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CountyTimes Three Notch Theater Celebrates a Decade in the Spotlight April 23, 2015 APRIL 23
CountyTimes
Three Notch
Theater
Celebrates
a Decade
in
the Spotlight
April 23, 2015
APRIL 23
rd
Spring
2015
Home
& Garden
Story Page 13
CHESAPEAKE’S
BOUNTY
MAKING YOUR YARD A
HOMEGROWN PARADISE
SEE PAGE 4
A SPECIAL SUPPLEMENT TO:
ALSO INSIDE
Photo by Frank Marquart

2

The County Times

Thursday, April 23, 2015

On the Cover Newtown Theater Celebrates 10 years pg. 12
On the
Cover
Newtown Theater Celebrates 10 years pg. 12
Earth Day in Leonardtown pg.7
Earth Day in Leonardtown
pg.7
Senior Gala at Tech Center pg. 18
Senior Gala at Tech Center pg. 18
Weather Watch
Weather
Watch
Weather Watch
COVER STORY the “ theatre’s done extremely well. It’s all been because of the volunteers.”
COVER STORY
the “
theatre’s done
extremely well. It’s
all been because of
the volunteers.”
- Wendy Heidrich on the success
of the Three Notch Theatre
located in Lexington Park.
CONTENTS
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Letters
Cops & Courts
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Library Calendar
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Sports
Community Calendar
Church Directory
Entertainment
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Games
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Contributing Writers
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4

Local News

The County Times

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Commissioners Hire New Economic Development Director

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

The Commissioners of St. Mary’s County approved an employment contract for a veteran public servant from Tucson, Ariz to head up the county’s Department of Economic and Com- munity Development. Chris Kaselemis, who has worked for the City of Tucson for nearly 30 years, will start work for the county June 15 at a time when concerns over diversifying the economy locally are key. In a Tuesday phone interview, Kaselemis said Tucson was hit hard by The Great Recession of 2008 after a housing boom went bust and the unemployment rate hit about 10 percent in a city of more than 500,000 people. Since that time the unemployment rate has decreased to about 5.6 percent; attracting major employers, helping expand light manufacturing and revitalizing the downtown area of the city were all catalysts that helped bring about a re- covery, he said. “We were really hurt by the great recession,” Kaselemis said. “In our downtown there has been $800 million of investment from public and private sources alone.” Kaselemis said St. Mary’s was an attrac- tive place for him to try and affect change in a smaller but economically vibrant jurisdiction. “It’s a beautiful area with a high quality of life,” Kaselemis said.

Commissioner Tom Jarboe said Kaselemis’ work in revital- izing an ailing economy with a focus on diversification, was his most attractive strength. “He’s done a lot for the com- munity he comes from,” Jar- boe said, who said Kaselemis

showed a real interest in St. Mary’s County during his inte- view process. “He’d really done his homework,” Jarboe said. “He drove all over the county and took meticulous notes.” The prospect of boosting light manufacturing with its promise of increased employment op- portunities, Jarboe said, was something Kasele- mis had a experience in. “This guy has a background in this,” Jarboe said. “He was the right fit.” Kaselemis said he had to make a deeper assessment of the county’s strengths and weaknesses to find a strategy for economic diversification. “That is the challenge,” he said. “You have to find a way to attract companies with compatible industries. “I really need to talk to the people on the ground to learn more.”

need to talk to the people on the ground to learn more.” Chris Kaselemis guyleonard@countytimes.net Fire

Chris

Kaselemis

guyleonard@countytimes.net

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Thursday, April 23, 2015

The County Times

5

Local News

Legislators Note Some Success But Other Measures Fell By The Wayside

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

The St. Mary’s County delegation saw few

of their legislative measures pass this year but both Sen. Steve Waugh and Del. Matt Morgan believed their first time out as lawmakers was

a success. “We had a great session… it didn’t always

feel like it,” said Waugh. “But we did real well.” Both he and Morgan said the delegation par- ticipated in passing a bill that increased gov- ernment transparency through public informa- tion requests and that the legislative session as

a whole was a success because of the positive

fiscal track the state was on as a result. “There was no new spending and no new taxes,” Waugh said. “And St. Mary’s and Cal- vert counties were fully funded by the state.” But there were pitfalls this session as well, Waugh said, since many pieces of legislation

did not pass including higher profile bills for exempting many St. Mary’s County business- es from the personal property tax and a mea- sure that would have granted reciprocity for concealed handgun carry permits from other states here in Maryland.

“It never got a committee vote,” Morgan

said of the personal property tax measure. “That [bill] ran contrary to the tax and spend efforts at the state level for the past eight years. “Local courtesy was not extended.” Local courtesy is a practice whereby bills submitted by local delegations that would only affect their jurisdictions receive positive votes from other lawmakers. There were other such bills that would have exempted small businesses from paying taxes on operations equipment, notably from Gov. Larry Hogan himself, but they also met with defeat.

“They just weren’t going to move any of them,” Morgan said. The Democrats still hold a vast major- ity in both houses of the legislature and resisted many tax relief measures. Morgan also said that a bill that Del. Anthony O’Donnell, the senior member of the delegation, has long championed, to ensure that state funding for screen- ing infants for hereditary disorders would not be spent on other programs, passed. Last year the bill got stalled in the Senate and died. “That was a huge victory,” Morgan said. On the concealed handgun permit reci- procity bill, Waugh acknowledged the momentary defeat but he believed just put- ting the bill forward had a positive effect. “It’s about changing the inertia of the conversation,” Waugh said. “In past years all anyone was talking about was elimi- nating gun rights.” Todd Eberly, professor of political sci- ence at St. Mary’s College of Maryland, said the first year for three out of the four lawmakers was a tough one because of the turnover in the legislature in 2014 and the need to build relationships with other legislators. But perhaps one of the most important achievements for the group was present- ing a united front in getting more plan- ning money for the third building at the Southern Maryland Higher Education Center for advanced autonomous systems research. “As far as getting funding from the state that’s the thing that really mattered,” Eb- erly said.

guyleonard@countytimes.net

Officials Deem Fire As Arson Attempt

By Lauren Procopio Staff Writer

A foreclosure home located on Three

Notch Rd. in Mechanicsville was inten- tionally set on fire Monday morning. On April 20, around 9:40 a.m., some 40 volunteer firefighters from the Mechanics- ville, Leonardtown, Hollywood, La Plata and Seventh District Volunteer Fire De- partments were dispatched to the vacant house after a passerby discovered the fire. Deputy State Fire Marshal Melissa Decker said an unknown suspect(s) en- tered into the one-story residence and ig- nited the fire in the kitchen area.

The intentional blaze caused an estimated $15,000 in damage to the residence. Firefighters were able to control the fire within five minutes. No injuries were reported as a result of this incident. Officials are currently looking for a suspect(s) in relation to this event; anyone with information pertain- ing to this incident is encouraged to contact the Southern Maryland Fire Marshal’s Office, Southern Region, at

443-550-6834.

lauren@somdpublising.net

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6

Local News

The County Times

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Third Building Design Funding Still Short

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

There is enough funding to keep the planning phase for the third building at the Southern Maryland Higher Education Center (SMHEC) moving but the full funding for that part of the project is still not com- pletely there, officials working on the project said. Between $2.5 million from a pri- or budget year, $1 million from the Commissioners of St. Mary’s County, $450,000 from Gov. Larry Hogan’s supplemental budget and $250,000 in grant money there is $4.2 million available but the costs for just the de- sign phase are likely to grow. “It’s waiting for us to use,” said Joe Anderson, head of the Board of Gov- ernors of SMHEC. “But it probably won’t cover all the costs. We’re going to need to get more design money.” Anderson said the entire cost of the design phase will likely be between $6 million and $6.5 million. Patrick J. Hogan, associate vice chancellor for Government Relations

with the University System of Mary- land, which will run the autonomous systems research project at the facil- ity, said numbers are not firm yet. “We’re still working on the exact size and scope of the building,” Ho- gan said, adding that the $4.2 mil- lion could be sufficient to get the design moving. “It’s enough to get us through fiscal 2016.” The third building is viewed by nearly all law makers locally and eco- nomic development specialists as one of the best chances to diversify the local economy and reduce the depen- dence on the U.S. Navy’s presence at Patuxent River Naval Air Station. The expectation is that the research at the facility into unmanned air sys- tems and other forms of robotics can work from the progress made in the military fields and be applied to civil- ian work. The total costs of the building’s actual construction are thought to be between $70 million to $80 million.

guyleonard@countytimes.net

Report Chides State Lottery Agency

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

A report issued by state government audi- tors investigating the operations of the State Lottery and Gaming Control Agency (SLG- CA) over a period of three years revealed sev- eral weaknesses including a lack of security for the agency’s computer network and unclaimed lottery and gaming funds were not always dis- persed according to state regulations. This report follows a report released in 2012 that showed some of the same problems. “The firewalls installed to protect the SL- GCA network allowed unnecessary and in- secure connections to network devices on the internal network,” the report stated. “The fire- walls’ rules were not configured to adequately secure connections into the network from the Internet, networkMaryland, and other untrust- ed sources.” The report concluded that “critical network devices were susceptible to attack which could result in a loss of data integrity or the interrup- tion of critical network services.” The report noted also that “firewall logs were not regularly reviewed for unusual or suspicious entries.” Password protections were also weak, the report stated, nor was security reporting adequate. Unnecessary access to the agency’s main-

frame could result in “unauthorized access to critical mainframe functions, disclosure of sensitive information or modification of criti- cal production data.” The report from the Office of Legislative Audits was issued this month; the state’s lot- tery agency oversees lottery and casino opera- tions that provide revenue to the state’s general fund as well as the education trust funds, the Maryland Stadium Authority and many other funds. The audit showed that as of June 30, 2014 the agency garnered $2.6 billion from gaming and lottery sales around the state with about $942 million being used by state agencies and other funds. $1 billon had been released to prize claims, the report stated. The agency was also faulted in the report for not dispersing unclaimed video lottery termi- nal winnings back to the state after 182 days, according to the report. The report stated that of $704,000 in un- claimed winnings, $347,000 was given to non- state entities. In its response to the audit SGLCA said it would work to eliminate the firewall problems and tighten security and restrict access to criti- cal systems to key administrators.

guyleonard@countytimes.net

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Thursday, April 23, 2015

The County Times

Local News

7

Leonardtown Celebrates Earth Day

By Lauren Procopio Staff Writer

Earth Day came to Leonardtown a few days ear- ly – the square hosted the celebration Sunday, April 19 from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. The sunny, spring day brought out a large crowd for the annual event; attendees were able to en- joy numerous information booths, live music and entertainment, Greyhounds, and classic cars that Winegardner had on display. Vendors included the College of Southern Mary- land; The University of Maryland; Anita’s Cake Shop; the Leonardtown Volunteer Rescue Squad Auxiliary and much more.

The St. Mary’s County Democrats had a booth on display, as well as the League of Women Voters of St. Mary’s, where attendees were able to register to vote. Guests were able to stroll around to the different vendors and purchase items such as custom-made jewelry and sand art. Some new features the celebration introduced this year were free kayak rides at the Wharf and boat tours, which ran hourly, on Breton Bay for $5. For more information on other events in Leonar- dtown, visit www.leonardtown.somd.com/events/ index.htm.

lauren@somdpublishing.net

in Leonar- dtown, visit www.leonardtown.somd.com/events/ index.htm. lauren@somdpublishing.net Photos By Lauren Procopio

Photos By Lauren Procopio

in Leonar- dtown, visit www.leonardtown.somd.com/events/ index.htm. lauren@somdpublishing.net Photos By Lauren Procopio
in Leonar- dtown, visit www.leonardtown.somd.com/events/ index.htm. lauren@somdpublishing.net Photos By Lauren Procopio
in Leonar- dtown, visit www.leonardtown.somd.com/events/ index.htm. lauren@somdpublishing.net Photos By Lauren Procopio

8

The County Times

Thursday, April 23, 2015

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Visit us on Facebook to view before and after photos! Local News Holmes-Tucker Partners with IBM

Local News

Holmes-Tucker Partners with IBM to Offer Jazz Lifecycle Project Management

Holmes-Tucker has partnered with IBM to offer naval aviation customers IBM Rational Jazz, the industry-standard lifecycle project management software. “Jazz is one-stop shopping for manag- ing an aircraft project from initial con- cept to retirement from the fleet,” said Holmes-Tucker President and CEO Doro- thy Hammond. Jazz integrates a suite of software, including two critical applications from IBM’s Rational Group: the Dynamic Object-Oriented Requirements System (DOORS) for requirements management and Rational Software Architecture (RSA) for enterprise architecture. Both are standard tools for the U.S. Navy’s Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) in all new aircraft programs. “It’s a major step forward toward the NAVAIR vision of online, model-based systems engineering,” Hammond said. Jazz incorporates additional capabili- ties normally available only as separate applications, such as project timeline tracking and multiple report formats including graphical and bulleted-text slides. Jazz also can import data from Microsoft Project, Excel and other ven- dors’ programs. All Jazz capabilities are bundled into one collaborative online platform accessible to all members of a project team no matter where they’re located. Holmes-Tucker has already installed Jazz for NAVAIR’s P-8A Poseidon sub- hunter program and provides Jazz sup- port and modifications for the UCLASS carrier-based unmanned aircraft program. “It’s imperative for a small business like ours to offer the Navy more and better services if we’re going to sur- vive the sequestration budget cuts,” said Hammond, whose employees support NAVAIR at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, MD and other Navy and Marine Corps bases around the country. As an IBM business partner, Holmes- Tucker gains a significant advantage in the competitive military contracting world, according to Adam Hammett, the company’s Jazz applications manager. “We have the full suite of Jazz soft- ware available for customer demon- strations, training and certification at our headquarters right across the street from NAVAIR at Pax River,” Hammett said. “And the IBM engineers we work with are on call for immediate customer assistance.” Hammett noted that until now much of

assistance.” Hammett noted that until now much of Holmes-Tucker installed Jazz for PMA-290’s P-8A Poseidon

Holmes-Tucker installed Jazz for PMA-290’s P-8A Poseidon program and provides continuing administration, maintenance, training and on-call support. The P-8A, which replaces the venerable P-3C, is a Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, Bosch and Bombardier.

the data generated in the development of a new aircraft has traditionally been main- tained by individual engineers responsible for specific subsystems in their own spread- sheets or databases. Other members of the project team can’t directly access that data and may only get to see it on PowerPoint slides during briefs. When team members leave, as inevitably happens during a multi- year development project, those individual- ized data records can be difficult for their replacements to operate and interpret. But with Jazz, Hammett said, “Data all goes into one big repository where every- one on a project team can manipulate, link and analyze it with the same suite of tools.” Hammett and software engineer Mark (K-9) Kilchenmann, an MIT engineering grad and former Navy test pilot, lead the installation team, which includes another programmer and the company’s IT engi- neer. The team configures the customer’s server, installs the software, makes sure all components talk to each other, adds certi- fied users’ names, activates the demo pro- gram and tailors the application to each cli- ent’s requirements, including a customized dashboard. The company’s Jazz package also includes administration, maintenance, training and on-call support. The Holmes-Tucker Jazz team has an ideal mix of talents, CEO Hammond said. “We’ve got a veteran engineer, K-9, who’s flown more kinds of airplanes than you can count, working with Adam and our other young whiz kids – the digital natives who’ve been immersed in computer tech- nology pretty much since birth.”

