to Gerald Cambrensis in his Itinerarium Cambriae (or Journey
through Wales), written in the late 12th century, the island’s name was derived from that of the
Celtic saint whose remains were interred on the island – St Barruch.
Originally pertaining to the island solely, the name Barry came to encompass areas of the
inland,2 and was adopted by the local noble family who owned the island and adjoining estates.3
During the Medieval period Barry incorporated several manorial estates, Barry, Cwmcidy,
Cadoxton, Merthyr Dyfan, and Uchelolau, which were established as a result of Norman
Conquest and colonisation.
Barry Castle was granted soon after conquest; and hearths, pits and pottery all put a 12th
century date to its initial earthwork form. Later two stone buildings were erected on either side
of a courtyard, with the further addition of a large hall and gatehouse on its south side.
In the later medieval period Barry was like the rest of the country, severely affected by
depopulation and subsequently, the parish of Barry combined with two of its neighbours.
Evidence of this impairment is discernible by the fact that it was at this time that the Castle was
allowed to fall into ruin. Further to this alterations to all churches ceased, whilst some even
became disused.
Owing to the absence of mineral resources in the Vale of Glamorgan, the area was spared the
rapid industrialisation that took place elsewhere during the post medieval period. It was not
until the mid 19th century that the increasing demands of the coal export industry led to the
identification of Barry as a suitable site for docks and a railway. A number of attempts were
made to develop the area but the plans were met with much opposition, and lacking in sufficient

1 Note that Alcock, who conducted the excavations, originally interpreted the site as a possible early medieval site, which was refortified during
the Norman period. The lack of structures and finds dating to the medieval period and the archaic character of the earthworks has caused the site
to be re-evaluated, with the result that it is now deemed to date to the 5th –7th centuries.
2 Barry during the 12th century applied to the parishes of Barry, Merthyr Dyfan and Cadoxton, however by the mid 13th century it was
restricted to Barry Island and the parish of Barry on the west side.
3 According to an extract from Gerald Di Barri, a 1st or 2nd generation member of the family: “A noble family resident on the coast of South
Wales has taken its name from the Island because they own it and the neighbouring estates” (cf. H. Thomas 1984, 61)

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Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

financial support, they failed. In 1881 a new conglomerate4 came together to promote the Barry
Dock scheme, and this time they met with more success.
The first dock opened in July 1889, it was followed 7 years later by the railway, which joined
the island to the mainland. Building culminated in 1898 with the building of the second dock
and the docks office. However, Barry Island continued to develop as one of four sub-towns;5
each adjacent to a docks entrance and a railway station and each with its own shopping and
business districts. The urban expansion gradually consumed the parish villages of Cadoxton and
Merthyr Dyfan, resulting in the modern settlement visible today.
2.5 Specific historical and archaeological background
Prehistoric (Up to AD 43)
An assortment of worked flint, flakes (01299s, 00565s, 00991s, 00774s) and even some bone
needles6 attest to intense early human activity on Barry Island. Mesolithic (00774s), Neolithic
(00991s) and later prehistoric worked flint have all been discovered across Friars point, a
headland 15m above OD on the west of the island.
On the same peninsular there are a number of Bronze Age burial mounds that form a small
cemetery7 (03828s), although only two remain visible today.8 J. R. Allen undertook the first
excavation of these features in 1872; JW Lukis and then John Storrie, later undertook further
investigations. Only two (00561s and 00559s/ 300878) of the five mounds were found to
contain human remains,9 and unfortunately the lack of recorded burials from the other mounds,
(in particular cairns Five (00560s/300879) and Six (00557s/300880) has cast doubt on their
funerary character.
Two further Bronze Age crouch burials (00568s - ST11406630 and 00581s – ST10776644)
have been found near to the cairns on Friars Point. The more articulate of the two was contained
within a stone cist. There is nothing at the finds site to indicate the location of the discovery.
The cist, which was tentatively identified in 1982, was apparently re-erected in the enclosure of
St Baruch’s Chapel (ST 1194 6666).
Also a short distance away from Friars Point, further inland to the west of Whitmore Bay, a
concentrated collection of approximately 30 flint implements and flakes were found. It is
probable that this collection, which included a reused piece of axe, also belong to the later
prehistoric period. The density of these flints, within a wider context that is already yielding
evidence of Bronze Age funerary activity, suggests an occupation of the site in that period, if
not earlier (Fox 1936, 25).
Roman AD 43 - 410
In his 1894-5 excavations Storrie identified two of the six sites that he investigated as Roman;
these were the ‘Roman Well’ (00564s) and ‘British Kitchen’ (0555s). However, this dating
resulted from Storries misclassification of artefacts, in particular the course wares, which he
believed were degraded Roman and sub Roman pottery. Both sites have now been reinterpreted
as belonging to the medieval period. Whilst no clear habitation sites are, as yet, known to have

4 David Davies usually receives credit for the building of the docks, but he did not act alone, Archibald Hood and O.J. Riches are also
responsible for their development.
5 The other three being Cadoxton, Barry and Barry Docks.
6 John Storrie discovered the bone needles in the highest peat deposit identified during the construction of the docks.
7 The round barrow cemetery comprises PRNs 542s, 557s-561s, 568s, 581s and 2992s.
8 Only 00561s / 300878 and 00562s / 24496/ 300875 remain visible.
9 Cairn Two (00561s – ST1104966042) and Four (00559s/ 300878 – ST11066600) were the only ones to contain burials. Roughly circular and
partially covered by grass, Cairn Two is composed of earth and stone, although some of the rock that can be seen at the surface is natural
outcrop. In the dished centre it contained a central cremation burial in an overhanging-rim urn, which had been placed in an inverted position on
a flat stone. Three more cremations, along with other fragments of pottery, mollusc shells, a horse tooth, and evidence of burning (Allen 1873;
1895) were discovered during the course of subsequent investigations. The burial remains in Cairn Four comprised a cremation covered by a
thin stone slab and accompanied by a burnt flint flake; a secondary burial was also found, along with three flakes and some horse teeth.
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Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

existed on Barry Island in the Roman period, finds including coins, pottery, jewellery and
building materials (00577s / 02967s/ 00967s), imply that the strong Roman presence evidenced
elsewhere in the Barry region was not entirely absent on the island.
Early Medieval (410AD – 1066)
Early medieval activity on Barry Island is typically limited. Beneath the 12th century apse of St
Barruch’s were two burials (PRN 00553s) which, being phased earlier than the structure, are
probably of early medieval date. John Storrie, the original excavator of St Barruch’s, believed
that there was also an earlier 5th century structure associated with the chapel (the oratory).
However this building, located immediately to the north of the chapel, has since been identified
as the priests house and deemed as contemporary with the later 14th century rebuilding of the
Chapel.
The notion of an early medieval predecessor to the Chapel has not ceased to persist though, with
both Dowdell (1984) and Thomas (1984) suggesting that the porch of the chapel might belong
to a pre Norman structure. Knight who re-excavated the site in 1968, concluded that the burials
under the walls of the chapel indicated that in actual fact an earlier structure would have had to
have stood elsewhere (Knight 1981, 57). Furthermore, his discovery of parts of a large stone
box, which is possibly an earlier container for the relics of St Barruch, have led him to argue
that the bones of St Barruch may have rested in an open-air grave shrine.10
Medieval (1066 – 1485)
The scheduled remains of St Barruch’s chapel (03805s), which is a simple Norman structure
with a nave and chancel built of local stone, are located on the eastern side of Barry Island. It
forms part of a religious complex including a cemetery, priest’s house and possibly the
habitation site known as ‘The British Kitchen’ (0555s).11 The site has been excavated twice, but
the extent of the cemetery has never been fully ascertained. Several skeletons and part of a wall
were found when excavations for the sewer on the western side of Friars Road, took place in
1895. An evaluation in 1999, on land adjacent to the junction of Breaksea Drive and Friars
Road was however, completely negative (Vyce 1999).
The chapel’s omission from documentary sources, such as, parish church valuations indicates
that it was probably a free chapel reliant on the income of pilgrims who visited. Income would
also have been derived through the rights of burial, which are attested to archaeologically and
historically. Significantly, the pilgrimage in conjunction with the number of burials on what
appears to have been a relatively uninhabited island, point to the place having been regarded as
one of special sanctity (Storrie 1896, Fox 1936, Knight 1981, and Dowdell 1984).
Another site that underwent examination by John Storrie in 1894-5 was ‘St Piero’s Abbey’
(00554s). There are no extant plans for the site, but Storrie describes it as being ‘a few yards
east of Paget Road and close to new south station approach, and less than one hundred yards
north of the shore of Wick Moore, or Whitmore bay as it is now called.’ (Storrie 1896, 27)
Accordingly, it is situated directly beneath where the log flume now stands at Barry Island
Pleasure Park.
The ‘abbey’ remains comprised a principal wall of lias stone, running east – west, with an
entranceway in the middle. Approximately seven small enclosures were found on either side of
the wall, each measuring around 2.1 - 2.4m by 0.6 - 0.9m.12 The absence of any roof tiles was

10 Knight’s excavation in 1968 recovered parts of a large stone box, which he believes may be the earlier container for the relics of St Barruch.
11 0555s – A habitation site with hearths, fires and a lot of cooking debris, was found beneath sand deposits measuring 4.5m. Finds included
lots of glazed and unglazed pot, as well as many fish and animal bones and shells. The site was later re-evaluated in 1936 by Aileen Fox, who
found that the pottery from the chapel and habitation site were of such similar character that they could be assigned to the same period and
regarded as a consistent group (Fox 1936, 23).
12 These were more roughly hewn than those in the central wall, and very irregularly fitted.
13
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

taken by Storrie to indicate a wattle and daub method of construction. This deduction has since
received further verification from the discovery of fragments of burnt daub, found during an
evaluation13 directly opposite the site on the western side of Paget Road (Howell, 2001). These
were discovered in association with an occupation layer of 13th century date.
In addition to the structure, Storrie found a paved area with a large hearth. It contained a
substantial amount of unglazed pottery, which he once again misclassified, this time as early
medieval. In a later re-evaluation of the site (Fox 1936) the pottery was identified as Ham Green
and Merinda Ware, which actually dates to 13th – 14th century. Overall though, the finds point
to a long period of occupation from the 12th – 17th century.
Another feature of the latent medieval settlement is Storrie’s ‘Roman Well’14 (00564s), which is
situated close to the railway embankment where it crosses Paget Road, .028km to the north west
of the structure. The well, again constructed in lias stone, measured 0.75m in diameter with
walls 1.47m thick at their thinnest. Although three pottery fragments were associated with the
well, the only find retrieved from within it, was a small piece of bone with a tapered end to
which a bronze loop with socket was riveted on. This find was, unbeknownst to Storrie, a
medieval pendant. Unfortunately he considered the find to be ‘small and unimportant’ and so
dated the well incorrectly by association with a Roman fibula, discovered 3.6m away.15
Attempts to conclusively reinterpret the structure have been unsuccessful, due to the
“puzzlingly incomplete nature” of Storrie’s records. Fox alleged that the cells were too small for
human occupation, but suitable for use as cattle stalls or stables (1936, 25). However, if large
animals could be housed in the cells there is no real reason why humans could not be. Further
weakening Fox’s argument is the reinterpretation of her basis for comparison, as the supposed
Tintagel monastry cells, which measured 1.80m by 3.60m, are now thought to be thirteenth-
century workmen's huts (Thomas 1993).
Meanwhile Knight (1981) believes that the evidence points to a multi period group of medieval
house sites, and there is certainly plenty of evidence on the island indicative of occupation
during the medieval period. For example, stray finds of medieval pottery found in allotments
near the site of Barry Island Farm (00970s) 0.43km NE of the Abbey, as well as on a pathway,
and in a rock crevice over-looking Whitmore Bay (01398s). Ridges and furrows have also been
identified on Friars point, which evidence arable land usage during this period (Griffiths 1989,
189). Arguably though, Knight’s notion of a ‘deserted medieval village’ is a stretch on both the
available archaeological and documentary evidence.
Another explanation of the structure envisages it as a hostel for visiting pilgrims (Pastfinders
Pers. Comm.), who making their way to the island at low tide may have been unable to return
again until the next day. It is possible that the similarity in building style between the priests
house and the ‘abbey’ structure, noted by Fox (1936, 24), means that they may be directly
associated and not simply contemporary to one another. The longevity of the sites occupation
may also be explained by this argument, as pilgrimage to the island occurred not only when the
chapel of St Barruch’s flourished, during the pilgrimage revival of the 15th century, but also
after the chapels demise in the 16th century with visitors attending the votive well.
Whatever the buildings purpose, it is clear that settlement of some kind occurred during the
medieval period, and that the area of occupation extended north to at least the railway, and west

13 The evaluation centred on NGR ST11306662; three trenches were investigated, but only the third trench revealed medieval archaeology.
This was situated beneath made ground and sand, which ran to an average depth of 1.20 – 1.45m. The occupation layer sloped east to west
from 10.38m od to 10.23m od, and consisted of a dark reddish brown sandy clay. Associated finds, all concentrated towards the eastern end of
the trench included 13th century pottery (locally made), fragments of burnt daub, animal bone and charcoal.
14 Steps were initially taken to preserve the well, but there are now no visible remains. (OS card ST 16 NW 150).
15 The fibula was found 12 yards south of the well.
14
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

to the other side of Paget Road. However, it is significant that its extent within the development
area is entirely unknown.

