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Lord Ashcroft International Business School

Retail Marketing
Marketing, Strategy and Enterprise
Module Code: MOD001195

Academic Year: 2014/15


Semester/Trimester: 2

Module Guide

Contents
Retail Marketing ..................................................................................................................................... 1
1. Key Information ................................................................................................................................ 2
2. Introduction to the Module ................................................................................................................ 2
3. Intended Learning Outcomes............................................................................................................ 3
3.1 Employability skills delivered in this Module ...................................................................................... 4
4. Outline Delivery ................................................................................................................................ 5
4.1 Attendance Requirements ................................................................................................................ 8
5. Assessment ...................................................................................................................................... 9
5.1 How to check your plagiarism via Turnitin ....................................................................................... 10
5.2 Submitting your work ...................................................................................................................... 12
5.3 Marking Rubric and Feedback ........................................................................................................ 12
5.4 Re-Assessment (resit) .................................................................................................................... 12
6. How is My Work Marked? ............................................................................................................... 12
7. Assessment Criteria and Marking Standards .................................................................................. 15
7.1 Specific Assessment Criteria and Marking Rubric........................................................................... 15
7.2 University Generic Assessment Criteria .......................................................................................... 17
8. Assessment Offences ..................................................................................................................... 19
9. Learning Resources ....................................................................................................................... 21
9.1. Library ........................................................................................................................................... 21
9.2. Other Resources ........................................................................................................................... 26
10. Module Evaluation ......................................................................................................................... 26
11. Report on Last Delivery of Module ................................................................................................. 27
Appendix 1: Re-Assessment Information .............................................................................................. 28

Page 1

Module Guide

1. Key Information
Module:

Retail Marketing

Module Leader:

Tim Froggett

Module Tutor:

Asanthi Kodituwakku

Every module has a Module Definition Form (MDF) which is the officially validated record of the module.
You can access the MDF for this module in three ways via:

the Virtual Learning Environment (VLE)


the My.Anglia Module Catalogue at www.anglia.ac.uk/modulecatalogue
Anglia Ruskins module search engine facility at www.anglia.ac.uk/modules

All modules delivered by Anglia Ruskin University at its main campuses in the UK and at Associate
Colleges throughout the UK and overseas are governed by the Academic Regulations. You can view
these at www.anglia.ac.uk/academicregs. A printed extract of the Academic Regulations, known as the
Assessment Regulations, is available for every student from your Faculty Office (all new students will
have received a copy as part of their welcome pack).
In the unlikely event of any discrepancy between the Academic Regulations and any other publication,
including this module guide, the Academic Regulations, as the definitive document, take precedence
over all other publications and will be applied in all cases.

2. Introduction to the Module


. Welcome to the Retail Marketing module. This module aims to build on knowledge of the basic
principles and practices of marketing by applying them in a retail context and to develop specialist
knowledge of the retail industry from a marketing perspective. There are links to many other areas of
your course: marketing, marketing management, consumer behaviour, pricing, purchasing and strategy.
It is through retailing that products and services are presented to consumers for personal purchase and
consumption. Retailers are never far from the news and their marketing strategies and activities are
highly visible to us as students of retailing and as consumers.
Retailing is an exciting, challenging and rewarding area of study and offers an increasing range of
rewarding graduate careers. New trends emerge and new retailers prosper whilst established ones
wither and die. The years of recession following the financial crisis have seen the failure of many
retailers who had been part of the UK high street for decades: Woolworth (variety store), MFI (kitchens
and bathrooms), The Pier (household accessories and gifts), Borders (books, magazines and music),
Habitat (furniture and household goods), Dolcis (shoes), Blacks Leisure (camping and other outdoor
clothing), La Senza (lingerie and nightwear), Hawkins Bazaar (toys, games and novelty). Trading
conditions in 2011were so difficult for white goods and electrical retailer Comet that its owners Kesa
Electrical sold it for 2 to investment company OpCapita and provided a cash injection of 50 million to
the new owners. Comet finally went in to Administration during 2012.In contrast to this Rolls Royce
Motor Company reported the highest sales value in its history for 2011whlist discount retailers such as
Aldi, Lidl, and Netto continued to enjoy rapid year on year sales growth. Challenging economic times
present an opportunity for retailers to adjust elements of their marketing mixes to reflect shoppers
changing needs and wants and to develop innovative retail marketing strategies. During 2009 Tesco
responded to the growth in discount grocery by developing its own discount brand range to go head to
head with Aldi and Lidl in this increasingly important segment. In December 2012 Tesco finally

Page 2

Module Guide

announced a strategic review of its loss making US business Fresh & Easy. Tesco had believed that its
choice of locations and formats, merchandise range and assortment and supply chain capabilities were a
strong basis for a sustainable competitive advantage. This proved not to be the case and in December
2012 Tesco CEO concluded that Fresh & Easy would not deliver acceptable shareholder returns in its
current form.
When retailers disappear from our high street is it a failure of marketing or an unavoidable consequence
of the rapid pace of change in the retail environment reflecting the increasingly difficult task retail
marketers face in connecting with consumers? As you learn more about the retail environment, retail
marketing and retail strategy attempt to explain why the retailers listed above failed. In addition, prepare
your own list of retailers that you think are vulnerable to continuing difficult economic times.
These, and many other questions are addressed in a module which combines lectures with a practically
based seminar programme where key issues are addressed through the use of research activities which
explore current issues in retail marketing and consumer behaviour research. Examples of topics covered
are:
Retail strategies
The retail marketing mix
The contribution of the retail environment and the retail experience to customer satisfaction
On-line retailing and other emerging trends
How behavioural research helps retailers develop a better understanding of consumers and their
shopping habits
How supply chain management is an increasingly important driver of retail performance and
customer satisfaction.
To get the most from the module it is important not only to attend lectures and seminars but also to take
a keen interest in topical retail stories presented through the media and to visit retailers as both
consumer and student of retail marketing. So get into the habit of taking paper and pen on your shopping
trips and making notes: it will make for a more interesting and rewarding learning experience

3. Intended Learning Outcomes


A detailed lecture and seminar programme is provided later in this module guide. The module aims to
enable students to understand thoroughly how the principles and practices of marketing are applied in
the retail environment. For those students with limited experience of marketing to date the first lecture
provides an overview of the marketing process.
Seminars are more rewarding where students prepare for them by reading the case study material in
advance. The format of the seminars is designed to enable students to apply knowledge and
understanding through completion of weekly research tasks and to practise their assessment technique
through mini presentations and written analyses.
On successful completion of this module students will be able to:
1. Understand core marketing principles and how they are applied in retail marketing
2. Compare marketing mixes and strategies in the context of national and international retail
operations
3. Evaluate key variables affecting the future of retail marketing