Press Release from Holmes-Tucker

Thursday, April 23, 2015

The County Times

9

Local News

State Fire Marshal Recommends Marylanders “Spring” Into Fire Safety

Spring-cleaning is an annual ritual for many people. Just as the first Robins of spring usher in a new beginning for nature, our spring- cleaning habits signify a fresh start for us af- ter the long winter months. State Fire Marshal Brian S. Geraci suggests that Spring-cleaning can take on another meaning. “It’s the ideal time to check our homes, porches, garages, sheds and yards for dangerous materials and unsafe conditions and to spend some quality time to protect our families and properties.” Start by taking a few minutes to plan your safety clean up day. You will want to check each room in your home, including the attic and basement. Also, don’t forget the garage, yard and storage shed. Plan to do several different things:

1. Remove All Hazards. Check and correct things such as:

Frayed or damaged appliance cords, wiring, fuses or breakers. Piles of rubbish, trash and yard debris. Remove stacks of paper and magazines and place them in recycling containers. Check for water leaks, especially near elec- trical appliances. Check for adequate clearance between heat- ing appliances and combustibles. 2. Properly Store Flammable Liquids and Home Chemicals:

Make sure that gasoline and cleaning fluids are well marked and are out of the reach of children and pets. Store in a cool, dry place outside the house. Clean up work areas. Put dangerous tools, adhesives, matches or other work items away and out of any child’s reach. Make sure that all chemicals are kept under lock and key and out of reach of children and pets.

3. Check Fire Protection and Safety Equipment:

Test your smoke alarms and CO detectors. Do it now while you’re thinking about it Make sure all doors and win- dows open easily and are accessible for fast escapes. Make sure your street numbers are posted properly and are clearly visible. Check and make sure you have a working flashlight and battery- powered radio for the approaching storm season. 4. Plan Your Escape:

Sit down with your family and make sure that everyone knows

what to do in the event of a fire by designing a home escape plan. Make sure you have two ways out of every room and that you have

a meeting place outside the home

for the whole family. Practice the plan at least twice a

year. Even the best plan is no good

if you don’t practice it!

5. Remove Outdoor Debris:

Clear away dead leaves and brush from the outside of walls of your home and other structures. Eliminate clutter under decks, porches and stairs. You can do a lot to protect your- self, your family and your proper- ty. In fact, you are the key to your safety. A little time spent on simple common sense prevention will do a lot to make your home a safer place to live!

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10

Letters to the

EDITOR

The County Times

Thursday, April 23, 2015

it resembles the current location as a convenient, com-

muter library branch. The downtown location, on the other hand, repre- sents an opportunity to draw significant foot traffic to an established residential, commercial and employ-

ment center where the new library is strategically posi- tioned at the center of a future mixed-use development master plan. This represents much more than a replace- ment project, and one that can leverage additional in- vestment and growth.

I ask you to walk the 200 or so footsteps on Fen-

wick Street from Leonardtown Square to the proposed downtown site on Lawrence Ave. The pedestrian de- sign of downtown Leonardtown clearly enables far greater strategic benefit than any location outside the town proper. This is confirmed by looking at the Cal- vert Library in Prince Frederick or the new Waldorf West Branch near the mall at St. Charles. These 21 st Century designs integrate libraries as anchors in com- mercial centers. Similarly, cities and towns across the state and country are increasingly building public li- braries in downtown locations as vital community centers. Therefore, I strongly recommend downtown Leonardtown as the better choice for our new library.

Sincerely,

Dr. Bob Schaller

41100 Paw Paw Hollow Lane, Leonardtown, MD

20650

Regarding Comments Attributed to the Library Board of Trustees

I write this letter reluctantly because I fear that

county residents are weary of the dialogue regarding the location of the Leonardtown library. As a home- owner in Leonardtown and a member of the Library Board of Trustees, I am cautiously hopeful about fu- ture plans for the town; however, having been swayed

by the optimistic plans for Leonardtown in my decision

to reside here 10 years ago I’m well aware that only the

unchanged sign on Rt. 5 has been the reflection of most of those plans. I am, however, incensed as a resident and board member that alleged comments have been printed in the County Times that the Library board members have considered the downtown area of Leon- ardtown as unsafe. The main focus of board discussion on location has been to provide comprehensive servic-

es to library patrons and accessibility for county resi- dents. I can attest in my involvement with the board for over two years there has never been a disparaging statement made about any section of Leonardtown— that would be an offense to the residents we value and support, nor anything but positive comments about the Lexington Park Library. I agree that the Leonardtown community should be “outraged” by such remarks if made, as stated in the County Times article; however, the Library trustees should be outraged when a dispar- aging remark is falsely attributed to the board. Such

a comment about any area of Leonardtown would be

positions or conclusions involving the Leonardtown Library, the Lexington Park Library or any Library matter. I don’t doubt that discussion will continue but I do hope that those discussions will not include unsub- stantiated statements about the position of the Library Board.

Jim Hanley Leonardtown resident and member of the Library Board of Trustees

Vision

or

Mirage?

Once again (still, actually) debate about locating a new home for the library at Leonardtown has sucked all the oxygen out of the atmosphere in the center of our county. On either side of the question, people express preferences, seek endorsements, and accuse the other side of misrepresenting facts. The question has become an issue of mere politicking in which we may all be using English, but none of us are speaking the same language. The town of Leonardtown is rightly concerned about the decline of its business district and is focused on gaining the county library as almost a trophy that would revitalize the county seat. However, all their sin- cere urgings are more theoretical “consider the possi- bilities” than a concrete viable bid. While Leonardtown has a master plan and a vision for its future, incorporating the public library would have unexpected consequences. The library is open 60 hours a week, plus its book drop is accessible 24 hours a day. The library receives regular and frequent deliver- ies by large truck. The library doesn’t even have a dress code. Within the Leonardtown business district, the li- brary would continue to welcome 800 to 1,000 visits a day. These patrons, most of whom are always carrying something in or out, have a well-established relation- ship with their library and will not change their pattern of use to include strolling around Leonardtown. The young mother bringing her toddler to Story Time and needing to get a watch battery, a box of pasta, and toilet paper before she picks up another child at school will drive to the library and drive right back out of town. The Mennonites are avid library users, but they will not have lunch in town or tarry in a gallery. The job seeker who goes to the library to use a computer to look for employment opportunities will not spend time loung- ing on the town square after he logs out. A branch of the county library within Leonardtown’s core will most certainly increase real-world traffic and add to the wear and tear of the town’s streets; but that a public library would be the economic engine, which will reverse the town’s decline? That’s only a theory, master plan or no master plan. Our library is an established and vibrant community resource. The branch on Hollywood has for too long been serving all comers well and graciously in a pre- 1960s building with probably lead and asbestos issues, a building in which one can’t even flush two toilets at the same time. To all who are involved in the decision- making process, please do your job. Delay no longer and decide. Our library needs a new home now, a home which will respond to the real-life needs of the maxi- mum number of users not just appeal to a vision which might well be a mirage.

elitist, biased and contrary to the character of all board members and library leadership and staff. Minutes of

Sara Fisher

board meetings are maintained and available; I suggest

Leonardtown, Md.

a

review of those minutes before commenting on board

Leonardtown Library for the 21st Century

Now that the decision has been made to build a new Leonardtown Library, the choice of where to build it in Leonardtown is before the Board of County Commis- sioners (BOCC) and will be decided on May 12, 2015. There is considerable debate over the choice of two lo- cations: the Hayden property on Rt 245 not far from the current library or in downtown Leonardtown some 200 footsteps from the Town Square. In comparison, each location offers advantages and disadvantages in terms of overall cost, access and parking, infrastructure ca- pacity, visibility, expansion, and other factors. All of these are important. From a practical standpoint, the head-to-head comparison seems pretty even, and can fairly easily be seen as the two sites are only 1½ miles apart. Several comparisons by different groups have been made on issues pertaining to today’s concerns. The factor I wish to raise concerns tomorrow. Spe- cifically, which location offers more strategic benefit to St. Mary’s County, and to Leonardtown as its only municipality? Looking beyond May 12 th and even this BOCC’s term, which location would contribute more to the County’s Economic and Community Develop- ment in terms of job growth, expanded tax base, and overall quality of life? This answer is less clear than which location has more parking spaces. But it is far more important. This may be the last new library built in the County for a long time, possibly for decades. So the decision must strongly consider future potential. When examining the two locations on their future de- velopment impacts, the Hayden property offers no more strategic benefit than the current location at the former armory site. Building a new library on the Hayden prop- erty is essentially a replacement project as the proposed site is not part of a larger development area. In this way

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Thursday, April 23, 2015

The County Times

11

Cops & Courts

Man Arrested at Tiki Bar for Assaulting Officer

By Lauren Procopio Staff Writer

A Mechanicsville man was arrested and charged with second-degree assault on a law-enforcement officer; disorderly conduct; failure to obey a reasonable and lawful order of a law enforcement officer; intoxicated endangerment and disorderly conduct; and resisting arrest, on Saturday evening during the opening weekend of the Tiki Bar. On April 18, around 7:20 p.m., Sgt. Bortchevsky of the sheriff’s office, ob- served two men arguing, which then es- calated into a pushing match. The officer approached the two men and told them they had to exit the prop-

erty due to their behavior, court docu- ments stated. According to court documents, the two men began leaving the bar, when one of the men, identified as Michael Ryan Hunter, 26, turned around at the exit tent and began approaching Bort- chevsky with his fists clinched, shout- ing expletive language “at the top of his lungs.” The suspect was approximately one arm length away from the officer and continued to move closer, court docu- ments alleged, “fearing an imminent attack” the officer pushed Hunter away and when Hunter lost his balance, Bort- chevsky attempted to gain control of him in order to place him under arrest.

Police Seek Convicted Fraudster

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

County law officers are searching for a man who took an Alford plea last year in county Circuit Court to defrauding parents of thousands of dollars in a theft scheme that used the prospect of starting up a youth baseball team as bait. Michael Shayne Erdolino, 41, violated conditions of his probation, said Sheriff Timothy K. Cameron, including withold- ing money he was ordered to payback. “He didn’t pay restitution,” Cameron said, adding that probation agents have been unable to find Erdolino. “He’s pretty noticable in the commu- nity,” Cameron told The Couny Times. “A lot of people know him.” It was unknown whether Erdolino had left St. Mary’s County, Cameron said. “We don’t know what kind of support structure he has outside the county,” he said. “He could just be here and laying low.” Two years ago court records show that Erdolino started Southern Maryland Athletics back in Sept. 20, 2012, obtain- ing an IRS number days later, using an old address in Hollywood. Erdolino charged parents $500 per reg- istered player and promised uniforms, practices and games, police said. At least five victims paid the money, police said, but never got their money’s worth. “There were only a few practices held,” police wrote in charging documents. “No uniforms were issued. Erdolino refused to provide any sort of accounting to the victims and refused to return any funds.” Erdolino enlisted the parents in fun- draising activities for his alleged scam, police said, by having spirit nights and other activities here and in Calvert County. Erdolino asked one of the parents to

and in Calvert County. Erdolino asked one of the parents to Erdolino pay for donuts, $793-worth,

Erdolino

pay for donuts, $793-worth, and never paid him back, police alleged. “Erdolino told [the victim] the fun- draiser did not make enough profit to cover the cost,” charging papers filed in county District Court stated. Erdolino would call victims while they were fundraising, police said, and would come by and collect small sums of money before the fundraiser was fin- ished; once he gave differing accounts of the sales for a 50/50 raffle and only provided the name of the winner. Police said the victims’ estimated fundraising and fees tallied around

$7,515.

Court records show that Erdolino was ordered to repay at least $3,000.

guyleonard@countytimes.net

ordered to repay at least $3,000. guyleonard@countytimes.net Hunter assault on a police officer; three years and/or

Hunter

assault on a police officer; three years and/or a $5,000 fine for resisting/interfer- ing with arrest; 60 days and/or a $500 fine for disorderly conduct; 60 days and/or a $500 fine for failure to obey a reasonable and lawful order of a law enforcement of- ficer; and 90 days and/or a $100 fine for intoxicated endangerment and disorderly conduct. Hunter is scheduled for a District Court hearing in Calvert County on June 3.

lauren@somdpublishing.net

The suspect began to “flail” in an attempt to prevent apprehension, according to court documents. Hunter was subsequent- ly taken to the ground, but continued to resist arrest. After the struggle, the suspect was handcuffed and arrested – he appeared to be intoxicated and had a strong odor of al- cohol emitting from him, court documents stated. According to court documents, while awaiting transport, Hunter continued to scream profanities – including threats of additional assault on Bortchevsky if the officer “didn’t have his badge on.” During the incident, approximately 45 to 60 people gathered and were witnessing Hunter scream profanities even after he was detained, court documents confirmed. Court document stated, as a result of the suspect’s actions, Bortchevsky sustained lacerations and abrasions to his knees and elbows. According to police, Hunter sus- tained minor abrasions to his face from the ground; he was provided with medical care on scene, but refused further treat- ment. Hunter was then transported to the Calvert County Detention Center. Hunter faces a maximum sentence of 10 years and/or a $5,000 for second-degree

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12 The County Times COLLEGE o f SOUTHERN MARYLAND FOUNDATION Splash for Scholarships is a
12
The County Times
COLLEGE o f SOUTHERN MARYLAND FOUNDATION
Splash for Scholarships is a poolside evening of fun to celebrate
the 5th Anniversary of our Wellness and Aquatics Center
at the Leonardtown Campus with all proceeds supporting CSM
student scholarships.
THANK YOU SPONSORS!
Thursday, April 23, 2015 7-11 P.M.
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7-11 P.M.

Tickets are available for $50 each. (Food and drinks are included with the purchase of a ticket.)