Post Medieval (1485 – 1901)

The emergence of a well with healing capabilities is a common occurrence at the resting place
of a saint. It is not surprising, therefore that situated 270m south of St Barruch’s chapel on
Nell’s point, is a well of the same name. The antiquity of this feature has never been established
despite investigation, although documentary sources for the well suggest that it is of some age.
Indeed, the reformation of 1535 denounced wells along with relics16 as superstitions, making it
highly unlikely that the well gained its association at this time or after, as a negative view of
wells was maintained well into the 18th century.
Rags and bent pins have been recovered from the well, both of which are articles associated
with ritual healing and wishing. A report of the island given circa 1700, confirms that the well
was attributed with medicinal properties, describing it as “a well of very good water which
cures ye Kings evil agues and is also good for pain in the Head and for sore eyes” (Cf. Fox,
1936 26). Lewis’s Topographical Dictionary of 1883 also mentions that the well was “much
resorted to on Holy Thursday by females, who having washed their eyes with the water, each
drop a pin into it.” (Cf. Fox, 1936 26) This type of Holy well was once common throughout the
British Isles, and at least three others are known in the Vale of Glamorgan.
By the 17th century Barry Island was home to a single farm, run by tenant occupants, which
was situated on the East side of Ostry hill and possessed three fields. The rest of the island
comprised sand dunes, marsh, and rough pasture. From as early as the 13th century rabbits
were farmed on the islands of the Bristol Channel, and documentary evidence of this from the
15th century onwards shows that Barry Island was no exception. It is also attested to
archaeologically, by the pillow mound (00562s/24496/300875) on Friars Point,17which shows
the artificial encouragement of rabbit breeding. By the 19th century rabbits were the main
produce of the island being shipped to Bristol in large quantities.
In the 1780’s Barry Island became the base of Thomas Knight, a notorious smuggler, who ran a
fleet ships from there. It is reported that he put fortifications around the shoreline and had a
force of 60-70 men defending the island. In 1785 Knight and his men were driven out and he
retreated to Lundy. Another smuggler William Arthur then based himself on Barry Island,
however, for reasons that are not entirely clear, the contraband trade from Barry petered out by
the end of the 18th century.
By the early 19th century the Barry Island farm had begun to take in guests who came to visit
the island on account of the beach. Barry Island did not gain any great popularity at the time
owing to its isolation, an extract from A Tour of South Wales by the visiting Rev. J Evans,
published in 1804, reads: “To a party that has all their amusements amongst themselves, it may
be a tolerable place for a time, but to those accustomed to the luxury of society and other

16 Although the causes of the chapel of St Barruch’s demise in the 16th century are unknown, after the cult reached some widespread
popularity in the 15th century with a side altar dedicated to the saint existing at Wenvoe Church a few miles inland, it is likely that the
reformation may have been a key factor.
17 Storrie excavated the barrow in 1894-5, but there was evidence of previous disturbance, and all that he found was a triangular chert flake and
some horse teeth. The date of the mound is unknown; it could be either post medieval or earlier.

15
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

pleasurable amusements, Barry will not furnish a single inducement to visit" (Cf. Storrie 1896,
12).
Nonetheless, when the island was put up for sale in 1856 it was its potential as a holiday resort
that was stressed. It was also the aspect which the new owner, Francis Crawshay, capitalised on
by erecting the Marine Hotel (02251s/13455/18692); now a grade II listed structure known as
Friars Point House.
In 1873 Barry Island changed hands, passing to John Travis Treharne who renamed the Marine
Hotel, the Pier Hotel and made a number of alterations to it. Eventually, in 1894 the house
became the private residence of Lord Windsor, who made further extensive changes to the
building and grounds, adding the gates (02252s/13456) and Lodge (02253s/18693/13457). Two
years prior the plan for the first houses on the island had been put forward and building started
in spring of the same year. A whole series of streets were built on the north side of the island
1894, and development continued on an ad hoc basis thereafter.
In 1896 the railway line was extended from Barry Station to the Island. This line crossed to the
island at road level, and eradicated the structural remains of Barry Island Farm. When
modernisation of one of the premises on Station Approach was undertaken recently, traces of a
track were found in the basement. The railway did not only benefit the docks, it also acted as a
catalyst for the development of the island as a tourist destination. Only a year later the first
major ride at Barry Island opened at the western end of the Promenade - the Switchback
Railway.
In 1902 Lord Windsor transferred the beach and facilities to the council, and several years later
the surrounding area also passed into their control. At the eastern end of the beach a fairground
was situated with swing boats, chair-o-planes and small roundabouts, whilst attractions on the
beach included donkey rides, stage shows, boat trips and Punch & Judy shows. In 1912, a much
larger Figure of Eight roller coaster opened on the site of the present Pleasure Park taking
business away from the Switchback, which closed two years later.
The early 20th century saw Barry grow to be the largest coal exporting port in the world, with
11 million tons of coal passing through it in 1913. However, World War One saw a decline in
trade and subsequent building, a trend repeated following the conclusion of the Second World
War in 1945. The Great War also interrupted the Council's plans for the development of the
Island and it was not until 1922 that work on the sea wall began.
In 1923 the work on the construction of the Western Shelter and shops began. Work also started
on the building of the promenade, causing the stallholders and fairground operatives to leave the
beach and move to a site adjacent to the Figure of Eight Roller coaster. The White Bros, who
held the beach concession, bid for and became the first tenants of the newly formed Barry
Island Pleasure Park.
Barry Island’s popularity as a tourist destination continued to grow, even during the recession of
the 1920’s, and it was reinvigorated in the 1960’s by the building of a Butlins complex on Nells
Point. Twenty years later the successful camp seemed set to avoid the first batch of closures,
with an upgrade to the camp being proposed instead. Only three months later Butlin's
announced that the camp was no longer included in their plans and was to close.
A buyer was found in the form of Majestic Holidays who announced plans for a new £15
million holiday complex. However, the new complex was never built although following
renovation works the site did reopen. In 1996, due to problems with renewing the entertainment
licence, low bookings and storm damage inflicted during October of that year, the camp finally
closed for good. A new housing development of over 250 homes now stands where Butlins
once did.
16
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

The beach, promenade and fun fair are Barry Island's only remaining attractions, and weather
permitting they continue to draw some visitors. Nowadays, Barry is now more renowned as a
manufacturing town and a service centre for the Vale of Glamorgan. It is still, however, an
active port with Barry Docks and the adjoining industrial area forming the largest employment
centre in the town.

2.6 Review of Documentary, Cartographic and Aerial Resources:

Documentary Sources

It is generally accepted that Barry Island was uninhabited, save for the Chapel of St Baruch,
until the occupation of Barry Island Farmhouse in the 17th century. This view of the island has
been propagated by historical sources; for example, in 1478 William Worcestre produced a list
of Welsh Islands, in which he describes Barry Island as “a mile and a half long…(it) is not
inhabitated but cattle are grazed there” (Thomas 1984, 58).
John Leland’s systematic survey of the realm (conducted at the request of King Henry VIII) in
1536-39 corroborates the earlier portrayal stating that: “The isle is about a mile in
circumference, and has very good corn, grass and some wood. There is no dwelling in the isle,
but there is in the middle of it a fair little chapel of St. Barruk, where much pilgrimage was
used” (Harvey 1969, 139 cf. Storrie 1896, 12).
However there are some sources that suggest that this depiction of the island is not entirely
accurate. The earliest of these comes from Gerald Cambrensis, author of the late 12th century
'Itinerary of Archbishop Baldwin through Wales,' he mentions that the remains of second chapel
are visible on Friars Point, Barry Island at low water. Lewis’s Topographical dictionary of
Wales (1833) gives a similar but more elaborate portrayal: “On the western side of the island,
opposite the ruins of the Barry Castle, are faint vestiges of a similar structure, and of two
ancient chapels, in one of which the hermit, St Barruch, was interred” (cf. Storrie 1896, 12).
Yet another source written by David Spencer, the son of the a lease holder of the island in the
late 17th century, states that “There is ye ruins of a Chapell and ye ruins of many houses, tho’
now inhabitted only with one house.” (Morris 1911, III 73-4). These descriptions actually fit
better with the available archaeological evidence, and may be a reference to the settlement near
the west end of Whitmore bay. It is unfortunate therefore that the cartographic evidence does
not substantiate them to any extent.

Cartographic Sources

The Wenvoe Estate map, produced in 1762, provides a graphic depiction of the island’s
appearance at the time. It clearly shows the location of the ‘Old Chapel’ and ‘Well’ of St
Barruch, suggesting that these may not as yet have been inundated by sand. Barry Island
Farmhouse is also clearly delineated on the map, with four enclosed fields (enclosing an area of
42 acres, leaving 158 acres as rough pasture). To the west of the farm, at the bottom of Ostry
Hill is ‘Leach pool’, whilst the north coast of the island is shown as marshland. A second
edition of this map was produced in 1798; it shows some additional field enclosures to the east
of the Barry Island farm. The development site, which is situated directly south of Leech pool,
is common warren and rough dunes in use for grazing.

17
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

The 1846 Tithe Map (Parish of Sully) and 1st edition OS map of 1879 show little change to the
island. The Tithe map in particular only shows an extension of land division, which still belongs
to the farm and the development area is given as ‘warren’. The chapel of St Barruchs is
discernible, as is the well on the OS map but not the Tithe. Also on the OS map is the second
chapel (00549s/02712s), referred to by both Gerald Cambrensis and Samuel Lewis (1833); it
shown on the opposite side of the island and it is referenced that there were human remains
(00542s/02712s) found there in 1876. Further changes to the island apparent on the OS map of
1879 include the erection of the Marine Hotel (later Friars Point House) and two ‘old’
limekilns, one on the north coast of the island and the other just northwest of the hotel. As for
the development site, it is still rough dunes, but does now have two footpaths running across it.
Barry Island has undergone massive development, with the building of the docks and railway,
by the time of the 1900 2nd edition OS map. The farmhouse and Leach Pool have both gone.
Friars Road and Paget Road, amongst others, are laid out, although the houses associated with
these two roads are not yet depicted. The areas of historical interest as identified by Storrie’s
excavations in 1894/5 are demarcated; and subsequently, the ruins of the ‘abbey’ are now
shown within the development area. Significantly, ‘Sand Pits’ with a single southeast-northwest
rail line running to them are shown on the eastern side of the development site. The contour
lines show that the site depth drops considerably along the northern perimeter as well as on the
northeast side of the railway track that runs across the site. The purpose of the quarrying has
not been possible to ascertain, but it may be that it was used for the ongoing building in the
area.
The 3rd edition OS map of 1920 refers again to the sand pits, although it is indicated that the
quarrying has ceased by this point with the use of the prefix ‘old’. The rail line leading to the
pits has been removed, and whilst there is still some disturbance to the ground level the
hachures delineate that it is to a lesser depth. On the north side of the site there is a series of six
structures of varying size, these are presumably associated with the figure of eight railway, but
the ride itself, despite having been erected in 1912, is not clear on the OS maps until the 4th
edition of 1936.
In the 4th edition map the site has been levelled and the fairground has been established, it is
fenced along Paget and Friars Road by a line of trees. A series of buildings are on the southern
perimeter, including the substantial red brick building that still stands today, housing a number
of shops including a Hypervalue store. A number of rides are located centrally, and another
large building has been built directly on the medieval settlement site, its exact purpose is
unclear although it is clearly a feature of the Pleasure Park.

