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THE LAST MINYAN IN PATERSON page 10

AREA BIBLE QUIZ KIDS KNOW THEIR VERSES


TALKING WITH ALAN DERSHOWITZ page 36
DIFFERENT SONS OF NAZI FATHERS page 49

page 16

MAY 8, 2015
VOL. LXXXIV NO. 33 $1.00

NORTH JERSEY

84

2015

JSTANDARD.COM

One hundred years


of Hoboken holiness

United Synagogue of
Hoboken marks centennial
page 28

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Page 3
Pharoah victory
good for the Jews
The horse and his rider He
has thrown into the sea, sang
Moses and Miriam after Pharaoh
and his army drowned while
chasing the Israelites.
On Sunday, though, the horse
American Pharoah (the name
was a typo in the Jockey Club
records) won the Kentucky
Derby, and the Jews were rejoicing in his victory.
The victory of American
Pharoah marked the biggest
success to date of its owner, a
Jewish Teaneck resident who
is a major figure in the racing
world: Ahmed Zayat.

Horses from Zayat Stables


had been expected to win the
Derby before but of course,
favorites dont always win.
(Thats what makes horse races.)
Mr. Zayat is a native of Egypt.
In 2002 he sold the Al Ahram
Beverages Company he headed
there to Heineken for $280 million. He soon entered the world
of horses; in 2006 he paid $4.6
million for a horse he named
Maimonides.
His philanthropy includes
a $500,000 donation to the
Frisch School in Paramus.
LARRY YUDELSON

What does Lindsey Graham


have against the word the?

A Google Street View image of 18 Yehoshua Bin Nun street in Jerusalem.

Google Street View


to map Israel Trail
In the future, youll be able to travel
the length of Israel without leaving
home.
And that future is getting very
close, now that Google Street View
has announced plans to photograph
the length of the Israel Trail, a hiking
route that runs from Israels northern
end to its southern extreme.
Google Street View is a feature of
Google Maps that merges photographs to provide a street-level view
of locations around the world. For
this project, Google Street View will
enlist hikers from the Society for the
Protection of Nature in Israel, or SPNI,
to map the 660-mile trail.
Inaugurated 20 years ago by SPNI,
the trail runs from Kibbutz Dan, near
the uppermost reaches of Israels
border with Lebanon, to Eilat on its

southern tip.
The trail will be the longest one
photographed for Google Maps, and
the first that spans an entire country.
Google is sending two cameras to
Israel for the mission.
Exposing the Israel National Trail
through Street View will encourage
tourists from Israel and abroad to
experience with their feet and their
senses the various cultures and landscapes of Israel, to fall in love with
them and to take action to preserve
them, SPNI CEO Moshe Pakman
said, according to the Israeli business
publication Globes.
Maybe. Or perhaps it will just let us
revel in the natural beauty of Israel
without leaving our couches.
LARRY YUDELSON/
JTA WIRE SERVICE

Senator Lindsey Graham


(R-S.C.) is considering a White
House run. He probably is the
candidate who is closest to the
pro-Israel community.
His ambitions and his
friendships were on display
on Monday night in Boston, where he addressed an
AIPAC dinner and said, You
will see me in New Hampshire.
He also said this: Al Qaeda, Al Nusra,
Al Qaeda in the Arab Peninsula Everything that starts with Al in the Middle
East is bad news.
Al is Arabic for the. Thats why
words of Arabic origin, like alcohol and
algebra, start with those two letters.

Bad news might be a broad


brush for everything that follows a definite article or the
prefix al in the Middle East.
Theres the Allenby Bridge
over the Jordan River. Theres
Theodor Herzls 1902 science
fiction novel Altneuland,
describing an imagined Jewish
state.
And, more personally, there a
woman I happen to know named Sarah
Albaldes in Izmir, Turkey, who fell hard
for a handsome guy from Salonika, now
in Greece.
Yes, my grandfather might have had a
beef with Senator Graham.
RON KAMPEAS / JTA WIRE SERVICE

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Shabbat ends: Saturday, May 9, 8:47 p.m.

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The Jewish Standard assumes no responsibility to return unsolicited
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publication and copyright purposes and subject to JEWISH STANDARDs
unrestricted right to edit and to comment editorially. Nothing may be
reprinted in whole or in part without written permission from the publisher. 2015

CONTENTS
NOSHES ...................................................4
OPINION ............................................... 22
COVER STORY .................................... 28
GALLERY ..............................................46
TORAH COMMENTARY ................... 47
CROSSWORD PUZZLE ....................48
ARTS & CULTURE ..............................49
CALENDAR ..........................................50
OBITUARIES ........................................ 53
CLASSIFIEDS ...................................... 54
REAL ESTATE...................................... 56

JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015 3

Noshes

I would like to give a dvar Torah tribute


to [Abe Foxman]. I can do this because I have
a honorary degree from Yeshiva University.
Senator Cory Booker, speaking at Monday nights Anti-Defamation League dinner
honoring Abe Foxman, as reported on Twitter by Rebecca Shimoni-Stoil of the Times
of Israel.

GRACE AND FRANKIE:

Tomlin, Fonda
reunite on Netflix
A new Netflix
series, Grace and
Frankie, will
premiere on Friday, May
8. Per Netflix practice,
the whole first season
will be released at once.
The series stars Lily
Tomlin and Jane Fonda
(who co-starred in the
hit flick 9 to 5) as
long-time rivals who are
brought together when
their husbands announce that they are in
love with each other and
plan to marry. Their
husbands are played by
Martin Sheen and Sam
Waterston. The latters
characters first name is
Sol, and I am guessing
that he is supposed to
be Jewish.
Grace and Frankie
was created by MARTA
KAUFFMAN, 58, who
co-created Friends
with DAVID CRANE,
57. She has been married to Cranes college
roommate, composer
MICHAEL SKLOFF, 57,
since 1984, and they
have three children.
Skloff composed the hit
Friends theme song,
Ill Be There for You,
as well as the music
for other TV shows. He
also helps bring music
programs to the Los
Angeles synagogue that
he and his wife belong
to. Crane, who is gay,
is married to JEFFREY
KLARIK, who is about

55, and was a principal


writer of Mad About
You. Im pretty sure
Kauffman got some
input from Crane and
Klarik on Grace and
Frankie .
The following two
movies open in
limited release on
May 8, or a bit later. In all
likelihood you will see
publicity about them
and reviews in the
national media, but it
will be hard to find them
playing in a theater near
you. Make a note about
their Jewish connections
and catch up with them
when they come to
other media outlets, like
streaming services/DVD.
The bromance comedy D Train stars
JACK BLACK, 45,
as Dan Landsman, a
Pittsburgh-based loser
who convinces his boss
JEFFREY TAMBOR,
70, to send him to Los
Angeles. Dan sells it as
a business trip, but what
he really wants to do
is meet up with Oliver
(James Marsden), an old
high school classmate
whom Dan wrongly
believes is a successful
actor. Dan thinks that
if Oliver attends a high
school reunion that Dan
is organizing, then it will
be a success and Dans
life will turn around.
Train was co-directed
and co-written by JAR-

Marta Kauffman

David Crane

Jack Black

Albert Maysles

Iris Apfel

Bob Iger

RAD PAUL, 38, who has


been acting steadily
in smallish parts since
the 90s. The actor was
born Jarrad Paul Goldstein, and his late father
owned a deli in North
Miami, Florida. Paul
once said, tongue-incheek: I grew up in the
roughest Jewish suburban neighborhood you
best be watching your
back.
Iris is the last
documentary made
by ALBERT MAYSLES,
who died on March 5

at 88. Alone and with


his brother DAVID (who
died in 1987), he created
some great documentaries, including Gimme
Shelter and Grey
Gardens. Iris is about
fashion icon IRIS APFEL,
now 93. She and her late
husband, CARL APFEL,
long ran a high-end textile firm, and Iris gained
some fame as a consultant to White House
restoration projects.
But she became an icon
when a 2005 museum
exhibit highlighting her

style (especially the


clothes she has chosen
to wear) was a surprise
hit. While not really
covering Apfels Jewish
background, the film is a
fun and interesting look
at a long and well-lived
life.
In a previous
column, I accidentally omitted the
name of BOB IGER, 64,
the CEO of Disney, from
the list of Jews in the
Time Magazine list of
the 100 Most Influential
People. He is one of 16

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Jews on Times list. Also,


in the same column, I
made many errors in an
item on basketball the
first name of the
Sacramento Kings
player, OMRI CASSPI,
was misspelled; I said
that the number of
Jewish owners of NBA
teams had increased
with the purchase of the
Atlanta Hawks by a
group led by ANTONY
RESSLER well, the
previous majority of
owner of the Hawks,
BRUCE LEVENSON, 65,
is Jewish, too; and I
misspelled the first
name of Resslers wife,
actress JAMI GERTZ
(not Jamie).
However, a more serious error was made in
the last 10 days by a lot
of the Jewish community media but not
by this writer. Driven
by assumptions (Jewish-sounding names)
and the 24-hour news
cycle, many Jewish
media outlets reported
that Dan Fredinburg,
an important Google
executive who died in
a Mt. Everest avalanche
triggered by the Nepal
earthquake, was Jewish.
By all accounts he was a
talented mensch, and his
death is a tragedy, but
Mr. Fredinburg was not
Jewish. His last name
is of non-Jewish Dutch
N.B.
origin.

California-based Nate Bloom can be reached at


Middleoftheroad1@aol.com

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JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015 5

Local
Moms Day in motion
Kaplen JCC on the Palisades
sponsors 34th annual Rubin Run
ABIGAIL KLEIN LEICHMAN

atalya Michaels is forgoing breakfast in bed in Mothers Day.


Instead, she will go for a run
with her husband and sons
along with about 1,300 others from as far
away as Canada in the annual Rubin Run,
now in its 34th year at the Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades in Tenafly.
Its a nice family day, Ms. Michaels said.
I like running and its what Im choosing to
do on Mothers Day.
Im doing the 10k; my husband, Adam, is doing the half
marathon; and our secondgrader, Gregory, is doing the
5K, as he did last year. Gregory
is in the JCCs youth running
clinic on Monday afternoons.
Their younger son, Alex,
a pre-kindergartner at the
JCC, was to participate in the
Rubin Romp on the Friday
before the big race.
Physical fitness is a priority
for the Michaels family, and
indeed for the borough in which they live.
The Rubin Run is a healthy family event,
whether youre 4 years old or 84 years old,
and it promotes a healthy, active lifestyle,
said Tenaflys Mayor Peter Rustin, who will
start off the race, as hes done for the past
few years. Mr. Rustin said that the Rubin
Run meshes well with the fact that since
2012, the borough has participated in the
Mayors Wellness Campaign, an initiative
of the NJ Healthcare Quality Institute. We
encourage any activity that keeps people
moving, he said.

Even beyond the importance that the


Rubin Run/Walk through Tenafly, Englewood and Englewood Cliffs has to its participants, there is an added value that the
greater community gains from it. Proceeds
from this major fundraiser support the JCCs
more than 70 monthly life-skills, therapeutic, and vocational programs for people with
special needs.
Spending a few hours together as a family
on Mothers Day is a great way for parents to
serve as role models for their kids and teach

The Rubin Run is a


healthy family event,
whether youre 4 years
old or 84 years old,
and it promotes a
healthy, active lifestyle.

A father and two happy daughters waiting for their mother to cross the finish
line at the Rubin Run in Tenafly.

MAYOR PETER RUSTIN

them about the importance of health and


wellness, the JCCs chief executive officer,
Avi A. Lewinson, said. But it also provides
our entire community with a chance to help
the JCC fulfill one of its core missions to
provide social service and healthy lifestyle
programs for children, teens and adults with
special needs.
Its a great thing the JCC is doing, and
weve participated by sponsoring our
kids through the clinic and the class, Ms.
Michaels said. She takes part in the centers
early-morning adult running clinic, and Mr.

Far left,
a motherdaughter
post-race
Mothers
Day hug.
At left, two
runners along
the route.

6 JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015

Local

All mothers who cross the finish line win a rose. Here, a son
strikes a presentation pose.

And all mothers are to receive roses when


they cross the finish line.
The morning also features a free brunch,
a childrens carnival from 9 to 11, free babysitting from 7 to noon, and music. Runners
may take advantage of pre-race stretches
and warm-ups led by professional fitness
staff from the JCC.
We provide, with our varying races,
a goal people can reach for each year in
their physical fitness, said Kaplen JCC
Director of Health and Recreation Roberto

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Michaels is a member of the JCCs triathlon club.


When she asked her son Gregory what
the Rubin Run makes him think of, he
replied, Never quit; never stop trying,
his mother reported.
Hes learning perseverance, she said
proudly. He said he looks forward to
finishing.
Medals await runners under 10 who finish the race; trophies will be awarded to
the top three winners in each age category.

Tenaflys police chief, Robert Chamberlain, and its mayor,


Peter Rustin, are enthusiastic Rubin Run supporters.

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Santiago, who is doubling as Rubin Run


race director for the fifth year. They
can do the 5K or push to the 10k or half
marathon. But the biggest thing is bringing everyone together for a great start to
Mothers Day.
The JCC offers a 12-week prep course
for the Rubin Run, dubbed Couch to
5K, which teaches preparatory steps for
that race option. We also have running
clubs for people who want to push themselves further in distance or time, said Mr.