Page 3

Module Guide

3.1 Employability skills delivered in this Module


It is important that we help you develop employability skills throughout your course which will assist you
in securing employment and supporting you in your future career. During your course you will acquire a
wide range of key skills. In this module, you will develop those identified below:
.
SKILL

Skills acquired in this


module

Communication (oral)
Communication (written)
Commercial Awareness
Cultural sensitivity
Customer focus
Data Handling
Decision making
Enterprising
Flexibility
Initiative
Interpersonal Skills
Leadership/Management of others
Networking
Organisational adaptability
Project Management
Problem Solving and analytical skills
Responsibility
Team working
Time Management
Other

X
X
X
X
X

Page 4

X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
x
x

Module Guide

4. Outline Delivery
Wk
1

Student activity
Introduction
to
marketing

Student activity
Reading references
retail In order to fully benefit from Gilbert D, (2003), Retail
the lessons, students are
Marketing Management, 2nd
expected
to
read
the
Edition, Pearson Education
recommended Lecture notes,
India, Chapter 1.
Practical applications and
Case studies, available in the Kotler P, Armstrong G,
IMSS.
Agnihotri P.Y, and Haque
E.U. (2010), Principals of
Marketing, 13th Edition,
Pearson Prentice Hall,
Chapter 13, pg. 314-323.

Retail marketing mix I


-

The
product
mix,
product selection and
buying, retailers as
product, retailer own
brand

Retail pricing, price


demand relationships,
pricing strategies,

Advertising
promotion

Kotler P, Armstrong G,
Agnihotri P.Y, and Haque
E.U. (2010), Principals of
Marketing, 13th Edition,
Pearson Prentice Hall,
Chapter 2.

Berman B, Evans J.R, and


Mathur M (2010), Retail
Management: A Strategic
Approach, 11th Edition,
Pearson Prentice Hall,
Chapter 3.

http://www.referenceforbusin
ess.com/encyclopedia/StrThe/StrategyFormulation.html

In order to fully benefit from


the lessons, students are
expected
to
read
the
recommended Lecture notes,
Practical applications and
Case studies, available in the
IMSS.

Gilbert D, (2003), Retail


Marketing Management, 2nd
Edition, Pearson Education
India, Chapter 5, 6, 7 and 8.
Kotler P, Armstrong G,
Agnihotri P.Y, and Haque
E.U. (2010), Principals of
Marketing, 13th Edition,
Pearson
Prentice
Hall,
Chapter 2, pg 44-48.

and

Page 5

Kotler P, Armstrong G,
Agnihotri P.Y, and Haque
E.U. (2010), Principals of
Marketing, 13th Edition,
Pearson
Prentice
Hall,

Module Guide

Chapter 4 & 5.

Retail marketing mix II


-

The selling
environment - retail
atmospherics, store
design and layout

People and retailing service and quality,


personal selling,
expectations and
satisfaction

Marketing logistics distribution and supply


chain management,
channel relationships,
efficient consumer
response

Berman B, Evans J.R, and


Mathur M (2010), Retail
Management: A Strategic
Approach,
11th
Edition,
Pearson
Prentice
Hall,
Chapter 18, pg.518-534.

McGoldrick, P (2002) Retail


Marketing,
2nd
Edition,
McGraw Hill, Chapter 12.

In order to fully benefit from


the lessons, students are
expected
to
read
the
recommended Lecture notes,
Practical applications and
Case studies, available in the
IMSS.

Kotler P, Armstrong G,
Agnihotri P.Y, and Haque
E.U. (2010), Principals of
Marketing, 13th Edition,
Pearson
Prentice
Hall,
Chapter 2, pg 44-48.

Kotler P, Armstrong G,
Agnihotri P.Y, and Haque
E.U. (2010), Principals of
Marketing, 13th Edition,
Pearson
Prentice
Hall,
Chapter 4 & 5.

Berman B, Evans J.R, and


Mathur M (2010), Retail
Management: A Strategic
Approach,
11th
Edition,
Pearson
Prentice
Hall,
Chapter 18, pg.518-534.

McGoldrick, P (2002) Retail


Marketing,
2nd
Edition,
McGraw Hill, Chapter 12.

In order to fully benefit from


the lessons, students are
to
read
the
- Generic strategies, retail expected
growth vectors, targeting recommended Lecture notes,
Practical applications and
and positioning
Case studies, available in the
Retail Marketing Strategies

Page 6

Gilbert D, (2003), Retail


Marketing Management, 2nd
Edition, Pearson Education
India, Chapter 5, pg.124 131, Chapter 4 and Chapter
9.

Gilbert D, (2003), Retail


Marketing Management, 2nd
Edition, Pearson Education
India, Chapter 10 & 11.
Kotler

P,

Armstrong

G,

Module Guide

IMSS.

Agnihotri P.Y, and Haque


E.U. (2010), Principals of
Marketing, 13th Edition,
Pearson
Prentice
Hall,
Chapter 18, pg 450-461.

Kotler P, Armstrong G,
Agnihotri P.Y, and Haque
E.U. (2010), Principals of
Marketing, 13th Edition,
Pearson
Prentice
Hall,
Chapters 8 & 11.

Berman B, Evans J.R, and


Mathur M (2010), Retail
Management: A Strategic
Approach,
11th
Edition,
Pearson
Prentice
Hall,
Chapters 17 & 19.

http://knowledge.wharton.up
enn.edu/article.cfm?articleid
=2837

consumer

- Principles of consumer
behaviour, motives for
shopping. the retail CDP

Gilbert D, (2003), Retail


Marketing Management, 2nd
Edition, Pearson Education
India, Chapter 5.

Berman B, Evans J.R, and


Mathur M (2010), Retail
Management: A Strategic
Approach,
11th
Edition,
Pearson
Prentice
Hall,
Chapter 7, pg.199 - 225.

http://www.consumerpsychol
ogist.com/intro_Consumer_B
ehavior.html

Globalisation and future of In order to fully benefit from


retail marketing
the lessons, students are
expected
to
read
the
recommended
Lecture
notes,
- International retailing
Practical applications and
- Non-store retailing
Case studies, available in the
IMSS.

Gilbert D, (2003), Retail


Marketing Management, 2nd
Edition, Pearson Education
India, Chapter 13 & 15

Understanding
behaviour

Page 7

Berman B, Evans J.R, and


Mathur M (2010), Retail
Management: A Strategic
Approach,
11th
Edition,
Pearson
Prentice
Hall,

Module Guide

Chapters 6.

Kotler P, Armstrong G,
Agnihotri P.Y, and Haque
E.U. (2010), Principals of
Marketing,
13th
Edition,
Pearson
Prentice
Hall,
Chapter 19.

Kotler P, Armstrong G,
Agnihotri P.Y, and Haque
E.U. (2010), Principals of
Marketing,
13th
Edition,
Pearson
Prentice
Hall,
Chapter 13, pg 329 - 333.