Aerial Photography

In 1929 the ownership of Barry Island Pleasure Park transferred from the White Brothers to Pat
Collins, but unfortunately the changes made to the Park at that time cannot be documented
through either the cartographic or photographic sources. It has been documented however, that
amongst the attractions and rides offered by Pat Collins on the opening of the ground for his
first season were The Honeymoon Express, Hey Day, The Welsh Golden Dragons, The
Caterpillar, and Over the Falls. Other attractions were the Death Ride, a Boxing Kangaroo, a
large open air dance floor with amplified music from gramophone records (one of the first
disco's), and a Menagerie with ten lions, nine tamed and one straight from the wild
(http://www.barrywales.co.uk/tomclemett/bisland1.asp).

18
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

The scenic railway, which replaced the Figure of Eight roller coaster in 1939 can however, be
clearly seen on the earliest aerial photos. It had a track of just over a mile long and an initial
climb and drop of seventy-two feet, making it was the biggest wood built roller coaster ever
erected in the UK. The ride only just fitted into the available space and ran almost the full
length of the park. The top entrance (giving access to the island’s railway station) had to be
moved by several yards to enable it to fit. Along with the other traditional scenic railways the
ride’s wooden framework was covered in rippled thick plaster and painted to resemble a rocky
mountain landscape, which can be seen a number of the aerial photo’s.
Apart from the Scenic Railway, the Waltzer, several carousels and most of the side stalls that
were owned and operated by the Pat Collins and later his family, the majority of the other major
rides in the park were independently owned and/or run. For example, between the 1950s-1970s
George Summers ran the Big Wheel, Dive Bomber, Moon Rocket, Revolving Jets and Tipping
Paratrooper rides along with the Mirror Maze, two One Arm Bandit Arcades and several "Prize
every time" booths. A fact, which along with the continuous changing of rides means that
ascertaining a detailed chronology of the park to an extent greater than that provided here, is
difficult.
Around the Scenic Railway the pleasure park continued to grow and alter, and by 1951 (24th
May) the site is very heavily built up. The Scenic Railway was partially dismantled, serviced
and rebuilt in 1963, but eventually demolished in 1973 as a result of severe damage incurred
during a gale. It was also becoming outdated and unable to compete with the newer and more
modern high-speed rides that were being introduced elsewhere.
Wooden beams from the Scenic Railway were salvaged, stored and reused in the construction of
the Log Flume and the Wacky Goldmine (now renamed the Haunted Mine). However, the log
flume was not erected until 1980, and until then the photographs show that the area of the
medieval settlement remained empty. Owing to the much smaller size of the new rides a major
change in the design and set out of the park occurred and a number of new structures appeared,
most notably on the southwest and southeast corners of the site.
For various commercial reasons during the 1990s, including a noticeable downturn in trade, the
Pleasure Park changed hands once again. The new proprietor was the millionaire owner of the
Hypervalue Group, Ken Rogers. He made sweeping changes and improvements to the Pleasure
Park, including the demolition and construction of many of the rides. When Ken Rodgers
passed away in 2000, ownership of the park passed to his son Ian; a memorial to Mr Rodgers is
now located in the centre of the Pleasure Park.
Following a recent restructure of the business, Hypervalue is now trading as Hyper Xtra and is
currently owned 50/50 between Ian Rogers and Hilco UK, including the pleasure park.
Investment in Barry Island Pleasure Park continues in consultation with the local authority. The
most current rides at the park include the following: Evolution (closed until further notice);
Viper; Tropical Fever; Waltzer; Log Flume; The Jungle Ride; The Haunted Mine; Seaoray
(closed until further notice); Fun Railway; Tea Cups Sting; Mini Twister (closed until further
notice); and Parartroopers. Two arcades, Lucky Penny and Just Penny also currently operate,
although due to vandalism both The Dolphin Restaurant and KR’s Night Spot are both closed.

19
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

3. Archaeological Interests
There are 81 sites of archaeological interest identified within the study area (Table 1). The
remains of the chapel at St Barruch’s and its associated structures (94570/ 00549s) are a
Scheduled Ancient Monument GM120. The total number of listed buildings in the area is
fifteen. Only eight of these are on the island itself, they include: Lifeboat house (15894); Docks
Slipway (15895); Docks Sliding Bridge (16562); Sliding Bridge Operators cabin (16837);
Walls of the dock basin (3212); Friars Point House (13455); Friars Point Lodge (13456) and
Friars Point Gates (13457). Further information relating to these interests can be found in the
gazetteer in Appendix V.
Numbers with a letter suffix are Primary Record Numbers (PRNs) in the regional Historic
Environment Record (HER). Five and six figure numbers without a letter suffix are National
Primary Record Numbers (NPRNs) of the National Monuments Record, as supplied to the HER
under the ENDEX agreement. Numbers with a ‘LB’ prefix are Listed Buildings, as provided by
Cadw. Numbers with a ‘Gm’ prefix are Scheduled Ancient Monuments (SAMs).
Table 1: Identified archaeological interests
ID NAME NGR PERIOD SITE_STATUS Value

03805s ST BARRUCH'S CHAPEL ST11936667 Early Medieval None U

03832s CEMETERY, BARRY ISLAND ST11936667 Medieval None C

INHUMATIONS AT ST
03834s BARRUC'S CHAPEL, BARRY ST11936667 Early Medieval None C
ISLAND

00559s/300876 FRIARS POINT CAIRN 4 ST11066600 Bronze Age None D

00560s/300879 FRIARS POINT CAIRN 5 ST11066604 Bronze Age None D

FRIARS POINT CAIRN 1;


00562s/24496/3 TREHARNES' PIER PILLOW
ST1103066122 Medieval None C
00875 MOUND;FRIARS POINT,
PILLOW MOUND

00542s/02712s INHUMATION - BARRY ISLAND ST10866638 Unknown None U

20
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID NAME NGR PERIOD SITE_STATUS Value

CHAPEL AT FRIARS POINT,


00549s/02712s ST10846637 Medieval None U
BARRY

00553s/
ST BARRUC'S CHAPEL ST11936667 Medieval SAM A
94570/GM120

00554s BARRY ISLAND 'ABBEY' ST11346663 Medieval None C

00555s BRITISH KITCHEN ST11896670 Medieval/ Roman None C

00556s/32331 ST BARRUC'S WELL ST12006642 Medieval None C

00557s/300880 FRIARS POINT CAIRN 6 ST11096596 Bronze Age None D

00558s/300877 FRIARS POINT CAIRN 3 ST11066597 Bronze Age None C

00561s/300878 FRIARS POINT CAIRN 2 ST1104966042 Bronze Age None C

00564s ROMAN WELL ST11346667 Medieval None D

00565s BARRY DOCKS FINDSPOT ST1167 Neolithic None C

00567s PAGET ROAD FINDSPOT ST11336664 Prehistoric None C

00568s BARRY INHUMATION ST11406630 Bronze Age None C

21
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID NAME NGR PERIOD SITE_STATUS Value

00570s SITE NAME NOT KNOWN ST1166 Early Medieval None U

BARRY HARBOUR /
00577s ST108667 Roman None C
STOREHOUSE POINT

FRAIRS POINT CROUCHED


00581s ST10776644 Bronze Age None D
BURIAL

00774s FRIAR POINT FINDSPOT ST110661 Mesolithic None C

00889s STOREHOUSE POINT ST10806685 Post Medieval None C

00967s BARRY PARADE GARDENS ST10566677 Roman None C

00970s SITE NAME NOT KNOWN ST11726683 Medieval None D

00999s STOREHOUSE POINT ST106669 Medieval None D

00991s FRIARS POINT ST111659 Neolithic None C

01005s BEGGARS WELL HABITATION ST109674 Medieval None C

01006s BEGGARS WELL HABITATION ST109674 Medieval None C

01007s EAST BARRY HOUSE ST109675 Medieval None D

22
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID NAME NGR PERIOD SITE_STATUS Value

01398s SITE NAME NOT KNOWN ST110661 Medieval None D

01696s SULLY HAVEN ST1266 Unknown None C

02018s NELLS POINT ST12056615 Modern None C

02025s WELLS POINT ST120661 Modern None C

BARRY CASTLE -
02204s ST117668 Medieval None C
WESTBARRY

02251s/13455/1 FRIARS POINT HOUSE/


ST109663 Post Medieval LBII B
8692 MARINE HOTEL

02252s/ 13456 FRIARS POINT HOUSE GATE ST109663 Post Medieval LBII B

02253s/18693/1
FRIARS POINT LODGE ST109663 Post Medieval LBII B
3457

NO 1 DOCK NORTH
02300s/13468/3
HYDRAULIC PUMPING HOUSE ST11176755 Post Medieval LBII B
3739
NORTHERN RANGE

NO 1 DOCK NORTH
02301s/13468/3
HYDRAULIC PUMPING HOUSE ST11176755 Post Medieval LBII B
3739
SOUTHERN RANGE

02705s SITE NAME NOT KNOWN ST10516670 Unknown None U

02710s SITE NAME NOT KNOWN ST107668 Roman None U

23
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID NAME NGR PERIOD SITE_STATUS Value

02711s TREHARNES PIER ST110665 Post Medieval None D

02713s SITE NAME NOT KNOWN ST121661 Post Medieval None D

02714s SITE NAME NOT KNOWN ST119661 Modern None C

03016s/41427 BARRY ISLAND STATION ST11536668 Post Medieval None B

02967s BARRY ISLAND ST115666 Roman None C

02991s FRIAR'S POINT ST10956615 Prehistoric None C

02992s FRIARS POINT BARROW ST11176593 Bronze Age None D

03828s FRIARS POINT CEMETERY ST11066600 Bronze Age None C

34234 BARRY DOCKS, BARRY ST12266714 Post Medieval None B

BARRY ISLAND PLEASURE


32744 ST1145566622 Post Medieval None B
PARK

FRIARS POINT HOUSE,


265833 ST1094166362 Post Medieval None C
GARDEN, BARRY

BARRY HOTEL, BROAD


305941/15509 ST10706735 Post Medieval LBII B
STREET, BARRY

24
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID NAME NGR PERIOD SITE_STATUS Value


WINDSOR ROAD ENGLISH
CONGREGATIONALCHAPEL
9180 (UNITED REFORMED ST10606742 Post Medieval None C
CHURCH), PORTHKERRY
ROAD;

34236 BARRY LIFEBOAT LAUNCH ST12256670 Post Medieval None C

BETHANY ENGLISH BAPTIST


CHAPEL, ARCHER ROAD,
9182 ST11616696 Post Medieval None C
BARRY ISLAND; YNYS-Y-
BARRI

41437 BARRY PIER STATION ST12196679 Post Medieval None C

41428 BARRY TOWN STATION SHED ST10726720 Post Medieval None D

41426/03015s BARRY TOWN STATION ST10706720 Post Medieval None B

308857 BARRY DOCKS SEA LOCK ST12366677 Post Medieval None B

OPERATOR'S CABIN, SLIDING


308595 ST12266714 Post Medieval LBII B
BRIDGE, BARRY DOCKS

ST BARUCH'S (2) CHURCH,


14079 PLYMOUTH ROAD, BARRY ST11606686 Post Medieval None D
ISLAND

PRESBYTERIAN CHAPEL
(ENGLISH CALVINISTIC
14080 ST11996680 Post Medieval None C
METHODIST), EARL
CRESCENT, BARRI ISLAND

BAILEY'S GRAVING DOCK,


91514 ST12206696 Post Medieval None B
BARRY DOCKS

ST BARUCH'S CHURCH (3),


97242 ARCHER ROAD/ PHYLLIS ST11606699 Post Medieval None C
STREET, BARRY ISLAND

25
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID NAME NGR PERIOD SITE_STATUS Value

PUMPHOUSE AT BAILEYS
91515 GRAVING DOCK, BARRY ST12176693 Post Medieval None C
DOCKS

LIFEBOATHOUSE, BARRY
404879/15894 ST1217366726 Modern LBII B
DOCKS

406806 BARRY TOWN ST1166 Multiperiod None B

NO 69, HIGH STREET (S SIDE)


15888 ST1073267473 Unknown LBII B
BARRY

NO 70, HIGH STREET (S SIDE)


15889 ST71073867478 Unknown LBII B
BARRY

NO 71, HIGH STREET (S SIDE)


15890 ST10742167481 Unknown LBII B
BARRY

NO 72, HIGH STREET (S SIDE)