Santiago. This is only the third year the


Rubin Run is offering a half marathon, and
you see the difference in people who have
been training for that race. Its not a matter
of just signing up and running.
Co-chaired this year by Joseph Lerner
and Suzette Josif, the annual event is
named in memory of Leonard Rubin, a
past president and founder of the JCC on
the Palisades who established this community-wide athletic event to encourage
a healthful lifestyle. It has grown larger
over the years and always attracts cheering spectators along the route.
When I first started, there were about
600 participants, and we had 1,250 last
year, said Mr. Santiago, who will be setting up with the JCC crew beginning at 5 in
the morning. We get great support from
the Tenafly Police Department, he added.
The Jewish Standard is one of 11 lead
sponsors of the event.
Though online registration closed earlier this week, last-minute participants
may register at the JCC, at 411 E. Clinton
Ave. in Tenafly, on the morning of the race.
Packet pickup and registration for the half
marathon is from 6:45 to 7:15; for the 10K
from 7:30 to 8:15; and for the 5K from 8:30
to 9:45. There are more details at www.
jccotp.org/rubinrun.

Special Centennial Events!


A Century of Song

W E!
NENU
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Jewish Home Family

Directed by Marilyn Bell

Centennial Golf, Tennis


and Card Outing

SUNDAY MAY 17, 2015

MONDAY MAY 18, 2015

Jewish Home Residents


musical presentation
highlighting
American Theater Wings
Tony Award winning songs
Time: 2:00 PM
Location: Jewish Home at Rockleigh
10 Link Drive, Rockleigh, NJ 07647

Brunch,
Golf and Tennis Tournament,
Bridge, Canasta and
Mahjong games,
Cocktail Hour, Dinner,
Silent Auction and 50/50 raffle
Registration and Donation
required for this all day event
Location: Montammy Country Club
7 Montammy Drive, Alpine, NJ 07620
For further information
mshulman@jewishhomefdtn.org

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4/27/15
JEWISH STANDARD MAY
8, 11:07
2015AM7

Local

You know I believe and how!


Emerson shul sets the Friday night liturgy to the Beatles music
love of Yiddishkeit, and his overwhelming musicality he adores
Broadway and has played Tevya,
a role he cherishes, in theaters
across the country. About six
years ago, when his shul was
between rabbis Mark Kiel had
retired and Debra Orenstein had
not yet arrived he decided to
set an entire Shabbat service to
the melodies of Fiddler on the
Roof. Since then, at first alone
and then with Rabbi Orenstein,
he has set the music of Billy Joel,
Simon (or, for the evening, Shimon) and Garfunkel, Frank Sinatra, Louis Armstrong, and many
other musicians, Jewish or not,
to the words of the Friday night
liturgy. He also has used themes
football and baseball, for example. In a match that perhaps was
too easy, he used a song from
Spamalot You Wont Succeed on Broadway (if you dont
have any Jews).
Cantor Mandel has worked in
the other direction, fitting the
words to the music, as well. He
has led Adon Olam Shabbatot
aka the Cantors Challenge. You
can name any song you want
it can be an oldie, rock and roll,
folk, Broadway, anything and
I will sing Adon Olam to it, he
said.
As is well known in the Jewish
world, you can sing Adon Olam
to anything, he said. Why? Oh,
its the meter, he said vaguely.
But, he added, among the first
melodies he was invited to sing
were Oklahoma and Gee Officer Krupke from West Side
Story. They worked, he said.
Once he was stumped someone
sang Adon Olam to Walk Like
an Egyptian but he insists that
the failure happened not because
he did not recognize the tune
but because the tune was sung
unrecognizably.

There is a seriousness of purpose behind this, Rabbi Orenstein said. Not only do such
casual Shabbats, as they are
called, draw in people who otherwise tend to stay away, they
also provides her with teaching opportunities. Often, Adon
Olam, the very last song of the
service, is a sign that the Kiddush is coming, she said. In fact,
the hymn has a deep and beautiful meaning; Cantor Mandels
singing it over and over gave
people the chance to focus on
the words.
This Friday will not be the first
time that Cantor Mandel has led
Beatles Shabbat. The first time,
Ken Dashow, the WAXQ disk
jockey who specializes in classic
rock and also a Stuyvesant High
School classmate of Cantor Mandels talked a bit about each
Beatles song and its relationship

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Financial assistance for: cleaning services, home health aid services,


transportation, medical, dental and emergency assistance.

Caf Europa: monthly social gatherings offering lunch and


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Second Generation support group meetings for children of


Holocaust Survivors.

JOANNE PALMER

he Sabbath Queen, the


Shechina, the female
emanation of God,
a vision of sublime,
radiant beauty, is said to live with
us from the time Shabbat begins
until we say goodbye to her at
Havdalah, when we mark its end.
Many people see this as metaphor; others might understand
it as a more literal truth. Either
way, that image is part of our Friday night liturgy. That is why we
bow toward the door as we welcome the queen in.
So how about putting Lecha
Dodi, the song we sing as she
enters our sanctuaries (define
that as you will), to the Beatles
song Something?
You know the song.
Something in the way she
moves/Attracts me like no other
lover.
Some in the way she woos
me.
I dont want to leave her now/
You know I believe and how.
Okay, so its not exact. That last
instrumental line in each verse as
the Beatles sing it dah dah dah
dah DAH DAH! needs words if
Lecha Dodi is to work. But once
you do that it flows.
Its a love song; something a
lover sings to a beloved, and a
Jew sings to the Shabbat haMalkah. On Friday night, Cantor
Lenny Mandel will sing it along
with his congregation during
Kabbalat Shabbat at Congregation Bnai Israel. It will be Beatles
Shabbat in Emerson.
Cantor Mandel is also a rabbi
we are choosing to call him
Cantor Mandel here because it
is both accurate and relevant to
this story. He became a cantor
almost accidentally a result
of his Orthodox upbringing, his

The Beatles arrive in New York for their first American tour on February 7, 1969. From left, John
Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr.
to the prayer set to it. It was
intense, Cantor Mandel said.
People came to shul dressed in
jeans and tie dies, and they had
their hair in headbands and do
rags.
I know that do rags were
the wrong period, he added
quickly. But we had kids there
in shorts and tie-die shirts, asking questions.
Take Something, for example. The song is all about a
woman. In Lecha Dodi, the first
two and the last two stanzas are
about the Sabbath Queen, about
keeping Shabbat, and the ones
in the middle are about redemption. Thats what the Shechina
is all about. The last two lines
of Something are Dont want
to leave her now/ You know I
believe, and how.
Next year, Cantor Mandel
hopes for a casual Shabbat that

he will call Peter, Paul, and


Lenny; he hopes that Peter Yarrow, who is Jewish, will be able to
join him on the bimah.
Casual Shabbatot are a reflection of who Cantor Mandel is,
Rabbi Orenstein said. His love of
music and his sense of fun come
through.
I also think that the Shabbatot are effective because when
ritual innovation is effective, it
causes people to look at the liturgy anew, and to consider the
juxtaposition between the familiar words and the familiar music.
It leads to beautiful new ways of
relating to it.
She remembered other casual
Shabbatot. We always try to do
something warm in the winter,
she said. One year it was Beach
Boys songs. The next year, it was
about the Jews of Curacao.
The two also have led Camp

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Local

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Cantor Lenny Mandel


Shabbat. Its under the stars, Rabbi Orenstein said.
Because an outdoor service must be during the summer, when it almost always is warm enough, Shabbat
starts late, and Rabbi Orenstein and Cantor Mandel
take advantage of that by lighting a big fire in a firepit
before dark, and then singing camp songs, the rousing
ones and the dreamy ones, too. My drash is about
how Shabbat is like camp, she said; iPhoneless, but in
a good way. For six weeks, theyll go to a place with
no iPhones, because its being in nature, with friends,
developing relationships, being on your own organic
time. Thats camp and its also Shabbes.
Sometimes Rabbi Orenstein and Cantor Mandel
offer Shabbatot that focus on a theme but are not particularly casual in fact, they often are emotionally
intense. The Shabbat before Thanksgiving is Gratitude Shabbat, Rabbi Orenstein said. We used the
melody for Tis a Gift to Be Simple, and we used some
contemporary music about gratitude.
For five years, we have done Freedom Shabbat, on
Martin Luther King day, to mark both King and Rabbi
Heschel. (The yarzheit of the influential Jewish theologian Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel usually falls right
around MLK Day. Lenny sets the words to Negro spirituals, and I have created a lot of readings, using mainly
their words.
She is even thinking about an Emerson Shabbat, as
in Ralph Waldo Emerson, the Transcendentalist poet
and essayist, even though our town wasnt named
after him, Rabbi Orenstein said. We would invite the
town council people, and consider what did Emerson
teach us that we could apply to Shabbat.
To go back to the words of the liturgy Cantor Mandel has chosen to set the words of the Shema, the
foundational prayer that binds Jews to God, to The
long and winding road that leads to your door/Will
never disappear.
Ive seen that road before. It always leads me here.
To your door!
What: Cantor Lenny Mandel and Rabbi Debra
Orenstein present Beatles Shabbat
Where: At Congregation Bnai Israel,
53 Palisade Ave., Emerson
When: On Friday, May 8, at 7:30
For more information: Call the shul at
(201) 265-2272 or email office@bisrael.com

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JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015 9

Local

At Federation Apartments,
ex-Soviet seniors pray
with Fair Lawn friends
LARRY YUDELSON

Vladamir Neplodnik, a resident


of Patersons Federation
Apartments (inset above),
in the buildings synagogue.

10 JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015

very other Shabbat,


Jerry Schranz crosses
the Passaic River to
keep the final echo of
Patersons once-storied Jewish
community alive.
Its a one and three quarters
mile walk from his Fair Lawn
home to East 27th Street, in
what 50 years ago was the center of Patersons Jewish life. East
27th Street was the sensible
place for the Jewish Federation
of North Jersey to build housing
for seniors: It was three blocks
away from Barnert Temple and
half a mile from the Barnet
Hospital both named for the
Jewish industrialist and philanthropist who was Patersons
mayor from 1889 to 1890. And
it was across the street from the
Yavneh Academy, Patersons
Jewish day school.
Today, Barner t Temple,
founded in 1847, is an empty
shell; the Reform congregation moved elsewhere in Paterson in 1964 before decamping
to Franklin Lakes in the 1980s.
Yavneh moved to Paramus in
1981; the building is now home
to the Rosa Parks High School of
Performing Arts.
The Federation Apartments,
however, continues to be home
to dozens of elderly Jews. Sandy
Eckstein, the buildings director, estimates that 40 percent
of the 158 residents are Jewish.
All but a handful of the tenants
are subsidized by federal Section 8 vouchers; they must be

at least 62 years old, and they


must qualify as low income. The
Jews in the building are from a
different generation than those
who moved in when the building opened in 1972; rather than
coming from Paterson, all but
eight of them were born in the
former Soviet Union. This is
because of Patersons proximity
to Fair Lawn, which became the
center for North Jerseys resettlement of Soviet Jews beginning in
the 1970s. It is not an assisted living facility there is no nurse on
staff but many residents are in
their 90s, and they have aides to
help them with some daily tasks.
Signs in the building are in
three languages English,
Spanish, and Russian. And in
the basement synagogue, across
from the boiler room, Russianlanguage prayer books fill the
shelves, and a Russian-labeled
map of Israel is affixed to a pillar.
Russians are not known to be
the most ardent of synagoguegoers; generations of official
Soviet atheism took its toll. Yet
there is a hardcore group of
seniors in the Federation Apartments who attend services. Most
of the half dozen are from the
former Soviet Union. They are
dependent on a small contingent
of outsiders from Fair Lawn, like
Mr. Schranz, to help make the
minyan, and on paid Torah readers. These days, the minyan has
a reader twice a month, so that
is how often it meets.
The seniors who attend the
minyan are enthusiastic as they
SEE PATERSON PAGE 12

Sarita
SCHERER
GROSS

Eleanor

Rachel

EPSTEIN

ADLER

Jewish Federation

OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY

Womens Philanthropy

TUE S DAY, MAY 1 2 , 2015

2015 Annual Spring Luncheon


Speaker
Carol Leifer

Comedian, Writer,
Producer and Actress

Tuesday, May 12
Rockleigh Country Club, Rockleigh, NJ

Orchid Sponsor

Lily Sponsor

ARTISTIC TILE
Geri Cantor
Jill Maschler
Paula Shaiman
Spring Luncheon Co-Chairs

Rena Klosk
Carol Newman
Womens Philanthropy Co-Presidents

Register online at www.jfnnj.org/springluncheon or for more information call 201-820-3953.


Minimum gift to attend, a dollar a day ($365) to help support Federations mission to take care of people in need locally, in Israel
and around the world, while supporting a strong, vibrant, connected Jewish community for today and future generations.
For first time contributors, 50 cents a day ($180) welcomes you to this event.
If you have already made your gift to Federation this year, please join us for the cost of lunch. Cover charge of $90 for lunch is in
addition to your Campaign gift (price of lunch reflects our actual cost). Dietary laws observed.
JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015 11

Local

Isak and Roza Meryam, left;


Charles Lehmann, above.
Below, Sandy Eckstein, the
buildings director, talks
with Ruben Udem, another
minyan regular.

Vladamir Neplodnik looks at the Torah scroll on loan from


Anshei Lubavitch while the minyans scrolls are being repaired.