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www.csmd.edu/Foundation/Splash

Thursday, April 23, 2015

The County Times

13

Feature Story

Three Notch Theatre Celebrates 10 Years of Making a Difference

By Guy Leonard Staff Writer

W hen Wendy Heidrich moved to

St. Mary’s County back in 2001

she brought the theatre bug

with her. Noticing that St. Mary’s had no theatre company at that time she jumped at the chance to start one in downtown Lexington Park when the then-director of the Community Development Corpora- tion Robin Finnacom asked if she would be willing to help refurbish the old vacant building that once housed the Lexington Park library. Heidrich helped found a group of fel- low thespians and volunteers to start the Newtowne Players and soon after make the Three Notch Theatre a reality a few years later. “We saw the potential,” Heidrich said of the project that they proposed to the county commissioners in 2003; one year later the new lease was approved and in 2005 their first performance under the stage lights took place. Now Heidrich is set to move out of the community in which she helped found the project but she says the theatre has been a success on several levels. “It’s bittersweet,” Heidrich said. “But the theatre’s done extremely well. It’s all been because of the volunteers.” The players and the theatre helped bring more cultural activities to the county, she said, and at a time when that part of the community needed it most. That area near Tulagi Place suffered from blight and there were fears that put- ting a theatre there would not be a success simply because no one would come for fear of a criminal element. But the volunteers were surprised that after 10 years they have not had any prob- lems of that sort. “It’s been so surprising it’s been so well received,” Heidrich said, adding that the group have been able to keep the theatre going largely through their own efforts. “We’ve had a lot of great support… and we’ve had great sponsors.

“But we’ve made enough money to sustain ourselves.” Finnacom said the theatre has helped revitalize Lexington Park and has even laid the groundwork for the county’s largest development district to become an arts and entertainment district. That is part of the Lexingtion Park Development District Master Plan, Fin- nacom said. “The theatre has been a phenomenal success for Lexington Park,” Finnacom said. “They have been successful since their first showing.” Finnacom, one of the county’s most ardent and strident voices to advocate for the revitalization of one of the coun- ty’s oldest communities, said she heard numerous worries that the theatre in such a stressed neighborhood would be a non-starter. But she said those detractors were soon proven wrong. “It’s played an important role in changing perceptions about Lexington Park,” Finnacom said. “That building was vacated and it had no future. “But it’s become a cultural asset for the county as a whole.” Joe Bowes, one of the founding mem- bers of the Three Notch Theatre, said it offers something closer to home than just a boost to community revitaliza- tion; it offers good entertainment that the community has come to appreciate. “They do good shows there that are entertaining,” Bowes said. “And it gives us imitation actors an outlet.” Eventhough the theatre has been around for just 10 years, many would find it difficult to think of the area without it. “There seems like there’d be a void there if we didn’t have it,” Bowes said. He said the host of volunteers that make the theatre work is not constrained by the number of actors, but includes the host of helpers who make and assemble the sets that are critical to rehearsals and the final performances. The actors couldn’t really make their rehearsals without them, he said. “The actors get a lot of attention but the

them, he said. “The actors get a lot of attention but the Dracula Photo by Frank

Dracula

Photo by Frank Marquart
Photo by Frank Marquart

The current production of “Picnic” runs April 17 - May 3

people behind the stage are equally im- portant,” Bowes said. Bowes said his hopes for the theatre were simple. “It’s to have every show a sell out and keep going,” Bowes said, adding that the theatre meant a reliable source of enter- tainment for those who wanted something beyond going to see a movie. “It’s an educational and cultural thing,”

he said. “You always know it’s going to be there… for six performances. “It brings people together. You get to see people who you haven’t seen in a long time and you get to meet people you’ve never met.”

guyleonard@countytimes.net

seen in a long time and you get to meet people you’ve never met.” guyleonard@countytimes.net Arsenic

Arsenic and Old Lace

14

Obituaries

The County Times

Thursday, April 23, 2015

The County Times runs complimentary obituaries as submitted by funeral homes and readers. We run them in the order we receive them. Any submissions that come to news@countytimes.net after noon on Tuesdays may run in the following week’s edition.

Barbara Elaine Lacey, 69

Barbara Elaine Lacey, 69, of Chaptico, Md. passed away on April 10 in Washington, D.C. Born on Feb. 12, 1946, she was the daughter of the late Agnes Hoise (St. Clair)

Penn and William Wilson Penn. Barbara was the loving wife of the late Leonard David (Satch) Lacey whom she married in Sa- cred Heart Catholic Church, Bushwood, Md. on Oct. 31, 1964, and who preceded

her in death on Sept. 30, 2001 in Leon- ardtown, Md. Barbara is survived by her daughter Charlotte Morgan of Avenue, Md., 2 grandchildren: D.J. Morgan and Olivia Morgan. Siblings: Catherine Connor of Texas, Doris Pilkerton and William Penn both of Mechanicsville, Md., Helen Rotzinger of Hollywood, Md., Mary Ann Hall of Chaptico, Md.,

She

was preceded in death by her siblings:

Jackie Lon and Jimmy Pen. She moved from Suitland, Md. to St. Mary’s Coun- ty, Md. in 1968. Barbara Graduated from LaPlata High School and was a Day care Provider. She loved her grandchildren, flowers, church, and her daycare kids. The family received friends on Wednesday, April 15 from 5 to 8 p.m. with prayers recited at 7 p.m. in the Mat-

tingley-Gardiner Funeral Home Leonar- dtown, Md. A Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated on Thursday, April 16 at 10 a.m. in Sacred Heart Catholic Church Bushwood, Md. with Father Anthony Lickteig officiating. Interment will fol- low in the church cemetery. Pallbearers will be: Allen Hall, Stephen Stewart, Charles Lacey, Jeff Farrell, Donald Con- nor and Glen buckler. Contributions may be made to the Nursing Program, James Forest Tech Ctr, 24005 Point Lookout Road Leonardtown, Md. 20650. Arrangements provided by the Mat- tingley-Gardiner Funeral Home, P.A.

and Agnes Farrell of Avenue, Md

Funeral Home, P.A. and Agnes Farrell of Avenue, Md CAPT. Thomas Frank Anderson, USN (Ret.), 83

CAPT. Thomas Frank Anderson, USN (Ret.), 83

CAPT. Thomas Frank Anderson, USN (Ret.), 83, of Leonardtown, Md. passed away Tuesday, March 17 at MedStar St. Mary’s Hospital in Leon- ardtown, Md.

Born on Aug. 16, 1931, in Minn., he was the son of the late Frank Anderson and Olive Sjoblom, both of Scandinavian descent. Tom earned a Bachelor of Science de- gree from the University of Wisconsin where he completed the NROTC program and was subsequently commissioned as an officer in the United States Navy. He was a dual-rated aviator, piloting both fixed wing multi-engine aircraft and he- licopters during his 26 years of dedicated service. Wearing his uniform with pride and a strong patriotic spirit that continued throughout his life, he completed Naval Intelligence School in 1962 and was hon- ored to serve as the Squadron Command- ing Officer of VXN-8 at Patuxent River, Maryland from 1972-73. Tom earned the Meritorious Service, Armed Forces Expe- ditionary, and National Defense Service

Armed Forces Expe- ditionary, and National Defense Service Medals and also Expert Rifle and Expert Pistol

Medals and also Expert Rifle and Expert Pistol qualifications during his Navy ser- vice, retiring in 1980 as a Captain. On June 19, 1955, he married his be- loved wife, Carol Anderson, in Wisconsin and together they celebrated over 59 faith- ful and loving years of marriage. Tom and his family travelled extensively within the United States while serving in the Navy and then, in retirement, he and Carol trav- elled abroad, with their favorite trip being Norway where his grandfather was born and where Tom had wanted to return ever since being there during his first tour in the Navy as a midshipman. One of Tom’s greatest passions through- out his life was music which began with the Marching Band in high school as well as choirs in both school and the Methodist church. As a midshipman at the Univer- sity of Wisconsin, he was honored to direct the Navy Choral Group and while in ac- tive military service in the following years he sang with St. Mary’s Musica for many years here in Southern Maryland. He also sang in the church choir at Lexington Park United Methodist Church (LPUMC) for over 30 years where he also enjoyed play- ing the trombone in the church band. Tom was an avid snow skier and enjoyed the sport well into his 70’s. His other pri- mary interests included hunting and fish- ing but his greatest love was working in his wood shop adjacent his home. Tom was a skilled woodworker who enjoyed combin- ing woods of different types to produce handcrafted furniture having unique and beautiful color variations. During his re- tirement, he started his own woodworking business, Anderson Handcrafted Prod- ucts, individually hand making and selling his signature patented latch hook frames worldwide from his “garage shop”, to the accompaniment of classical music (played with increasing volume to accommodate his declining hearing). In addition to his wife, Carol, Tom is survived by his children, Suzin (Ev- ans) Anderson of La Plata, Md. and Paul Anderson (Bettina) of Senaca, S.C.; his grandchildren, Caroline Anderson of Se- naca, S.C., Thomas Frank Anderson II of Ashville, N.C. and Zachary Evans of La Plata, Md.; and his sister, Amy Fetzner of Hudson, Wisc. A Memorial Service was held on April 18, at 11 a.m. at LPUMC, 21760 Great Mills Road, Lexington Park, Md. 20653. Memorial Contributions may be made to LPUMC where Tom and his wife have been members since 1976. Condolences to the family may be made at www.brinsfieldfuneral.com. Arrangements handled by the Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A.

William Benjamin “Benny” Thompson, Sr., 66

William Benjamin

Benjamin “Benny” Thompson, Sr., 66 William Benjamin “Benny” Thompson, Sr., 66, of Morganza, Md. passed away

“Benny” Thompson, Sr., 66, of Morganza, Md. passed away on April 10 in Leonardtown, Md. Born on Aug. 18, 1948 in Leonardtown, Md., he was the son of Rose Lee Thompson and the late Louis Marshall Thompson, Jr. Benny was the loving husband of Mary Ce- celia Thompson, whom he married on Oct. 18, 2000 in Compton, Md. Benny

is survived by his children: Carrie Wil-

lett

(Willie) and William B. Thompson,

Jr.

(Amy) both of Mechanicsville, Md.

7 grandchildren and 1 great grandchild. He is survived by his siblings: Marga-

ret Taylor of Hollywood, Md., Louis

Thompson, III (Buddy), and Rosemary

George both of Avenue, Md., and Joseph

D. Thompson (Donny) of Mechanics-

ville, Md. He was a lifelong St. Mary’s County, Md. resident, and graduated from Chopticon High School. Benny worked as a Grocery Manager for Food Lion in Prince Frederick, Md. for 18 years. He enjoyed NASCAR, Coin col- lecting and gardening. The family received friends on Wednesday, April 15 from 5 to 8 p.m. with prayers recited at 7 p.m. in the Mat- tingley-Gardiner Funeral Home Leonar- dtown, Md. A Funeral Service will be held on Thursday, April 16 at 10 a.m. in the Funeral Home Chapel with Rev. Joe Gass officiating. Interment will be private. Arrangements provided by the Mat- tingley-Gardiner Funeral Home, P.A.

Melvin D. Bladen, Sr. (Mel), 71

Melvin D. Bladen, Sr. (Mel), 71 of Conway, S.C. formally of Calvert County, Md., passed away on April 11 in Con- way, S.C. Mr. Bladen was born

on May 29, 1943 in Wash- ington, D.C. Mel started his Government career

July, 1961 when he joined the U.S. Navy shortly after high school graduation. During his early Navy years, he married his high school sweetheart, Darlene. During 1965 and 1966, while serv-

ing on the Navy Destroyer USS Barry

DD933, he was deployed with Destroyer Squadron 24 to the Western Pacific and combat duty in Vietnamese waters, ac- companying the USS Enterprise. After military separation in May,

1966, Mel entered Federal Service at the Naval Communications Station, Wash-

DC (Cheltenham, Md.) in the Commer-

cial Refile section. To obtain Govern- ment “status”, he tested for Security Police and was assigned to the Naval Research Laboratory’s Chesapeake Bay Division in Randle Cliffs, Md. (Chesa- peake Beach) and later transferred to a Communications position there. In 1985, Mel ventured “outside” the Government to manage the first fast food restaurant (Hardees) in his home

county of Calvert (Md.) later to re-enter Government service with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms or ATF. There he aided in establishing and man- ning their first Communications Center. In February, 1973, Mel began work at the Department of State in the Office of Communications, Telegraphic Branch

State in the Office of Communications, Telegraphic Branch and advanced to the position of Facili- ties

and

advanced to the position of Facili-

ties

Control Technician.

In 1986, Mel was invited to join the nucleus of the Department of State’s new Relay Facility in Beltsville, Md.

Ultimately he became the midnight shift Supervisor. In this position he became well known to the Communicators at

the

Department of State’s Embassies

and

Consulates throughout the world in

guiding them in the ways of the new re- lay system. Mel retired in October, 1994, after 20 years at the Department of State, with a total combined 33 years service. In retirement, Mel enjoyed the laid

back life style of Southern Maryland liv- ing. He was proud to serve on the Ves- try at Christ Church. He enjoyed riding his motorcycle, cutting grass on his John Deere, visits with family and friends, playing with his grandkids, and recon- necting with old friends on the inter- net. In 2012, he and Darlene moved to Conway, SC and fulfilled their lifelong dream of building their first new house where they enjoyed walks on the beach, making many new friends, and enter- taining family and friends during visits Mel is preceded in death by his fa- ther Temple Bladen and stepfather Don Harris. Mel is survived by his loving wife of

53 years, Darlene, children, Melvin Jr. &

Emily Bladen, Melissa Sisk & Charles “Chip” Poff and Michael Bladen & Lisa Burns; his mother, Edith Harris; sisters Connie Abner and Patricia Reynolds; nine grandchildren: Shane Bladen, Ron- nie Sisk, Niki Bladen, Casey Sisk, Dean- na Bladen, Shania Bladen, Robbie Sisk, Mariam Bladen and Jo-Jo Bladen; two great-grandchildren: Hailey Bean and Shawn Bladen. The family received friends on Friday April 17 from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. at the Rausch Funeral Home, 4405 Broomes Island Road, Port Republic, Md. Funeral services were held on Saturday April 18, 10 a.m. at Christ Church, Port Repub- lic Md. with interment to follow in the church cemetery. Honorary pallbearers will be James Vitale, John Vitale, John Abner, Thomas Guy, and George Ow- ings, III. Active pallbearers are Richard Lang, John Morgan, Leonard Ogden, Larry Bowen, Ronald Sisk, Tony Reyn- olds, Robert Abner and Charles Poff. Memorial contributions may be made to Christ Church, 3100 Broomes Island Road, Port Republic, Md. 20676

Mary Loretta Saunders, 62

Mary Loretta Saun-

ders,

62,

of

Leonar-

dtown,

Md.

passed

her

residence

on

of Leonar- dtown, Md. passed her residence on away Monday, April 6 at Big Chestnut Road.

away Monday, April

6 at

Big Chestnut Road. Born on June 23, 1952

in Leonardtown, Md., she was the daughter of the late Joseph Preston Goldsborough and Anne Loretta Abell Goldsborough. Mary is a 1970 graduate of Chopticon High School. On Sept. 27, 1975, she married her beloved husband, Joseph “Al” Saunders at St. John’s Church in Hollywood, Md. Together, they cel- ebrated 39 wonderful years of mar- riage. She was employed as a teacher’s aide at Father Andrew White School for twenty years. She began at Father An- drew White School as a volunteer when her children were very young. She was a devoted and caring mother, wife, sister, grandmother and friend. She was a good cook and an excellent baker; known among friends for her famous chocolate cake and chocolate chip cookies. She enjoyed being outside, especially taking