15891 ST1074767485 Unknown LBII B
BARRY

PORTHKERRY METHODIST
15893/14105 CHURCH, PORTHKERRY ST10526744 Post Medieval LBII B
ROAD (N SIDE), BARRY

15895 SLIPWAY, BARRY DOCKS ST1222066710 Unknown LBII B

SLIDING BRIDGE (AT NORTH


16562 ST1224067130 Unknown LBII B
ENTRANCE TO BASIN)

WALLS OF DOCK BASIN


3212 (ALSO KNOWN AS NO 3 ST1227067000 Unknown None C
BASIN)

274096 R'EAUMER ST11006600 Post Medieval None C

26
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID NAME NGR PERIOD SITE_STATUS Value

POTENTIAL PREHISTORIC
BI001 ST11346663 Prehistoric None U
SITE

BI002 MEMORIAL ST1145566622 Modern None C

27
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

4. Assessment
4.1 Effect of the development on archaeological sites (Table 2)
A total of 81 sites have been identified within the study area. Four of these are located within
the proposed development area, which is where Barry Island Pleasure Park (32744) currently
operates. The park has been a physically prominent feature of the townscape since its
establishment in 1923, from which time it has been a major contributing factor in the
characterisation of Barry Island as a seaside resort. Consequently, it has been important in
creating a sense of place, not only for the permanent residents of the immediate community, but
also for all those who have visited.
Located within the Pleasure Park is a memorial (BI002) to the previous owner of the park, Ken
Rodgers, who passed away in 2000. It comprises a statute, plaque and small garden area. The
effect of the proposed development on Barry Island Pleasure Park and this memorial will be
‘severe’.
There are known buried remains in the development area too, which were partially excavated by
the antiquarian John Storrie. Interpretation of the site is difficult due to the incomplete nature
of the records and theories range from the structure being cattle stalls or stables, to it being apart
of a multi phased deserted medieval village or a hostel for visitors to the island. Because of the
difficulty in identifying and understanding the site, it has not been possible to gauge its value.
During his excavation of the ‘abbey’ site John Storrie also found a collection of prehistoric
flints, possibly from the Bronze Age. These may represent an earlier occupation of the site,
especially given the other prehistoric activity in the vicinity. The condition of any buried
remains is particularly difficult to gauge, given the high level of intrusive activity on the site
over the last century and the unknown depth of the Aeolian deposits. The effect of the proposed
development, if the archaeology is still intact, will be severe.
The impact of the proposed development on the remaining 77 sites situated within the study
area, but outside of the actual development area, has been assessed as ‘none’.
Table 2: Effect of the development on known archaeological interests
ID NAME NGR PERIOD Value Effect

00554s BARRY ISLAND 'ABBEY' ST11346663 Medieval C Severe

32744 BARRY ISLAND PLEASURE PARK ST1145566622 Post Medieval B Severe

BI001 POTENTIAL PREHISTORIC SITE ST11346663 Prehistoric U Severe

BI002 MEMORIAL ST1145566622 Modern C Severe

28
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID NAME NGR PERIOD Value Effect

03805s ST BARRUCH'S CHAPEL ST11936667 Early Medieval U None

03832s CEMETERY, BARRY ISLAND ST11936667 Medieval C None

INHUMATIONS AT ST BARRUC'S
03834s ST11936667 Early Medieval C None
CHAPEL, BARRY ISLAND

00559s/300876 FRIARS POINT CAIRN 4 ST11066600 Bronze Age D None

00560s/300879 FRIARS POINT CAIRN 5 ST11066604 Bronze Age D None

FRIARS POINT CAIRN 1;


00562s/24496/3008 TREHARNES' PIER PILLOW
ST1103066122 Medieval C None
75 MOUND;FRIARS POINT, PILLOW
MOUND

00542s/02712s INHUMATION - BARRY ISLAND ST10866638 Unknown U None

00549s/02712s CHAPEL AT FRIARS POINT, BARRY ST10846637 Medieval U None

00553s/
ST BARRUC'S CHAPEL ST11936667 Medieval A None
94570/GM120

00555s BRITISH KITCHEN ST11896670 Medieval/ Roman C None

00556s/32331 ST BARRUC'S WELL ST12006642 Medieval C None

00557s/300880 FRIARS POINT CAIRN 6 ST11096596 Bronze Age D None

29
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID NAME NGR PERIOD Value Effect

00558s/300877 FRIARS POINT CAIRN 3 ST11066597 Bronze Age C None

00561s/300878 FRIARS POINT CAIRN 2 ST1104966042 Bronze Age C None

00564s ROMAN WELL ST11346667 Medieval D None

00565s BARRY DOCKS FINDSPOT ST1167 Neolithic C None

00567s PAGET ROAD FINDSPOT ST11336664 Prehistoric C None

00568s BARRY INHUMATION ST11406630 Bronze Age C None

00570s SITE NAME NOT KNOWN ST1166 Early Medieval U None

BARRY HARBOUR / STOREHOUSE


00577s ST108667 Roman C None
POINT

00581s FRAIRS POINT CROUCHED BURIAL ST10776644 Bronze Age D None

00774s FRIAR POINT FINDSPOT ST110661 Mesolithic C None

00889s STOREHOUSE POINT ST10806685 Post Medieval C None

00967s BARRY PARADE GARDENS ST10566677 Roman C None

30
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID NAME NGR PERIOD Value Effect

00970s SITE NAME NOT KNOWN ST11726683 Medieval D None

00999s STOREHOUSE POINT ST106669 Medieval D None

00991s FRIARS POINT ST111659 Neolithic C None

01005s BEGGARS WELL HABITATION ST109674 Medieval C None

01006s BEGGARS WELL HABITATION ST109674 Medieval C None

01007s EAST BARRY HOUSE ST109675 Medieval D None

01398s SITE NAME NOT KNOWN ST110661 Medieval D None

01696s SULLY HAVEN ST1266 Unknown C/B None

02018s NELLS POINT ST12056615 Modern C None

02025s WELLS POINT ST120661 Modern C None

02204s BARRY CASTLE - WESTBARRY ST117668 Medieval C None

02251s/13455/1869 FRIARS POINT HOUSE/ MARINE


ST109663 Post Medieval B None
2 HOTEL

31
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID NAME NGR PERIOD Value Effect

02252s/ 13456 FRIARS POINT HOUSE GATE ST109663 Post Medieval B None

02253s/18693/1345
FRIARS POINT LODGE ST109663 Post Medieval B None
7

NO 1 DOCK NORTH HYDRAULIC


02300s/13468/3373
PUMPING HOUSE NORTHERN ST11176755 Post Medieval B None
9
RANGE

NO 1 DOCK NORTH HYDRAULIC


02301s/13468/3373
PUMPING HOUSE SOUTHERN ST11176755 Post Medieval B None
9
RANGE

02705s SITE NAME NOT KNOWN ST10516670 Unknown U None

02710s SITE NAME NOT KNOWN ST107668 Roman U None

02711s TREHARNES PIER ST110665 Post Medieval D None

02713s SITE NAME NOT KNOWN ST121661 Post Medieval D None

02714s SITE NAME NOT KNOWN ST119661 Modern C None

03016s/41427 BARRY ISLAND STATION ST11536668 Post Medieval B None

02967s BARRY ISLAND ST115666 Roman C None

02991s FRIAR'S POINT ST10956615 Prehistoric C None

32
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID NAME NGR PERIOD Value Effect

02992s FRIARS POINT BARROW ST11176593 Bronze Age D None

03828s FRIARS POINT CEMETERY ST11066600 Bronze Age C None

34234 BARRY DOCKS, BARRY ST12266714 Post Medieval B None

FRIARS POINT HOUSE, GARDEN,


265833 ST1094166362 Post Medieval C None
BARRY

BARRY HOTEL, BROAD STREET,


305941/15509 ST10706735 Post Medieval B None
BARRY

WINDSOR ROAD ENGLISH


CONGREGATIONALCHAPEL
9180 ST10606742 Post Medieval C None
(UNITED REFORMED CHURCH),
PORTHKERRY

34236 BARRY LIFEBOAT LAUNCH ST12256670 Post Medieval C None

BETHANY ENGLISH BAPTIST


9182 CHAPEL, ARCHER ROAD, BARRY ST11616696 Post Medieval C None
ISLAND; YNYS-Y-BARRI

41437 BARRY PIER STATION ST12196679 Post Medieval C None

41428 BARRY TOWN STATION SHED ST10726720 Post Medieval D None

41426/03015s BARRY TOWN STATION ST10706720 Post Medieval B None

308857 BARRY DOCKS SEA LOCK ST12366677 Post Medieval B None

33
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID NAME NGR PERIOD Value Effect

OPERATOR'S CABIN, SLIDING


308595 ST12266714 Post Medieval B None
BRIDGE, BARRY DOCKS

ST BARUCH'S (2) CHURCH,


14079 ST11606686 Post Medieval D None
PLYMOUTH ROAD, BARRY ISLAND

PRESBYTERIAN CHAPEL (ENGLISH


14080 CALVINISTIC METHODIST), EARL ST11996680 Post Medieval C None
CRESCENT, BARRI ISLAND

BAILEY'S GRAVING DOCK, BARRY


91514 ST12206696 Post Medieval B None
DOCKS

ST BARUCH'S CHURCH (3), ARCHER


97242 ROAD/ PHYLLIS STREET, BARRY ST11606699 Post Medieval C None
ISLAND

PUMPHOUSE AT BAILEYS GRAVING


91515 ST12176693 Post Medieval C None
DOCK, BARRY DOCKS

404879/15894 LIFEBOATHOUSE, BARRY DOCKS ST1217366726 Modern B None

406806 BARRY TOWN ST1166 Multiperiod B None

NO 69, HIGH STREET (S SIDE)


15888 ST1073267473 Unknown B None
BARRY

NO 70, HIGH STREET (S SIDE)


15889 ST71073867478 Unknown B None
BARRY

NO 71, HIGH STREET (S SIDE)


15890 ST10742167481 Unknown B None
BARRY

NO 72, HIGH STREET (S SIDE)


15891 ST1074767485 Unknown B None
BARRY

34
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID NAME NGR PERIOD Value Effect

PORTHKERRY METHODIST
15893/14105 CHURCH, PORTHKERRY ROAD (N ST10526744 Post Medieval B None
SIDE), BARRY

15895 SLIPWAY, BARRY DOCKS ST1222066710 Unknown B None

SLIDING BRIDGE (AT NORTH


16562 ST1224067130 Unknown B None
ENTRANCE TO BASIN)

WALLS OF DOCK BASIN (ALSO


3212 ST1227067000 Unknown C None
KNOWN AS NO 3 BASIN)

274096 R'EAUMER ST11006600 Post Medieval C None

35
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

5. Mitigation

In operation for 88 years, Barry Island Pleasure Park is a cultural landmark renowned
throughout Wales. An important feature of the townscape, it has been an active and enormously
successful component in the characterisation of Barry Island as a British seaside resort. Given
the physical, as well as cultural, prominence and role of the Park not just in the local community
but also in a wider geographical context it is considered necessary that the site be subject to a
buildings survey, to be undertaken both prior to, and during the clearing of site.
Whilst seemingly unexceptional it must be remembered that some of the permanent rides have
reused timbers from the scenic railway of 1912 and the large redbrick building, which now
houses an array of shops, is also an original feature of the park. The proposed demolition of the
Pleasure Park also means that the level of building record should be higher than for buildings of
comparable significance, which are not similarly at risk. It is therefore proposed that in order to
better understand the development and history of the park in its wider cultural, historical and
social context a Level Two survey be undertaken. Archaeological investigation will supplement
the building survey and help elucidate the earlier history of the Pleasure Park.
A memorial to the late owner of Barry Island Pleasure Park and the Hypervalue stores, Ken
Rodgers is located within the park grounds. It is recommended that this monument be dealt with
sensitively and relocated to a suitable location within the immediate vicinity.
Information provided by cartographic sources, aerial photographs and previous investigations in
the vicinity indicate that it is possible that significant archaeological deposits may be
encountered below ground, especially in the northwestern area of the site. These remains
include a definite medieval occupation site with structural elements, as well as a further
potential prehistoric settlement. In addition, vestiges from the earlier phases of the parks
development may also be encountered.
Information concerning the extent of the surviving archaeological resource is limited, and at
present the condition of these interests is not known. The use of the eastern side of the
development site as a sand quarry in the early 20th century, and subsequent building across the
whole area may have already had a major impact on the remains; especially the log flume,
which is positioned directly over the known medieval site (00554s).
If of adequate depth, however, the Aeolian deposits in the area may have ensured the
archaeology’s preservation in situ. Some post-medieval deposits were up to 6m deep and the
well just north of the site was covered by 1.80m of sand. An earlier layer that is known to have
reached a maximum depth of 0.45m may have provided further protection for any prehistoric
remains. Without forms of archaeological mitigation it is possible that the construction works
associated with the redevelopment of the Pleasure Park will have a ‘severe’ effect on these. It
would therefore prove prudent to deal with the potential archaeological resource prior to the
development commencing. Subsequently, it is recommended that an archaeological evaluation
consisting of trenching and test pitting be carried out, to a design approved by the
archaeological advisors to the LPA, to assess and record the survival and condition of any sites
of archaeological interest.
The impact on these remains depends upon the final footprint and foundation design. The
completed evaluation would inform layout and foundation design so that if necessary impact on
the archaeological resource may be minimised. It is recommended that the evaluation be carried
out, to the standards laid down by the Institute of Field Archaeologists, before any decision on
the planning application is taken as the evaluation may provide information useful for

36
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

identifying potential options for minimising or avoiding damage to the archaeological resource
(Welsh Office Circular 60/96 section 13).
In addition, efforts should be made to reduce the off-site changes (i.e. noise, pollution,
vibration) during the construction phase, in order to minimise the effects on the nearby
structures that are protected as Listed Buildings and Scheduled Ancient Monuments.