Paterson
FROM PAGE 10

show a visitor their synagogue.


I like this synagogue, Vladamir Neplodnik said. He came to
the Federation Apartments from
New York. Before that he lived
in Moscow; he was born in the
northern Caucasus.
I like all synagogues, he adds.
In general, expenses for the
synagogue in particular, hiring the Torah reader are split
between the Federation Apartments and the synagogues own
account. The synagogue charges
membership for High Holy Day
services, when there is a larger
turnout. Dues are $10. Members
also contribute $10 for Yizkor.
The synagogues electricity and
heat are part of the general building expenses; the buildings custodian turns out the lights after
services and disposes of the garbage from the kiddush.
Isak Meryam is in charge of the
minyan in the Apartments. On
Fridays, hell call to make sure
people are coming. He opens up
the synagogue on Shabbat mornings at 8 a.m., an hour before services begins. He leads the beginning of the service. He sets up the
table where a kiddush of herring

and shnapps will be served after


services. And finally, he cleans
up.
Mr. Meryam speaks pretty
good English it is one of his
five languages. He is from Latvia. He was wounded in the Latvian army, where he met Roza, a
nurse he soon married. That was
63 years ago. Baruch Hashem,
she is looking very nice, he says.
Roza is one of the two women
who attend services regularly.
(Holidays bring more women to
the womens section.)
Charles Lehmann is the one
American-born resident who is
a minyan regular. He grew up
in New York City and lived in a
number of places before moving to New Jersey in 1990. He has
been in the Federation Apartments for a little over three years.
And in that time, Ive been here
for every service, he said.
Before this, he was not a regular synagogue-goer.
One of the reasons I moved
into the building was to try to
get some religious education,
he said. Growing up I was not
raised religious. My parents were
of two different religions.
Mr. Schranz originally was
recruited for the Apartments
minyan by a member of his

12 JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015

softball team. I didnt know


where Paterson was, Mr.
Schranz recalled. It was about a
45 minute walk for me.
He became a regular.
Everybody gets involved.
Thats the essence of the shul,
he said.
A fellow Fair Lawn resident,
Sam Heller, coordinates the
minyan, arranging for the Torah
reader and making sure that
enough men will arrive to make
a minyan. (The synagogue is
Orthodox, as are most of the outsiders who attend.)
Now, though, four decades of
low-budget no-rabbi synagogue
maintenance have caught up
with the synagogue.
We were worried the Torah
was going to fall apart in our
hands, Mr. Schranz said. The
Yavneh Academy donated the
two Torah scrolls in the late 70s.
Now, the seams were coming
unsewn, the handles were falling
apart, and letters were fading.
Even the belt holding the scrolls
was going slack.
It was time for repairs.
In the spirit of the minyan, Mr.
Schranz jumped in and found a
scribe in Fair Lawn who could
make the necessary repairs.
The expec ted price tag:
$3,600.
Ms. Eckstein said the building
would put up the money. The
Torah scrolls were given to the
scribe. Anshei Lubavitch in Fair
Lawn lent a Torah for the minyan
to use in the meantime.
Mr. Schranz, though, would
like the broader community to

contribute to the repair project.


He sees his call to support the
minyan as a way of connecting
people scattered by the Paterson
diaspora the Jews of Fair Lawn
and Wayne and Franklin Lakes
and elsewhere who left Paterson,
or whose parents left Paterson.
He also looked into the history
of the two Torah scrolls. One
was donated by the Sussman
family in 1953. He tracked down
the 99-year-old daughter of the
donor, and discovered that her
grandson, Chaim Sussman the
donors great grandson teaches
at Yavneh.

Beyond the Torah repair,


Mr. Schranz would love to have
money to buy new prayer books.
I think the chairs could probably need an upgrade, he said.
You have elderly people sitting
on chairs without armrests.

How to help
For more information
and to find out whether the
minyan is meeting on any
particular Shabbat you can
go to patersonshul.com or
email JerrySchranz@gmail.
com.

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JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015 13

Local

Teaneck lecture features noted composer, visual artist


Steve Reich and Beryl Korot will discuss Jewish influences on their work
LOIS GOLDRICH

lan Marans, the music and video


specialist at the Solomon Schechter Day School of Bergen County
is New Milford, is eagerly anticipating the tenth annual Alfred and Rose
Buchman Endowed Lecture in the Visual
Arts, a project of Teanecks Congregation
Beth Sholom.
Chaired by Joan and Reuben Baron, the
program, he said, will feature quite an
important person.
That is no exaggeration.
Musician Steve Reich, who will visit
the congregation on May 11, together
with his wife and frequent collaborator,
Beryl Korot, is widely recognized as one
of Americas greatest and most influential living composer.
At the Teaneck program A Theater
of Ideas: Exploring the Life and Legacy of
Abraham through Video, Music, and the
Spoken Word Mr. Reich and Ms. Korot,
a pioneer in the field of video art, will
describe their joint work in an innovative art form, documentary video opera.
Using excerpts from The Cave, a
piece centering on the biblical Cave of
Machpelah, the couple will participate in
a conversation on their working methods
and discuss how Jewish life and teachings
have influenced their work.
Mr. Marans, who grew up in Ridgewood and studied music composition at
Columbia University, said the recognition
of Mr. Reich as a groundbreaking composer is unusual because many composers are recognized for their contributions
only after their death. Mr. Reich is very
much alive and still hard at work.
Pointing to the composers many
accomplishments, Mr. Marans noted
that Mr. Reich was a pioneer of minimalism, which started in the 1960s and
70s. Breaking with the tradition embodied by such composers as Bach, Mozart,
and Beethoven who based their music
on the idea of a melody, and people harmonizing with that melody Mr. Reich
chose a different path, following in the
footsteps of Austrian composer Arnold
Schoenberg.
Contemporary classical music does not
necessarily provide an easy listening
What: A Theater of Ideas: Exploring the Life and Legacy of Abraham
through Video, Music, and the Spoken
Word A Conversation with Steve
Reich and Beryl Korot.
When: Monday, May 11, 7:30 p.m.
Where: Congregation Beth Sholom,
354 Maitland Ave., Teaneck
Cost: Free and open to the public; no
RSVP required
14 JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015

Beryl Korot and Steve Reich will speak at Congregation Beth Sholom in Teaneck
on their collaborations as musical and visual artists.

experience, Mr. Marans said, adding that


while the old forms are still available, if
youre doing that, youre not as original as you can be. People are constantly
adapting and changing things.
For example, after learning music theory and harmony, Schoenberg began to
radicalize his understanding, creating
serialism, or patterns of melodies and
rhythms in a self-contained series, Mr.
Marans said. Toying with Schoenbergs
idea, Mr. Reich, who studied philosophy as an undergraduate and eventually
moved on to study composition at Mills
College, also started to rethink how we
envision composition.
Becoming involved in the minimalist
movement, working with people such as
Terry Riley in the experimental San Francisco Tape Music Center, he got into
this music, based on repeating patterns,
Mr. Marans said. His thing was loops,
repeated over and over again. Mr. Reich
also became interested in phasing patterns, or repeating patterns that slowly
break apart and are overlaid by the same
pattern in a different key. Its more rhythmically based.
In the 1980s, while still using phasing
ideas and tape loops, Mr. Reich began
to integrate recorded interviews into
his music. His work Different Trains
based on two sets of interviews won
a Grammy. In addition, having reconnected with his Jewish roots, learning not
only text but also cantillation, the composer began to integrate those elements
into his music as well.
Conceptually, Jewish music revolves
around the idea that the artist is putting

his Jewish self into his music, Mr. Marans


said. Different Trains, for example,
incorporates Holocaust music. But it is
not sad; instead, it tells a story, juxtaposing the composers own experience traveling on trains when he was young with

His [Jewish]
literacy enables
him to do so
much more to
instill his Jewish
values into
his music.
ILAN MARANS

the use of trains during the Holocaust.


The three-movement piece includes
material from interviews with survivors
as well as with people Mr. Reich knew
from his own childhood. The music representing his childhood experience is
calmer, Mr. Marans said, while the eastern European segment is more dissonant, or siren-like.
When he listened to the voices of
those he interviewed, Reich attempted
to re-create melodies from what they
were saying, Mr. Marans said. He
was writing conversations in musical
notation.
His video work began when he met
Ms. Korot, a visual artist. Together they

embarked on a new collaborative journey


producing video operas.
For The Cave, Reich interviewed
Christians, Jews, and Arabs about Machpelah. As he was recording those interviews, he wrote down melodies.
This is not just music, Mr. Marans
said. It goes beyond the need to make
music.
While Mr. Reichs Jewish identity was
not yet fully awakened when he composed his earlier works, today he is a
shomer Shabbat Jew. His piece Tehillim,
created in 1981, is arguably the first one
in which he draws extensively from his
Jewish background. A later piece, Daniel, composed in memory of the murdered Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel
Pearl, was based on verses from the Book
of Daniel.
His [ Jewish] literacy enables him to
do so much more to instill his Jewish values into his music, Mr. Marans said. He
is the first person to have gotten to this
point a proud, learned religious Jew
who is using that to create his music.
In an article written for Mr. Reichs
70th birthday, Rabbi Ephraim Buchwald,
director of the National Jewish Outreach
Program, recalled his close relationship
with the musician.
Noting that the Village Voice called
Mr. Reich Americas greatest living composer, the New Yorker opined that he is
the most original musical thinker of our
time, and the New York Times anointed
him as among the greatest composers
of the century, Rabbi Buchwald said
that in 2006 the composer was awarded
the Praemium Imperiale Award in Music,
the equivalent of the Nobel Prize, presented in areas of the arts not covered by
the Nobel awards.
Rabbi Buchwald first met Mr. Reich in
1974, when the composer and his then
girlfriend Beryl Korot walked into the
Bible class the rabbi was teaching at New
Yorks Lincoln Square Synagogue.
Steve took his Jewish studies seriously, Rabbi Buchwald said. He decided
that he needed to learn and try to master
Biblical Hebrew. We teamed him up with
Rabbi Dr. J. Mitchell Orlian of Yeshiva
University, who became his mentor and
taught him advanced Hebrew grammar
and [cantillation.] Only later did Rabbi
Buchwald realize that Mr. Reich had
decided to include Jewish themes in his
music.
Rabbi Buchwald also credits Mr. Reich
with inspiring Shabbat beginners service at Lincoln Square. It was Steve and
Beryl who suggested to me in the fall of
1975 that they could benefit from a special Shabbat service specifically designed
for those with little or no synagogue

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background, he wrote.
In December 1975, Lincoln Square Synagogue
launched its first beginners service. Today, Rabbi
Buchwald said, there are between two and three
hundred Shabbat beginners services that are conducted on a regular or semi-regular basis throughout
the U.S. and Canada.
Andrew Silow-Carroll, a CBS member and editorin-chief of the Essex County-based New Jersey Jewish
News, will moderate the May 11 conversation with
Reich and Korot.
He described the Buchman lectures as a series
that brings in people who are tops in their field [and]
say really interesting stuff about Jewishness and their
art, noting that after Philip Glass, Reich is the best
known American composer.
Mr. Silow-Carroll said The Cave tries to reflect
the cacophony of voices surrounding Machpelah.
The composer shows in musical and visual form
that these voices are clashing yet partially in harmony. Using actual tape loops of peoples voices,
he hears a melody in how we speak and composes
around that.
Reflecting on the similarities of Mr. Reichs music
to the sounds of a synagogue, Mr. Silow-Carroll noted
that in a roomful of people who are praying, sometimes theyre all on the same melody. [But] some are
chanting, some have better voices, some are faster.
You hear all those multiple voices.
He added that after experiencing Mr. Reichs performances, I started thinking in a new way about
the prayers and Torah [portions] that you read or
chant by rote. After listening to Mr. Reich, you
bring back some of his rhythms in your head when
you go back to what you do. A good visual artist can
make you visualize. As a musician, he makes you
hear things.
Its like listening to a really good cantor with a
fresh melody, who makes you understand the text
in a new way. Hes a serious Jew he wants to pull
people into the tradition. But you dont have to be
Jewish or know Hebrew traditions to appreciate his
work.
Since The Cave represents collaboration
between Mr. Reich and Ms. Korot, who are partners in this, some of Mr. Silow-Carrolls questions
to them will be about their working relationship.
He also plans to ask such questions as what art
brings to an understanding of the narrative. Audience members also will have the chance to ask
questions.
JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015 15

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NJERSEY

Local middle-schoolers compete


during Bible contest in Israel

Gi

NEXT RUN

ust back from two weeks in Israel


as a contestant in the International
Youth Bible Quiz, Teaneck eighthgrader Tehila Kornwasser offered
encouraging words to contestants at the
56th annual National Bible Quiz last Sunday
at Manhattan Day School.
It was here, last year, that Tehila captured first place in the famously difficult
contests middle-school division as a seventh-grader at the Rosenbaum Yeshiva of
North Jersey in River Edge. She qualified
for a free trip to Israel, culminating with the
international round in Jerusalem on Israel
Independence Day.
Based on their scores on preliminary written tests administered during the two weeks before the trip, she
and Shalva Eisenberg of Passaic placed
_________________________
among the 16 finalists in the nationally
broadcast competition, which Shalvas
brother Yishai won in 2013.
Another Passaic resident, YBH of Passaic
seventh-grader Avi Rybak, took first prize in
the national middle-school division and will
have a chance to ply his knowledge at the
internationals in Israel next May.
Avi was among a larger group coached
for the Bible quiz by Reuven (Ruby) Stepansky of Passaic on Sundays at Congregation Adas Israel of Passaic-Clifton.
That was the synagogue led by Avis
grandfather, Rabbi Solomon Rybak. Mr.
Stepansky has primed several national
winners in the past few years, including
Tehila and the Eisenberg siblings.
Rabbi Rybak learns Talmud with Avi
after school but left the Bible coaching to