Thursday, April 23, 2015

The County Times

15

Obituaries

The County Times runs complimentary obituaries as submitted by funeral homes and readers. We run them in the order we receive them. Any submissions that come to news@countytimes.net after noon on Tuesdays may run in the following week’s edition.

hikes, bike riding and sitting on her out- door swing. Her favorite vacation spots were the beaches, particularly Virginia Beach and Ocean City, Md. She en- joyed seafood, especially picking Mary- land blue crabs. She loved many dogs throughout her life, especially Smokey, her current pet. She was an active mem- ber of St. Aloysius Catholic Church. In addition to her beloved husband, Mary is survived by her children, Anne E. Saunders of Frederick, Md., Teresa M. Stevenson (Scott) of Lothian, Md., and Joseph Preston Saunders (Lisa) of Leonardtown, Md.; her brothers, Je- rome M. Goldsborough of Hollywood, Md., Paul C. Goldsborough (Betty) of Loveville, Md. and Wayne Goldsbor- ough of Loveville, Md.; and her grand- son, Sawyer James Saunders. She is preceded in death by her parents, and by her brothers James “Jimmy” Goldsbor- ough and William “Bill” Goldsborough. Family will receive friends for Mary’s Life Celebration on Friday, April 10 from 9 to 11 a.m. at Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A., 22955 Hollywood Road, Leonard- town, Md. 20650. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated by Reverend David Beaubien at 11:30 a.m. at St. Aloy- sius Catholic Church, 22800 Washington Street, Leonardtown, Md., 20650. Inter- ment will follow in the church cemetery. Pallbearers will be Mike Goldsborough, Kenny Goldsborough, Lenny Guy, James Norris, Ray Guy, and Bill Combs. The family would like to thank every- one for their prayers and condolences during their time of bereavement. They would especially like to thank Mary’s cousin and guardian angel Rose Miller for her devoted service over the past year. They would also like to thank the Hospice of St. Mary’s team for their as- sistance during the past few months. Memorial contributions may be made to Hospice of St. Mary’s, P.O. Box 625, Leonardtown, Md. 20650. Condolences to the family may be made at www.brinsfieldfuneral.com. Arrangements by the Brinsfield Fu- neral Home, P.A.

George Roger Querry, 76

George Roger Querry, 76 of Mechanicsville, Md. passed away Satur- day, April 11 at Hospice House of St. Mary’s in Callaway, Md. He was born on Feb.

15, 1939 in Cincinnati, Ohio to the late Robert Querry and Irma Gardiner Querry. On Sept. 19, 1957, Roger proudly enlisted in the United States Navy and served his country until his honorable discharge on June 23, 1961. On April 29, 1983, he married his beloved wife, Beverly Ann Querry at Lexington Park United Methodist Church in Lexington Park, Md. Together, they celebrated over

31 wonderful years of marriage. He was employed with Bell Atlantic as a Tech- nician with over 30 years of dedicated service before his retirement in 1995. He also ran his own locksmith company on a part-time basis. He was a handy man, and could build or fix just about anything. He was a skilled woodworker with meticulous attention to detail. He

a skilled woodworker with meticulous attention to detail. He produced many elegant pieces, including bunk beds

produced many elegant pieces, including bunk beds for his children, baby cradles for his grandchildren, wall units, jew- elry display cases and much more. He

was a proficient bowler, proudly bowling

a game of 300. He participated in league

bowling at Esperanza Bowling Lanes. He also enjoyed boating, fishing, crab- bing, golfing and throwing horseshoes. He liked to vacation in Cancun, Las Vegas, Atlantic City and at Lake Tahoe. His greatest love was time spent with

his family, especially his grandchildren. He was a youth league bowling coach for Esperanza Bowling Lanes. He was

a member of Mechanicsville Optimist

Club, serving as past president. He was

a founder of the Mechanicsville Junior Optimist Club.

In addition to his beloved wife, Roger

is also survived by his children, Bruce

Martin Loughmiller (Wendy) of Spring- field, Va., Yvonne Marie Donley (Wil- liam) of Mechanicsville, Md. and Deb- bie Sibenmark (Bob) of Dameron, Md.; his brothers, Gary Draheim (Diane) of LaPlata, Md., William Draheim (Bon- nie) of Prince Frederick, Md., and Ed- ward Draheim (Sally) of Hollywood, Md.; and five grandchildren, Alexander Donley, Maxwell Loughmiller, Benja- min Loughmiller, Kayla Siebenmark, and Holly Siebenmark. In addition to

his parents, he is preceded in death by his brothers, Robert Draheim and Wally Querry.

A Life Celebration Memorial Service

was held Tuesday, April 21 from 5 to 8 p.m., with a service celebrated at 7 p.m. by Reverend John A. Burnham, at Brins- field Funeral Home, P.A., 22955 Holly- wood Road, Leonardtown, Md. 20650. Interment will be held at a later date. Memorial contributions may be made to St. Mary’s Animal Welfare League, P.O. Box 1232, Leonardtown, Md. 20650. Condolences to the family may be made at www.brinsfieldfuneral.com. Arrangements by the Brinsfield Fu- neral Home, P.A.

Ronald Woodrow Fletcher, Sr., 65

Ronald Woodrow

Home, P.A. Ronald Woodrow Fletcher, Sr., 65 Ronald Woodrow Fletcher, Sr., 65, of Me- chanicsville, Md.

Fletcher, Sr., 65, of Me- chanicsville, Md. passed away on April 16 at Med- Star St. Mary’s Hospital

in Leonardtown, Md. He was born on Dec.

8, 1949 in Washington, D.C. to the late Woodrow Wilson Fletcher and the late Mary (Yew) Cawood. Ronald enjoyed watching television and especially watching football. He loved the Dallas Cowboys and loved

rooting for any team that played against the Washington Redskins. He worked for CVS for 29 years.

In addition to his parents, Ronald was

predeceased by his sister, Pam Hilton. Ronald is survived by his wife, Bev- erly Ann (Beard) Fletcher; son, Ronnie Fletcher, Jr. and Ronnie’s wife Maggie; step-children, Wendy, Denise, Thomas and Terri; grandchildren, Michael, Matthew and Emma; step-grandchil- dren, Ricky, Michael, Caitlynn, Megan, Melo and Nikki; brothers, Kenny Fletch- er and Markie Cawood; step-sister, Ja-

net Lyndnor and her husband Frankie;

and close friends, Bill, Artie, Larry and Karen. Family and friends were received for

a Memorial Gathering on Wednesday, April 22 from 4 to 5 p.m. at Brinsfield- Echols Funeral Home, P.A., 30195 Three Notch Road, Charlotte Hall, Md. 20622.

A Memorial Service began at 5 p.m. on

Wednesday at the funeral home. Dea- con Bill Kyte officiated. A reception fol- lowed at Immaculate Conception Catho- lic Church Hall.

To Place A Memorial, Please Call 301-373-4125 or send an email to info@somdpublishing.net
To Place A Memorial,
Please Call
301-373-4125
or send an email to
info@somdpublishing.net
LEONARDTOWN FIRST FRIDAY • MAY 1, 2015 JOIN US FOR A DRAMATIC READING OF THE
LEONARDTOWN FIRST FRIDAY • MAY 1, 2015
JOIN US FOR A DRAMATIC READING OF THE BIBLE:
TOUCHED BY GOD THROUGH LIFE
MAY READING:
THE GOD WHO KNOWS US COMPLETELY
Two performances of the first reading: one at 6:30 PM and one at 7:30 PM,
each about 20 minutes long. So drop on by the Leonardtown
Church of the Nazarene, right on the square. We look forward to seeing you!
BRING THE PRESENCE OF CHRIST TO THE COMMUNITY
Caring for the Past Planning for the Future Traditional Funerals, Cremation Services, Memorial Church Services,
Caring for the Past
Planning for the Future
Traditional Funerals, Cremation Services, Memorial Church Services,
Direct Burials, Monuments, Unlimited with Commitment ThroughAfter Care.
www.brinsfieldfuneral.com
FAMILY-OWNED & OPERATED
FOR FIVE GENERATIONS
Brinsfield Funeral Home, P.A.
22955 Hollywood Road
Leonardtown, Maryland 20650
Brinsfield-Echols Funeral Home, P.A.
30195 Three Notch Road
Charlotte Hall, Maryland 20650
(301) 475-5588
(301) 472-4400

16

The County Times

Handcrafted Items & Gifts Produced by Local Fiber Farmers &Artisans 
Handcrafted Items & Gifts Produced by Local Fiber Farmers &Artisans

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Friday May 1

5 -8 PM

FENWICK STREET USED BOOKS AND MUSIC 41655A Fenwick Street Zenobia Dyson will be signing copies
FENWICK STREET USED BOOKS AND MUSIC
41655A Fenwick Street
Zenobia Dyson will be signing copies of her book Inside
of Me: My Life, Your Inspiration from 5:00 to 7:00 PM. “In
this book of inspirational messages and poetry, one will
find some of the most basic answers, yet these answers
come from a hard place in my life; filled with mental and
physical scars, this hard place shall inspire you.”
22696
CRAZY FOR EWE
22715 Washington Street
Mr. Kennedy Abell will be at Crazy for Ewe during May
First Friday sharing pictures, memorabilia, and stories
from the early days of Leonardtown. Mr. Abell still lives
right here in Leonardtown, and he’ll be a delightful
addition around the table!
23190
Then, join us for a terrific spring top project featuring
beautiful new Tandem yarn. This design highlights
Tandem’s beautiful colors and fun blend of shiny and
matte fibers. Bring size 8 needles (gauge is 4.5 stitches
per inch) Come get started with us from 5 - 8 p.m.
First Friday. Pattern is complimentary with purchase of
Tandem on First Friday only.
CAUGHT MY EYE
22760 Washington Street, Unit #1
41665
During first Friday hours, receive a free photo card of a
historic site in Leonardtown with any purchase. Choose
from photos of the Old Jail, Tudor Hall, Leonardtown
Wharf, Wesley Chapel/Old Town Hall, Court House, and
Moll Dyer site.
GOOD EARTH NATURAL FOODS COMPANY
41675 Park Avenue
Staff members Maria and Danielle will be available to talk
about the history of our store. Plus, we will have Cynthia
from Virginia Beach formerly with Heritage Store now
with Nutraceutical in our store to demonstrate Heritage
Products. Come experience massage oils, learn about
The Maryland Antique Center

The Maryland Antique Center

is in the Heart of Leonardtown, MD

is in the Heart of Leonardtown, MD

We Have It All

Center is in the Heart of Leonardtown, MD We Have It All (301) 690-2074 Over 30

(301) 690-2074

Over

30 Dealers!

Gifts • Primitives Collectibles • Yard Art Vintage Painted Furniture Antique Furniture Lamps and Clocks!

Route 5

www.MarylandAntiqueCenter.com

Leonardtown, MD

Art, Shopping & Fun!

t s e i t r A s e s d e f Classic Country
t
s
e
i
t
r
A
s
e
s
d
e
f
Classic Country French Dining
a
in a casual, relaxing atmosphere
301-997-0500
41655 Fenwick Street, Leonardtown
email: cafedesartistes@somd.us
C
www.cafedesartistes.ws
Chef-owned and operated by Loic and Karleen Jaffres

castor oil therapy and more; Cynthia is a wealth of knowledge. Mention this advertisement and you will qualify for a 20% discount on any Heritage items during our May First Friday event.

FUZZY FARMERS MARKET

Washington Street

The Fuzzy Farmers will be on hand to demonstrate how spinning, weaving, and sewing have been accomplished throughout many time periods and cultures, and all without electricity. Come see how Granny used to clothe her family!

electricity. Come see how Granny used to clothe her family! COASTAL ARTS MARKET Newtowne Neck Road,

COASTAL ARTS MARKET

Newtowne Neck Road, Port of

Leonardtown Public Park

Presented by the Coastal Arts Partnership, the Arts Market is an outdoor market now open First Fridays too! The Arts Market features handmade, affordable art from local and regional artists and artisans. Types of art include painting, photography, ceramics, glass, jewelry, wood, plus handmade quilts, clothing, soap, furniture and other delights.

BLACK MARKET INTERIORS

Fenwick Street

Come Check Out Our SpeakeaSy Bar Free S'mores Behind the Bookcase! every First Come Try
Come Check Out Our
SpeakeaSy Bar
Free
S'mores
Behind the Bookcase!
every
First
Come Try Our
Great Coffee,
Smoothies,
Frappes &
Food Menu
Friday!
Monday 6 am – 6 pm • Tuesday - Thursday 6 am – 10 pm
Friday 6 am – Midnight • Saturday 7 am - Midnight • Sunday 8 am – 2 pm
41658 Fenwick Street
Leonardtown, MD
(301) 475-2400

Come by the newest shop on Fenwick Street and see our beautiful furnishings waiting to make your home more spectacular. For May’s First Friday, we are offering 25 % off of Fantasy Flowers and 10 % off all vases and urns.

PORT OF LEONARDTOWN WINERY off Rt. 5 at 23190 Newtowne Neck Road

The Winery will be hosting the Folk Salad Trio! They will perform on the patio from 5:30 to 8:30 pm. Did you know that our wine bar is the original bar from Penny’s?

41675 Park Avenue
41675 Park Avenue
from 5:30 to 8:30 pm. Did you know that our wine bar is the original bar

Ma

For Fi

Thursday, April 23, 2015

The County Times

17

New LocatioN! 41665 Fenwick street unit 17 Leonardtown, MD 20650
New LocatioN!
41665 Fenwick street unit 17
Leonardtown, MD 20650

bellamusicschool.com

Hours:

Monday-Friday

3 -10pm

Hours: Monday-Friday 3 -10pm Saturdays/ Sundays by Appointment

Saturdays/

Sundays by

Appointment

301-247-2602

Sundays by Appointment 301-247-2602 Next Week Leonardtown Then & Now ! Vinyl lettering
Sundays by Appointment 301-247-2602 Next Week Leonardtown Then & Now ! Vinyl lettering

Next Week

Leonardtown Then & Now!