Krafft M, Mantrala M.K,


(2009), Retailing in the 21st
Century: Current and Future
Trends, Springer, Page 96

4.1 Attendance Requirements


Attending all your classes is very important and one of the best ways to help you succeed in this module.
Research has found a clear correlation between student attendance and overall performance. In
accordance with the Student Charter, you are expected to arrive on time and take an active part in all your
timetabled classes. If you are unable to attend a class for a valid reason (e.g. illness), please contact your
Module Tutor.
Anglia Ruskin will closely monitor the attendance of all students and will contact you if you have been
absent without notice for two weeks. Continued absence can result in various consequences including the
termination of your registration as you will be considered to have withdrawn from your studies.
International students who are non-EEA nationals and in possession of entry clearance/leave to remain as
a student (student visa) are required to be in regular attendance at Anglia Ruskin. Failure to do so is
considered to be a breach of national immigration regulations. Anglia Ruskin, like all British Universities, is
statutorily obliged to inform the UK Border Agency of the Home Office of significant unauthorised absences
by any student visa holders.

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Module Guide

5. Assessment
The assessment for this module consists of a written assignment.
You are required to provide a TWO PAGE summary of your complete assignment in order to
provide you with suggestions for improvement before the final submission.

Part

Type of
assessment

Word or
page
limit

Draft:
2 page summary of
assignment

2 pages

Written assignment

3000
words

Submission method

Deadline for assessment

Submission to the tutor via


learning portal

TBA

London School of Marketing


Submission website
http://www.lsmsubmissions.com

May 2015
Please follow email
correspondence for deadlines
and any possible revisions

Part 1 Assignment
Mark

Learning
Outcome

1. For a non-domestic retailer operating in a country of your choice


analyse each element of the retail mix. The analysis should
include:
Merchandise range and assortment
- Retail communications
- Store layout, design and visual merchandising
- Customer service and facilitating services
- Formats and locations
- Pricing strategy and tactics

60%

1 and 2

2. Assess the extent to which the retail mix provides a basis for
sustainable competitive advantage

20%

1 and 2

3. Evaluate the challenges to continued international growth that will


be faced by your chosen retailer. Consider, for example, PEST
factors, the competitive context, growth objectives, growth
strategy, market selection and entry methods, emerging retailing
trends.

20%

TOTAL MARKS

100%

All coursework assignments and other forms of assessment must be submitted by the published deadline
which is detailed above. It is your responsibility to know when work is due to be submitted ignorance of
the deadline date will not be accepted as a reason for late or non-submission.

Any late work will NOT be accepted and a mark of zero will be awarded for the assessment task in
question.
You are requested to keep a copy of your work.

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Module Guide

5.1 How to check your plagiarism via Turnitin


You are required to submit your written assignments online via Turnitin. You must put YOUR Student
ID number (SID) as the submission title (details below).
You will be enrolled automatically to a Turnitin class: The Originality Report Class to which you can submit
multiple drafts for originality checking. You should follow the detailed instructions provided on the
LEARNING PORTAL.
When you submit your paper, remember to:

a) Keep Default

b) Enter your first


and last name(s)

SID

c) Enter your SID


as the submission
title: VERY
IMPORTANT!
d) Browse to search for your
assignment file

f) or cancel

e) Upload

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Module Guide

Plagiarism Requirement:
Prior to final submission the assignment must be submitted to the electronic plagiarism checking
software (i.e. Turnitin);
Turnitin.com uses the Originality Check tool to compile the Originality Report, which contains
detailed information about the number and the use of each primary source in the submitted
document. This is done through the Similarity Index, which is a percentage of words in the paper
that match all the primary sources to all words in the document.
The Similarity Index also shows a copy of the student paper with primary sources. Each primary
source is given a colour and number. The text within the students paper, which corresponds to a
primary source, will be highlighted in that respective colour and attached with its respective number.
The percentage of each primary source refers to a percentage of words in the entire paper that
match the source.
HOW TO VIEW YOUR FEEDBACK
Click on the class that you wish to view and then you will see the assignments for the module listed.
Click the blue view button to open up the document viewer. A new window will open and you will see
your feedback on the right-hand side of the screen. Or click on the grey arrow to download a copy of
your assignment and feedback.

POINTS TO NOTE

1. All work submitted MUST be entitled by your Student ID number.


2. The Originality Report is automatically generated by Turnitin on submitting work. A paper copy
of the originality report is not required.

3. The Originality Report will not be used to make assessment decisions unless concerns
arise as to poor academic practice, plagiarism, or collusion. The report may then be
considered as part of the normal investigatory procedures undertaken by the academic
team and the Director of Studies (again, please see Section 10 of the Assessment
Regulations).

4. Re-sits and extensions are also to be submitted via Turnitin. New Turnitin classes will be
created for re-sits.

5. Full details as on submitting to Turnitin, the Originality Report, and a FAQs list, can be
located on the module VLE.
All assignments must be submitted by the published deadline. It is your responsibility to know
when work is due to be submitted ignorance of the deadline date will not be accepted as a
reason for late or non - submission.

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Module Guide

5.2 Submitting your work


All student work which contributes to the eventual outcome of the module (i.e. if it determines whether
you will pass or fail the module and counts towards the mark you achieve for the module) is submitted to
London School of Marketing Submission Website. Academic staff CANNOT accept work directly
from you.
Any late work will NOT be accepted and a mark of zero will be awarded for the assessment task in
question.
You are requested to keep a copy of your work.

5.3 Marking Rubric and Feedback


The rubric, shown in Section 7.1 Specific Marking Criteria, will be used to mark your work.
Feedback
You are entitled to written feedback on your performance for all your assessed work. For all assessment
tasks which are not examinations, this is provided through the completion of the assignment coversheet
on which your mark and feedback will relate to the achievement of the modules intended learning
outcomes and the assessment criteria you were given for the task when it was first issued.
Examination scripts are retained by London School of Marketing and are not returned to students.
However, you are entitled to feedback on your performance in an examination and may request a
meeting with the Module Leader or Tutor to see your examination script and to discuss your
performance.
London School of Marketing is committed to providing you with feedback on all assessed work within 20
working days of the submission deadline or the date of an examination. This is extended to 30 days for
feedback for a Major Project module (please note that working days excludes those days when LS is
officially closed; e.g. between Christmas and New Year). Personal tutors will offer to read feedback from
several modules and help you to address any common themes that may be emerging.
On occasion, you will receive feedback and marks for work that you completed in the earlier stages of
the module. We provide you with this feedback as part of the learning experience and to help you
prepare for other assessment tasks that you have still to complete. It is important to note that, in these
cases, the marks for these pieces of work are unconfirmed. This means that, potentially, marks can
change, in either direction!
Marks for modules and individual pieces of work become confirmed on the Dates for the Official
Publication of Results which can be checked at www.anglia.ac.uk/results.