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16 JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015

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Mr. Stepansky, whom he called wonderful in his rapport with the students and the
preparation he does to tutor them. He said
his grandson achieved a perfect score in the
regional round. Avi put in the required
effort. His whole family is very proud of
him, but its the result of very hard work.
National finalists in both the English and
Hebrew divisions had to be thoroughly
familiar with select chapters from Exodus
as well as the entire books of Samuel 1,
Jonah, and Esther. Middle-school students
taking the quiz in Hebrew also had to know
commentaries of Rashi in certain chapters
of Exodus, while high-school contestants
in the Hebrew division were responsible as
well for the books of prophets Joel, Ovadia,
Jonah, Chaggai, and Malachi.
Two brothers from Teaneck, Shlomi and
Ephraim Helfgot, placed third in the highschool and middle-school divisions, respectively. Ephraim, a seventh-grader at Yavneh
Academy in Paramus, shared that spot with
RYNJ student Esther Guelfguat and Yeshivat
Noam student Uriel Simpson.
Shlomi and Ephraims father, Rabbi
Nathaniel Helfgot, spiritual leader of
Teanecks Congregation Netivot Shalom,
learned Psalm 127 with parents of contestants while their children were taking the written part of the quiz. Rabbi
Helfgot said that Shlomi, a Torah Academy freshman, participated in weekly
study sessions via Skype with Rabbi Neil
Winkler, a longtime Chidon coach at the
Moriah School of Englewood who now
lives in Israel. He also worked with one
of his teachers at Yavneh, Karen Kedmi.
Tehila, who will join Shalva at Bruriah
High School in Elizabeth next year, said

Local

Dont forget to vote.


See page 40.

YBH of Passaic student Avi Rybak with Bible


Contest coordinator Rabbi Ezra Frazer and Lerone
Edalati, project manager at the Jewish Agency.

that the highlight of her time in Israel was touring the


country and meeting Israeli dignitaries in the company of 83 Jewish kids from 33 countries who share
her interest in biblical texts.
I got to be really close friends with a lot of them,
she said. Over the course of the two-week free tour she
roomed with girls from Mexico, Holland, Canada, and
Australia. She studied with Shalva and with girls from
Canada and Australia.

We were nervous
for ourselves and
everyone else,
because we were not
just competitors but
friends.

WOMEN ARE GOING PLACES

With love and pride we salute our graduating seniors on the unique
individuals they have become. Their achievements are represented by
the array of Yeshivot and colleges to which they have been accepted.

TEHILA KORNWASSER

It was great to ask each other questions and discuss


Tanach, the Hebrew acronym for the Five Books of
Moses, Prophets and Writings, she said.
As for her appearance onstage, It was very nervewracking but one of the most amazing experiences in
my life, Tehila said. We were nervous for ourselves
and everyone else, because we were not just competitors but friends. We were all singing together before
going on stage.
Tehilas parents, grandparents, and aunt flew to
Israel for the Bible Quiz, in which she provided the
correct answer to a two-part question on Ezekiel.
Though her cumulative score still wasnt high enough
to allow her to advance to the finals, she feels like a
winner for having made the top 16 four from Israel,
three each from Canada, the United States, and Mexico, and one each from South Africa, Panama, and
Belarus.
Anything is possible if you put your mind to it. I
tried really hard and it worked, she said. Learning
Tanach lets you understand the differences between
the prophets and their time periods, their tone of
voice and attitudes on destruction and forgiveness.
This is our history, and to study it in Israel, where it
all happened, is the most amazing thing.

Ma'ayanot Yeshiva High School for Girls


1650 Palisade Ave. Teaneck, NJ 07666 | Tel: 201-833-4307 | www.maayanot.org
JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015 17

Local

Dignitaries applaud the raising of the Israeli flag during a ceremony at


the Bergen County Executive Building.

Melvin and Lillian Solomon

Rabbi Ely Allen

Moshe and Susan Castiel

Walter Ramsfeld

BCHJS to honor six at May 28 gala


Students from the choir at Gerrard Berman Day School get ready to
sing at last months Israeli flag-raising ceremony.

Bergen County celebrates


first annual Israeli flag-raising
Guests at the flag-raising included the
deputy consul-general of Israels consulate in New York, Amir Sagie; Assemblyman Tim Eustace; County Executive Jim
Tedesco; Freeholder Chairwoman Joan
Voss; Freeholders David Ganz, Maura
DeNicola, Tom Sullivan, and Tracy Silna
Zur; Sheriff Michael Saudino; representatives from Congressman Bill Pascrells
office; Dr. Zvi Marans and Steve Rogers
of the Jewish Federation of Northern
New Jersey, who helped organize the
event, and Rabbis Shalom Baum of the
Congregation Keter Torah in Teaneck
and David-Seth Kirshner of Temple
Emanu-El in Closter.

The flag of Israel flutters outside


the Bergen County Executive
Building.

Program aims to help siblings


of children with special needs
Ohel Sibshops is coming to Clifton-Passaic on Sundays, May 10 and June 14, at
11 a.m. It is partnering with Jewish Family Service of Great Clifton-Passaic to
offer fun, support, and inspiration for
siblings of people with developmental
disabilities.
Sibshops features activities in an
accepting, nonjudgmental environment.
It offers a place where children can have
questions answered and learn more
about their siblings, different disabilities,

18 JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015

and what the future might hold.


The Passaic-Clifton sibshops group
will be led by facilitators from OHEL and
JFS, trained by Don Meyer, the creator of
the Sibshops model.
JFS of Clifton Passaic is at 925 Allwood Road, second floor, in Clifton. For
information, call Leah Elyakin, OHEL
NJ Sibshop coordinator, (862) 686-7205
or Suzanne Miller, director, Parent
Resource Center, at (973) 777-7638 or
email njsibshops@ohelfamily.org.

The Bergen County High School of Jewish Studies, Bergen Countys only weekly
Hebrew high school, will hold its annual
gala on Thursday, May 28, at the Fair
Lawn Jewish Center/CBI. This years honorees are Lillian and Melvin Solomon of
River Edge and Susan and Moshe Castiel
of Woodcliff Lake. Walter Ramsfeld will
receive a Distinguished Service award and
special recognition will be given to Rabbi
Ely Allen.
Mel Solomon, BCHSJS immediate past
president, is the president of Congregation
Beth Tefillah in Paramus. He also chaired
the board of the Jewish Educational Services Committee of the Jewish Federation
of Northern New Jersey. Lillian Solomon is
past president of Womans American ORT
and an active member of Hadassah. She
volunteers with the Adler Aphasia Center.
Susan and Moshe Castiel, BCHSJS Parents of the Year, have two children: Alexandra, a senior at BCHSHJS and Pascack
Hills High School, who also was part of the
second JFNNJ Partnership2Gether/BCHSJS

Young Leadership program, and Simon,


15, a freshman at both schools. The Castiels have hosted events at their home to
promote the school.
Rabbi Ely Allen of Bergenfield, a BCHSJS
former faculty member and a co-founding board member, will also be honored.
Rabbi Allen, director of Hillel of Northern
New Jersey for JFNNJ at four local colleges,
teaches at Yeshiva University and is rabbi
emeritus at Shaarei Orah, the Sephardic
Congregation of Teaneck.
Walter Ramsfeld of Teaneck, who is a
founding board member of BCHJS, served
as its board president several times during the past 40 years; he retired from the
board just last year. His daughter Miriam
was among the schools first graduates
and his granddaughter graduated from the
school in 2013. Walter and his wife, Ruth,
are members of Congregation Bnai Yeshurun in Teaneck.
To buy tickets or place an ad in the
online journal, go to www.bchsjsdinner.
org.

Rabbi/cantor from Israel visiting Fort Lee


educator with his musical talThe Sephardic Congregation of Fort Lee welcomes
ent and love for Sephardic
Rabbi Haim Louk, a rabbi
poetry and liturgy. He has produced scores of audio recordand cantor from Israel, to its
ings of authentic Moroccan
congregation.
Jewish liturgy and is internaRabbi Louk will lead daily
tionally recognized as a virservices at 7 a.m. and 7 p.m.
tuoso of classical Andalusian
and will teach an adult class
music. He has performed reciton Moroccan Jewish liturgy
Rabbi Haim Louk
als in Morocco, Israel, Spain,
on Mondays at 8 p.m.
France, Belgium, Canada,
Rabbi Louk was born in
Poland, and the United States.
Casablanca, Morocco, and made aliyah
For more information, call Sale Benito Israel in 1964. He combines his teaching in rabbinical texts and his work as an
chou at (917) 560-5052.

21

, 2015

sh Fe
dera
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OF
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NEW
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Federation Full House


May 21, 2015
The Alpine Country Club
80 Anderson Avenue, Demarest
Dinner and Cocktails at 6:30 pm
Tournament at 7:30 pm
A fabulous poker tournament and event for
professionals and philanthropists in support
of Northern New Jerseys Jewish Community
Vegas style Texas Hold Em | Live and Silent Auction
Sensational Dinner Fare, Scotch and Stogies | Mentalist, Oz Pearlman
To make a reservation please go to www.jfnnj.org/fullhouse
TABLE SPONSORS
Citi
Jones Day
Lowenstein Sandler
Paul Hastings
RBC Capital Markets
Wells Fargo

GRAND PRIZE
$10,000 Luxury Mens Watch
SECOND PRIZE
$2,500 Amazon Gift Card
THIRD PRIZE
60 TV

PLAYER SPONSOR
Deutsche Bank
CLASSIC SPONSORS
Barclays
BMW of Tenafly
Coldwell Banker, the Kolsky Team
Englewood Hospital and Medical Center

Jewish Federation

OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY

, 2015
21

Jewis
h

OF
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NEW
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NO
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, 2015

Fede
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21

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Jewis
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21
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, 2015

OF
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Jewis
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NEW
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TION FU

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DE

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Chairs
Daniel Herz
Jason Schwartz
Steve Rogers
Committee
Jared Bluestein
Clive Gershon
Michael Gutter
Eric Kanefsky

Erik Maschler
William Rose
Barry Slivka
David Smith

For more information, please contact Beth Jenis, 201-820-3911


JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015 19

FE

DE

Local
Emunah spring luncheon
honors empowered women

Ellis Island event to feature


Grammy Award-winning violinist

Emunah, which evolved


of Sangha Yoga Shala;
through the efforts of a few
child and adolescent psyvisionary women in Israel
chiatrist Dr. Joyce Weg
in 1935, will pay tribute to
Rydzinski; Lisa Septimus,
Empowering Women at its
yoetzet halacha for the
May 19 spring luncheon at the
Five Towns and ManhatPrince George Ballroom in
tan communities and rebManhattan. Among this years
bitzen of the Young Israel
honorees is Dr. Micole Tuchof North Woodmere; and
Dr. Micole Tuchman
man, a dermatologist from
speech-language patholoEnglewood.
gist Susan T. Weg, all will
Sora Grunstein and Tova Gerson, both
be honored at the luncheon.
of Bergen County, are chairing the lunEmunah has been instrumental in procheon, and Cheryl Borenstein, Shaindy
tecting womens rights in Israel, operatBrothman, Ronnie Faber, Amy Gibber,
ing programs for women in business,
Felicia Hoenig, Lisa Schechter, and Debleadership lectures, and networking
bie Siegler are local committee memopportunities. Its 250 social welfare and
bers. Proceeds will support Emunahs
educational programs in Israel strive to
four award-winning girls high schools
improve the lives of children, families,
and its college for young women in
and senior citizens. The organization
Israel.
received the Israel Prize for its social,
Miriam Wallach, general manager of
educational, humanitarian, and cultural
the Nachum Segal Network and host of
contribution to Israeli society.
radio program Thats Life, will be the
For information, call (212) 564-9045,
keynote speaker.
ext. 315, or register online at emunah.
Alana Kessler, founder/owner/director
org/springluncheon.

Miri Ben-Ari, a Grammy Award-winning


violinist, will be among the 90 honorees
to receive the Ellis Island Medal of Honor
from the National Ethnic Coalition of Organizations on Saturday, May 9. The 29th
annual ceremony will be held on Ellis
Island at 6:30 p.m., followed by a gala dinner in the historic Great Hall.
The Israeli-born Ben-Ari, a violinist, producer, and humanitarian, has lived in Edgewater for six years. A classically trained
violinist, she studied under Isaac Stern.
She also is the founder/CEO of Gedenk,
a not-for-profit organization dedicated
to promoting tolerance to youth through
creative campaigns and raising awareness
about racism and anti-Semitism.
In 2011, she was honored at a White
House ceremony and in 2012 she was
invited to perform for President Barack
Obama. She received the first Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr. Israeli award from Israeli
President Shimon Peres and the first 2015
Girl Up Advocate award from the United
Nations Foundation.
I am humbled and honored to be recognized among such a distinguished group
of people who have shaped and influenced the lives of many. As a U.S. citizen
who grew up in Israel, it has helped me to
understand the importance of being true
to ones own ethical and religious heritage
and promoting tolerance, she said.
The Ellis Island Medals of Honor
embody the spirit of America in their

Straus named chairman


of Yeshiva trustees board
Yeshiva Universitys board of trustees has elected Moshael J.
Straus, 70YUHS, 74YC, of Englewood as its next chairman.
Mr. Straus, an accomplished investment executive, will begin
his term on July 1. He succeeds Dr. Henry Kressel, who joined
the board in 2005 and has been its chairman since 2009.