Vinyl lettering Banners SIGNS & Decal S t Yard s igns e Wall Wraps c
Vinyl lettering
Banners
SIGNS & Decal
S
t
Yard s
igns
e
Wall Wraps
c
e
301-475-1700
si
r
u
www.heritageprinting.com
t
M
S
k
&
c
ks
i
w
oo
B
Tom Gross will be signing
copies of his book
Don’t forget to visit the Gallery
Spaces for local Art. Current
displays will show through
May First Friday. Visit www.
leonardtownfirstfridays.com
for a complete list of
Gallery Spaces.
n
d
THE TOUCH
e
se
Friday, May 1 from 5-7 PM
U
F
www.fenwickbooks.com
41655A Fenwick Street
Downtown Leonardtown, MD
301-475-2859
Fenwick Street Downtown Leonardtown, MD 301-475-2859 Quality Yarns • Stylish Designs Lessons and Classes For
Quality Yarns • Stylish Designs Lessons and Classes For All Levels 22715 Washington Street Leonardtown,

Quality Yarns • Stylish Designs

Lessons and Classes For All Levels

22715 Washington Street Leonardtown, MD 20650

301-475-2744

www.crazyforewe.com

To Place Your Ad On This Page, Contact Our Sales Department at 301-373-4125 or email sales@ countytimes.net

To Place Your Ad On This Page, Contact Our Sales Department at 301-373-4125 or email sales@
To Place Your Ad On This Page, Contact Our Sales Department at 301-373-4125 or email sales@
To Place Your Ad On This Page, Contact Our Sales Department at 301-373-4125 or email sales@

Leonardtown - Then and Now Join us for First Friday this month and through pictures, scrapbooks, and the stories of long-time residents, we'll celebrate Leonardtown and share its evolution from those early days of Riverboats on the Wharf.

We have our first band of the season David and Joe Norris, outstanding guitarists, vocalists, and local boys will share their stories of growing up here.

Where to find “Leonardtown “ Then and Now” Memorabilia

Where to find “Leonardtown “ Then and Now” Memorabilia

Caught My EyeWhere to find “Leonardtown “ Then and Now” Memorabilia 22760 Washington Street, Unit #1 301-475-6805 Crazy

22760 Washington Street, Unit #1

301-475-6805

Crazy for EweCaught My Eye 22760 Washington Street, Unit #1 301-475-6805 22715 Washington Street Fuzzy Farmer’s Market 22696

22715 Washington Street

Fuzzy Farmer’s MarketUnit #1 301-475-6805 Crazy for Ewe 22715 Washington Street 22696 Washington Street 301-475-FUZZ(3899) Fenwick Street

22696 Washington Street

301-475-FUZZ(3899)

Fenwick Street Used Books and Music 41655A Fenwick Street 301- 475-2859 41655A Fenwick Street 301- 475-2859

Big Larry’s Comic Book CafeUsed Books and Music 41655A Fenwick Street 301- 475-2859 22745 Washington Street 301-475-1860 Opal Fine Art

22745 Washington Street

301-475-1860

Opal Fine Art Gallery and GiftsComic Book Cafe 22745 Washington Street 301-475-1860 41625 Park Avenue 301-884-2356 The Good Earth Natural Foods

41625 Park Avenue

301-884-2356

The Good Earth Natural FoodsFine Art Gallery and Gifts 41625 Park Avenue 301-884-2356 41765 Park Avenue 301-475-1630 Ye Old Towne

41765 Park Avenue

301-475-1630

Ye Old Towne CaféThe Good Earth Natural Foods 41765 Park Avenue 301-475-1630 22685 Washington Street 301-475-5151 The Rex 22695

22685 Washington Street

301-475-5151

The RexYe Old Towne Café 22685 Washington Street 301-475-5151 22695 Washington Street 301-475-1512 Port of Leonardtown

22695 Washington Street

301-475-1512

Port of Leonardtown Winery Off Rt. 5 at 23190 Newtowne Neck Road Off Rt. 5 at 23190 Newtowne Neck Road

301-690-2192

ke Leonardtown “Your Place” Every First Friday!

rst Friday Updates and Event Locations visit www.leonardtownfirstfridays.com

18

Education

The County Times

Thursday, April 23, 2015

C o u n t y T i m e s Thursday, April 23, 2015 dents

dents the capabilities of their program in real-life settings. Parents, other students, St. Mary’s County Public School System officials, and industry representatives attended. Jason Adams, of the Hospitality and Tourism program, put together the Gala as his own senior project, which took him the length of the school year. “It’s been fun,” Adams said of his experi- ence at the Tech Center. He also said he’d been able to get many jobs from companies who recruited in his program, citing Yo Kool, Golden Corral, and Subway. Presenters at the Gala included Sarah La Rocco, of the Graphic Communica- tions program, who completed a project in Blender, a three-dimensional animation

Photos by Megan Conway

software. She was able to create detailed, realistic animations of such items as water and chocolate. “It helped me to experience real-life situations, about the job, and helped me to better understand whether or not I should go into this field,” said La Rocco. Other projects included a Radiology study project (whose presenter comment- ed on the exciting nature of being able to view procedures at St. Mary’s Hospital, in a field she loved), a 3-D printing display, and the makings of a comic book. For more information about the Forrest Center, visit schools.smcps.org/tech/.

contributing@countytimes.net

Students Show Off Job Skills and Experience at Senior Gala

By Megan Conway Contributing Writer

The Dr. James A. Forrest Career and Technology Center hosted a Senior Gala on Tuesday, April 21. The Forrest Center is comprised of sev- eral electives and programs (including such classes as Dental Assisting, Graphic Communications, and Residential Wir- ing) in various subject fields. Students gain practical, real-life job skills related to

these different fields. “Practical, real-life experiences at the Forrest Center can help you fine tune your career interests before potentially throw- ing thousands of dollars toward a career that may not be for you,” reads a line of the Forrest Center website. The Senior Gala consisted of 36 stu- dents in their final year of a Forrest Center program who completed a Capstone proj- ect inside and/or outside of the classroom. These projects were designed to show stu-

d e s i g n e d t o s h o w s t
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Thursday, April 23, 2015

The County Times

19

In Our Community

What is Occupational Therapy?

By Frank Digiovannantonio CEO, Occupational Therapist

April is Occupational Therapy Month. As an Occupational Therapist (OT) for the past 24 years I am often asked, “what is an OT”. The name can be confusing. Occupational Therapy. And no, we don’t find jobs for people. The word, Occupation, is referring to one’s purposeful activities. The pro- fession began in 1917 when a group of people dedicated to the curative prop- erties of human occupation or activity began to use purposeful activities as a means to treat patients with a number of physical and emotional aliments. The profession really took off in 1975 when the Education for all Handicapped Chil- dren Act was introduced. Thousands of OT’s where employed by school systems across the country. Today, OT’s work to provide care to patients suffering from physical, emo- tional, and neurological disorders. They help patients recovering from stroke and head injuries as well as those trying to regain independence as they live with the effects of Cerebral palsy, Multiple sclerosis, and Muscular dystrophy. OTs use a multitude of modalities to assist patients with the common goal of returning those patients back to their

normal daily routines. OTs treat patients of all ages ranging from infants to octo- genarians. The goal is to assist patients in regaining or achieving independence. At RCSM, we have four OT’s who work primarily with patients suffering from hand and upper extremity inju- ries. Of those four therapists, three have earned their Certification as specialists in the treatment of hand and upper ex- tremity injuries. They are known as cer- tified hand therapists (CHTs). In order to become a CHT you must successfully complete five years of practice as an OT or a PT, have 4,000 hours or more in the care of patients with hand and upper quadrant injuries, and pass a national board examination. Currently, there are approximately 5,900 CHTs worldwide. The role of the occupational therapist has been key to the return of a more meaningful and productive life for many suffering from injury, illness, or dis- ability. I am proud to work with these wonderful men and women who work to help our patients achieve their goals of returning those members of our com- munity back to life following injury or illness.

Brought to you by the Rehabilitation Center of Southern Maryland

LIBRARY

ITEMS

Staff Development Day Closings The St. Mary’s County Library branches will be closing for staff de- velopment. Leonardtown branch will be closed from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday, April 24. Charlotte Hall branch will be closed from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday, May 1. Lexington Park branchy will be closed from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Friday, May 15.

May the 4th Be With You The Lexington Park branch will hold ‘May the 4th Be With You’ for all ages on Monday, May 4 from 6 to 7:30 p.m. May the fourth be with you as you travel to a library not so far, far away to destroy the Death Star, partic- ipate in Jedi Archives trivia, and more.

Southern Maryland Math Circle Lexington Park branch will host the Southern Maryland Math Circle on Saturday, May 9 from 10 a.m. to noon. The Math Circle provides fun, fasci- nating math activities to middle- and high-school students (and their fami-

to middle- and high-school students (and their fami- lies!) This activity is run by the fac-

lies!) This activity is run by the fac- ulty at St. Mary’s College of Maryland and is sure to inspire a love of math- ematical exploration to everyone who comes. Snacks will be provided.

Genealogy Open Lab Charlotte Hall branch will hold a Genealogy Open Lab on Saturday, May 9 from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Partici- pants will use the library computer lab to do genealogical research on their ancestors with assistance from the instructor. Basic computer skills and email account are required. Registra- tion is required, www.stmalib.org.

Intermediate Microsoft Word 2010 Leonardtown branch will hold an Intermediate Microsoft Word 2010 class on Monday, May 4 from 2 to 4 p.m. Participants will learn interme- diate features for Word. Basic Word skills are required. Adult computer classes are limited to ages 16 and up and registration is required.

13 th Annual

PLANT SALE

SUMMERSEAT FARM

26655 Three Notch Rd, Mechanicsville MD 20659

FARM 26655 Three Notch Rd, Mechanicsville MD 20659 Photos Courtesy of Deb Lewis Amazing Plant Selection

Photos Courtesy of Deb Lewis

Amazing Plant Selection - Crafts - Gifts Kids Activities - Food/Drink & Tours - Come Join Us!

Saturday, May 9, 2015

8:00 am – 2:00 pm

For information call 301-373-6607 or visit www.summerseat.org

information call 301-373-6607 or visit www.summerseat.org 11:00 Legendary local Singer/songwriter David Norris

11:00

Legendary local

Singer/songwriter

David Norris

performs

Legendary local Singer/songwriter David Norris performs Special Thanks to Sponsors: Café Des Artistes Luke M.

Special Thanks to Sponsors:

Café Des Artistes Luke M. Morgan, DDS & Assoc. All American Harley-Davidson, Inc. CMI Group, LLC Three Notch Veterinary Hospital

Downs Plumbing & Heating, Inc. Printing Press, Inc.

Summerseat Farm, Inc is an IRS designated 501(c)3 nonprofit organization. Proceeds go to the farm for programs,

maintenance, upkeep, etc.

We’re dedicated to preserving the history, agricultural, natural resources of the farm.

Peaceful Living IN A QUIET SETTING, EXCELLENT SCHOOLS $150.00 Deposit With 301-862-5307 This Ad! 13
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20

In Our Community

The County Times

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Watergate Journalist to Speak at Ben Bradlee Lecture

Former investigative journal- ist for the Washington Post Carl Bernstein is the 2015 speaker for the annual Ben Bradlee Lecture. Bradlee served as executive edi- tor of the Post during a critical time in U.S. history. Together with Post journalist Bob Wood- ward, Bernstein, supported by Bradlee and working with FBI informant Mark Felt, then known as Deep Throat, Bernstein and Woodward unraveled the scandal that became known as Watergate. Their work led to the resignation of President Richard Nixon and earned the two reporters a Pulit- zer Prize. Bernstein will eulogize Bra- dlee who died in October 2014 after years of service to Historic St. Mary’s City and St. Mary’s College of Maryland. He will also discuss the need for civility in politics. Bernstein currently lives in New York City where he writes books featuring the recent histo- ry of American politics. He also serves as a visiting presidential professor at the State University

as a visiting presidential professor at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. The

of New York at Stony Brook. The lecture is co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Democracy at St. Mary’s Col- lege of Maryland and the League of Women Voters of St. Mary’s County. Free and open to the pub- lic, it will be held in the Michael P. O’Brien Athletics and Recre - ation Center on E. Fisher Road on Tuesday, April 28, at 7 p.m.

Local Entrepreneur Achieves Glamorous Trip to Hollywood

Top Avon Leadership and Sales Representatives Awarded Recognition Trip In Los Angeles For Success With The Company

Avon Representative Molly Stone-Bibb from Lexington Park has been recognized by Avon Products, Inc., as one of the beauty company’s top Representatives in the U.S. In honor of this recognition, the company rewarded Stone-Bibb, along with other top Avon Representatives at the company, a trip to Los Angeles, CA to celebrate their success during the annual President’s Recognition Program Celebration. Avon’s President’s Recognition Program Celebration (PRPC) is an annual event, bringing together the nation’s top achiev- ing Avon Representatives who have distin- guished themselves as top performers in Sales or Leadership. “The extraordinary Avon Representatives who have achieved this distinctive honor this year make me extremely proud each day,” says Pablo Muñoz, Senior Vice President &

President, North America. Molly embodies the entrepreneurial spirit that has been at the heart of Avon since the company’s be- ginning, demonstrating first-hand how Avon Representatives can achieve financial em- powerment, the flexibility to run their busi- nesses on their own terms, and the opportu- nity to lead a team and mentor others.” In recognition of their success, the elite group of Avon Representatives celebrated their accomplishments with a five-day, four-night trip to Los Angeles from March 22-March 26, 2015. During their trip, they enjoyed a guided tour of Hollywood from Rodeo Drive to the Sunset Strip, as well a day of fun in the sun at Santa Monica Beach. They were also recognized for their achieve- ments with a Gala Recognition Dinner, host- ed by Avon Executives.

Good Food Always Beats Fast Food!

Good Food Always Beats Fast Food! OLDE TOWN CAFE Delicious Homemade Breakfast & Lunch Weekend/Holiday Buffets

OLDE TOWN CAFE

Delicious Homemade Breakfast & Lunch

Weekend/Holiday Buffets

22685 Washington Street, Leonardtown, MD 20650

301-475-5151

Monday - Friday 7AM - 3PM Saturday - Sunday 8AM - 3PM

Thursday, April 23, 2015

The County Times

In Our Community

21

2015 Chesapeake Bay Waterfowl Arts Show Celebrates the Region’s Rich Culture While Supporting a Great Cause

New Name, Same Mission to Help Our Community

Warmer weather is in the air and the time is right to start planning activities for spring. At the top of everyone’s list should be the 2015 Chesapeake Bay Wa - terfowl Arts Show, to be held May 15-16 at the St. Mary’s County Fairgrounds in Leonardtown, MD. All artists, exhibits and vendors are indoors, so the show is open rain or shine (we hope shine)! For the ninth straight year, world class wildlife art, antique duck decoys, deli - cious wild game, local wines, and re - triever dogs come together in southern Maryland for a fun-filled weekend, with something for everyone. While the event promotes and cele - brates the traditional arts and heritage of the region, attendees and exhibitors can feel good in that it also serves as a major fundraiser for the Community Founda - tion of Southern Maryland. The founda - tion provides vital grants to a wide array of community organizations, addressing education, health and wellness, youth initiatives, the environment and arts and culture. A major change this year is the show’s name – from Potomac River Waterfowl Festival to Chesapeake Bay Arts Show.