37
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

Bibliography

Anon, August 1999 Nell’s Point Barry Island Archaeological Evaluation – Foundations
Archaeology.
Beaudette, G. and Beaudette, K.F. 1984, The Foundations of Barry: Rocks and Landscape – In
Moore, D. (Ed.) Barry the Centenary Book, 1984, Barry Centenary Book Committee
Limited, Qualitex Printing Limited
Campbell, E. 1988, 58-61, Dinas Powys - In Edwards, N. and Lane, A. (Ed.) Early Medieval
Settlements in Wales AD 400-1100, University College Cardiff.
Dowdell, G. 1984, Before Barry Began: Paleolitic to Pre-Norman – In Moore, D. (Ed) Barry the
Centenary Book, 1984, Barry Centenary Book Committee Limited, Qualitex Printing
Limited
Evans, J. 1804, Letters Written During A Tour through South Wales in the Year 1803 - London
Cf. Knight, J. K. 1981: Excavations at St Barruc’s Chapel, Barry Island, Glamorgan -
Reprinted from The Transactions of the Cardiff Naturalists’ Society vol. 99, 1976-78.
Fox, A. John Storrie’s Excavations on Barry Island, 1936, 12-38 In Transactions of the Cardiff
Naturalists Society vol. LXIX
Griffiths, M. 1984 Landlords and Tenants, 1700-1880– In Moore, D. (Ed.) Barry the Centenary
Book, 1984 Barry Centenary Book Committee Limited, Qualitex Printing Limited
Howell, J. K. 2001 Paget Road, Barry Vale of Glamorgan: Archaeological Field Evaluation –
GGAT report no 2001/037.
Knight, J. K. 1981 Excavations at St Barruc’s Chapel, Barry Island, Glamorgan - Reprinted
from The Transactions of the Cardiff Naturalists’ Society vol. 9
Lane, A. 1988, 76-78, Glan-Y-Mor, Cold Knap, Barry - In N. Edwards andA. Lane (Ed.) Early
Medieval Settlements in Wales AD 400-1100, University College Cardiff.
Lewis, R. and Hudson, N. Landscapes Working for the Vale of Glamorgan: History and
Archaeology Aspect, March 2006, Glamorgan-Gwent Archaeological Trust Ltd.
Newman, J. 2004 The Buildings Of Wales: Glamorgan, Yale University Press.
Pierce, G. 1968, The place Names of Dinas Powys Hundred, Cardiff. Cf. Knight, J. K. 1981
Excavations at St Barruc’s Chapel, Barry Island, Glamorgan - Reprinted from The
Transactions of the Cardiff Naturalists’ Society vol. 99, 1976-8.
Sell, S. May 1996 Archaeological Desk Based Assessment, Atlantic Trading Estate, Barry,
GGAT Report no 96/031
Storrie, J. 1896 Notes on Excavations made during the Summers of 1894-5 at Barry Island and
Ely Race Course, Western Mail Limited, c/o Glamorgan Archive Service.
Taverner, N. 1998 Nell’s Point, Barry Island: Archaeological Assessment, Cambrian
Archaeological Projects Typescript Report.

Thomas, H.J. 1984, Castle, Church and Village: Medieval Barry, 1100-1500 – Moore, D. (Ed.)
Barry the Centenary Book, 1984, Barry Centenary Book Committee Limited, Qualitex
Printing Limited
Vyce, D. 1999 Friars Road, Barry Island, Wales: A Report on an Archaeological Evaluation,
Hereford Archaeology Series 142.

38
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

Gerald of Wales, Journey Through Wales (1188) and the Description of Wales Translated and
edited Lewis Thorpe, Penguin. In Knight, J. K. 1981, Excavations at St Barruc’s Chapel,
Barry Island, Glamorgan - Reprinted from The Transactions of the Cardiff Naturalists’
Society vol. 99, 1976-8.
Thomas, C. 1993 Tintagel: Arthur and Archaeology London: Batsford/English Heritage Harvey
Harvey , J.H. (Ed.) 1969 Itineraries Oxford 1969 cf. Storrie, J. 1896 Notes on Excavations
made during the Summers of 1894-5 at Barry Island and Ely Race Course, Western Mail
Limited, c/o Glamorgan Archive Service.

Websites

http://www.barryislandpleasurepark.co.uk/
http://www.smuggling.co.uk/gazetteer_wales_10.html#fn175
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barry_Island_Pleasure_Park

Cartographic sources

Morrice, William. 1762/3 - Wenvoe Estate Map X


Ordnance Survey 1:2500, 1879, First Edition
Ordnance Survey 1:2500, 1900, Second Edition
Ordnance Survey 1:2500, 1920, Third Edition
Ordnance Survey 1:2500, 1936, Fourth Edition

39
Appendix I Barry Island Amusement Park: archaeological desk-based assessment
Map Regression

GRID

0 1.00km
Figure 3. Wenvoe estate map X 1762 (William Morrice) with development boundary (red)
40
Barry Island Amusement Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

GRID

0 1.00km
Figure 4. Parish of Sully Tithe Map, 1846
41
Barry Island Amusement Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

GRID

0 100 200 300 400 500metres

Figure 5. First Edition Ordnance Survey Map (1879) with development boundary (red)

42
Barry Island Amusement Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

GRID

0 100 200 300 400 500metres

Figure 6. Second Edition Ordnance Survey Map (1900) with development boundary (red)

43
Barry Island Amusement Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

GRID

0 100 200 300 400 500metres

Figure 7. Third Edition Ordnance Survey Map (1920) with development boundary (red)

44
Barry Island Amusement Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

GRID

0 100 200 300 400 500metres

Figure 8. Fourth Edition Ordnance Survey Map (1936) with development boundary (red)

45
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

Appendix II
Walkover Survey

Plate 1:View of Barry Island Pleasure Park looking northwest

Plate 2: View of Barry Island Pleasure Park looking southwest

46
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

Plate 3: View of Barry Island Pleasure Island looking southeast

Plate 4: View of Log Flume looking northwest

47
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

Plate 5: Front elevation of 1920’s building at Barry Island Pleasure Park looking north

Plate 6: Front elevation of 1920’s building at Barry Island Pleasure Park looking north

48
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

Plate 7: Front elevation of The Dolphin café at Barry Island Pleasure Park

Plate 8: Rear of The Dolphin café at Barry Island Pleasure Park

49
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

Appendix III
Aerial Photographs with Coverage of the Evaluation Area
The following is a list of the aerial photographs with coverage of the study area held by the
Central Registry of Air Photography for Wales.
RAF Sorties
Sortie Scale Date Frames
1 PRU RAF 2470 1:25150 06/07/1992 131
39 RAF 3764 VARIOUS 07/09/1971 F41, 42: 18
58 RAF 8659 1:52000 18/03/1968 28-30
58 RAF 5154 VARIOUS 01/06/1962 F21: 377-379. F22: 449-
452
58 RAF 3066 OBLIQUE 07/08/1959 263-268
542 RAF 690 OBLIQUE 24/05/1951 65-70, 71-78
58 RAF 473 1:3420 03/06/1950 5006-5008, 5017-5019,
5023, 5003X – 5004X
58 RAF 251 1:9900 21/06/1949 5131-5133
CPE UK 2258 1:29100 25/08/1947 5016
540 RAF 227 - 24/06/1949 5131-33

Ordnance Survey
Sortie Scale Date Frames
OS 63 051 1:24000 06/05/1963 5-7
OS 00 088 1:5100 30/04/2000 20-24, 45-48
OS 63 074 1:2400 31/05/1963 82-83
OS 66 200 1:7500 16/08/1966 28-30
OS 78 137 1:10000 03/09/1979 14-16, 24-26
OS 79 130 1:24400 22/09/1979 140, 447-148
OS 89 072 1:5300 08/04/1989 404-409, 417-421
OS 90 160 1:8200 13/07/1990 109-112, 115-117
OS 97 696 1:4300 22/07/1997 4-7, 19-20
OS 97 232 1:5000 10/09/1997 35-40, 10-14 (NPH)

50
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

Commercial and other Sorties


Sortie Scale Date Frames
Getmapping 1:10000 01/01/2000 On screen
COWI 1:10000 01/06/2006 On screen
Medenham 42/2 - 27/04/1942 42/4
Medenham FNO/17 - 25/06/1942 6.62-6.69
Meridian 60/68 1:5000 05/08/1968 60/68: 88-91, 100-103
JA Story 8669 1:5000 29/06/1981 2181: 15-19, 87-91
Geonex 1:5000 01/07/1991 7891: 57-61. 7391: 210-225

51
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

Plate 9: OS 66/200 16th August 1966

52
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

Plate 10: Barry Island Pleasure Park WAG 2181 30th July 1981

53
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

Appendix IV
Gazetteer of archaeological interests

ID
03805s
Name St Barruch's Chapel
NGR ST11936667 Period Early Medieval
Full description
Barry Island is given by Lifris's Vita Sancti Cadoci (c. 1100), as the burial place of St Barruch whose remains are
believed to have been housed in the Norman chapel on the east of the island. The original excavator of the Chapel,
John Storrie originally believed that there was an earlier 5th century structure associated with the chapel (the
oratory); however this building located to the immediate north of the chapel has since been dated as contemporary
with the later 14th century rebuilding of the Chapel, and interpreted as the priests house. Furthermore, Knight
(1981, 57) concluded from his excavations that the presence of burials beneath the chapel meant that an older
structure would have to have been stood elsewhere. However, Knight's excavation did uncover recovered parts of
a large stone box, which he believes may be the earlier container for the relics of St Barruch.
Type Condition Status
Shrine Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Medium Possible - Medium
Confidence Value Effect
Low U None

ID
03832s
Name CEMETERY, BARRY ISLAND
NGR ST11936667 Period Medieval
Full description
Although the associated chapel has been excavated twice, once in 1884 by John Storrie and again in 1968, by
Jeremy Knight, the area of investigation in the second excavation was limited. This is because the graveyard had
been covered by a car park in 1964 that extended right up to the chapel fence line on three sides – the fourth
boundary to the site was Friars Road. The actual limits of the burial ground therefore remain unclear – bodies were
found in the gardens on the western side of Friars Road, but an evaluation on land adjacent to the junction of
Breaksea Drive and Friars road did not find anything (Vyce, 1999). The number of burials on what appears to have
been a relatively uninhabited island, point to the place having been regarded as one of special sanctity (Storrie,
1896; Knight, 1981; Dowdell, 1984). Storrie reports finding a large number of bodies, in an extremely decayed
condition. An extensive graveyard, there were no coffins found but some were covered with flat stones, or
surrounded by stones set on there edge, a number of headstones were also found although none had inscriptions.