Miri Ben-Ari

celebration of patriotism, tolerance, brotherhood, and diversity. NECO remains dedicated to the maintenance and restoration
of Ellis Island, Americas greatest symbol
of its immigrant history. Since the medals
founding in 1986, it has honored distinguished and diverse Americans including
six U.S. presidents and Nobel Prize recipient Elie Wiesel.
The Ellis Island Medal of Honor ranks
among the nations most prestigious
awards.

Moshael J. Straus

Israeli soldier speaks in New Milford

Front row, from left, Karen Goldman, Jill Tekel, Ruth Grossberg, and Yvette
Tekel. Back row, Stephanie Bonder, Ruth Cole, and Yoram Weiss, at the April
19 Big Gifts Hadassah dinner.

Hadassah holds Big Gifts dinner


Hadassah Northern NJ held its Big Gifts
dinner at the home of Martha Zilbert of
Fort Lee. Yvette Tekel and Ruth Cole,
both past region presidents, were the
co-chairs. The group of 26 attendees
included other past region presidents,
including Karen Goldman and Ruth
Grossberg, along with current region
20 JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015

president Stephanie Bonder and current


organization vice president Jill Tekel.
The guest speaker was Professor
Yoram Weiss, director of Hadassah Hospital, Ein Kerem. More than $20,000 was
raised in support of medical research,
care, and equipment for Hadassah Medical Center, Jerusalem.

A panel of speakers, keynoted


loathing of Israel, are the
by Sgt. Benjamin Anthony of
norm on many campuses,
Our Soldiers Speak, talked
he said.
about Israel at a recent meetWe must tell the truth,
ing in the Solomon Schechter
despite them; we must
School of Bergen County, sponempower our children with
sored by Unite4Unity.
the knowledge that will
U4U is dedicated to bringing
allow them to face down
disparate parts of the local Jewmouth-breathing haters. He
ish community together; the
does.
evening was predicated on the
His underlying message
Sgt. Benjamin
understanding that all commuwas the need to be proud of
Anthony
nity members share a focus on
Israel, and proud of being
Israel, and all are interested in
Jewish. It is that pride that
learning how to advocate for the Jewish
underlies everything else, he said.
state.
The Schechter Schools head, Ruth
The lead speaker, Mr. Anthony, a BritGafni, introduced the panel: Jasmine
ish Jew who made aliyah and served in
Patihi of StandWithUs, Andrew Gross of
three wars in Israel, showed a film, stark
the Israeli embassy in New York, and Danin its ugliness, of the beginning of a meetiel Mizner of AIPAC. Each discussed how
ing with undergraduates at a college camhis or her work supports Israel.
pus. These students, with their reflexive

Like us on Facebook
facebook.com/jewishstandard

upcoming at

Kaplen

JCC on the Palisades

Have Summer Camp Plans?

From exciting summer-long full day camps to


week-by-week specialty camps in sports, dance,
drama, and music, travel camp and everything in
betweenthe JCC has it all. Dont miss out...sign
your camper up TODAY!
For more info, applications, or to register, visit:
jccotp.org/camps

College Scholarship Fund


application deadline: may 11, 2015

This fund allocates annual grants to well-deserving


college-bound Jewish students in Bergen County,
including students with special needs. Open
to undergraduates looking to attend a 4-year
accredited college in the US or Israel. Candidates
must demonstrate financial need and good academic
standing. Grants are not renewable, but students
may reapply each year. Sponsored by the Hildegard
& Sidney Schonfeld Jewish Community College
Scholarship Fund.
For more info, contact Michal Greenbaum at
201.408.1469 or mgreenbaum@jccotp.org.

Join us this Sunday for


the 2015 Rubin Run!

running to enhance the lives of


individuals with special needs

Dont miss out on a fun day, a great runand


the best way to kick off your Mothers Day
festivities. With a Half Marathon at 7:30 am,
10K at 8:30, and a 5K run/walk at 10:00 am,
there is a race for everyone. Complimentary
brunch, babysitting and kids carnival available
for all who participate. Get in on the good times.
Visit www.jccotp.org/rubinrun to support a
runner or a team or to sponsor the event.
Register in person on Race Day, arrive early
Mothers Day, Sun, May 10

Preventing Sun Damage,


Surgical Treatments
of Skin Cancers, and
Cosmetic Surgery

Leading doctors in the fields of Dermatology,


Oncology and Plastic Surgery will speak
about causes and prevention of sun
damage, advanced treatments for skin
cancers and new cosmetic procedures.
Noted local and Israeli physicians from
the Medical Center of the Galilee in
Nahariya, Israel will lead the forum.
Mon, May 18, 7:30 pm
Free and open to the community.

Kaplen

JCC University

The Bridge Table: New!

Top professors and experts present


on a diverse array of topics. On May
14th, FDU professor Pat Schuber will
present on the United States Entry into
WWI and LIU English professor and
author Louis Parascondola will speak
about Coney Island.
To register, contact Kathy at
201.408.1454 or kgraff@jccotp.org.
Thursdays, May 14 & 28 and Jun 11,
10:30 am-2:15 pm, 1 Thursday $32/$40

First session FREE! For those who have never played bridge
before, our hands-on approach will have you playing bridge
before you know it. The first lesson is absolutely free, so bring
your friends and find out what youve been missing.
For more info, call Judy at 201.408.1457.
9 Wednesdays, May 13Jul 15, 7-9 pm, $200/$240

spring term continues

evenings for absolute beginners with amy nellissen

to register or for more info, visit

jccotp.org or call 201.569.7900.

JCC on the Palisades taub campus | 411 e clinton ave, tenafly, nJ 07670 | 201.569.7900 | jccotp.org
Jewish Standard MAY 8, 2015 21

Editorial
Jewish life outside Bergen County

ergen County is rich in


Jewish life. It is so rich, in
fact, that at times we do
not have the chance to look
past its borders.
This week, though, we look west to
Paterson, in Passaic County, and south,
to Hoboken, in Hudson County. As we
do so, we also think a little bit about
the history of Jews in this state.
To the rest of the world, American
Jewish history began on the Lower
East Side and radiated out from there.
Yes, Philip Roths novels taught us that
Newark had its own proudly distinct
history it centered around Weequahic, a word that non-natives are challenged to spell, much less to pronounce but few outsiders know that
Paterson, too, was a separate community, and so were the river towns on
the Hudsons left bank, Hoboken and
Jersey City. They lived in the shadow of
New York, but they were the center of
their own Jewish worlds.

Paterson and Hoboken (and Jersey


City too) are going in different directions now. Jews started flowing out
of Paterson soon after World War II,
when the magnetic benefits of the
GI Bill and allure of a nice clean new
home in the suburbs, complete with
green lawn and white picket fence,
drew them as if they were iron filings.
The city they left behind continued to
be the home for new immigrants, for
people on the first leg of their climb
from poverty. It did not appeal to the
Jews who were able to afford to do
better.
Most of the Jews still in Paterson
now are elderly, if not actively old,
and most certainly not all, but most
live there because they cannot afford
to move. There does not seem to be
much of a future for the community
there. Thats why we are so heartened
to hear about the minyan we write
about on page 10, and so glad to know
that younger people from Bergen

County are working to ensure that it


keeps going.
For a long time,Hudson County
towns were enmeshed in corruption
and scandal, and they were irrepressibly urban. Jews left as soon as they
could. For decades now, young people,
including young Jews, have lived there
right after college, only to move to the
suburbs as soon as they found partners, had children, and could afford
mortgages.
Now, though, Hoboken and Jersey
City are retaining more young people,
boasting more young families, to educating more children. As we write on
page 28, United Synagogue of Hobokens building is celebrating its centennial. The shul is flourishing, and the
community is growing. Its exciting.
There is vibrant Jewish life in northern New Jersey outside the borders of
Bergen County. Were glad to be able
JP
to report on it.

Bridgegate and bullying

kay. Were a local Jewish newspaper, and we


agree that Bridgegate
isnt inherently a Jewish
issue unless, of course, the fact that
the Bridgegate Davids, Wildstein and
Sampson, are Jewish somehow make
the whole crazy episode Jewish too.
In fact, its hard not to notice that
the three people who showed up on
Monday to plead guilty (Wildstein) or
be indicted (Bridget Anne Kelly, Bill
Baroni) are representative of three of
the states largest ethnic groups. Its
almost like the beginning of a joke
a Jew, an Irishwoman, and an Italian
walk across a bridge.
But Jews sat in the insanely snarled
traffic along with everyone else, and
certainly Bridgegate is a local issue.
Its just about as local as you can get.

Jewish
Standard
1086 Teaneck Road
Teaneck, NJ 07666
(201) 837-8818
Fax 201-833-4959
Publisher
James L. Janoff
Associate Publisher Emerita
Marcia Garfinkle

So think about this. The New


York Times reported that according
to the U.S. Attorney for New Jersey,
Paul Fishman (another Jew!), the
three conspirators, working together
like villains in Hardy Boys or Nancy
Drew stories, with the same levels of
malice and juvenile idiocy, connived
to hold off on the bridge closings until
the first day of school. Why waste the
induced disaster on the relatively
light traffic of late summer? They
closed EZ Pass-only lanes, to make it
even harder for drivers. They joked
to each other about the misery they
caused. They chortled over email
about the joy they got in imposing
radio silence instead of responding
to the increasingly desperate mayor
of Fort Lee.
They planned this is an incredible

Editor
Joanne Palmer
Associate Editor
Larry Yudelson
Guide/Gallery Editor
Beth Janoff Chananie
About Our Children Editor
Heidi Mae Bratt

jstandard.com
22 Jewish Standard MAY 8, 2015

detail to have the lane closings last


for a full month, and were enraged
when they were forced to stop after
four days.
This all was supposed to be political payback to the mayor of Fort
Lee, a Democrat, because he did
not endorse the conspirators boss,
the Republican Chris Christie. But it
seems more like a Three Stooges version of classic bullying. These jokers
had power, and they used it. It seems
as if the real reason for their use of
power was the sheer joy they took in
it (although certainly they are paying
for that joy now).
We hope it is a long time before any
other political goon decides to play
chess with an imaginary opponent,
using the rest of us as life-size pawns.
JP


Correspondents
Warren Boroson
Lois Goldrich
Abigail K. Leichman
Miriam Rinn
Dr. Miryam Z. Wahrman
Advertising Director
Natalie D. Jay
Business Manager
Robert Chananie
Classified Director
Janice Rosen

Advertising Coordinator
Jane Carr
Account Executives
Peggy Elias
George Kroll
Karen Nathanson
Brenda Sutcliffe
International Media Placement
P.O. Box 7195 Jerusalem 91077
Tel: 02-6252933, 02-6247919
Fax: 02-6249240
Israeli Representative

keeping the faith

Eye on a big lie

here is a reason why Jewish law insists even


true statements can be lashon hara, evil
speech. Last Sundays presentation of The
Lessons of War on the CBS News program
60 Minutes could just as well be called The Lessons
of Evil Speech.
An estimated 10 million viewers saw the report. Little of what was said in it was untrue, yet in the aggregate the report was a lie of monumental proportions.
Ostensibly, the report focused on the horrific impact
last summers Gaza war had on the children, with Palestinian children the primary focus and Israeli children receiving slightly more than passing notice. From
the beginning, however, it was clear that the true focus
was to demonize Israel as an indiscriminate murderer
of children and a destroyer
of homes and families.
A few examples suffice to
demonstrate how the CBS
program twisted truth.
According to Scott Pelley, the on-air talent who
anchored the report (on
60 Minutes, most of the
reporting actually is done
Shammai
by the producers), The war
Engelmayer
began with the murders of
three [Israeli] teenage boys.
He went on to say that on
the day after one of those youths, 16-year-old Naftali
Fraenkel, was buried, Israeli terrorists kidnapped a
Palestinian boy. Same age. Mohammad Abu Khdeir
was burned alive. Within days, it was war.
The teenagers Fraenkel, Gilad Shaer, 16, and Eyal
Yifrah, 19 were abducted on June 12, 2014. Fraenkel
was buried on July 1. Mohammad Abu Khdeir was murdered on July 2. The Gaza War began on July 8.
It would seem that Pelley was expressing a truth,
except that he was telling truths in a way that distorted
the truth. The war did not begin with the murders of
three teenage boys. Saying that suggests that Israel
launched a 50-day air and ground campaign against
Gazan civilians during which, according to Pelley,
Israel lost one child, [and] Gaza lost more than 500
to avenge the deaths of three Israeli teenagers.
Revenge had nothing to do with it, and the kidnappings were not the catalyst.
Shammai Engelmayer is rabbi of Temple Israel
Community Center | Congregation Heichal Yisrael in
Cliffside Park and Temple Beth El of North Bergen.