In explaining the name change, Gretch - en Heinze Hardman, Executive Director of the Community Foundation of South - ern Maryland, which has sponsored the show since its inception said, “While we are so proud to call the Potomac River watershed home, the scope of our show has grown and expanded over the past nine years, to encompass so many other aspects of life, culture, art and history of the Chesapeake Bay.” The event kicks off Friday, May 15, with a Cattails and Cocktails reception and auction in recognition of the show’s 2015 Featured Carver, renown Maryland decoy carver, President of the Southern Maryland Carousel and carousel animal maker, Burkey Boggs. At the reception, guests will enjoy delicious gourmet hors d’oeuvres while mingling with the art - ists and previewing the decoys and re - lated items to be auctioned off the next morning. On Saturday, May 16, visitors will be able to see, taste, experience and pur- chase a wide array of Chesapeake Bay culture, including:

Mingle with artists from the Carolinas to New Jersey and Pennsylvania; view

Papa Johns Maryland - Beach Boys Pizza
Papa Johns Maryland - Beach Boys Pizza

and purchase fine wildlife art includ - ing original oil and watercolor paint - ings, photography, hand carved gunning and decorative decoys, sculpture, wood carvings, hand crafted furniture, beach glass jewelry, ceramics and more. Meet 2015 Featured Artist, Burkey Boggs, Maryland decoy carver and President of the Southern Maryland Carousel Group. See and learn about antique duck de - coys from Maryland and learn about this fascinating aspect of Chesapeake Bay history. Free decoy appraisals and identifica - tions offered by Decoy Magazine and the Potomac Decoy Collectors Association. Live Auction of Decoys and related items conducted by Farrell Auction Ser- vice, LLC. Wildfowl and game tasting and cook- ing demonstrations offered by noted big game hunter Jimmy Stewart.

Enjoy local wine tastings and tutorials. See and pet some of the most amazing canines on the east coast at the show’s retriever dog demonstration. Enter your own carving or simply admire the masterpieces entered in the 2015 Working Decoy Competition or- ganized by Heck Rice, champion carver and President of the International Wild - fowl Carvers Association. See birds made from trash – really! An unforgettable display of “recycled” sculptures on loan from Salisbury Uni - versity’s Stash Your Trash exhibit. Bluebird House Workshop – build a special home for your little feathered friends! For tickets and information, please contact cbwaterfowlartsshow@gmail. com or visit www.cfsomd.org.

Book Review “Body of Truth” by Harriet Brown
Book Review
“Body of Truth”
by Harriet Brown

c.2015, DaCapo LifeLong $25.99 / $32.50 Canada 274 pages

c.2015, DaCapo LifeLong $25.99 / $32.50 Canada 274 pages Your summer clothes don’t fit this year.

Your summer clothes don’t fit this year. You’ll admit that you weren’t paying atten- tion: too many holiday cookies, too little New Years’ resolving. The pounds crept up and you need to lose them before they multiply again. It’s for your health and well-being, right? Or maybe not. In the new book “Body of Truth” by Harriet Brown, you’ll see that ev- erything you thought you knew about weight may be a big fat lie. Some twenty-five years ago on a “sticky summer evening,” Harriet Brown sat in a ther- apist’s chair, sobbing about her weight. Once, she’d been thin but “three pregnancies and a whole lot of living” later, she couldn’t take off the pounds. She was absolutely stunned when the thera- pist asked if she could learn to be okay with the body she had. She “couldn’t even consider the possibility” that having a few extra pounds wasn’t such a bad thing. Even the language we use for weight has changed in the past few years: what was once chubby or husky is now “obese” or “over- weight,” words that carry a meaner stigma. Yes, as a society, we’ve gained weight but our eating habits and our sedentary lives are not solely to blame. There are, says Brown, sev- eral reasons for weight gain, one of which is that dieting is generally detrimental. Statistically speaking, just five percent of dieters keep the weight off, long-term; the other 95 percent of calorie-counters usually gain back any weight lost, and then some. We understand that yo-yo dieting is unhealthy, but we may not know that some researchers be- lieve there’s no increased risk of death due to

extra weight. Even so, says Brown, physicians sometimes admit to having “weight bias,” and treat (or don’t treat) patients accordingly. But our obsession with weight goes much deeper than just physical effects. Negative social pressure can affect our mental health, which suffers when we loathe our bodies and indulge in “fat talk.” What’s worse is that our emphasis on weight adverse- ly affects future generations: some pediatri- cians recommend that infants be put on diets and one study found three-year-old children who were “unhappy with their bodies.” Says Brown, “Something is definitely wrong with this picture.” Food for thought. No pun intended, but that’s what you’ll find in “Body of Truth.” You’ll also find a good amount of controversy. For readers who struggle with their weight, there’s a certain Ahhhhh-feeling of freedom that comes with author Harriet Brown’s urg- ing for acceptance. It’s hard not to see that our attitudes about being overweight have gone overboard, and it’s equally hard to argue with the experts and research she cites. Definitely, this could cause weight-watch- ing readers’ heads to spin – but Brown is quick to reassure the flummoxed: “There’s no one-size-fits-all approach…” when it comes to weight or loss thereof. Overall, I really liked this book – in part, because it provides more balance in a world where new diets come out seemingly every day. If you’ve grown weary of that, then read “Body of Truth.” You may have nothing to lose.

22

The County Times

Thursday, April 23, 2015

Business

Food for the Family

By Emily Charles Contributing Writer

If you’re looking for good food in a fam- ily friendly setting, Big Larry’s Eatery in Leonardtown might be just the place for you! Established in April 2010, the shop of-

fers a variety of ice cream flavors, smooth- ies, homemade meals and means for enter- tainment. The eatery is also a comic and gaming store, appealing to a broad audi- ence in an individual way. “My passion was always food and I wanted to open a comic book café. It’s something you don’t find everywhere. We’re one of the few family places in St. Mary’s County. You can bring your whole family here and still be welcome. If your child is loud or grouchy, no one is going to say anything to you. If they leave a bunch of chips on the floor, we’ll understand, because that’s just what kids do,” owner Larry Rhodes said. “Our food is real food done right. I make most of my food here,

carry Hershey’s ice

it’s homemade

cream, which I believe is the best ice cream

out there you can buy. We have smoothies

We

best ice cream out there you can buy. We have smoothies We that are made of

that are made of 100 percent fresh fruit from California. We slice our own meats here, and we use top of the line imported meats…My food is kind of comfort food. It’s food my customers are familiar with, but it’s the best they’ve ever had.” Some of these comfort foods include homemade soups, salads, sandwiches and even more

creative options, like the eatery’s Walking Taco, a customer favorite. “I like to keep my finger on the pulse, and the pulse is the customer. I find out what my custom- ers want and that’s how we’ve evolved into what we are today. We’re a funky business,

definitely not your run of the mill. We have this thing called Walking Tacos, and it’s

a small bag of crushed Doritos with taco meat and toppings mixed in. We make a

taco in a bag and then you can eat it with a fork, and people seem to really enjoy that,” Rhodes said. In addition to a broad selection of care- fully made food items, Big Larry’s sells comics, action figures and tin signs. There

is also a gaming section in the back where

customers can utilize gaming systems on different occasions, including during spe- cial events and birthday parties. The biggest upcoming event to be host- ed by Big Larry’s is Free Comic Book Day on May 2, beginning at 11 a.m. “We’ll have free comics for all ages. People can come here, have a meal, have a good time. This is a national event and I’ve been doing it for 15 years,” said Rhodes. Rhodes has a deep love for his business, his clientele and for the community around him. “I’m living my dream. I’m doing exactly what I want to be doing and exactly where I want to be doing it. It’s such a surreal feel-

Photo courtesy of tripadvisor.com

ing…I love Leonardtown. I love St. Mary’s County. It has a small town community feel and I’m in love with it. The wonder- ful thing about being in this location and in this business is our clientele. People don’t come to Big Larry’s with a bad attitude; they come in here because Big Larry’s is

a fun place. It means a lot to me that this is

a place where family and friends can come together to spend time with each other,” he said. “There’s not a day I wake up that I’m not excited for this store to open.” As a tribute to his love for the communi- ty, Rhodes does his best to give back what he can. “Every year I donate to the cystic fibro-

sis cause. We do a lot for the local schools, like Leonardtown High School, the church schools. If they’re having a themed event, we get product in, we donate to it that way.

I love giving back to the community,”

Rhodes said. If you’re looking for a diverse eatery with good times to offer, be sure to check out Big Larry’s! For more information about Big Larry’s Eatery, call 301-475-1860, visit www. biglarryscomicscafe.com, or stop by the shop at 22745 Washington Street in Leonardtown.

contributing@countytimes.net

Mike Batson Photography Freelance Photographers Events Weddings Family Portraits 301-938-3692
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Events
Weddings
Family Portraits
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Thursday, April 23, 2015

The County Times

Sports

23

“Takes Round One of the MD/VA Title Chase”

By Doug Watson Contributing Writer

Second year driver Jeremy Pilkerton scored his first-career feature win in the 15-lap U-Car event. Pilkerton,who lined- up second for the start, blasted into the race lead on lap-one and would repel the re- peated advances from eventual runner-up Mikey Latham to score the break-through win. Corey Swaim, David Rhodes and Erica Bailey would round out the top-five. Ed Pope Sr. took the win in the nightcap 15- lap Strictly Stock feature. Pope came from his second starting spot to eventually lead every lap of the main to collect his division-leading 14th career Potomac feature win. John Hard- esty, Johnny Hardesty, Drew Payne and JJ Silvious would fillthe front-five.

York Haven Pa.’s Jason Covert, the de- fending Potomac Speedway Late Model champion, drove to victory in last Friday nights 35-lap main event. The win for Co- vert, worth $3,000, came in round one of the highly touted MD/VA chase for the championship in the first appearance for the class at Potomac this season. Ross Robinson and Stevie Long brought the field to the initial green flag of the event with Long gaining control as the mob raced off turn-two. Fourth-starting Jason Covert settled into second and set his sights on Long. Covert, wheeling his Cameron/Mann owned Rocket no.72, would then snare the race lead from Long on lap-six and would lead the distance to score the popular win. As Covert and Long battled for the lead 14th-starting JT Spence was coming in a hurry and he would get to third and would eventually finish in that spot. “Four years ago you would never have heard me say this, but I love this place.” Covert jokingly stated during his post-race interview. “I’m going to be politically correct, but Potomac has the best surface in the region and as hard as we were able to race here tonight proves that.” A well prepared race car was propelled Covert to the checkered flag. “This is a brand new race car.” Said Covert. “All the guys on this team have been working hard on this car and we’re starting to get it figured out, but I think we can make it better and it sure is nice to get a win for the team this early in the sea- son.” Eighth-starting Dan Stone would take fourth with Ross Robinson posting a solid finish in fifth. Heats for the 17-cars entered went to Covert and Jamie Lathroum. Mike Latham took the win in the 16-lap Street Stock feature. Latham,who started on the pole, took the lead at the drop of the green and despite a smoking race car, would lead every lap to post his 38th career Potomac feature win. Chuck Bowie, Mike Franklin, Scotty Nelson and Dale Reamy rounded out the top-five. Billy Crouse came out on top in anoth- er wild finish in the 15-lap Hobby Stock main. Crouse grabbed the race lead from Buddy Dunagan on lap-eight and would then have to fend-off a furious late race challenge from Jerry Deason to score the win. Twelfth-starting Ed Pope came home third with Ryan Clement and Dunagan completing the top-five.

Late Model feature finish

1.

Jason Covert 2. Stevie Long

3.

JT Spence 4. Dan Stone 5. Ross

Robinson 6. Dale Hollidge 7. Jamie

Lathroum 8. Glenn Elliott 9. Deane Guy

10.

Walter Crouch 11. Nick Davis

12.

Amanda Whaley 13. Larry

Ramsey 14. Kenny Moreland 15. Jacob Burdette 16. Kyle Lear 17. James Carte

Street Stock feature finish

1.

Mike Latham 2. Chuck Bowie

3.

Mike Franklin 4. Scotty Nelson

5.

Dale Reamy 6. Billy Hill 7. Lloyd

Deans

8. Mike Hanbury 9. Ray Hackett

Hobby Stock feature finish

1.

Billy Crouse 2. Jerry Deason

3.

Ed Pope 4. Ryan Clement 5. Buddy

Dunagan 6. Greg Morgan 7. Korey

Downs 8. John Burch 9. Dave Adams

10.

Matt Stewart 11. Robbie Kramer

Jr. 12. Ray Reed 13. Jordan Pilkerton

14.

Yogi Pope 15.Gage Perkins 16.

Tommy Wagner Jr. 17. Jonathon Raley

U-Car feature finish

1.

Jeremy Pilkerton 2. Mikey Latham

3.

Corey Swaim 4. David Rhodes

5.

Erica Bailey 6. Sam Raley 7. DJ

Powell 8. Jamie Marks 9. DJ Stotler

10.

John Molesberry 11. Savannah

Windsor 12. Kasey Campbell

13.

Cody Wathen 14. Greg Carrico

Strictly Stock feature finish

1.

Ed Pope Sr. 2. John Hardesty 3. Johnny

Hardesty 4. Drew Payne 5. JJ Silvious

6.

Nabil Guffey 7. Greg Mattingly

8.

Jimmy Suite 9. Ray Bucci

International Drag Bike League Heads to MDIR

International Drag Bike League Heads to MDIR The Mickey Thompson Tires IDBL Se- ries kicks-off the

The Mickey Thompson Tires IDBL Se- ries kicks-off the season at Maryland In- ternational Raceway with the 18th annual Pingel Spring Nationals on April 24-26. The event will feature Orient Express Pro Street, DME Racing Real Street, Vance & Hines 4.60 index, FBR Shop 5.60 Index, Carpenter Racing Crazy 8’s, Trac King Clutches Top Sportsman, Shinko Tires Pro E.T., Brock’s Performance Street E.T., and Eastside Performance Grudge. This event will also feature a 2-Hour Af- terdark Underground grudge program on Saturday night! The event will also host a huge vendor midway full of motorcycle parts, apparel, and accessories! So head to Maryland In- ternational Raceway for an exciting week- end of motorcycle action! On Friday the gates will open at 9 a.m., and there will be an Early Bird Test Session from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. for $100 per bike. Friday evening there will be Test & Tune from 6:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. for $25 per bike. On Saturday the gates will open at 8am. Top Sportsman, Pro ET, Street ET, Crazy 8’s, and 5.60 Index will start qualifying at

9 a.m. 4.60 Index, Pro Street, Real Street, and Grudge will run at 1 p.m., 4 p.m., and 7 p.m. Pro E.T. and Street E.T. eliminations will start on Saturday at 2 p.m. After Sat- urday’s E.T. eliminations the After Dark Underground will begin with 2 hours of grudge racing! On Sunday the gates will open at 8 a.m., and the church service will start at 8:30 a.m. Top Sportsman, Pro E.T., Street E.T., Crazy 8’s, and 5.60 Index will get one time run at 9am so be sure to arrive early. Eliminations for pro classes will start at 11:30am, and 12noon for sportsman classes. Pro Street entry fee is $200, Real Street entry fee is $150, 4.60 Index entry fee is $150, 5.60 Index entry fee is $75, Crazy 8’s racer entry fee is $50, Pro E.T. racer entry fee is 1-day $70 or 2-day $120, Street E.T. entry fee is 1-day $50 or 2-day $80, Grudge entry fee is $50 per day. A weekend pass for spectators and crew is $40 or a 1-day pass is $20. All kids 6-11 are only $5 per day. For full details on the IDBL visit RaceIDBL.com.