5.4 Re-Assessment (resit)


If you are unsuccessful with the 1st attempt of your assessment, you must complete a re-assessment.
As indicated in Section 6.2.7. of the Senate Code of Practice, this is a NEW assessment, you CANNOT
re-work the assessment explained in this section. You must choose a different retailer from your
original submission. The re-assessment information is given in Appendix 1.

6. How is My Work Marked?


After you have submitted your work or you have completed an examination, Anglia Ruskin undertakes a
series of activities to assure that our marking processes are comparable with those employed at other
universities in the UK and that your work has been marked fairly, honestly and consistently. These
include:
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Module Guide

Anonymous marking your name is not attached to your work so, at the point of marking, the
lecturer does not know whose work he/she is considering. When you undertake an assessment task
where your identity is known (e.g. a presentation or Major Project), it is marked by more than one
lecturer (known as double marking)

Internal moderation a sample of all work for each assessment task in each module is moderated
by other Anglia Ruskin staff to check the standards and consistency of the marking

External moderation a sample of student work for all modules is moderated by external
examiners experienced academic staff from other universities (and sometimes practitioners who
represent relevant professions) - who scrutinise your work and provide Anglia Ruskin academic staff
with feedback, advice and assurance that the marking of your work is comparable to that in other UK
universities. Many of Anglia Ruskins staff act as external examiners at other universities.

Departmental Assessment Panel (DAP) performance by all students on all modules is discussed
and approved at the appropriate DAPs which are attended by all relevant Module Leaders and
external examiners. Anglia Ruskin has over 25 DAPs to cover all the different subjects we teach.
This module falls within the remit of the Marketing, Strategy and Enterprise DAP.
The following external examiners are appointed to this DAP and will oversee the assessment of this
and other modules within the DAPs remit:

MARKETING, ENTERPRISE AND STRATEGY


External Examiners Name

Academic Institution

Position or Employer

Dr Ross Brennan

University of Hertfordshire

Reader in Marketing

Dr Lindsey Carey

Glasgow Caledonian University

Senior Lecturer

Prof. Dr. Jens Cordes


Dr Margaret Fletcher

Hochschule Harz University of


Applied Sciences
University of Glasgow

Professor of Service Management


and Service Marketing
Lecturer

Mr David Gibson

Queen's University of Belfast

Senior Teaching Fellow

Mr Luiz Montanheiro

University of Sheffield

Associate Lecturer

Prof Roger Palmer

Bournemouth University

Dean of Business School

The above list is correct at the time of publication. However, external examiners are appointed at
various points throughout the year. An up-to-date list of external examiners is available to students and
staff at www.anglia.ac.uk/eeinfo.

Anglia Ruskins marking process is represented in the flowchart below:


Anglia Ruskins marking process is represented in the flowchart below:

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Module Guide

Student submits
work / sits
examination

DAP4 Stage
1
2

Work collated and passed to


Module Leader

Work is marked by Module


Leader and Module Tutor(s)1. All
marks collated by Module Leader
for ALL locations2

Internal moderation samples


selected. Moderation undertaken
by a second academic3

Any issues?

YES

NO
Students receive
initial (unconfirmed)
feedback

External Moderation Stage

Internal Moderation Stage

Marking Stage

Flowchart of Anglia Ruskins Marking Processes

Unconfirmed marks and feedback


to students within 20 working
days (30 working days for Major
Projects)

External moderation samples


selected and moderated by
External Examiners4

Any issues?

YES

NO
Marks submitted to DAP5 for
consideration and approval
Confirmed marks
issued to students
via e-Vision

Marks Approved by DAP5 and


forwarded to Awards Board

All work is marked anonymously or double marked where identity of the student is known (e.g.in a presentation)
The internal (and external) moderation process compares work from all locations where the module is delivered
(e.g.Cambridge, Chelmsford, Peterborough, Malaysia, India, Trinidad etc.)
The sample for the internal moderation process comprises a minimum of eight pieces of work or 10% (whichever
is the greater) for each marker and covers the full range of marks
Only modules at levels 5, 6 and 7 are subject to external moderation (unless required for separate reasons). The
sample for the external moderation process comprises a minimum of eight pieces of work or 10% (whichever is
the greater) for the entire module and covers the full range of marks
DAP: Departmental Assessment Panel Anglia Ruskin has over 25 different DAPs to reflect our subject coverage

Page 14

Module Guide

7. Assessment Criteria and Marking Standards

Retail mix analysis

7.1 Specific Assessment Criteria and Marking Rubric


A++ = 90-100

A+ = 80-89%

A = 70-79%

B = 60-69%

C = 50-59%

D = 40-49%

F = 30-39%

F- = 20-29%

F = 10 -19%

F---- = 0-9%

Exceptional retail
mix analysis.
Comprehensive
and detailed
evidencing
exceptional in-store
research.
Exceptional clarity,
structure,
referencing and
range of sources

Outstanding retail
mix analysis. Very
detailed showing
outstanding insight
with outstanding
level of in-store
research.
Outstanding clarity,
structure,
referencing and
range of sources

Excellent retail mix


analysis. Very
detailed showing
excellent insight
with excellent level
of in-store research
.Excellent clarity,
structure,
referencing and
range of sources

Very good analysis


though lacks the
insight for a first
class answer.
Detailed in-store
research and
referencing, range
of sources and
clarity are very
good

Analysis good
overall with minor
omissions in
respect of some
mix elements.
Structure, clarity
referencing and
range of sources
are good

Basic level
analysis. Lacks
details and is not
based on detailed
in-store research.
Structure, clarity,
referencing and
range of sources
are acceptable

Below the required


standard. Mix
elements lack
detail and there is
little evidence of instore research.
Structure, clarity,
referencing and
range of sources
are all below the
required standard

Not eligible for a


compensated pass
due to lack of detail
in in analysis, lack
of in-store research
and overall
structure, clarity
and referencing are
inadequate

Very poor work


lacking detail, poor
evidence of
research.
Referencing,
structure, clarity
and range of
sources are all very
ppor

Little/nothing of
merit

Understanding and
application of
theoretical
perspectives is
very good but lacks
the insight for a
first class answer
Clarity structure,
referencing range
of sources are very
good

Discussion is
rather descriptive
and application of
theoretical
perspectives lacks
insight. Structure,
clarity, referencing
and range of
sources are good
with some errors

Analysis and
application are at a
basic standard as
are referencing,
structure, clarity
and range of
sources

Work is not of the


standard required
to pass. Limited
evidence of
understanding of
theory and of
scholarly
conventions

Not eligible for


compensated pass
with limited
evidence of
understanding and
application and
inadequate use
and understanding
of scholarly
conventions

All aspects of the


work are poor

Basis of competitive advantage

Understanding and
application of
theoretical
perspectives is
exceptional. Clarity
structure,
referencing range
of sources are
exceptional