Production Manager
Jerry Szubin
Graphic Artists
Deborah Herman
Bob O'Brien
Credit Manager
Marion Raindorf
Receptionist
Ruth Hirsch

Founder
Morris J. Janoff (19111987)
Editor Emeritus
Meyer Pesin (19011989)
City Editor
Mort Cornin (19151984)
Editorial Consultant
Max Milians (1908-2005)
Secretary
Ceil Wolf (1914-2008)
Editor Emerita
Rebecca Kaplan Boroson

t
-

r
r

r
f

a
r

t
,

Opinion
Between January 1, and July 7, 2014, 353
rockets were launched at Israeli settlements from Gaza, forcing Israeli children
to spend many of their days that first half
of the year in fallout shelters.
That should have been provocation
enough to launch an invasion into Gaza.
There was an even greater threat that had
to be addressed, however.
On July 7, Hamas terrorists were carrying explosives through a terrorist tunnel
in Khan Yunis in the Gaza Strip. Something set off the explosives, and seven of
them died.
The existence of an extensive tunnel
system beneath Gaza was well known by
then. As was also well known but rarely
reported, Hamas constructed the system
using money meant to rebuild Gazas
civilian infrastructure.
Supposedly, the tunnels were meant
to circumvent Israels blockade of
Gaza, meaning that they were meant to
improve the quality of life there. In truth,
the tunnels were being used as storage
facilities for weapons and as launching
sites for missiles.
The tunnels had another purpose, as
well. Some extended inside Israel itself
and were designed to launch attacks
against Israeli settlements.
One such tunnel was discovered near
Kibbutz Ein Hashlosha in October 2013.
According to a Washington Post report,
the tunnel was 1.5 miles long and 66 feet
underground. It was equipped with
electricity and contained enough cookies, yogurt, and other provisions to last its
occupants several months. Israeli forces
estimated that Hamas had dumped $10
million and 800 tons of concrete into the
two-year project.
The July 7 tunnel explosion beneath
Khan Yunis signaled to Israel that the
extensive system posed an even greater
threat than originally believed. On that
same day, Hamas unleashed 80 rockets
on Israeli targets.
The next day, Israel launched Operation Protective Edge, with the announced
purpose of seeking out and destroying the terror tunnels, and putting the
launching sites out of commission.
The war had nothing to do with the
deaths of the three teenagers. Israel, in
fact, had launched Operation Brothers
Keeper on the West Bank, not Gaza, to
seek out the terrorists responsible for that
outrage.
Here is another example. Pelley said,
This summer, Hamas attacked Israel to
lift the blockade and Israel invaded Gaza
to destroy the tunnels.
He then asked a United Nations aid
worker, Scott Anderson, What are the
needs here [in Gaza] right now?
Anderson answered: The number one
need is to find a way to lift the blockade
and restore economic opportunity here
in Gaza.
Hamas, however, did not attack Israel
this summer. As noted, since January

2014 alone, 353 missiles were fired into


Israel before Operation Protective Shield
was launched. Perhaps Hamas was trying
to pressure Israel into ending the blockade, but the 60 Minutes report made it
sound like the blockade was an illegal act
meant to force Gazans to live like animals.
Pelley even quoted an elderly Gazan,
Ahmed Karim Audha, as saying even the
animals have better lives.
There is nothing either illegal or evil
about the blockade. Several years ago,
following the Marvi Marmara incident,
in which Israeli forces in 2010 boarded
a blockade-running Turkish vessel
bound for Gaza, killing nine people, a
United Nations investigation came to this
conclusion:
Israel faces a real threat to its security
from militant groups in Gaza.The naval
blockade was imposed as a legitimate
security measure in order to prevent
weapons from entering Gaza by sea and
its implementation complied with the
requirements of international law.
The United Nations is no friend of
Israels, yet it had no choice but to confirm that the blockade of Gaza is justified
under international law. The facts speak
for themselves. On March 5, 2014, just
four months before Protective Edge was
launched, Palestinians sought to smuggle
dozens of long-range missiles into Gaza
by sea. The Israeli navy interdicted the
shipment.
Israel, by the way, is not the only country blockading Gaza. Egypt has participated in the blockade from its very beginning. The United States supports both
blockades.
The virtually simultaneous blockades
were initiated after the so-called Battle
of Gaza in June 2007, when Hamas, an
internationally recognized terrorist organization, seized Gaza from the Palestinian Authority in a week-long battle that
ended in the deaths of 118 Gazans and the
wounding of over 500. Egypt imposed its
blockade almost immediately after that
happened. Israel did the same.
By leaving out the reasons for the
blockade, 60 Minutes made it seem as
though Israel does not care for the suffering of anyone but its own people.
The 60 Minutes report showed devastating footage of whole Gazan neighborhoods in ruins because of the Israeli
bombing campaign. Israel struck Gaza
with digital domination, blasting neighborhoods into seismic collapse, Pelley
said.
He said nothing, however, about why
Israel bombed these particular sites.
Hamas deliberately used these neighborhoods as launching sites for missiles.
He also did not mention the advanced
warnings Israel gave its bombing targets,
something unheard of anywhere else in
the world.
CBS and 60 Minutes did not lie on
Sunday night. They just told the truth in
a way that made it into a lie.

The Batman rollercoaster at Great Adventure 

Coasterman via Wikipedia

Gratitude
How we all can benefit from trying it more often

his past Sunday, my husband


for us. You spent money, and I know you
and I took our children to
dont really like amusement parks. I really
Six Flags Great Adventure.
appreciate it!
My daughter was performing
I told him the truth: I may not love
with the JCC dance troupe there. I loved
theme parks, but I love going with my
watching her on stage. However, the rest
kids. His dad and I are happy to save up
of Six Flags is not my (spinning) cup of
for special outings as a family; that is our
tea. I fell off a mountain when I was 16,
joy. And his gratitude makes my heart
and I have had a fear of heights since. I
swell with gratitude. Its not just that he is
like to push myself to overcome that fear
a great kid (though, of course, I think he
occasionally, but a full day
is). Its that once someone
of roller coasters is my idea
leads you into a mindset of
of torture. So, I held the
gratitude, it seems like the
backpacks and waited at
most obvious, rightful, and
the exit ramps like a champ.
beautiful thing in the world.
I enjoyed my kids enjoying
You want to partake, reciprocate, live there.
themselves. I thanked God
By the same token, when
for my husband. And I got
you focus on how hot and
to go on safari in deepest,
sweaty you are, or those
darkest New Jersey.
Rabbi Debra
rude people who just cut
Even as we enjoyed ourOrenstein
selves on a day of leisure
the line, when you recite an
and indulgence, each meminner monologue condemnber of the family had our
ing the commercialization of
complaints. My husband expressed shock
fun, then you fall back just as quickly
at the cost of parking and kosher food,
into a complaining, impatient, entitled,
dismay at the ads and product placement
and arrogant mindset that seems perfectly normal. Live there at your peril.
everywhere. The kids kvetched about
Its easy to backslide. Gratitude is not a
standing in long lines. We forgot a hat. My
default for most people. I, for one, have
daughters feet hurt. I was disappointed
to consciously choose it. Over and over.
that people did not go in groups to fill up
I attended a conference on women in
the cable car or safari jeep efficiently, but
the rabbinate last week. I enjoyed some of
insisted on traveling only with their party.
the rides er, sessions more than othThis was American independence gone
ers. I found things to condemn and things
amok! And I was misdirected. Why didnt
to celebrate. One particular decision by
the workers know the map of the adventure park!? And this was just the litany we
conference organizers was, in my opinion, a major mistake in fact, an insult.
verbalized.
When a friend, who was among the orgaThese are not first world problems.
nizers, asked me what my reaction was,
They arent problems at all.
I gave it to her with both barrels. I was
That night before bed, my son tearfully
See Gratitude page 26
thanked me. You and Pops do so much
Opinions expressed in the op-ed and letters columns are not necessarily those of the
Jewish Standard. The Jewish Standard reserves the right to edit letters. Be sure to include
your town. Email jstandardletters@gmail.com. Handwritten letters will not be printed.
Jewish Standard MAY 8, 2015 23

Opinion

In every generation
On Peter Beinart, criticism of Israel, and risks for peace

ast month, we read the classic


passage from the Haggadah:
In every generation they try
to destroy us
Its a dubious distinction, being hated
by so many for so long. Inexplicable as
this attitude toward us from
non-Jews is to fathom, its
even more puzzling when its
our co-religionists often leading the charge, or adding fuel
to the fire.
Someone who has been
gaining prominence in these
efforts is Peter Beinart, the
intellectual wunderkind and
Robert
self-appointed arbiter of all
Isler
things right and wrong with
both American and Israeli
Jewry. Although Beinart is
only one person, and his influence only
goes so far, he is emblematic of the everpresent Jewish fifth column.
At a time when European anti-Semitism is soaring and when U.S.-Israel
relations hover near their lowest point
in decades, Beinart recently saw fit to
pile on by urging the Obama administration to punish Israel. Among his
suggestions Support Palestinian bids
at the U.N., join the BDS movement on
settlement goods, and freeze the assets
of certain Israeli officials. He also urged
Jews to organize protests whenever
Israeli cabinet members speak. The reason for his latest ire the Israeli public,
in democratic elections, voted to keep
Netanyahu in power.
At one point during his tirade, Beinart
takes a step back to exclaim, It means
loving Israel more than ever He may
genuinely view his approach as one of
tough love, but its employment is reminiscent of a ploy Jimmy Carter regularly used in his Mideast op-eds. Hed
open about the paramount importance
of guaranteeing Israels security, then
spend the remaining 95 percent of his
piece likening the Jewish state to the
devil incarnate.
Beinarts views stop short of those
held by Jews who question Israels right
to exist, but paradoxically that makes
him more dangerous because hes taken
seriously. At a time when traditionally
rock-solid bipartisan U.S. support for
Israel is developing serious cracks,
Beinart is doing his part to widen the fissures. He has become a media darling
and the poster child for J Street which
says it all.
So what are his views? In his book,
The Crisis of Zionism, Beinart writes
that the great American Jewish challenge of our age is saving liberal Zionism in the U.S. so that American Jews
can help save liberal Zionism in Israel
24 Jewish Standard MAY 8, 2015

Loosely defined, his tactic for keeping


young American Jews engaged and in
the fold is acknowledging and relentlessly criticizing Israels faults.
That wouldnt top my list, but Im not
an intellectual.
Beinarts mindset is all
too familiar. In an April
9 article in Haaretz, he
wrote that it is sheer fantasy to think Israel and
the Palestinians could
reach an agreement without a return to the 1967
b ou n d a r i e s . He ad d s
that these are the only
parameters that could
lead to a deal. Its understandable that these may
be the only parameters
the Palestinians would accept, but what
about parameters necessary to increase
Israels comfort level so the process
could truly move forward? Why is that
never discussed seriously?
When the Oslo Accords began in
1993, a cautious Yitzhak Rabin insisted
that any exchange of territory for intangible promises of peace must include a
provision calling for Palestinian leaders to cease from engaging in hostile
propaganda against Jews and Israel.
Toning down the rhetoric of hate was
a necessary prelude to resolving all
other issues. Israel made an attempt to
change the status quo when it withdrew
from Gaza. It also put the West Bank
and potentially parts of Jerusalem into
play with far-reaching offers in both
2000 and 2008. What has the Palestinian establishment done to engender a
climate of trust during that time? Is it
any wonder a poll conducted late last
year by the Palestinian Center for Policy
and Survey Research found that 80 percent of Palestinians support attempts
by individual Palestinians to stab or
run over Israelis in Jerusalem, with the
overwhelming majority also in favor
of continued rocket attacks on Jewish
civilians?
While constantly taking Israel to task
for its control over the territories, why
arent Beinart and the many outspoken
Jews in media who share his views vocal
about the need for Palestinian leaders
to be held accountable for their poisonous rhetoric and actions? Even those
who sympathize with Beinarts view
have pointed out that he just doesnt
seem to grasp Israels very real concerns. If he does, he gives them little
more than lip service, instead focusing
almost exclusively on Palestinian suffering. The cause and effect that lead to
that suffering dont seem to be part of
his equation.

Peter Beinart is a contributing editor at the Atlantic magazine. His outspoken


views on Israel make him a controversial figure in the Jewish world, to which
he belongs.
Joe Mabel via Wikimedia Commons

Even those who


sympathize with
Beinarts view
have pointed
out that he
just doesnt
seem to grasp
Israels very real
concerns.
Beinart loves to criticize the Jewish
establishment for reflexively feeling a
need to come to Israels rescue with its
blind support. Apparently his solution
to counter their tired ways and break
the logjam in Mideast negotiations is to
club Israel into submission with threats
meant to isolate and undermine it. If
this doesnt sound very original or fair,
thats because it isnt. The liberal Zionist model that he is forever touting is
strikingly familiar to the one long held
and increasingly practiced by European
leaders, who are decidedly unsympathetic to Israels situation.
Making matters worse is Beinarts timing, given the realities of todays Middle
East.
There have been recent reports of
Hamas turning to heavy machinery to
rebuild its tunnels and of Iran increasing delivery of sophisticated weaponry
to Hezbollah. With the fortification of
these northern and southern borders,

is this really the time for Israel to allow


a potential third front to open by ceding
the West Bank, a mere stones throw (or
advanced rocket launch) away from Tel
Aviv and Ben Gurion Airport?
Even if Palestinian leaders were to
honor a deal and try to maintain peace,
the current high level of upheaval is
unusual even by Mideast standards.
ISIS and others are treating the region
like the old Risk board game. Imagine
the status and PR coup for the first
group able to wrest control of the West
Bank from the Palestinians to open a
new front? Likely, it would be a proxy
group for Iran moving in to gain a threepronged stranglehold. Must Israel set
itself up for potential national suicide
to please its critics?
Rather than American Jews heeding
Peter Beinarts advice and organizing
protests whenever and wherever Israeli
cabinet members are invited to talk, it
would be far more useful and productive to have our voices heard in protest
when he is the one speaking.
At a time when openly hating Israel,
and quite often the Jewish people as
well, has become fashionable again,
unity is our strength. To attempt to
force the Jewish States hand and at the
same time discredit most major advocacy groups from AIPAC to the AntiDefamation League is not a recipe for
maintaining support of Israel but for
destroying it.
Robert Isler is a media research director
who occasionally writes about the
Middle East and Jewish issues. He lives
in Fair Lawn.