Photo Courtesy of Kate Jones 50 th Anniversary Open House Saturday, May 16 • 10
Photo Courtesy
of Kate Jones
50 th Anniversary Open House
Saturday, May 16 • 10 a.m.
- 3 p.m.
Wade in the water
Climb the
tower
Touch
the wildlife
…and discover how the Bay has changed in half a century.
Free parking with online registration. $10/car for drop-ins.
Sign up at www.serc.si.edu.
Supported by the Chaney Foundation.
647 Contees Wharf Road • Edgewater, MD 21037 • 443-482-2200 • Visiting Hours: Mon.
– Sat., 9 a.m.
- 4:30 p.m. • Closed Sun. and federal holidays.

24

The County Times

Thursday, April 23, 2015

C o u n t y T i m e s Thursday, April 23, 2015 To
C o u n t y T i m e s Thursday, April 23, 2015 To
C o u n t y T i m e s Thursday, April 23, 2015 To
C o u n t y T i m e s Thursday, April 23, 2015 To
C o u n t y T i m e s Thursday, April 23, 2015 To

To submit your event listing to go in our Community Calendar, please email news@countytimes.net with the listing details by 12 p.m. on the Tuesday prior to our Thursday publication.

by 12 p.m. on the Tuesday prior to our Thursday publication. April, Month Long Casino Trip

April, Month Long

April, Month Long Casino Trip Sign-Up Taj Mahal Casino (1000 Virginia Av- enue, Atlantic City, NJ)

Casino Trip Sign-Up Taj Mahal Casino (1000 Virginia Av- enue, Atlantic City, NJ) Event: Bus trip to Atlantic City to the Taj Mahal casino Date: Monday, May 18, 6 a.m. to ap- proximately 8:30 p.m. Pick-Up Location: Golden Beach Park & Ride, Charlotte hall location Cost: $50 per person – due by April 27 to guarantee your spot Includes: coffee & donuts in the morning; sodas, snacks and a movie on the return trip. Each per- son will receive $35 in free slot play upon arrival at the Taj Mahal. Must be 21 years old. We must have reservations for 30 people by April 27 to confirm trip. If trip is cancelled, money will be refunded. Contact: Valerie at 301-481-0148

Saturdays – April 11, 18 & 25 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tours: 10:30 a.m.,
Saturdays – April 11, 18 & 25
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Tours: 10:30 a.m., 1 p.m., 2 p.m., 3
p.m.
(Beginning May 1, this will be the
regular schedule
for Tuesdays through Saturdays
through Oct. 31)
Sundays – April 12, 19 & 26
11:45 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Tours: Noon, 1 p.m., 2 p.m., 3 p.m.
(Beginning May 3, this will be the
regular schedule
for Sundays through Oct. 31)
This year promises to be an exciting
one for Historic Sotterley Plantation
and we hope you and yours will take
advantage of our early start. Visit us
soon and often!
Thursday, April 23
Little Minnows
Calvert Marine Museum (14200 Solo-
mons Island Rd. S, Solomons) – 10 to
11 a.m.
Animals in Motion - Can you walk
sideways like a crab or hop like a frog?
Explore animal movements while
watching the river otter swim. For chil-
dren ages 3 to 5 years. Members are
free; $5 for non-members.
this event we are meeting the family of
Navy Chiefs and our panel is a team of
Navy Chiefs who will talk about their
various missions and celebrate their
122nd birthday. Our Panel discussion
will start at 2 p.m. We have children’s
activities and balloons for children of
all ages. We will be raffling several
Hank Caruso Print’s. Regular Admis-
sion Fees are waived for this event.
Friday, April 24
Film Festival Submissions
Film makers from the Tri-County
area are invited to submit original pro-
ductions to the Southern Maryland
Film Festival, to be held Saturday, July
11 in Leonardtown, Md. All ages and
experience levels welcome. No sub-
mission fees. Prizes will be awarded
in several categories. Submission
deadline is April 30. For submission
and volunteer information, visit www.
smdfs.org. For sponsorship informa-
tion, contact Theresa at fotlt@outlook.
com.
Special Olympics
Leonardtown High School (23995
Point Lookout Rd, Leonardtown) – 10
a.m. to 2 p.m.
St Mary’s County Special Olympics
would like to announce that the an-
nual Spring Games will be hosted at
Leonardtown High School on Friday
April 24. Athletes will compete in track
and field events and qualify for state
competition. Community members
are welcome to attend.
Dog Obedience Classes
Leonardtown Fairgrounds (42455
Fairgrounds Rd., Leonardtown)
Saint Mary’s County De-
partment of Recreation and
Parks Dog Obedience Classes
Puppy Kindergarten
Start: April 15 and Ends: May 20
Days: Wednesdays
Time: 7 to 7:45 pm
Fee: $45 (6 weeks)
Basic Obedience
Start: April 13 and Ends: May 25
Days: Mondays
Time: 7 to 8 p.m. (no second class
offered)
Fee: $50 (7 weeks)
Advanced Dog Obedience With
CGC Training.
Start: April 15 and Ends: May 27
Days: Wednesdays
Time: 8 to 9 p.m.
Fee: $50 (7 weeks)
FMI: 301-475-4200; ext 1801
Open Mic
Christ Church Parish Hall (37497 Zach
Fowler Rd., Chaptico) – doors open at
7 p.m.
The Southern Maryland Traditional
Music and Dance HomeSpun Cof-
feeHouse will sponsor an Open Mic
at the Christ Church Parish Hall on
Friday, April 24. This is a great event
with many varieties of music and lots
of friendship, so if you haven’t been
to an SMTMD event before, this is a
great time to start! The doors open at
7 p.m., and the music starts at 7:30.
The admission fee for this event is
only $7, and performers are admit-
ted free. Light refreshments will be
provided (donations are suggested).
For additional information, or to sign
up to perform, please contact John
Garner at garner@wildblue.net or call
John at 301-904-4987. Visit www.
smtmd.org for directions and more
information.
St. Maries Musica Concert
Brick Chapel of 1667, Historic St.
Mary’s City (18751 Hogaboom Ln, St
Marys City) – 2 p.m.
On Friday, April 25, Historic St.
Mary’s City will host local a cappella
singers, St. Maries Musica for a free
concert in the Brick Chapel of 1667.
This season, St. Maries Musica pres-
ents “Hope for Resolution,” a compi-
lation of musical works meant to in-
spire hope and peace, while reflecting
on the recent bicentennial celebration
of the War of 1812. The program be-
gins at 2 p.m. and admission for the
concert is free. Those wishing to en-
joy the museum as well may pay regu-
lar admission fees.
Historic St. Mary’s City is a mu-
seum of living history and archaeol-
ogy on the site of Maryland’s first
capital in beautiful, tidewater South-
ern Maryland. For more informa-
tion about this program or the mu-
seum, contact the Visitor Center at
240-895-4990, 800-SMC-1634, or
info@hsmcdigshistory.org.
Pork Loin and Beef Sandwich Sale
American Legion Post 221 (21690
Colton’s Point Rd., Avenue) – 11 a.m.
to 4 p.m.
American Legion Post 221 is spon-
soring a pork loin and beef sandwich
sale. Pork loin, sliced roast beef, and
BBQ beef sandwiches will be sold on
both Saturday and Sunday, April 25
and 26, at American Legion Post 221.
Sandwiches will cost $6 each. Call
(301) 884-4071 for further information.
www.co.saint-marys.md.us/recre-
ate/index.asp
“Fire and Ice”
North End Gallery (41652 Fenwick St.,
Leonardtown) - to April 26, First Friday
on April 3 from 5 to 8 p.m.
Winter is hopefully behind us but we
still have vivid memories of the cold
and snow and ice. And, with these
beautiful and bright images of winter
in mind the North End Gallery will con-
tinue their popular All Member show
“Fire and Ice “. This show will hang
until April 26. Put it on your calendar
to visit the Gallery during this time and
also plan to join us for the First Friday
celebration on April 3 at the Gallery.
The North End Gallery may be reached
at 301 475 3130 and the web address
is www.northendgallery.org.
St. Michael’s School Grocery
Auction
St. Michael’s School (16560 Three
Notch Rd., Ridge) – 6 to 10 p.m.
St. Michael’s School is hosting a
Grocery Auction starting at 6 p.m. All
are invited to a fun evening of bidding
for everyday items found in a grocery
store. Products are brought in a re-
frigerated truck and offered in both
small & large lots. Buy as much, or as
little, as you like for yourself, your ex-
tended family or your next event. Re-
freshments – beer, wine, soda, water
& sandwiches - will be on sale. Save
money, spend time with your family
and friends, and get some great deals
at this fun fundraiser for St. Michael’s
School.
Field Trip
(10455 Ward Rd., Dunkirk) – 7:30 a.m.
to 10 a.m.
“Spring Bird List” Leader: Karen
Anderson, Master Naturalist
Join Karen to explore Calvert Coun-
ty’s newest park and assist the Natu-
ral Resources Division to compile a
comprehensive bird list for this excit-
ing new 209 acre property at 10455
Ward Road, Dunkirk, Md.
Saturday, April 25
Meet the Airplane Event
Patuxent River Naval Air Museum
(22156 Three Notch Rd, Lexington
Park) – noon to 4 p.m.
The Patuxent River Naval Air Muse-
um is hosting their next meet the air-
plane event on Saturday, April 25. For
ACA Kayak Instructor Course
Greenwell State Park (25450 Rose-
dale Manor Ln, Hollywood) – 9 a.m. to
5 p.m.
The Greenwell Foundation is offer-
ing an ACA Kayak Instructor course
on April 25 & 26 along the beauti-
ful waterways of Greenwell State
Park. This is a great certification for
camps or schools offering kayak-
ing (or canoeing) programs, Girl
or Boy Scout leaders who want to
lead trips, or for anyone who wants
to expand their skills on the water.
Course: American Canoe Associa-
tion Level 1 Introduction to Kayak-
ing Instructor Development Work-
shop (IDW). For current instructors,

Registration for Camp The House of Dance (24620 Three Notch Rd., Hollywood) Register for CAMP: Dance Discov- ery! All students ages 6-12 welcome. Everyday July 13-17. Discover a sum- mer dance program packed with a variety of different dance styles! Students will learn world Dance, Hip Hop, Breaking’, Jazz, Choreography, Musical Theatre, Hooping, and much more! Students will also learn cos- tuming, making props, characteriza- tion, and create unique art projects! Dancers will increase their strength, coordination, rhythm, and awareness with this program. Students will need to bring a bag lunch, and wear com- fortable clothing. $249/Student For more information call 301-373-6330, Email admin@thehouseofdance.org, or visit www.thehouseofdance.org.

Spring Ball Tickets Bethesda North Marriott Hotel (5701 Marinelli Rd, North Bethesda) Saturday, May 9 Montgomery County Democratic Central Committee Bethesda North Marriott Hotel For information and tickets, go to calvertdemocrats.us3.list-manage. com or call (301) 946-1000.

Register for Summer Youth & Adult Classes The House of Dance (24620 Three Notch Rd., Hollywood) Summer is right around the corner, and with our variety of classes for youth and adults, you can have fun all summer! For more information, or to register, please call 301-373-6330, Email admin@thehouseofdance.org, or visit www.thehouseofdance.org.

Early Opening for Historic Sotter- ley Plantation Historic Sotterley Plantation (44300 Sotterley Ln., Hollywood) In anticipation of a fabulous 2015 season, Historic Sotterley Plantation is set to open earlier than ever before – a month earlier, to be exact! Begin- ning on Saturday, April 11, the site will be open for Self-Guided Audio Tours and Guided Tours of our 1703 Planta- tion House on weekends only.

Thursday, April 23, 2015

The County Times

25

23, 2015 T h e C o u n t y T i m e s
23, 2015 T h e C o u n t y T i m e s
23, 2015 T h e C o u n t y T i m e s
23, 2015 T h e C o u n t y T i m e s
23, 2015 T h e C o u n t y T i m e s

To submit your event listing to go in our Community Calendar, please email news@countytimes.net with the listing details by 12 p.m. on the Tuesday prior to our Thursday publication.

by 12 p.m. on the Tuesday prior to our Thursday publication. an Instructor Update is available.

an Instructor Update is available. Prerequisites and fees apply. Details: www.greenwellfoundation.

org/aca-kayak-instructor-certifica-

tion/ Email: info@greenwellfounda- tion.org

17th Annual Plant Sale Sotterley Plantation (44300 Sotterley Ln, Hollywood) – 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. The Plant Sale, sponsored by the Sotterley Garden Guild, will run on Saturday, April 25 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and on Sunday, April 26 from noon to 3 p.m. Because of their dedi- cation to this National Historic Land- mark, these nurturing volunteers have not only raised thousands of dollars in support of Historic Sotter- ley Plantation, but they are also re- sponsible for the maintenance of the exquisite Colonial Revival Garden. Their passion for beauty is evident in the smallest of details, so take the opportunity to appreciate their horti- cultural artistry!

Free Plant Exchange Sotterley Plantation (44300 Sotter- ley Ln, Hollywood) – 10 a.m. The Free Plant Exchange will run on Saturday only from 10:00 a.m. until the plants run out! You can ex- change your plants for other annu- als, perennials, herbs, vegetables, shrubs, trees, bulbs and seeds! Don’t have plants to exchange? No prob- lem – stop by anyway to adopt a new plant!