Understanding and
application of
theoretical
perspectives are
outstanding. Clarity
structure,
referencing range
of sources are
outstanding

Understanding and
application of
theoretical
perspectives is
excellent Clarity
structure,
referencing range
of sources are
excellent

Page 15

Little/nothing of
merit

Evaluation of future challenges

Module Guide

Exceptional insight
is demonstrated in
identification and
analysis of relevant
future challenges.
All academic
aspects of work are
exceptional

Outstanding insight
is demonstrated in
identification and
analysis of relevant
future challenges.
All academic
aspects of work are
Outstanding

Excellent insight is
demonstrated in
identification and
analysis of relevant
future challenges.
All academic
aspects of work are
excellent

Insight
demonstrated is
below level
required for first
class answer but is
nevertheless very
good All academic
aspects of work are
very good

Limited range
factors are
identified and
application is
limited. Academic
aspects of work are
satisfactory

Basic level answer


demonstrating little
insight in
identification of
relevant factors.
Academic factors
are of a basic pass
standard

Page 16

Worrk is below the


standard required
to pass with limited
understanding,
significant
omissions and
limited
understanding of
scholarly
convention

Not of a standard
eligible for a
compensated pass
with significant
omissions and lack
of applications.
Limited
understanding of
scholarly
convention

All aspects of the


work are poor

Little/nothing of
merit

Module Guide

7.2 University Generic Assessment Criteria


ANGLIA RUSKIN UNIVERSITY GENERIC ASSESSMENT CRITERIA AND MARKING STANDARDS
LEVEL 7
Level 7 is characterised by an expectation of students expertise in their specialism. Students are semi-autonomous, demonstrating
independence in the negotiation of assessment tasks (including the major project) and the ability to evaluate, challenge, modify and
develop theory and practice. Students are expected to demonstrate an ability to isolate and focus on the significant features of problems
and to offer synthetic and coherent solutions, with some students producing original or innovative work in their specialism that is worthy
of publication or public performance or display.

Generic Learning Outcomes (GLOs) (Academic Regulations, Section 2)

Characteristics of Student Achievement by Marking Band

Mark Bands

Outcome
Knowledge & Understanding

Intellectual (thinking), Practical,


Affective and Transferable Skills

90-100%

Exceptional analysis of key issues/concepts/ethics with


very clear originality and autonomy. Exceptional
development of conceptual structures and argument
making an exceptional use of scholarly conventions.
Demonstrates independence of thought and a very high
level of intellectual rigour and consistency. Work pushes
the boundaries of the discipline and may be considered for
external publication

Exceptional analysis of key issues/concepts/ethics.


Exceptional development of conceptual structures and
argument, making consistent use of scholarly conventions.
Exceptional research skills, independence of thought, an
extremely high level of intellectual rigour and consistency,
exceptional expressive/professional skills, and substantial
creativity and originality. Exceptional academic/intellectual
skills. Work pushes the boundaries of the discipline and
may be considered for external publication

80-89%

Outstanding analysis of key issues/concepts/ethics with


clear originality and autonomy. Outstanding development
of conceptual structures and argument making an
exemplary use of scholarly conventions. Demonstrates
independence of thought and a very high level of
intellectual rigour and consistency

Outstanding analysis of key issues/concepts/ethics. Very


high level development of conceptual structures and
argument, making consistent use of scholarly conventions.
Outstanding research skills, independence of thought, a
high level of intellectual rigour and consistency,
outstanding expressive/professional skills, and
considerable creativity and originality. Exemplary
academic/intellectual skills

70-79%

Excellent analysis of key issues/concepts/ethics. Excellent


development of conceptual structures and argument
making excellent use of scholarly conventions.
Demonstrates independence of thought and a high level of
intellectual rigour and consistency

Excellent analysis of key issues/concepts/ethics. High


level development of conceptual structures and argument,
making consistent use of scholarly conventions. Excellent
research skills, independence of thought, a high level of
intellectual rigour and consistency, excellent expressive/
professional skills, and considerable creativity and
originality. Excellent academic/intellectual skills, and
considerable creativity and originality

60-69%

Good analysis of key issues/concepts/ethics.


Development of conceptual structures and argument
making consistent use of scholarly conventions

Good analysis of key issues/concepts/ethics.


Development of conceptual structures and argument,
making consistent use of scholarly conventions

50-59%

Satisfactory knowledge of key issues/ concepts/ethics in


discipline. Descriptive in parts but some ability to
synthesise scholarship and argument. Minor lapses in use
of scholarly conventions

Satisfactory knowledge of key issues/ concepts/ethics in


discipline. Descriptive in parts but some ability to
synthesise scholarship and argument. Minor lapses in use
of scholarly conventions

Achieves module
outcome(s) related to
GLO at this level

40-49%

A marginal pass in
module outcome(s)
related to GLO at this
level

Basic knowledge of key issues/concepts/ethics in


discipline. Generally descriptive, with restricted synthesis
of existing scholarship and little argument. Use of
scholarly conventions inconsistent

Basic knowledge of key issues/concepts/ethics in


discipline. Generally descriptive, with restricted synthesis
of existing scholarship and little argument. Use of
scholarly conventions inconsistent.

30-39%

A marginal fail in
module outcome(s)
related to GLO at this
level. Possible
compensation. Satisfies qualifying mark

Limited knowledge of key issues/concepts/ethics in


discipline. Largely descriptive, with restricted synthesis of
existing scholarship and limited argument. Limited use of
scholarly conventions.

Limited research skills impede use of learning resources


and problem solving. Significant problems with
structure/accuracy in expression. Team/Practical/
Professional skills not yet secure. Weak academic/
intellectual skills. Limited use of scholarly conventions

Little evidence of knowledge of key issues/concepts/ethics


in discipline. Largely descriptive, with little synthesis of
existing scholarship and little evidence of argument. Little
evidence of use of scholarly conventions.

Little evidence of research skills, use of learning resources


and problem solving. Major problems with structure/
accuracy in expression. Team/Practical/Professional skills
virtually absent. Very weak academic/intellectual skills.
Little evidence of use of scholarly conventions

Inadequate knowledge of key issues/concepts/ethics in


discipline. Wholly descriptive, with inadequate synthesis
of existing scholarship and inadequate argument.
Inadequate use of scholarly conventions.

Inadequate use of research skills, learning resources and


problem solving. Major problems with structure/accuracy in
expression. Team/Practical/Professional skills absent.
Extremely weak academic/intellectual skills. Inadequate
use of scholarly conventions

20-29%

10-19%

Fails to achieve
module outcome(s)
related to this GLO.
Qualifying mark not
satisfied. No
compensation
available

Page 17

Module Guide

1-9%
0%

No evidence of knowledge of key issues/concepts/ethics in


discipline. Incoherent and completely but poorly
descriptive, with no evidence of synthesis of existing
scholarship and no argument whatsoever. No evidence of
use of scholarly conventions.