Type Condition Status


Cemetery Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium High Possible - Low
Confidence Value Effect
High C None

54
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
03834s
Name INHUMATIONS AT ST BARRUCH'S CHAPEL, BARRY ISLAND
NGR ST11936667 Period Early Medieval
Full description
Of the burials excavated on the site of St Barruch's chapel (PRN 00553s), two were located beneath the 12th
century apse, being phased earlier than the chapel they are probably of early medieval date.
Type Condition Status
Inhumation Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
High High Possible - Low
Confidence Value Effect
High C None

ID
00559s/300876
Name FRIARS POINT CAIRN 4
NGR ST11066600 Period Bronze Age
Full description
On Friars Point, a headland on Barry Island, a series of mounds have been recorded. Several are of doubtful
origin, and only two remain visible at the present day (PRNs 561s and 562s). This particular monument was
described in 1873 as being the middle one of three mounds. Although it was excavated in 1872 nothing was
found. However, Storrie carried out further excavations in 1894-5, and discovered a cremation burial covered
by a thin slab and accompanied by a burnt flint flake; a secondary burial with three flakes was also found,
along with three horse teeth. At that time the mound measured 6.1m in diameter. The mound had been
destroyed by 1953 or earlier, perhaps as a direct result of the 19th century excavations
Type Condition Status
Round Barrow Destroyed None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium High Certain - Medium
Confidence Value Effect
High D None

55
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
00560s/300879
Name FRIARS POINT CAIRN 5
NGR ST11066604 Period Bronze Age
Full description
The monument was excavated in 1894-5 and was found to be encircled by a shallow ditch. The only small finds
were two pieces of chert and several horse teeth. The mound had been destroyed by 1953, and probably rather
earlier, perhaps as a direct result of the 19th century excavation. Doubts concerning the authenticity of this mound
and mound six (00557s/300880) exist, as it was not found to contain any funerary remains.
Type Condition Status
Round Barrow Destroyed None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Medium Certain - Medium
Confidence Value Effect
Medium D None

ID
00562s/24496/300875
Name FRIARS POINT CAIRN 1; TREHARNES' PIER PILLOW MOUND;FRIARS POINT, PILLOW
NGR ST1103066122 Period Medieval
Full description
The monument is a low ovoid mound, longer on its east-west axis than its north-south. It is low and poorly defined,
being covered by turf with no stone detectable beneath the surface. It is surrounded on all sides by a shallow
ditch no more than 0.1m in depth. Storrie excavated the barrow in 1894-5, but there was evidence of previous
disturbance, and all that he found was a triangular chert flake and some horse teeth. This mound is now believed to
be a pillow mound, 14m long from east to west by 9.1m wide.
Type Condition Status
Round Barrow Near Destroyed None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Low Possible-Low
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C None

56
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
00542s/02712s
Name INHUMATION - BARRY ISLAND
NGR ST10866638 Period Unknown
Full description
In 1876 human remains were discovered on the west side of Friars Point. Gerald Cambrensis makes mention
that a second chapel was located on this side of Barry Island (00549s/02712s) and it has generally been
assumed that the remains were associated with this religious structure. However, it should not be forgotten
that a cairn cemetery of Bronze Age date, as well as two crouched inhumations of the same date have also
been found on Friars Point, and an association with these is equally as likely given the absence of details
regarding the burial.
Type Condition Status
Inhumation Destroyed None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Medium Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Low U None

ID
00549s/02712s
Name CHAPEL AT FRIARS POINT, BARRY
NGR ST10846637 Period Medieval
Full description
Gerald Cambrensis author of the late 12th century 'Itinerary of Archbishop Baldwin through Wales' mentions that
the remains of second chapel are visible on Friars Point, Barry Island at low water. Lewis's Topographical
Dictionary' written in 1833 also mentions that: 'On the western side of the island, opposite the ruins of the Barry
Castle, are faint vestiges of a similar structure, and of two ancient chapels, in one of which the hermit, St Barruch,
was interred.' When visited in year four of the Early-medieval Ecclesiastical Sites Project, (GGAT 73: 2003-04) no
remains were seen at this site, which comprises jagged limestone rocks. The chapel has been associated with
human remains found nearby (00542s/02712s), however, it should be remembered that the chapel's existence and
location can only be inferred from a documentary source, whilst a number of Bronze Age burials are known in the
immediate vicinity.
Type Condition Status
Chapel Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Low Possible - Medium
Confidence Value Effect
Low U None

57
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
00553s/ 94570/GM120
Name ST BARRUCH'S CHAPEL
NGR ST11936667 Period Medieval
Full description
The dedication is vouched for by Gerald Cambrensis in 1187-8 and confirmed by Leland in 1540. TheNorman
structure with apsidal chancel was demolished in the late 13th or early 14th century and rebuilt with a square east
end. Thenorth half of the chancel was later rebuilt and asouth porch was added to the nave. A rectangular cist-like
structure beneath the floor in front of the chancel at the east end of the nave was interpreted as a people's altar with
associated kerb and wooden rail. North of the chapel was a priest's house, which is later than the second rebuilding
of the chancel, and comprised of a rectangular two-bay hall with roof supports (?cruck), and a small chamber
block. Traces of a fresco painting were found in the north side of the chancel. Other finds included medieval
pottery, primarily unglazed, some handmade. Also associated with the chapel is a cemetary (PRN 03834s).
Type Condition Status
Chapel Not known SAM
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium High Certain- High
Confidence Value Effect
High A None

ID
00554s
Name BARRY ISLAND 'ABBEY'
NGR ST11346663 Period Medieval
Full description
Excavated by John Storrie in 1894/5 this structure was originally interpreted as the monastery of St Peiro, which
has since been identified on Caldey Island. The structure has a principal wall that runs east - west with a doorway
almost in the middle. It averages .65m in thickness, and is built of Lias stones. On either side of the wall are
enclosures about 2.10 – 2.40m by .75 - .90m. A paved area with burning and lots of pottery was also discovered,
which dated to the 13th-14th century. The structural remains are not readily interpretable, Fox (1936) argued that
the rooms were too small to be cells and argued that they were most likely stables or cattle stalls. However, this is
not the most sustainable of her revisions and it has since been suggested that the structure may have been
accommodating pilgrims visiting the Island (Pastfinders pers comms). Knight in his later investigations of the
chapel, concludes that the evidence for the 'abbey' site 'indicates a multi-period group of medieval house sites'
(1981, 38) The site is now overlain by the Pleasure Park.

Type Condition Status


Settlement Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Medium Possible - Low
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C Severe

58
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
00555s
Name BRITISH KITCHEN
NGR ST11896670 Period Medieval/ Roman
Full description
In 1885, following the discovery of human remains during the construction of Friars Road, John Storrie (curator of
Cardiff Museum) was asked to make a general search of the island. Storrie discovered and investigated six sites,
one of which he called the 'British Kitchen'. This site was situated west of Friars Road, and before excavation
appeared as two large sand dunes approx 15ft high. These covered the remains of hearths, cooking vessels,
and cooking debris remains - including charred bones, as well as piles of limpet, periwinkle, oyster and other
shells. A collection of roughly worked flints including one discoidal scraper, one rough core and six
flakes with worked edges, were also found. Now in the National Museum of Wales, these are believed to be of
Roman date. Storrie originally interpreted the site as early medieval, however, it has since been dated to the
medieval period and is viewed as contemporary to St Barruch's chapel. The site has been entirely built over.

Type Condition Status


Midden Destroyed None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C None

ID
00556s/32331
Name ST BARRUC'S WELL
NGR ST12006642 Period Medieval
Full description
On Nell's Point on Barry Island, approximately 300m south of the chapel of St Barruch's, is a holy well. A type of
well once common throughout the British Isles. Rags and bent pins have been recovered from the well, both of
which are articles associated with ritual healing and wishing. The report of the island returned to Edward Lhwyd c.
1700, confirms that the well was attributed with medicinal properties, describing it as “a well of very good watter
which cures ye K(ing)s evill agues and is also good for pain in ye Head and for soer eyes” (Cf. Fox 1936, 26).
Lewis’s Topographical Dictionary written in 1883 also mentions that the well was “much resorted to on Holy
Thursday by females, who having washed their eyes with the water, each drop a pin into it.” (Cf. Fox 1936, 26).
The water was used up until the early 20th century as eye water and for other diseases. The well has since been
built over.
Type Condition Status
Holy well Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Medium Certain - Medium
Confidence Value Effect
High C None

59
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
00557s/300880
Name FRIARS POINT CAIRN 6
NGR ST11096596 Period Bronze Age
Full description
This monument was described in 1873 as being a small mound about 3m in diameter. It was excavated in 1894-5
but without any result, and it was subsequently viewed as a dubious mound. There is now no trace of this round
barrow.
Type Condition Status
Round Barrow Destroyed None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium High Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Medium D None

ID
00558s/300877
Name FRIARS POINT CAIRN 3
NGR ST11066597 Period Bronze Age
Full description
This monument was described in 1873 as being the largest and most southerly of a group of three. At that time it
had already been partially destroyed in order to create a level platform; the remaining stones were subsequently
removed to make a flagstaff mound. Its remaining stones were subsequently removed to make a flagstaff mound.
There are now no traces of this round barrow.
Type Condition Status
Round Barrow Destroyed None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium High Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
High C None

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Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
00561s/300878
Name FRIARS POINT CAIRN 2
NGR ST1104966042 Period Bronze Age
Full description
The most northerly of three mounds, measuring 3m in diameter and 0.9m high. The cairn is roughly circular and
partially covered by grass. It is composed of earth and stone, although some of the rock that can be seen at the
surface is natural outcrop. The centre is dished. Excavated in 1872 by JR Allen, when a central cremation burial
was found in an overhanging-rim urn 0.35m high, inverted on a flat stone. Shortly afterwards JW Lukis visited the
site and found three more cremations, encircled by sea-shell and small stones. J Storrie re-opened the tumulus in
1896 and found marks of fire, three flint flakes, a broken horses tooth, a decomposed fragment of pottery, and
'quantities of whelks, limpets, winkles and a few oyster shells'. The rim of the cairns remains and is 7.9m in
external diameter, 1.5m wide and 0.5m high. The urn is in the National Museum of Wales.
Type Condition Status
Round Barrow Near Destroyed None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium High Possible - Low
Confidence Value Effect
High C None

ID 00564s
Name ROMAN WELL
NGR ST11346667 Period Medieval
Full description
The well is situated close to railway embankment where it crosses Paget Road. It is built in lias masonry, and quite
substantial with walls 1.45m thick, at the thinnest. It was excavated by Storrie, who dated the well incorrectly, on
association with a Roman fibula found some distance away. The only find from within the well was a small
medieval pendant, some pottery was also found nearby. There are now no visible remains of this well. A circular
stone-lined pit, the bottom of which is c.4m below ground, now occupies the site.
Type Condition Status
Well Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low Medium Possible - Low
Confidence Value Effect
High D None

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Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
00565s
Name BARRY DOCKS FINDSPOT
NGR ST1167 Period Neolithic
Full description
At Barry Docks a polished Neolithic axe was found at a depth of about 16m. Exposure not specified.
Type Condition Status
Axe Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
High Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C None

ID
00567s
Name PAGET ROAD FINDSPOT
NGR ST11336664 Period Prehistoric
Full description
An unclassified flint knife now in National Museum of Wales, was found near the medieval site (00554s) east of
Paget Road. It may possibly be associated with the large group of approx 30 worked flints and flakes found on site
00554s.
Type Condition Status
Findspot Near Intact None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
High C None

ID
00568s
Name BARRY INHUMATION
NGR ST11406630 Period Bronze Age
Full description
An incomplete human skeleton was found, buried in crouched position (on left side, with head to west),
beneath boulder 2.9m down in the sand at Whitmore Bay, Barry Island.
Type Condition Status
Inhumation Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Medium Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C None

62
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
00570s
Name SITE NAME NOT KNOWN
NGR ST1166 Period Early Medieval
Full description
An early Christian ring-brooch, found on Barry Island.
Type Condition Status
Findspot Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
High Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Low U None

ID
00577s
Name BARRY HARBOUR / STOREHOUSE POINT
NGR ST108667 Period Roman
Full description
Brick or tile fragments, with adherent brick-mortar and a grey-ware sherd were identified in the mud near
Storehouse Point. A 2nd century samian sherd was also found on the Barry Island promenade.
Type Condition Status
Findspot Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Low C None

ID
00581s
Name FRAIRS POINT CROUCHED BURIAL
NGR ST10776644 Period Bronze Age
Full description
During excavations for the harbour pier in 1895, near Friar Point House at the Western extremity of Barry Island,
a stone cist was discovered containing a crouched female skeleton. The cist was apparently re-erected, by J Storrie,
in the enclosure of St Baruch’s Chapel, on the opposite side of the island (ST 1194 6666). There is nothing at the
finds site to indicate the location of the discovery, and whilst the re-erected remains were tentatively identified in
1982 at the chapel (heavily overgrown, beyond the SE corner of the building), these were not found during the
present study. What may be it's re-erected remains show as a flat stone slab 0.8m by 0.4m barely protruding from
the graves, immediately beyond the south-east corner of St. Baruch's Chapel (ST16 NW9).
Type Condition Status
Round Barrow Destroyed None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Medium Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Low D None