Sunday, April 26

Sunday, April 26

Spring Fling XXX Classic Car Show Leonardtown Square (Leonardtown, Md.) – 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. See classic, antique cars and street rods displayed on the Leonardtown Square during the St. Mary’s Rod & Classic Car Club’s annual Spring Fling and Car Show Fundraiser for Hospice. This is the 30th year for the event, and the 15th year on the Leon- ardtown Square! Also included are family entertainment with 50’s and 60’s tunes, blessing of the cars, kid’s tractor pull and games, as well as the trophy presentation, a silent auction and a raffle for a Cruise to Bermuda! A $2 donation is requested to benefit Hospice of St. Mary’s. For registra- tion information or schedule, call 301- 994-9666 or go online stmarysrodan- dclassic.com (Rain date: May 3)

Field Trip Sotterley Plantation (44300 Sotterley Ln, Hollywood) – 8 to 11 a.m. “Eagles, Earth Day and Sotterley” Leaders: David Moulton and Mi- chael Patterson Wrap up your Earth Day week by exploring the bird life on this scenic and historic Patuxent River property. Nesting bald eagles, early migrants, meadowlarks, woodpeckers and wa- terfowl abound along Sotterley’s ex- tensive new trail system. From Rt. 235, go north on Sotterley Road, turn right through gates to gravel parking lot. RSVP to David Moulton at moulton. davidh@gmail.com or 240-278-4473

17th Annual Plant Sale Sotterley Plantation (44300 Sotterley Ln, Hollywood) – noon to 3 p.m. The Plant Sale, sponsored by the Sotterley Garden Guild, will run on Saturday, April 25 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. and on Sunday, April 26 from noon to 3 p.m. Because of their dedi- cation to this National Historic Land- mark, these nurturing volunteers have not only raised thousands of dollars in support of Historic Sotterley Planta- tion, but they are also responsible for the maintenance of the exquisite Co- lonial Revival Garden. Their passion for beauty is evident in the smallest of details, so take the opportunity to appreciate their horticultural artistry!

Monday, April 27

Bible Study “Genesis to Jesus” St. John’s Catholic Church (43950 St Johns Rd, Hollywood) – 7 p.m. Starting April 13 to June 1. All are welcome, from beginners to more advanced students of Scripture. The series is based on the St. Paul Cen- ter for Biblical Theology course. For more details go to the St. Paul site and look under “Studies, Journey through Scripture”. Contact Mike at

301-373-8545.

Tuesday, April 28

Metropolitan Baltimore Council AFL/CIO 34th Annual Dinner Patapsco Avenue, Unit 110, Baltimore. Contact Cliff Savoy at (301) 655-7800.

Lecture St. Mary’s College of Maryland, Cole Cinema (18952 E Fishers Rd, St Mary’s City) – 8 p.m. Former Washington Post Journalist Carl Bernstein will present the 2015 Ben Bradlee Lecture on Tuesday, April 28, at St. Mary’s College of Maryland. Bernstein, with his colleague Bob Woodward, won a Pulitzer Prize for their investigative reporting on the 1972 Watergate burglary and related conspiracies. Their work helped lead to the resignation of President Rich- ard Nixon in 1974. The lecture is co-sponsored by the League of Women Voters of St. Mary’s County and the Center for the Study of Democracy at St. Mary’s College of Maryland. The lecture is free and open to the public. It will take place in the Cole Cinema of the St. Mary’s College Campus Center on Tuesday, April 28, at 8 p.m. The community is cordially invited to attend.

Wednesday, April 29

Intermediate PowerPoint 2010 Charlotte Hall Library (37600 New Market Rd, Charlotte Hall) – 2 to 4 p.m. Learn introductory features for cre- ating presentations, including anima- tion and running a slide show. Basic computer skills required. Registration required. Free. 301-884-2211 Web address: www.stmalib.org

CHURCH SERVICES DIRECTORY

BAHA’I FAITH

BAHA’I FAITH

BAHA’I FAITH

BAPTIST CATHOLIC CHURCH

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

Now Running In Every Issue!

God is One, Man is One, and All Religions are One

Discussions 3rd Wed. 7-8 Lex Pk Library, Longfellow Rm 301-884-8764 or www.bahai.org

CATHOLIC CHURCH

St. Cecilia Church

47950 Mattapany Rd, PO Box 429 St. Mary’s City, MD 20686 301-862-4600

Vigil Mass:

4:30 pm Saturday

Sunday:

8:00 am

Weekday (M-F):

7:30 am

Confessions:

3-4 pm Saturday www.stceciliaparish.com

METHODIST

Hollywood United Methodist Church

24422 Mervell Dean Rd • Hollywood, MD 20636

301-373-2500

Rev. Sheldon Reese, Pastor Sunday Worship 8:30 and 11:00 a.m. Sunday School for all ages 9:45 a.m. All of our services are traditional. Child care is provided. Sunday Evening Youth Group Christian Preschool and Kindergarten available

are traditional. Child care is provided. Sunday Evening Youth Group Christian Preschool and Kindergarten available

Victory Baptist Church

29855 Eldorado Farm rd CharlottE hall, md 20659

301-884-8503

Order Of gOOd news services

10:00

sun schOOl, all ages… sun mOrning wOrship sun evening wOrship… wed evening prayer mtg

…11:00

7:00

…7:00

ProClaiming thE ChangElEss word in a Changing world.

Jesus saves

victOrybaptistchurchmd.Org

HUGHESVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH

A member of the Southern Baptist Convention 8505 Leonardtown Road, Hughesville, MD 20637 301-884-8645 or 301-274-3627

Senior Pastor Dr. J. Derek Yelton Associate Pastor Kevin Cullins

Sunday School (all ages)

9:15 am

• Sunday Morning Worship

10:30 am

• Sunday Evening Worship & Bible Study

6:00 pm

• Wednesday Discipleship Classes (Adults, youth & Children)

7:00 pm

Greetings from the Bible Temple Church family in Mechanicsville Maryland. Here at Bible Temple, we

Greetings from the Bible Temple Church family in Mechanicsville Maryland. Here at Bible Temple, we believe that in this life it is important to have strong and healthy relationships

1. A relationship with Christ

2. A personal relationship with family and friends

Through these relationships, we develop the characteristics of love, understanding and forgiveness; the true heart of Christ. “ Endeavoring to keep the unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace” (Ephesians 4:3).

unity of the Spirit in the bond of peace” (Ephesians 4:3). We invite you to experience

We invite you to experience the change… the transformation with us. Just bring your heart and God will supply the rest. Come grow with us in a place, “Where the Word Reaches the Heart!” Everyone is Welcome! Leadership: Pastor Joseph and First Lady Marilyn Young Sunday School for all ages: 9:00AM Sunday Morning Worship: 9:45AM Bible Study: Wednesdays at 7:30PM

Address: 29050 New Market Village Road, Mechanicsville, MD 20659 Website: www.bibletemplechurch.org Phone number: 301-374-9110

www.bibletemplechurch.org Phone number: 301-374-9110 To Advertise in the Church Services Directory, Call The
www.bibletemplechurch.org Phone number: 301-374-9110 To Advertise in the Church Services Directory, Call The

To Advertise in the Church Services Directory, Call The County Times at 301-373-4125

ANGLICAN

St. John's Anglican Church

at 301-373-4125 ANGLICAN St. John's Anglican Church SUNDAY MASS 10 a.m. 26415 North Sandgates Rd.

SUNDAY MASS 10 a.m. 26415 North Sandgates Rd. Mechanicsville, Md 20659

www.facebook.com/

StJohnsAnglicanMD

stjohnsanglicanchurchmd.com

26

Entertainment

The County Times

Thursday, April 23, 2015

In Entertainment Thursday, April 23 Open Mic Night Ruddy Duck (13200 Dowell Rd, Dowell) Trivia
In Entertainment
Thursday, April 23
Open Mic Night
Ruddy Duck (13200 Dowell Rd, Dowell)
Trivia and Karaoke
– 7 p.m.
Anthony’s Bar and Grill (10371 Southern
Maryland Blvd, Dunkirk) – 7 p.m.
Thursday, April 30
Friday, April 24
Jen Van Meter
Ruddy Duck (13200 Dowell Rd, Dowell)
Jacked Up Band
– 7:30 p.m.
Anthony’s Bar and Grill (10371 Southern
Maryland Blvd, Dunkirk) – 9 p.m.
Ladies Night and Karaoke
Anthony’s Bar and Grill (10371
Saturday, April 25
Southern Maryland Blvd, Dunkirk)
– 7 p.m.
Pirates of the Chesapeake
Friday, May 1
Father Andrew White School (22850
Washington Street, Leonardtown)
– 7 p.m.
Band Forte
DJ
Anthony’s Bar and Grill (10371
Southern Maryland Blvd, Dunkirk)
– 9 p.m.
Anthony’s Bar and Grill (10371 Southern
Maryland Blvd, Dunkirk) – 8:30 p.m.
Saturday, May 2
The Woven Lullabies
Redwine Jazz Trio
Westlawn Inn (9200 Chesapeake Ave,
North Beach) – 7:30 p.m.
Westlawn Inn (9200 Chesapeake Ave,
North Beach) – 7:30 p.m.
Karaoke
DJ and Karaoke
Applebee’s (45480 Miramar Way,
California) – 9 p.m.
Anthony’s Bar and Grill (10371 South-
ern Maryland Blvd, Dunkirk) – 8:30 p.m.
Funkzilla
Karaoke
St. Leonard’s Tavern (4975 St. Leonard
Road, St. Leonard) – 9 p.m.
Applebee’s (45480 Miramar Way,
California) – 9 p.m.
Sunday, April 26
Sunday, May 3
Higher Standards
John Shaw
Ruddy Duck (16810 Piney Point Road,
Piney Point) – 11 a.m.
Ruddy Duck (16810 Piney Point Road,
Piney Point) – 11 a.m.
Monday, April 27
Drinkable Arts
Team Trivia
Anthony’s Bar and Grill (10371
Ruddy Duck (13200 Dowell Rd, Dowell) –
7 p.m.
Southern Maryland Blvd, Dunkirk)
– 6 p.m.
Tuesday, April 28
Monday, May 4
DJ Spitfire
Team Trivia
Memories Bar (2360 Old Washington
Road, Waldorf) – 9 p.m.
Ruddy Duck (13200 Dowell Rd, Dowell)
– 7 p.m.
Wednesday, April 29
Dylan Galvin
Port Tobacco Marina (7610 Shirley Blvd,
Port Tobacco) – 6:30 p.m.
The Calvert County Times is always looking for more local
talent to feature! To submit art
or band information for our
entertainment section, e-mail info@somdpublishing.net.
Please submit calendar listings by 12 p.m.
on the Tuesday prior to our Thursday publication.

St. Mary’s County House & Garden Pilgrimage

The annual Maryland House & Gar- den Pilgrimage returns on Sunday, May 3 from 10am to 5pm. A longstanding Maryland tradition, the Pilgrimage provides access to some of St. Mary’s County’s most noteworthy proper- ties and enables residents to see their county with fresh eyes. The 2015 tour includes 8 sites in the mid section of the County. Rosedale Manor is located within Greenwell State Park in Hollywood, and overlooks the lower Patuxent River. The interior of the manor house dates to between 1850 and 1880, as evidenced by the American Chestnut wood floors. Pleasant Hill Farm, a former tobac- co farm, it’s now notable for its abun- dant gardens and English boxwoods that are over a century old. Sotterley Plantation is a National Historic Landmark. The Plantation House had its beginnings in 1703. Sot- terley today consists of almost 100 acres of breathtaking Patuxent River waterfront, Colonial Revival Gardens, and over 20 historic buildings – includ- ing a surviving original Slave Cabin from the early 1800s. St. Andrews Church, was entered on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973. The graveyard con- tains remains of those who fought in the American Revolution as well as the Civil War. Sunnymeade at Pleasant Hill Farm was built in 2005 on part of the owner’s family farm. A pond, pas- tures, and cultivated fields surround this private property and lead to lush gardens creating a series of outdoor rooms to be enjoyed nearly year round. The Tour also includes three private homes:

Red Hill Court situated on three acres along Cuckhold Creek, upper and lower perennial gardens of daylil- ies, peonies, iris, and jonquils grace the water view.

No Fish Creek, Pinto Drive is a six year old home that sits on 27 acres of hidden land and woods behind Fen- wick Manor. Peacocks and other fowl of antique lineage roam throughout the grounds. A newly constructed home evokes a feeling that is both rustic and spacious. MOTU, Clarks Mill Road In the fall of 2001, the existing rambler on this site was demolished and a federal style home was constructed. The core of the house was completed in 2002 . The landscape was designed to create a peaceful, private setting with a seclud- ed pool and patio - a “motu” just two miles from a shopping center! A delicious gourmet box lunch by Quality Street Catering will be avail- able by pre-paid reservation received by April 25 or you can pay on the day of the event. Lunch pickup is on the patio of Rosedale Manor at Greenwell State Park between the hours of 11:00 and 2:00. Make your check for $15 payable to St. Mary’s County Garden Club and mail it to Macy Hovland, 23320 Esper- anza Drive, Lexington Park MD 20653. For inquiries contact hmhovland@ gmail.com or 301-862-2549. Visitors may also find additional dining options in the Hollywood area. Proceeds from the tour will be used to replace and landscape the entrance to the White House, circa 1803, the for- mer Headmaster’s House at the former Charlotte Hall Military Academy. The White House now is a museum facility used to preserve its archive collection. All aspects of the project will conform to historic specifications. Advance tickets for each tour are $30 per person ($35 if purchasing day-of). Purchase tickets and get more informa- tion at mhgp.org. Questions: Barbara Raley 301-904- 2172 barbara.raley@mcnelisgroup. com Susan Tyner 301-904-1449 susan- tyner@metrocast.net.

com Susan Tyner 301-904-1449 susan- tyner@metrocast.net. R o s e d a l e M a

Rosedale Manor

Submitted Photo

Thursday, April 23, 2015

The County Times

GAMES

27

2015 T h e C o u n t y T i m e s GAMES

CLUES ACROSS

47.

An open metal dish

13.

Nonfeeding stage for insects

1.

Hindu social class

48.

And, Latin

14.

Old Irish alphabet

6.

Hassles

50.

Supreme singer Diana

15.

Brings out of sleep

12.

Pillsbury best seller

52.

Gaelic name (morning)

25.

Old Spanish monetary units

16.

Midway between S and E

54.

Expresses pleasure

26.

Roman God of the underworld

17.

A President’s 1st address

56.

Overdose

27.

Pouch

18.

The 24th state

57.

Spanish be

29.

For all ills or diseases

19.

Atomic #18

59.

A border for a picture

31.

Jewelled headdress

20.

Most abundant mineral in the

60.

Doctor

33.

Hostage for Pythias

body

61.

Ancient Egyptian sun god

36.

Midway between E and SE

21.

Golf score

62.

Lansing is the capital

38.

Financial gain over time

22.

14th Greek letter

63.

Clothed

39.

Tunes

23.

12th Greek letter

66.

In contact with the surface

41.

In a way, ricochets

24.

4-stringed Chinese instrument

67.

70 year olds

42.

Direct a weapon

26.

Order of the British Empire

70.

Wall bracket for candles

43.

Stood for election

women

71.

Metrical romance (archaic)

46.

Harm to property

28.

Watering places

 

47.

Plate for Eucharist

30.

Atomic #58

CLUES DOWN

49.

Monarch’s ceremonial seat

31.

death do us part

1. A member of the clergy

51.

Southeast Asia Treaty

32.

Radioactivity unit

2. Gangster Capone

Organization