No evidence of use of research skills, learning resources


and problem solving. Incoherent structure/accuracy in
expression. Team/Practical/Professional skills nonexistent. No evidence of academic/intellectual skills. No
evidence of use of scholarly conventions

Awarded for: (i) non-submission; (ii) dangerous practice and; (iii) in situations where the student fails to address the
assignment brief (eg: answers the wrong question) and/or related learning outcomes

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Module Guide

8. Assessment Offences
As an academic community, we recognise that the principles of truth, honesty and mutual respect are
central to the pursuit of knowledge. Behaviour that undermines those principles weakens the community,
both individually and collectively, and diminishes our values. We are committed to ensuring that every
student and member of staff is made aware of the responsibilities s/he bears in maintaining the highest
standards of academic integrity and how those standards are protected.
You are reminded that any work that you submit must be your own. When you are preparing your work
for submission, it is important that you understand the various academic conventions that you are
expected to follow in order to make sure that you do not leave yourself open to accusations of plagiarism
(e.g. the correct use of referencing, citations, footnotes etc.) and that your work maintains its academic
integrity.

Definitions of Assessment Offences


Plagiarism
Plagiarism is theft and occurs when you present someone elses work, words, images, ideas, opinions or
discoveries, whether published or not, as your own. It is also when you take the artwork, images or
computer-generated work of others, without properly acknowledging where this is from or you do this
without their permission.
You can commit plagiarism in examinations, but it is most likely to happen in coursework, assignments,
portfolios, essays, dissertations and so on.
Examples of plagiarism include:

directly copying from written work, physical work, performances, recorded work or images, without
saying where this is from;
using information from the internet or electronic media (such as DVDs and CDs) which belongs to
someone else, and presenting it as your own;
rewording someone elses work, without referencing them; and
handing in something for assessment which has been produced by another student or person.

It is important that you do not plagiarise intentionally or unintentionally because the work of others
and their ideas are their own. There are benefits to producing original ideas in terms of awards, prizes,
qualifications, reputation and so on. To use someone elses work, words, images, ideas or discoveries is
a form of theft.
Collusion
Collusion is similar to plagiarism as it is an attempt to present anothers work as your own. In plagiarism
the original owner of the work is not aware you are using it, in collusion two or more people may be
involved in trying to produce one piece of work to benefit one individual, or plagiarising another persons
work.
Examples of collusion include:

agreeing with others to cheat;


getting someone else to produce part or all of your work;
copying the work of another person (with their permission);
submitting work from essay banks;
paying someone to produce work for you; and
Page 19

Module Guide

allowing another student to copy your own work.

Many parts of university life need students to work together. Working as a team, as directed by your
tutor, and producing group work is not collusion. Collusion only happens if you produce joint work to
benefit of one or more person and try to deceive another (for example the assessor).
Cheating
Cheating is when someone aims to get unfair advantage over others.
Examples of cheating include:

taking unauthorised material into the examination room;


inventing results (including experiments, research, interviews and observations);
handing your own previously graded work back in;
getting an examination paper before it is released;
behaving in a way that means other students perform poorly;
pretending to be another student; and
trying to bribe members of staff or examiners.

Help to Avoid Assessment Offences


Most of our students are honest and want to avoid committing assessment offences. We have a variety
of resources, advice and guidance available to help make sure you can develop good academic skills.
We will make sure that we make available consistent statements about what we expect. You will be able
to do tutorials on being honest in your work from the library and other support services and faculties, and
you will be able to test your written work for plagiarism using TurnitinUK (a software package that
detects plagiarism).
You can get advice on how to use honestly the work of others in your own work from the library website
(www.libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/referencing.htm) and your lecturer and personal tutor.
You will be able to use TurnitinUK, a special software package which is used to detect plagiarism.
TurnitinUK will produce a report which clearly shows if passages in your work have been taken from
somewhere else. You may talk about this with your personal tutor to see where you may need to
improve your academic practice. We will not see these formative TurnitinUK reports as assessment
offences. All students in Cambridge and Chelmsford are also expected to submit their final work through
TurnitinUK as outlined above.
If you are not sure whether the way you are working meets our requirements, you should talk to your
personal tutor, module tutor or other member of academic staff. They will be able to help you and tell
you about other resources which will help you develop your academic skills.

Procedures for assessment offences


An assessment offence is the general term used to define cases where a student has tried to get unfair
academic advantage in an assessment for himself or herself or another student.
We will fully investigate all cases of suspected assessment offences. If we prove that you have
committed an assessment offence, an appropriate penalty will be imposed which, for the most serious
offences, includes expulsion from Anglia Ruskin. For full details of our assessment offences policy and
procedures, see Section 10 of the Academic Regulations at: www.anglia.ac.uk/academicregs.

Page 20

Module Guide

9. Learning Resources
9.1. Library

Lord Ashcroft International Business School


libteam.aibs@anglia.ac.uk

Reading List Template Anglia Ruskin University Library


Resources

Notes

Key text
Retail Marketing Management, David Gilbert, FT
Retail Marketing, Peter McGoldrick, McGraw Hill
Books
Retail Management: A Strategic Approach, Berman and
Evans, Pearson
Retailing Management: Levy and Weitz, McGraw Hill
Introduction to Retailing, Lusch, Dunne and Carver,
South Western Cengage Learning
International Retailing, Alexander and Doherty, Oxford
University Press
Journals
REFER TO THE VLE FOR ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
AND VISIT THE VLE REGULARLY FOR UPDATED NEWS
STORIES, LINKS, CASES AND WHITE PAPERS
Specific journal articles
Websites
REFER TO THE VLE FOR ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
AND VISIT THE VLE REGULARLY FOR UPDATED NEWS
STORIES, LINKS, CASES AND WHITE PAPERS
o

Advertising Association
The Advertising Association is a federation of 26
trade bodies representing the advertising and
promotional marketing industries, including
advertisers, agencies, media and support
services. The website contains a lot of information
about advertising related issues plus some useful
student briefings about the industry.

Advertising Standards Authority


The Advertising Standards Authority is the
independent body set up by the advertising
industry to police the rules for non-broadcast
advertisements, sales promotions and direct
marketing that are laid down in the CAP Code.

Customer Contact Association


Provides services, at both individual and
organisation level, encouraging the promotion of
best practice and professional standards.

Page 21

Module Guide
o

Direct Marketing Association


Europe's largest trade association in the
marketing and communications sector.

Institute of Direct Marketing


Leading body for the professional development of
direct and digital marketing.

Institute of Practitioners in Advertising


The trade body and professional institute for
leading agencies in the UK's advertising, media
and marketing communications industry.

Incorporated Society of British Advertisers


The UK advertisers representative body on all
aspects of marketing communications.