Opinion

A tale of two societies


When the PA presidents hero is a terrorist

he president of a normal, civilized


country naturally is anxious to
distance himself from any suspicion of ever having had a connection to a terrorist.
Thats how President Barack Obama
reacted when the Bill Ayers
controversy erupted. But the
recent decision by the Palestinian Authoritys president to
give awards to three Arab terrorists reminded us that some
governments are neither normal nor civilized.
Ayers, the co-founder of an
American terrorist group, the
Stephen
1960s Weather Underground,
Flatow
was involved in planting
bombs at New York City police
headquarters, the United
States Capitol building, and the Pentagon
from 1970 to 1972. It was just by pure chance
that nobody was injured in those attacks,
which caused extensive damage.
During the 2008 presidential campaign,
journalists revealed that Ayers had hosted the

first-ever fundraiser for Obama, then a candidate for the Illinois state senate, in his home.
Obama quickly distanced himself from Ayers,
whom he described as just some guy in our
neighborhood. Ayers subsequently said that
he never had any contact with Obama, either
during the campaign or after
his election as president.
Whatever the details of the
Ayers-Obama connection,
candidate Obama wanted
to make it crystal clear that
he had no admiration for
Ayerss views or deeds, and
did not want to be associated
with a terrorist in any way. In
M.
American society, terrorism is
regarded as evil. A connection
with a terrorist spells the end
of any politicians career.
Not so in Palestinian society. There, even
the most heinous terrorists are considered
heroes, and the president rushes to heap
honors upon the killers and their families.
Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas celebrated Palestinian

Prisoners Day on April 17 by bestowing


medals upon three notorious terrorists
the first female and male Fatah terrorists
jailed by Israel and the first Fatah terrorist killed while trying to murder Israelis.
Abbas is also chairman of Fatah, which is
the largest faction of the Palestine Liberation Organization.
The first female Fatah terrorist captured
by the Israelis was Fatima Bernawi. In October 1967, Bernawi placed a bomb in the Zion
Cinema in Jerusalem. Note, by the way, that
the attack did not take place in occupied
territory, except in the sense that Fatah
considers even pre-1967 Israel to be occupied Palestine.
By sheer chance, the bomb did not
explode. Bernawi was captured and sentenced to life in prison for attempted mass
murder. Unfortunately, Israel released her
after 10 years as a gesture in honor of Egyptian president Anwar Sadats visit to Israel.
That was a terrible mistake by the Israelis. It helped create an expectation about
releasing terrorists, when in fact Israel
See Two Societies page 26

Michelle and Barack Obama flank


Palestinian Authority President
Mahmoud Abbas. The two presidents
react very differently to terrorists.


White House photo by Lawrence Jackso

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1:22 PM
Jewish Standard MAY5/1/15
8, 2015
25

Opinion
Two societies
from page 25

should have always maintained that Arab


leaders who are against terrorism surely
would not want terrorists to be set free.
Shortly after the PA was established
in 1994, Bernawi was rewarded with the
position of chief of the womens section
of the PA police. That, too, was an outrage. The PA should have been told in no
uncertain terms, by both Israel and the
United States, that no terrorist should be
rewarded with a government job. Such
rewards send a message that terrorists
are heroes and should be emulated.
That is exactly the wrong message to
send to young Palestinians.
The fact that the United States helped
train the PA police makes the situation
even more outrageous. American government personnel were training a convicted bomber. Imagine if Bill Ayers were
to apply for a position in his local police
department. Would anyone in his right
mind say he should be hired?
Bernawi, like Ayers, never expressed
any regret for her terrorism. To this day,
she regards planting a bomb in a movie
theater as an act of heroism.

Gratitude
Please join us for

50th

Fifty Years Revisited on the


Anniversary of the Voting Rights Act
Featuring

Rabbi Saul Berman

Renowned rabbinic scholar, educator and active participant in the


Civil Rights movement, present at the 1965 demonstrations in Selma, Alabama

Richard Smith

New Jersey State NAACP Conference President

Monday, May 18, 2015 7:30pm


Dr. John Grieco Elementary School
50 Durie Avenue, Englewood, NJ

Free and open


to the community.

Co-sponsored by
The Bergen County NAACP
and the
Jewish Federation of
Northern New Jerseys Jewish
Community Relations Council

Jewish Federation

OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY


Jewish Community Relations Council

This program was made possible


by the Israel Action Network,
an initiative of the Jewish Federations
of North America in partnership with
the Jewish Council for Public Affairs.

26 Jewish Standard MAY 8, 2015

oting
Rights
Act
For further information contact
JCRC at 201-820-3944 or
Bergen County NAACP at
201-724-8956 or 201-227-1875

from page 23

calm, but very disapproving. I also


expressed gratitude for her efforts, but
the main message was my upset.
Just then, a rabbi who had taken my
class on gratitude at the Rabbinic Training Institute a couple of years back
came up to me and said, Thank God! I
thought you were so perfect. Its good
to see that you complain, too.
I felt the righteousness of my complaint and of her observation. It was
a humbling, human moment.
I saw two perspectives, clearly and
simultaneously. The first: The organizers were wrong in what they did, I
was wrong in calling my friend out on
that error so vociferously, and my colleague and former student was wrong
for embarrassing me.
The second: the organizers had
been trying to honor the first cohort of
women rabbis; though I do believe they
were in error, I also believe they were
doing their best. I was in pain, and
managed to be funny and self-deprecating while delivering a difficult but necessary message. My timing may have
been lousy I responded to what I am
sure my friend thought was a casual,
pass-you-in-the-hall question with
strong opinions that demanded her
full attention. But I was doing my best.
My friend on the organizing committee
received my message without defensiveness and asked me to please give
my feedback to the other organizers as

Fatahs official website, announcing


Abbass decision to present Bernawi
with a medal, hailed her as one of the
first Palestinian women to adopt armed
self-sacrifice operations after the start
of the modern Palestinian revolution.
(Translation courtesy of the Middle East
Media and Research Institute.)
So there you have it. An American
president who distances himself from a
terrorist, and an American society that
utterly rejects terrorism. A Palestinian
president who embraces terrorists, and
a Palestinian society that treats mass
murderers as heroes.
Two societies, two different sets of values, two different ways of life. Perhaps
there is nothing Americans can do to
change the PA. But why must $500 million in U.S. aid continue to be sent to the
PA each year?
American taxpayers would not want
to subsidize Bill Ayers; so, why is their
money being used to subsidize Fatima
JNS.org
Bernawi?
Stephen M. Flatow of West Orange, an
attorney who practices in Fairfield, is the
father of Alisa Flatow, who was murdered
in a Palestinian terrorist attack in 1995.

well. She reflected on her own process


of decision-making, explaining why
she didnt intervene when she perhaps
should have. She was doing her best.
My student had graciously told me
many times how inspired she had been
by my teachings on gratitude. Apparently, she also felt inadequate in the
face of them. She was relieved when
she saw me complain and felt friendly
and close enough to me that she could
say so. She, too, was doing her best.
Its harder to capture the second perspective. I am sure I didnt get all the
words or summaries right. But the feeling, I hope, is conveyed. It was a peaceful feeling. My mind seemed to say:
there is fault in everything and everyone, and everything/everyone is also
fine and beautiful.
I dont mean to suggest that all complaining is wrong. Righteous rebuke
is holy. Spiritual dissatisfaction is the
most frequent motivation for repairing
the world. But almost everyone could
benefit by expressing complaints less
and gratitude more. Myself, of course,
included.
Here is one way to express gratitude: Thanks, Six Flags Corporation
and employees, for doing your best.
Thanks, family, for the same. Thanks,
fellow rabbis. Just. Thanks.
Rabbi Debra Orenstein is spiritual
leader of Congregation Bnai Israel
in Emerson, as well as a scholar-inresidence. Go to RabbiDebra.com for
more on gratitude.

Letters
Israel dodges truth
of Armenian genocide

I read Rabbi Shmuley Boteachs May 1 column, Dress rehearsal for the Holocaust?
under the logo Truth Regardless of Consequences, with great amazement.
The column criticized President Barack
Obama and, in particular, Ambassador
Samantha Powers for not labeling the
massacre of the Armenians by the Turks
as genocide. Rabbi Boteach rightfully criticized this indefensible decision, calling it
the final indignity, and said that the victims are now robbed of the chance to be
remembered.
You can imagine my shock when a colleague brought to my attention that Israel
also will not recognize the Armenian massacre as genocide. I couldnt believe it. My
colleague showed me a news report from
Haaretz, dated January 9, 2015, http://
www.haaretz.com/news/diplomacydefense/1.636058, in which Rafael Harpaz, Israels ambassador to Azerbaijan,
said that because it wants to improve relations with Turkey, Israel will not call the
massacre genocide. Ambassador Harpaz
was quoted as saying: There are enough
common interests and issues in the world
for us to cooperate. I would like to take
an example of Turkish Airlines. Turkish

Airlines is the biggest foreign airline which


is active in Israel. Istanbul is the biggest
hub for Israelis. The same goes for tourism, trade which is up. We hope that
our political relations with Turkey will
improve.
I hope that Rabbi Boteach will comment
on the Israeli action, given that he advocates truth regardless of consequence.
If the U.K. or some other country refused
to acknowledge the Holocaust because of
trade relations with Germany, we would
call it anti-Semitic. What do we call Israels conduct? There is only one word.
Shameful.
Ben Kaplan, West Orange

community. Yes, you read that right. Every


single one of them. Embraced. Even by the
Orthodox Jewish community.
That doesnt mean we cant debate
about the permissibility of certain acts.
It does mean that we can no longer make
sweeping generalizations about the lifestyle of gay people. It does mean we cannot pretend that the Torah prohibits a gay
lifestyle when in fact no such expression
can be found in the Torah. And it most
definitely means that we can no longer
tolerate expressions of bigotry even, and
especially, when they cloak themselves in
the language of saintliness.
Adam Schorr, Englewood

Respect for gays


in the Orthodox world

Kudos to Joy Kurland

Im not so sure, though, that the question of homosexuality in the Orthodox


community has been exhausted, despite
what I read in Respect, not discord (Letters, May 1). I suspect our gay brothers
and sisters who do not yet feel accepted as
human beings and Jews within their communities would not feel the issue has been
exhausted. Exhausting perhaps. But not
yet exhausted.
And it will not be exhausted until every
gay man and woman is embraced by their

Count me as one of the many saddened to


hear of Joy Kurlands departure from Federations Community Relations Council
(Thank You, Joy May 1).
I agree with Rabbi Neal Borovitz about
1) the difficult challenge in replacing her,
and 2) the rise of conflict and competition
between and among religious and ethnic
communities.
Thats how I met Joy Kurland two years
ago.
Palisades Park is a small town that once
had a large enough Jewish population

to first support then expand the Sons of


Israel congregation. In the 1940s, when
my immigrant grandparents opened a
store on Broad Avenue, they sought to be
good Americans. The store signs were in
English and they employed every type of
person who lived in the primarily ItalianAmerican town for the 50 years they did
business here.
No more. Todays Jewish population
is a mere handful. The majority Korean
population considers it acceptable to put
store signage/menus in Korean only and
to employ only Korean speaking staff.
The ItalianAmericans, who still hold the
majority of municipal positions, do nothing to address this form of discrimination.
Korean-only signage is now moving northward and can be seen in Leonia. Where
next?
In addition, theres a growing movement
to attach the WWII issue of the so-called
Comfort Women (aka sex slaves of the
Pacific War) onto Holocaust exhibits and
institutions across America. The Comfort
Women, numbering perhaps 200,000,
were the tragic spoils of war, as were millions of other abused women. But they
were not victims of a sustained campaign
of genocide.
See Letters page 33

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Jewish Standard MAY 8, 2015 27

Cover Story

28 Jewish Standard MAY 8, 2015

Cover Story

100 years
in Hoboken
United Synagogues building
celebrates its centennial
Joanne Palmer

oboken is surprisingly small,


given its outsize reputation.
Its only got 50,000 residents, and its nickname, Mile
Square City, is roughly accurate. (It actually covers an area of two square miles
when including the under-water parts in
the Hudson River, Wikipedia helpfully
tells us. Its hard to understand why anyone would want to count the underwater
parts.)
Its a city with a storied history Frank
Sinatra, On the Waterfront and therefore Marlon Brando, gangsters, music,
angst, longshoremen, gritty local color.