63
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
00774s
Name FRIAR POINT FINDSPOT
NGR ST110661 Period Mesolithic
Full description
A group of two to ten Mesolithic blades, flakes, and microliths, were found at Friars Point, Barry Island.
Type Condition Status
Findspot Not Known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
High Medium Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Low C None

ID
00889s
Name STOREHOUSE POINT
NGR ST10806685 Period Post Medieval
Full description
Austry Farmhouse is the Post Medieval structure, associated with a limekiln. A series of stratified deposits were
found beneath the building by G. Dowdell and H. Thomas. The lowest of which dated to the 14th – 15th centuries,
although the basis for this dating has not been noted. Above this deposit was a layer of blue/grey clay in which
excellently preserved wood fragments and leather shoes were found. The next layer was comprised of gravels
dating to the 17th century based upon the variety of pot fragments found. The uppermost deposit dated to the 19th
century and was composed of tavern rubbish i.e. Wine bottles. It has since been inferred that there was a
medieval building prior to Austry Farmhouse.
Type Condition Status
Settlement Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low High Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C None

ID
00967s
Name BARRY PARADE GARDENS
NGR ST10566677 Period Roman
Full description
Roman pottery of 2nd century date (including samian ware) was recovered from flowerbeds in Barry
Parade Gardens.
Type Condition Status
Sherd Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Low C None

ID
64
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

00970s
Name SITE NAME NOT KNOWN
NGR ST11726683 Period Medieval
Full description
Medieval (13th - 14th century) and Post - medieval pottery found in allotments, near site of Barry Island
Farm.
Type Condition Status
Findspot Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Low D None

ID
00999s
Name STOREHOUSE POINT
NGR ST106669 Period Medieval
Full description
A rock-cut pit with 13th/14th Century pottery was noted in the side of the cliff.
Type Condition Status
Findspot Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Low D None

ID
00991s
Name FRIARS POINT
NGR ST111659 Period Neolithic
Full description
A group of worked flints, including two arrowheads, two microliths, and two flakes, have been found on Friar's
Point. No data on tool type and material is available. Exposure not specified.
Type Condition Status
Flint scatter Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Medium Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C None

65
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
01005s
Name BEGGARS WELL HABITATION
NGR ST109674 Period Medieval
Full description
Hearths and middens with 12th century pottery have been found, at Beggars Well in Barry. The hearths have
a separate HER number 01006s.
Type Condition Status
Midden Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low Medium Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Low C None

ID
01006s
Name BEGGARS WELL HABITATION
NGR ST109674 Period Medieval
Full description
Hearths and middens, were found along with 12th century pottery at Beggars Well, Barry. The middens have a
separate HER number 1005s.
Type Condition Status
Hearth Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low Medium Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Low C None

ID
01007s
Name EAST BARRY HOUSE
NGR ST109675 Period Medieval
Full description
Pottery of 12th/15th century date was found in disturbed garden soil at East Barry House.
Type Condition Status
Findspot Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Low D None

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Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
01398s
Name SITE NAME NOT KNOWN
NGR ST110661 Period Medieval
Full description
Potteryof 13-14th century date was located on a pathway, and in a rock crevice over-looking Whitmore Bay.
Type Condition Status
Findspot Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Low D None

ID
01696s
Name SULLY HAVEN
NGR ST1266 Period Unknown
Full description
Sully was a port in the 1740s, but the law restricted foreign trade to Cardiff, so theoretically, Sully could only
trade coastwise (with another British port). Nevertheless, quantities of goods, notably livestock, were landed
on the beach at Sully, and stored in the yard of the Pot Inn.
(http://www.smuggling.co.uk/gazetteer_wales_10.html#fn175)
Type Condition Status
Port Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Low C None

ID
02018s
Name NELLS POINT
NGR ST12056615 Period Modern
Full description
Two coastal artillery search lights (C.A.S.L's) c.1900. Gun positions (4.7 & 6 batteries) are located under holiday
camp.
Type Condition Status
Battery Damaged None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Medium Certain - High
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C None

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Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
02025s
Name WELLS POINT
NGR ST120661 Period Modern
Full description
No further information.
Type Condition Status
Pill box Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low Medium Certain - High
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C None

ID
02204s
Name BARRY CASTLE - WESTBARRY
NGR ST117668 Period Medieval
Full description
The sub manor of Barry was granted soon after conquest. The castle is located on high ground overlooking the
Bristol Channel, on a site that had been occupied in Roman times by a native homestead (Thomas 1984, 62). The
presence of hearths and pits containing 12th century potsherds indicate that the castle had been established by that
date. The castle was initially in the form of a ditched and embanked ring work with dry stone or timber buildings,
by the late 13th century two stone buildings had been built. In the 14th century a hall with gatehouse was added,
these are all that now remain. The structure was used as inn during the 16th century.
Type Condition Status
Settlement Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Medium Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C None

ID
02251s/LB13455/18692
Name FRIARS POINT HOUSE/ MARINE HOTEL
NGR ST109663 Period Post Medieval
Full description
Set in its own grounds and reached along a tree-lined and gated drive. In 1858 Francis Crawshay, new owner of the
island, built the Marine Hotel (02251s/LB13455/18692), at the west end of Barry Island facing Friars Point with
broad sea views. In 1873 Barry Island changed hands, passing to John Travis Treharne who changed the name of
the building to the Pier Hotel and made a number of alterations to it. Eventually, in 1894 the house became the
private residence of Lord Windsor, who made further extensive changes to the building and grounds, adding the
gates (02252s/ LB13456) and Lodge (02253s/18693/LB13457). The building is now Grade II listed.
Type Condition Status
House Intact LBII
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low High Certain - Medium
Confidence Value Effect
High B None

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Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
02252s/ LB13456
Name FRIARS POINT HOUSE GATE
NGR ST109663 Period Post Medieval
Full description
Tall-rusticated stone gate piers with cornices and plinths. Paired and painted iron gates to an ornate design with
inials and lock bar; castor rails on either side. Probably contemporary with the lodge and erected during the 1890's
(shown on the 2nd edition OS map). Included with Friars Point House and Lodge for group value.
Type Condition Status
Wall Intact LBII
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium High Possible - Low
Confidence Value Effect
Medium B None

ID
02253s/18693/LB13457
Name FRIARS POINT LODGE
NGR ST109663 Period Post Medieval
Full description
Single storey structure with pebbledash elevations, painted quoins and rubble plinth. Hipped slate roof with
broad gable. Erected by Lord Windsor, the third owner of the main property, which he renamed Friar Point
House.
Type Condition Status
House Intact LBII
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low High Possible - Low
Confidence Value Effect
Medium B None

ID
02300s/LB13468/33739
Name NO 1 DOCK NORTH HYDRAULIC PUMPING HOUSE NORTHERN RANGE
NGR ST11176755 Period Post Medieval
Full description
Barry Docks were constructed from 1884 as a new outlet for coal from the Rhondda to break the shipping
monopoly of Cardiff and ease congestion. The building consists of two massive ranges, constructed of red and blue
engineering brick in matching styles with corbel-headed panels and segmental-arched small-paned windows. The
north range contained workshops and hydraulic controls and has a dividing wall running down the middle. This
range is the longer of the two.
Type Condition Status
Pump house Near Intact LBII
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium High Certain - High
Confidence Value Effect
Medium B None

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Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
02301s/LB13468/33739
Name NO 1 DOCK NORTH HYDRAULIC PUMPING HOUSE SOUTHERN RANGE
NGR ST11176755 Period Post Medieval
Full description
Barry Docks were constructed from 1884 as a new outlet for coal from the Rhondda to break the shipping
monopoly of Cardiff and ease congestion. The building consists of two massive ranges, constructed of red and blue
engineering brick in matching styles with corbel-headed panels and segmental-arched small-paned windows. The
south range contained the boilers and steam engines and had two gables at each end, each of three bays wide.
There are segmental-arched windows at ground level, with circular openings to the gables and a partial basement
fro servicing the plant. Engine beds of concrete and granite blocks survive although the plant as been removed.
Type Condition Status
Pump house Near Intact LBII
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium High Certain - High
Confidence Value Effect
Medium B None

ID
02705s
Name SITE NAME NOT KNOWN
NGR ST10516670 Period Unknown
Full description
A rectangular shape can be seen on photographs collected during the excavations at Glan y Mor (PRN 539s)
c.1930, to the east of Marine Parade before the landscaping of this area. It may represent a building.
Type Condition Status
Structure Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Low U None

ID
02710s
Name SITE NAME NOT KNOWN
NGR ST107668 Period Roman
Full description
Finds of Roman and medieval date, now thought to be in the National Museum Wales.
Type Condition Status
Findspot Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Medium U None

ID
02711s

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Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

Name TREHARNES PIER


NGR ST110665 Period Post Medieval
Full description
Pier situated halfway along the point, on the Whitmore Bay side (identifiable on the 1st edition OS map). The pier
was built by JD Treharne in 1876, and was used by the Yellow Funnel Fleet to pick up and drop visitors to the
Island. It was demolished in 1902 after being declared unsafe by the coroner.
Type Condition Status
Pier Destroyed None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Low Certain - Medium
Confidence Value Effect
Medium D None

ID
02713s
Name SITE NAME NOT KNOWN
NGR ST121661 Period Post Medieval
Full description
Post-medieval pottery.
Type Condition Status
Findspot Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Low D None

ID
274096
Name R'EAUMER
NGR ST11006600 Period Post Medieval
Full description
Steel constructed steamship of unspecified type, measuring in feet: 249x 35x 16. It was made by Doxford, W. and
Sons and was registered in La Rochelle, France. It was carrying iron ore from Bilbao to Cardiff, when it sank on 7
of February 1903. No lives were lost and the ship was later salvaged and returned to service (since LR 1907 lists
her as being owned in Sweden under the name SAGA).
Type Condition Status
Wreck Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C None

71
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
02714s
Name SITE NAME NOT KNOWN
NGR ST119661 Period Modern
Full description
Modern World War Two searchlight battery. Associable with pill box (02025s) on Well's Point.
Type Condition Status
Battery Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Medium High
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C None

ID
BI001
Name POTENTIAL PREHISTORIC SITE
NGR ST11346663 Period Prehistoric
Full description
Potential Prehistoric Site - During John Storrie's excavation of a medieval structure (00554s) just north of
Whitmore Bay, he recovered a group of approximately 30 worked flints and flakes. Included within this
assemblage were scrapers, arrowheads, an axe, awls, and a core (see Storrie 1986, 29-32), of possible bronze age
date. An unclassified flint knife (00567s) now in National Museum of Wales was also found in close proximity to
the site. The density of these finds, not far from Friars Point, where a number of Bronze Age burials were
discovered along with various flint finds, makes it extremely likely that this site was occupied in the Bronze Age
period, and possibly earlier (Fox, 1936 25).
Type Condition Status
Settlement Not Known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Low U Severe

ID
03016s/41427
Name BARRY ISLAND STATION
NGR ST11536668 Period Post Medieval
Full description
The railway line was extended across to Barry Island in 1886. It has been the terminus, and only active station, of
the Barry Island branch of the Vale of Glamorgan Line since the closure of Barry Pier station in 1976.
Type Condition Status
Railway station Intact None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low High Certain - High
Confidence Value Effect
High C None

72
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
BI002
Name MEMORIAL
NGR ST1145566622 Period Modern
Full description
Situated in the centre of the park is a small enclosed area is a memorial commemorating Ken Rodgers, the late
owner of Barry Island Pleasure Park, who passed away in 2000. It is comprised of a statue of two dolphins,
and a plaque.
Type Condition Status
Intact None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Low Certain - Medium
Confidence Value Effect
High C Severe

ID
02967s
Name BARRY ISLAND
NGR ST115666 Period Roman
Full description
Roman pottery deposited by Barry UDC from various excavations carried out by the late John Storrie on various
sites on Barry Island.
Type Condition Status
Sherd Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C None

ID
02991s
Name FRIAR'S POINT
NGR ST10956615 Period Prehistoric
Full description
Flint implement,either a scraper or possible a leaf shaped arrowhead found by N. Taverner
Type Condition Status
Arrowhead Intact None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C None

73
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
02992s
Name FRIARS POINT BARROW
NGR ST11176593 Period Bronze Age
Full description
A possible barrow, surviving as a large low mound, was reported at this location by N Taverner. The date
and reliability of this report is not known, and no monument could be found here during the present study.
Type Condition Status
Round Barrow Destroyed None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Medium Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Low D None