Chartered Institute of Public Relations


The institute represents and serves the interests
of people working in public relations in the UK
and abroad. We offer access to information,
advice and support, and provide networking and
training opportunities through a wide variety of
events, conferences and workshops.

Institute of Sales Promotion


A trade association that truly represents
promoters, agencies and service partners
engaged in promotional marketing. The website
provides useful information about rules,
regulations and guidelines concerning sales
promotions.

Ofcom
The regulator for the UK broadcast and
telecommunications industry. Ofcom deals with
complaints about TV and radio, and is largely
consumer orientated. The website provides
research and market reports.

British Promotional Merchandise Association


A comprehensive listing of premium promotional
goods and services, and their suppliers.

Voucher Association
A trade body which represents the interests of
voucher providers in the corporate incentive,
loyalty, reward and gift voucher markets.

Marketing associations and support websites

Advertising Archives
This website provides an online picture library,
containing a vast collection of American and
British press advertisements and magazine cover
illustrations in Europe.

Brandchannel.com
Brandchannel.com provides a global perspective
on brands, and challenges viewers to think
further about the important issues that are
affecting brands now and in the future. They offer
tools and information, including global listings for
conferences, courses and careers, as well as links
Page 22

Module Guide
to other valuable industry resources.

Chartered Institute of Marketing


The website for the Chartered Institute of
Marketing. The Knowledge Hub section offers
articles, case studies and research surveys.

History of Advertising Trust


A website which contains a stunning collection of
advertising artefacts and memorabilia.

Institute of Sales and Marketing


Management
The professional body for salespeople in the UK.

Market Research Society


The world's largest international membership
organisation for professional researchers and
others engaged or interested in market, social
and opinion research. Contains online guides to
market research and associated activities.

Marketing Society
A professional association dedicated to raising the
stature of marketing in business.

Mintel
A global supplier of consumer, media and market
research.

Nielsen Media Research


Offers market information gathered from a wide
range of sources.

Thomson Intermedia

Xtreme Information

World Advertising Research Center (WARC)


WARC is a leading supplier of information,
knowledge, insight and data to the global
marketing, advertising, media and research
communities.

B2B online publications, portals and


directories

B2BMarketingBiz.com
Offers a free weekly B2B case study by e-mail
from an American "media company serving
marketers".

B2BYellowPages.com
"A worldwide business-to-business Yellow Pages
and website directory that allows businesses to
locate and/or publicise websites to other
businesses".

Business.com
A business-focused search engine and directory useful for general industry background or

Page 23

Module Guide
specifics about a particular product line.

Contact B2B
"High profile exhibition platform, from which
businesses of all sizes are able to sell,
demonstrate and explain their products and
services to an appreciative and decision making
audience". The website provides a list of
upcoming B2B exhibitions.

CRM Buyer
"Offers impartial product reviews and practical
advice, in addition to a comprehensive directory
of CRM vendors".

E-Commerce Research Forum


"Publishes research abstracts periodically via
email and maintains them in a searchable archive
with links to working papers".

Line56
"The leading source of global news and analysis
on e-business technology and strategy".

MagPortal.com
Offers over 300 searchable articles in its B2B
section.

OutsourcingCenter
A portal that "hosts a wealth of free research,
case studies, database directories, market
intelligence, and ever-expanding content targeted
to the information organisational decision-makers
seek on emerging trends and best practices in
outsourcing as a strategic business solution".

SupplyChainBrain.com
"The nerve center for today's supply-chain news,
developments and innovative thinking". The
website contains case studies, newsletters, and
online magazines.

Publications

Brand Republic
This website features professional marketing
news, views and developments. It incorporates
material from Marketing, Campaign, PR Week,
Revolution, Direct Response, Marketing Direct and
Promotions & Incentives, all of which are
available on subscription. Students rates
available.

B2B Online
Online magazine - offers an annual listing of the
best 100 B2B websites, which can be sorted by
industry.

Chartered Institute of Marketing


Publish The Marketer each month. Members only.

ComputerWeekly.com
Online magazine - includes a searchable library of

Page 24

Module Guide
white papers.

ClickZ
E-mail marketing news, articles and case studies.

Shared Insights
A source of information for the evaluation,
purchase and implementation of electronic
business to business technology and solutions.
This website has good news items, applications
information, plus case studies and white papers.
The website also provides access to a number of
affiliate websites, such as CRM and
PortalCommunity.

E-Commerce Times
"Provides daily original editorial content, with full
coverage of e-business and technology news and
information".

Financial Times
Extensive range of articles and case studies.

Journal of Business-to-Business Marketing


The Journal of Business-to-Business Marketing.
Subscription is required for full access but offers a
free 'Table of Contents' e-mail service.

CIO
An online magazine with various 'research
centres' including CRM, ERP, and Supply Chain
Management. Provides newsletters and case
studies.

Mad.co.uk
Features professional marketing news, views and
developments. The website incorporates material
from Marketing Week, Design Week, Precision
Marketing, DM Weekly, Technology Week and
Creative Review, all of which are available on
subscription. Student rates available.

McKinsey Quarterly
"Articles that go beyond reportage and analysis to
offer new ways of thinking about management in
the private, public, and nonprofit sectors". The
website provides a free online newsletter, and
there are membership options for access to
archives.

The Manufacturer.com
An online magazine providing news and articles.
Good for supply chain management issues.

Times Online

Provides a range of news and archive materials


on a variety of business marketing issues.

Additional notes on this reading list


Eg. Additional reading will be recommended weekly in class.
Link to the University Library http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/
Page 25

Module Guide
Link to Harvard Referencing guide http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/referencing/harvard.htm

9.2. Other Resources

10. Module Evaluation


During the second half of the delivery of this module, you will be asked to complete a module evaluation
questionnaire to help us obtain your views on all aspects of the module.
This is an extremely important process which helps us to continue to improve the delivery of the module
in the future and to respond to issues that you bring to our attention. The module report in section 11 of
this module guide includes a section which comments on the feedback we received from other students
who have studied this module previously.
Your questionnaire response is anonymous.
Please help us to help you and other students at Anglia Ruskin by completing the Module Evaluation
survey. We very much value our students views and it is very important to us that you provide feedback
to help us make improvements.
In addition to the Module Evaluation process, you can send any comment on anything related to your
experience at Anglia Ruskin to tellus@anglia.ac.uk at any time.

Page 26

Module Guide

11. Report on Last Delivery of Module


MODULE REPORT FORM

This form should be completed by module tutors (where there is more than one delivery) and forwarded to Module Leaders who
compiles the results on to one form for use at the Programme Committee and other methods of disseminating feedback to
students.

Module Code and Title: Retail Marketing 001195


Anglia Ruskin Department: MSE
Location(s) of Delivery: Cambridge, Chelmsford, Peterborough and Partnerships
Academic Year: 2012-13

Semester/Trimester: 2

Enrolment Numbers (at each location):


Module Leader: Tim Froggett
Other Module Tutors: Various
Student Achievement Provide a brief overview of student achievement on the module as evidenced by the range of marks awarded. A
detailed breakdown of marks will be available at the Departmental Assessment Panel.

The mark range covered 0 96%. In Cambridge the overall pass rate was 83% and the module satisfaction rating was
83%. The overall pass rate in other centres ranged from 73 100%.

Feedback from Students Briefly summarise student responses, including any written comments
Student responses are overwhelmingly positive praising the applied and practical nature of the module and its
assessment

Module Leader/Tutors Reflection on Delivery of the Module, including Response to Feedback from Students
(including resources if appropriate)
Feedback and evaluations in all centres is excellent. Module will continue its applied and practical nature retaining the
strong emphasis on in-store research

Developments during the current year or planned for next year (if appropriate)
The range of on-line resources will be further developed

External Examiners Comments State whether the external examiner agreed the marks and/or commented on the
module
All marks agreed by External Examiner

Page 27

Module Guide

Appendix 1: Re-Assessment Information

THIS INFORMATION ONLY APPLIES TO STUDENTS WHO ARE


UNSUCCESSFUL IN THEIR FIRST SUBMISSION
The re-assessment for this module consists of one:
Part
010

Type of assessment

Word or Deadline for assessment


time limit
Improve the original submission based on the 3000
Resit period: TBA
feedback provided
words

011
Part 010 Assignment
Mark

Learning
Outcome

1. For a non-domestic retailer operating in a country of your choice


analyse each element of the retail mix. The analysis should
include:
Merchandise range and assortment
- Retail communications
- Store layout, design and visual merchandising
- Customer service and facilitating services
- Formats and locations
Pricing strategy and tactics

60%

1 and 2

2. Assess the extent to which the retail mix provides a basis for
sustainable competitive advantage

20%

1 and 2

3. Evaluate the challenges to continued international growth that will


be faced by your chosen retailer. Consider, for example, PEST
factors, the competitive context, growth objectives, growth
strategy, market selection and entry methods, emerging retailing
trends.

20%

TOTAL MARKS

Page 28

100%

Module Definition Form (MDF)


Module Code: MOD001198

Version 1

Date amended 03/Aug/2009

1. Module Title
Retail Marketing
2a. Module Leader
Timothy Froggett

2b. Department
2c. Faculty
Dept of Marketing, Strategy and Lord Ashcroft International
Enterprise
Business School

3a. Level
6
4a. Credits

3b. Module Type


Standard Module
4b. Study Hours

15

150

5. Restrictions
Type
Module Code
Module Name
PreBD130002S
Managing People, Finance and Marketing
requisites:
CoNone
requisites:
Exclusions:
None
Courses to which this
None
module is restricted

Condition
AND
(Compulsory)

LEARNING, TEACHING AND ASSESSMENT INFORMATION


6a. Module Description
The module applies core marketing principles in a retail context and develops specialist
knowledge of the retail industry from a marketing perspective. There are clear links to other
business curriculum areas: marketing management, consumer behaviour, human resources,
operations management and economics. Retailers are never far from the news and their
marketing activities are equally visible to students of retail marketing and to consumers. This
makes for an exciting and rewarding area of study as the module examines the fast moving
nature of the retail environment and the increasingly difficult task retail marketers face in
connecting with consumers in a crowded and competitive market place. Retail marketing is
explored through a combination of lectures and a seminar programme where key issues are
addressed through discussion of case study material drawn from the popular and professional
press, retailer "in-house" publications and traditional and contemporary academic literature.
Areas explored include: retail marketing mixes and strategies, the "retail product", experiential
elements of customer satisfaction, internet retailing and other emerging trends, behavioural
research in retailing and supply chain management and retail performance. The module
assessment requires students to conduct a comparative retail marketing analysis which involves
detailed desk and field research of retail organisations.
One of the main focuses for the design of this module has been the further development of
relevant employability and professional skills. Such skills are implicit in the learning outcomes.

MDF generated on Tuesday 12 November 2013, 00:17:46.94

Page 1 of 3

6a. Module Description (Continued)


Multiculturalism has been considered during the design of this module and will be considered
when the assessment brief is written.
6b. Outline Content
-The retail environment
-Models of retail change
-Competitive strategies
-The "retail product" and retail marketing mixes
-Merchandising
-Retail pricing
-Consumer behaviour
-Positioning and store image
-Service and quality
-Retail formats, atmospherics, locations and strategies
-Supply chain management
-Brands
-New technology
-Internationalisation/globalisation
-Consumerism and ethics
-Conduct retailer research
-Apply retail marketing theory
-Comparative analysis
6c. Key Texts/Literature
Gilbert, D. (2003) Retail Marketing Management (2nd Edition), FT Prentice Hall
Cox, R. and Brittain, P. (2005) Retailing: An Introduction (5th Edition), FT Prentice Hall
Last Updated: 03/08/2009

6d. Specialist Learning Resources


None
7. Learning Outcomes (threshold standards)
No. Type
On successful completion of this module the student will be
expected to be able to:
1
Knowledge and
Critically analyse core marketing principles and how they are
understanding
applied in retail marketing
2
Intellectual, practical, Make an in-depth comparison of marketing mixes and strategies in
affective and
the context of national and international retail operations
transferable skills
3
Intellectual, practical, Critically evaluate key variables affecting the future of retail
affective and
marketing
transferable skills
8a. Module Occurrence to which this MDF Refers
Year
Occurrence
Period
Location
2013/4
ZZF
Template For
Face To Face
Learning Delivery

MDF generated on Tuesday 12 November 2013, 00:17:46.94

Mode of Delivery
Face to Face

Page 2 of 3

8b. Learning Activities for the above Module Occurrence


Learning
Hours
Learning
Details of Duration, frequency and other comments
Activities
Outcomes
Lectures
12
1-3
Weekly lectures and seminar/tutorial/workshops
Other teacher
managed
12
1-3
Weekly lectures and seminar/tutorial/workshops
learning
Student
A comprehensive module guide is provided in week
managed
1 containing a range of reading material to support
learning
seminar and workshop discussions. In addition
126
1-3
students are expected to be aware of topical retail
news stories from popular and specialist media. The
nature of the assignment requires extensive primary
and secondary research of retail organisations.
TOTAL
150
9. Assessment for the above Module Occurrence
Assessment
Assessment
Learning
Weighting (%) Fine Grade or Qualifying Mark
No.
Method
Outcomes
Pass/Fail
(%)
010
Coursework
1-3
100
Fine Grade
30
Details:
Assignment: 3000 words
In order to pass this module, students are required to achieve an overall mark of 40%.
In addition, students are required to:
(a) achieve the qualifying mark for each element of fine grade assessment as specified
above
(b) pass any pass/fail elements.

MDF generated on Tuesday 12 November 2013, 00:17:46.94

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