ID
03828s
Name FRIARS POINT CEMETERY
NGR ST11066600 Period Bronze Age
Full description
Round barrow cemetery comprising PRNs 542s, 557s-561s, 568s, 581s and 2992s.
Type Condition Status
Round Barrow Cemetery Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium High Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C None

ID
34234
Name BARRY DOCKS, BARRY
NGR ST12266714 Period Post Medieval
Full description
1. Victorian bunkering port. 2. Extensive coal exporting port and dockyard developed during the 19th
century. Associated with Sea Lock (Nprn308857) and Dock Board Office (Nprn147).
Type Condition Status
Dockyard Not known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium High Certain - High
Confidence Value Effect
High B None

74
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
32744
Name BARRY ISLAND PLEASURE PARK
NGR ST1145566622 Period Post Medieval
Full description
When the Promenade was built in 1923, the Council moved the fairground from the beach into a permanent site
adjacent to the Figure Eight. White Bros, who had the beach lease, therefore were the first tenants of the Pleasure
Park, and remained there from 1923 to 1929. When the White Bros tried to renew the lease in 1930, they found that
Pat Collins had outbid them. This was in response to White Bros outbidding Collins at the Evesham Pleasure Park.
Collins even renamed Barry Island Park - 'Evesham Pleasure Park'. The Figure Eight coaster was demolished in
1939 and replaced by the giant Scenic Railway (a rebuild of the Scenic Railway from the 1938 Glasgow Empire
Exhibition). This in turn was replaced by the log flume in the 1970's. In the 1950s Pat Collins' brother, John, took
over and ran the fairground until 1966, when it was taken over by John's sons John Jnr and Pat Jnr. The park
changed hands again in 2000 when the owner of the Hypervalue chain, Ken Rodgers, bought it. The park is now
run by his son, Ian.

Type Condition Status


Recreation Centre Near Intact None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Medium Certain - Medium
Confidence Value Effect
High B Severe

ID
265833
Name FRIARS POINT HOUSE, GARDEN, BARRY
NGR ST1094166362 Period Post Medieval
Full description
This garden is depicted on the 2nd Edition OS map (1900). Its main elements on that map include greenhouse,
possible tennis court, fountain, lodge, orchard, wind pump and woodland with vista paths.
Type Condition Status
Country House - Garden Not Known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium High Possible - Medium
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C None

ID
305941/LB15509
Name BARRY HOTEL, BROAD STREET, BARRY
NGR ST10706735 Period Post Medieval
Full description
The Barry Hotel has three storeys plus attic and basement, and was built c. 1890. It is of red brick
construction with Bath stone dressings. It has a slate roof and polygonal corner tower.
Type Condition Status
Hotel Not Known LBII
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
High B None

75
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
9180
Name WINDSOR ROAD ENGLISH CONGREGATIONALCHAPEL (UNITED REFORMED CHURCH),
NGR ST10606742 Period Post Medieval
Full description
The chapel was built in 1890, and a schoolroom and lecture hall were added in 1900 (to the design of Ernest
Knapman of Barry Docks). It was modified again in 1904, this time according to the design of Rev C J Clarke.
The building style is Gothic, and it had a gable type entry with integral tower. The chapel was still in use as of
1998.
Type Condition Status
Chapel Not Known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low Low Certain - Low
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C None

ID
34236
Name BARRY LIFEBOAT LAUNCH
NGR ST12256670 Period Post Medieval
Full description
In 1901 the RNLI established a lifeboat station on Barry Island, and a boathouse and slipway were built.
Type Condition Status
Lifeboat Station Not Known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Medium Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
High C None

ID
9182
Name BETHANY ENGLISH BAPTIST CHAPEL, ARCHER ROAD, BARRY ISLAND
NGR ST11616696 Period Post Medieval
Full description
Vernacular style chapel with gable type entry built in 1880. Still in use in 1998.
Type Condition Status
Chapel Not Known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
High C None

76
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
41437
Name BARRY PIER STATION
NGR ST12196679 Period Post Medieval
Full description
The Barry Island Pier Station was the most southerly in Wales. It opened on 20th April 1905, providing access to
the Barry and Bristol Channel Steamship Company's paddle steamers. The station closed in 1971.
Type Condition Status
Railway Station Not Known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low High Certain - High
Confidence Value Effect
High C None

ID
41428
Name BARRY TOWN STATION SHED
NGR ST10726720 Period Post Medieval
Full description
No further information available.
Type Condition Status
Railway Station Not Known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low High Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Medium D None

ID
41426/03015s
Name BARRY TOWN STATION
NGR ST10706720 Period Post Medieval
Full description
Barry Railway Station is one of three stations in the town of Barry. It is located on the Vale of Glamorgan Line,
which runs from Cardiff Central to Bridgend via Barry, Rhoose, and Llantwit Major. A short branch off this
line connects Barry to Barry Island. The station is still in use (2008).
Type Condition Status
Railway Station Not Known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low High Certain - High
Confidence Value Effect
High B None

77
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
308857
Name BARRY DOCKS SEA LOCK
NGR ST12366677 Period Post Medieval
Full description
Barry town sea lock. Four locks in two sets. The first set, (Lady Windsor Lock), both face each other north-west to
south-east segregating a narrow passage from the sea and the main docks. Dock Three has the second set of locks
positioned north to south, opposite each other. Separating Dock Three from the sea and the main docks. Associated
with Barry Docks (Nprn34234).
Type Condition Status
Dock Gate Not Known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium High Possible - Medium
Confidence Value Effect
High B None

ID
308595
Name OPERATOR'S CABIN, SLIDING BRIDGE, BARRY DOCKS
NGR ST12266714 Period Post Medieval
Full description
Operators hut, probably contemporary with bridge (1889). In form of standard pattern wooden Barry
Railway signal box. Decorative barge boards and some panelling to gable ends. Inside the hut is the original
lever frame mechanism of seven levers, with a futher adjacent lever. It is believed to be the last surviving
example of wooden Barry Railway signal box. Associated with PRN’s 308857, 34234, 91514, 91515
Type Condition Status
Dock Gate Hut Not Known LBII
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium High Possible - Medium
Confidence Value Effect
Medium B None

ID
14079
Name ST BARUCH'S (2) CHURCH, PLYMOUTH ROAD, BARRY ISLAND
NGR ST11606686 Period Post Medieval
Full description
Built in 1881 and demolished sometime in the 20th century.
Type Condition Status
Church Destroyed None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Medium D None

78
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
14080
Name PRESBYTERIAN CHAPEL (ENGLISH CALVINISTIC METHODIST), EARL CRESCENT, BARRI
NGR ST11996680 Period Post Medieval
Full description
Built in 1894.
Type Condition Status
Chapel Not Known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C None

ID
91514
Name BAILEY'S GRAVING DOCK, BARRY DOCKS
NGR ST12206696 Period Post Medieval
Full description
Large dry dock, which is still intact although not used. The keel wedges are still in place and the pump house
(91515) stands on the dockside to the west.
Type Condition Status
Dock Not Known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium High Possible - Medium
Confidence Value Effect
High B None

ID
97242
Name ST BARUCH'S CHURCH (3), ARCHER ROAD/ PHYLLIS STREET, BARRY ISLAND
NGR ST11606699 Period Post Medieval
Full description
This Chapel is built in the late 20th century and is of gable entry type.
Type Condition Status
Church Not Known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C None

79
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
91515
Name PUMPHOUSE AT BAILEYS GRAVING DOCK, BARRY DOCKS
NGR ST12176693 Period Post Medieval
Full description
Red-brick pump house with a pitched slated roof, standing on the west side of Bailey's Graving Dock (91514).
Although apparently only one storey high, the building has a deep basement that is level with the floor of the
graving dock.
Type Condition Status
Pump Not Known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium High Possible - Medium
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C None

ID
404879/LB15894
Name LIFEBOATHOUSE, BARRY DOCKS
NGR ST1217366726 Period Modern
Full description
Lifeboat house of c.1901. Constructed in pressed red brick, it has gable coping, kneelers, pinnacles and
corrugated roof covering. The seaward west end has large sliding boat doors, above which is camber-headed
window. The north side has roughly central camber-headed doorway, one camber-headed window to left, and
two to the right. There is also a small window at eaves level (R). The south side is similar but has only two
windows. To the rear of the building there is a lower gabled extension with camber-headed window. The
slipway is constructed of steel girders, which are supported on groups of four iron columns with horizontal and
diagonal cross ties. Included as good example of building type.
Type Condition Status
Lifeboat Station Not Known LBII
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Medium Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
High B None

80
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
406806
Name BARRY TOWN
NGR ST1166 Period Multiperiod
Full description
The name Barry is thought to have been in use since the 11th century and possibly even earlier, but its origins are
unclear; the name could have been derived in one of at least three ways. Linguistically, the Welsh for hill or rise,
is ‘bar’ and likewise, the Old Norse for border or shore is ‘bars’, whilst ‘ey’ means island (cf. Knight 1981, 31).
However, according to Gerald Cambrensis in his Itinerarium Cambriae (or Journey through Wales), written in the
late 12th century, the island’s name was derived from that of the Celtic saint whose remains were interred on the
island – St Barruch.

Type Condition Status


Town Not Known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Low High Possible - High
Confidence Value Effect
High B None

ID
LB15888
Name NO 69, HIGH STREET (S SIDE) BARRY
NGR ST1073267473 Period Unknown
Full description
Situated on corner of High St and Market Street. Group of four shops dating to c.1891. Number 69 is three storeys
high, and built in red brick with dressings in bathstone or terracotta. There is a parapet with urn finials and horned
sash glazing. Bracketed cornice terracotta band course; sill course and bracketed sills to second floor windows.
First floor windows have cambered heads with keyblocks, broken cornice at impost level, sill course; bracketed
sills with terracotta reliefs between brackets. On ground floor modern shop fronts between pilasters supporting
dentil cornice; above pilasters small lunettes with reliefs of lion's heads; corner has former doorway, round-headed
with keyblock; floral capitals to jamb pilasters. Elevation of No 69 to Market Street has three windows to each
floor and two large shop windows. Included as well-balanced design of period.
Type Condition Status
Unknown Not Known LBII
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Medium Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
High B None

81
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
LB15889
Name NO 70, HIGH STREET (S SIDE) BARRY
NGR ST71073867478 Period Unknown
Full description
Group of four shops dating to c.1891.
Type Condition Status
Unknown Not Known LBII
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Medium Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
High B None

ID
LB15890
Name NO 71, HIGH STREET (S SIDE) BARRY
NGR ST10742167481 Period Unknown
Full description
Group of four shops dating to c.1891
Type Condition Status
Unknown Not Known LBII
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Medium Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
High B None

ID
LB15891
Name NO 72, HIGH STREET (S SIDE) BARRY
NGR ST1074767485 Period Unknown
Full description
Group of four shops dating to c.1891
Type Condition Status
Unknown Not Known LBII
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
High B None

82
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
LB15893/14105
Name PORTHKERRY METHODIST CHURCH, PORTHKERRY ROAD (N SIDE), BARRY
NGR ST10526744 Period Post Medieval
Full description
Designed by architects Jones, Richards and Budgen of Cardiff the Methodist church was built in 1897.
Type Condition Status
Unknown Not Known LBII
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium Low Unknown
Confidence Value Effect
High B None

ID
LB15895
Name SLIPWAY, BARRY DOCKS
NGR ST1222066710 Period Unknown
Full description
In 1901 the RNLI established a lifeboat station on Barry Island, and a boathouse and slipway were built.
Type Condition Status
Dock Slipway Not Known LBII
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium High Possible - Medium
Confidence Value Effect
High B None

ID
LB16562
Name SLIDING BRIDGE (AT NORTH ENTRANCE TO BASIN)
NGR ST1224067130 Period Unknown
Full description
Spans the north entrance to the Dock Basin.
Type Condition Status
Unknown Not Known LBII
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium High Possible - Medium
Confidence Value Effect
High B None

83
Barry Island Pleasure Park: archaeological desk-based assessment

ID
3212
Name WALLS OF DOCK BASIN (ALSO KNOWN AS NO 3 BASIN)
NGR ST1227067000 Period Unknown
Full description
Situated at the seaward end of Barry Docks.
Type Condition Status
Dock Wall Not Known None
Rarity Group association Historical association
Medium High Possible - Medium
Confidence Value Effect
Medium C None

84

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