The synagogue,
which is
Conservative,
is booming.
Its preschool
is bursting.
Its lack of parking, which makes finding
a space in Manhattan seem relatively as
easy as finding one in, say, Montana, is
legendary.
For the last few decades, Hobokens
been home to young people who work in
Manhattan but dont want or cant afford
to live there; it pulses with singles, who
might make noises about staying but have
tended to move once theyre married and
certainly once they have kids.
Hoboken also has a more recent history
of apparently being on the cusp, the verge,
the very sharp tip of change, but somehow
not quite making it.
Thats all changing now, though, for
real. The citys population has been growing. More and more people have been
choosing to stay, and to bring their children up in the city.
There always have been Jews in

The 100-year-old buildings sanctuary was renovated in 2000; its plain windows since have been replaced with stained glass.

Hoboken. United Synagogue of Hoboken


is about to celebrate its buildings centennial; the congregation itself is almost
a decade older, although it has changed
shape considerably in that time. The synagogue, which is Conservative, is booming. Its preschool is bursting. People of all
ages and of a range of Jewish backgrounds
find themselves at home there. Its sense of
community is palpable. It has a great deal
to celebrate.
Rabbi Robert Scheinberg arrived at
United Synagogue in 1997; he is believed
to have set the tone for the synagogues
revival, although he is too modest to
claim that credit for himself. Instead, he
talks about the distinct challenges and

opportunities the shuls densely packed


urban environment provides.
Hoboken is small, but it is routinely on
the list of the five most densely populated
areas in the United States, he said. (That
explains the parking situation.) Although
it is less packed with people than its neighbors Union City and West New York, it
is way ahead of New York City, although
probably not Manhattan separately, he
continued. And compared with Jersey City
or Bayonne, which also has a synagogue,
it is more urban in feeling. Members of
United Synagogue primarily live in apartments; some are in brownstones. Almost
nobody is in a detached house.
The shul is a medium-size community,

with about 320 households. The scale


makes it hard to get lost, Rabbi Scheinberg said. Its probably still more transitory than most, but he sees that as an
advantage: There will always be a steady
stream of new people. Thats useful and
good for the vitality of the community.
Both the stable population and the
more transient people are at our core.
One of the adjustments the community
has made to that fact of its life is supremely
practical. Because many people believe
that to become a member is to commit to
staying in the city, and because they often
are not ready to make that commitment,
at least not right away, We never have
had a building fund, Rabbi Scheinberg
Jewish Standard MAY 8, 2015 29

Cover Story
said. We dont want people to feel that
joining a synagogue has to be a multiyear
proposition.
That is the approach the shul takes to
cultivating its leadership. We want to
identity people who are potential leaders
within six months of their arrival, because
we want them on the board by Year 2.
They might be in the suburbs by Year 3.
That is changing, however. Now,
though, the stable part of the community
is growing, so that more of our synagogue
leadership is from that group. But we try
to make leadership opportunities available
for people who are not sure that they will
stay in the area.
Another difference that sets us apart is
that the average age here is a lot younger
than in most other places, Rabbi Scheinberg said. And we are also seeing a lot
of empty nesters, young retirees. That is
a growing segment of the community.
Overall, he estimated, the average age of
his congregants is probably somewhere in
the early 40s. Younger than I am Im in
my mid-40s, he said, a bit ruefully.
There are not many synagogues in the
area. Chabad opened one recently, and
there is a Reform shul in Jersey City that
attracts a few Hoboken residents, but for
most of United Synagogues long history
its been the only game in town.
United Synagogue of Hoboken is
an informal place, Rabbi Scheinberg

Once the contract was signed in 1914, work on the building began. 

continued. Its one of my goals that no


matter what someone wears a suit and a
tie, or anything else that they should feel
comfortable. They should feel that theyre
not being judged by what theyre wearing.
We strive to be informal and inclusive.
Another aspect of the shuls informality
is the rabbis approach to sermon-giving.
Instead of a sermon, I lead a discussion of

Artist Susan Klein designed the new stained glass windows, which incorporate found objects to illustrate the seven days of creation.
30 Jewish Standard MAY 8, 2015

the parasha, the Torah reading, he said.


Other demographic distinctions are the
number of couples where one partner
is Jewish and the other is not, and also
the number of people who are involved
in the conversion process, or who have
converted. This correlates with the ethnic
diversity in the community.
Some of these things may have made us
more distinctive 20 years ago than it does
today, he conceded. There is not a single
role in Conservative life that has not been
played by someone who converted. We are
the location for the Introduction to Judaism course run by the Rabbinical Assembly of New Jersey the association for
local Conservative rabbis. Thats because

courtesy Hoboken Historical Museum

we always have so many people looking to


convert.
Lauren Sapira, an active member of the
shul who works in publishing, tells a story
that echoes some of the themes Rabbi
Scheinberg brought up. I have been here
in Hoboken for 21 years, she said. When
I first moved here after college, I assumed
that it would be for just a few years.
I grew up in Livingston, and I always
assumed that I would move to the suburbs.
I definitely can say that the thing that
has kept me in Hoboken is the synagogue
and the community, she continued. It
is a unique community. People are here
because they want to be here, not because
they feel that they should be here.

Cover Story
I am amazed every year at Neila the
emotionally and spiritually draining and
exhilarating service at the end of Yom Kippur how the place is just packed. After
we have finished, after the last shofar
blast, nobody leaves.
Everybody stays for Havdalah. Nobody
has eaten for 25 hours, and everybody
stays so we can all do Havdalah together.
Its that kind of place.
Ms. Sapira is a product of the Conservative movements United Synagogue Youth,
and then of Hillel at Cornell University, so
once she graduated from college she knew
that if she was to feel at home somewhere,
she had to be part of its Jewish community. When she got to Hoboken, she found
one that was small and intimate, but also
struggling.
When I first started going to the synagogue, there wasnt much in terms of
young people, she said. That was a little
discouraging at first. I was asked if I would
help run singles events, even though I
didnt really like the idea, because the
whole idea of singles events is to meet people so you never have to go there again.
Because she knew that people in their
20s often do not want to affiliate with a
synagogue but she also knew that she
wanted a peer group for herself, Ms.
Sapira and some friends put together Jewish events that met in other places. The
first event was a Purim party in a bar in
town, she said. We purposely kept it out
of the synagogue for a number of years.
We liked going to Friday night services, so
people started coming along, and we built
up a whole Friday night community, and
then Saturday morning at times.
At first, the group would go to services
and then to a restaurant for dinner; soon
they graduated to pot-luck dinners, and
then to full-on Shabbat dinners in each
others homes. At that point, people
wanted to be part of a community, she
said.
The shul is named United Synagogue of
Hoboken for the most straightforward of
reasons. It was formed by the merger of
two earlier communities, the Star of Israel,
which had been Orthodox, and the Hoboken Jewish Center, which was Conservative. After the merger, the community
used both buildings, the Jewish Centers
brownstone and the Star of Israels larger
structure. In the 1970s, when the community reached its nadir, they almost sold
the Star of Israel building, Ms. Sapira said.
They could have gotten good dollars for
it. But they decided not to.
And then, in the late 90s, we made a
momentous decision that we needed to
consolidate everything, that we were better off selling the brownstone, consolidating, expanding, and putting in a preschool.
I was 29, and I on the board. I said
Why build a preschool? No one will stay
here. No one will use it. What did I know?
We built it and people stayed.
That was in 1997 or 98. The preschool
started in 2000. When I had my son, in

Rabbi Robert Scheinberg

Lauren Sapira with her husband, Valdi,


and their children, Sammi and Josh.

2003, all of a sudden we thought We dont


have to move!
When they decided to build, I thought
they were crazy, and then I became one of
the first to say that we should stay. Now
the Sapiras have two children. Both are
graduates of the nursery school and now
in the shuls religious school.
It is not only United Synagogue of Hoboken that has changed over the last two
decades, Ms. Sapira said. Hoboken is different too. When I moved to town in
1994, it was all about the bars. The bars
are still here, but now they are allowed
to serve food, and look at how many high
chairs there are!
Wolfgang Puck, the famous restaurateur, opened a restaurant in Hoboken in
2004, called Wolfgang Puck Express, Ms.
Sapira said. Its closed now. But we went
there when it was open, and asked for a
high chair, and he said We keep running
out of them. Nobody told me wed need so
many high chairs.
While he was waiting for the building the restaurant was in to go up, he did
research on the neighborhood. It took two
years, and by the time the community had
changed so much.
Now there are kids activities all over

Alexander Gorlin

the place. Theater, dance, sports all of


sudden everythings everywhere, and you
cant possibly keep up.
United Synagogue of Hoboken is kidfriendly, she said. Every Shabbat, children
are invited to follow the Torah in the procession as it is taken out of the ark, and
when they get back, they go up on the
bimah, kiss the Torah, and then everyone sings Hinei Ma Tov how good and
pleasant it is for brothers and sisters to
live together. Later, they come back on the
bimah. The rabbi thanks every single one
of them by name, she said. He knows
every single one of them by name. That
makes them feel like its their home.
There are anywhere from 30 to 60 children any given week, she added.
When synagogue leaders decided to
plan the upcoming celebration, they
decided that the community and the building it calls home could not be teased apart,
so they focused on the building itself.
Alexander Gorlin, a Manhattan architect
who specializes in synagogues and other
places of worship, oversaw a major renovation in 2000.
We restored the interior to its original glory, he said. We decided to create
a color palette that would be in keeping
with the original date of the building. It is
a series of sky blues and creams, based on
19th century Victorian palettes.
The building, which sits very close to the
street, in touch with the outside world, is
compact and vertical. It is clearly a town
synagogue, Mr. Gorlin said. It is appropriate to the size of Hoboken, kind of a
complementary province to the city just
across the river. It is definitely an urban
building. Its charm comes in part from the
exotic onion domes, the Byzantine style
that became appropriate for Jewish congregations in the 19th century.
It has an intimacy that is charming,
and almost recalls the Jewish experience
in Europe before the war.
It is to be cherished as a neighborhood
landmark; even apart from its function as
a synagogue it gives character and identity
to the immediate neighborhood.
Susan Klein has been a member of
United Synagogue of Hoboken since 1987.

She is also an artist. Joining those two


identities, she has restored or created
the buildings old windows, removing the
bars that held them together, using stronger, more modern lead and also her own
vision producing original, compelling
stained-glass artwork.
She is providing the direction; other synagogue members work with her, experiencing the hands-on pleasure of creation.
All are volunteers.
Some of the windows in the sanctuary
had been plain glass. Ms. Klein is replacing them with artwork showing the seven
days of creation. She incorporated found
objects into the glass, making the windows
a marvel of texture as well as shape and
light, rendering them surprising as well as
beautiful.
She had never used this technique
before, but she had the materials and the
idea demanded some experimentation.
I had the bottom of an Israeli bowl that I
had bought when I was a kid, and broken
years ago, she said. She is using that as the
center of a nebula in the window showing
the first day of creation. There are swirly
blobs of glass, a swirly bubbly thing.
On the fifth day, the Bible tells us, Gods
creations include fish. Ms. Klein included
shells and a really gorgeous mother of
pearl piece that sticks far out of the
frame for that days window.
Ms. Klein has taken the opportunity of
making the windows to comb through her
store of interesting or beautiful objects,
and to go on shopping expeditions to
find more. Her finds often end up in the
sanctuary.
Next weekend, United Synagogue of
Hoboken is going to celebrate the buildings centennial by acknowledging its
three identities as a beit tefilah, a house
of prayer; a beit midrash, a house of study,
and as a beit am, the peoples house and
the communitys center. It also will celebrate the communitys sturdy, stubborn
independence and resolve, the Hobokenlike virtues that are likely to see it well into
its second century.
What: United Synagogue of Hobokens
celebration of its buildings first century
When: On Friday, May 15, from 6 to 9
p.m., a Special Kabbalat service and
oneg will showcase the building as a
beit tefilah a house of prayer
On Saturday, May 16, from 1 to 6 pm.,
the Learning Center will celebrate during Shabbat services and the kiddush,
showing the building a beit midrash
a house of study.
On Sunday, May 17, from 1 to 6 p.m. a
block party, guided tours of the Star of
Israel historical museum, and a concert
by Paula Valstein emphasize the buildings function as the beit am the
house of the people.
Where: United Synagogue of Hoboken, 115 Park Ave., Hoboken.
For more information: (201) 659-4000
or www.hobokensynagogue.org
Jewish Standard MAY 8, 2015 31

Opinion
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TRANSFORMING LIVES.
INCLUDING YOURS.
32 JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015

After anti-Israel pressure, the Virginia State Bar canceled a planned seminar at the David Citadel Hotel in
Jerusalem.
IGORSHIMANOVVIAWIKIMEDIACOMMONS

BDS movement infiltrates


the Virginia State Bar

or just more than a month now,


religious, and national origin grounds,
the Virginia State Bar which, it
and effectively prevents Arab, Muslim,
should be noted, is a state body
and Palestinian members of the VSB from
working with the legal profesattending.
sion in Virginia has been embroiled in a
I will deal with the substance of these
nasty political row over its apparent boyclaims further on, but for now its imporcott of Israel.
tant to record what happened next. On
I say apparent because this hasnt
March 27, the petition was sent to the VSBs
been the kind of run-of-the-mill boycott
council members. By late afternoon on the
Ben Cohen
row you encounter on college campuses.
same day, VSB members were receiving
Leading VSB officials are insisting that they
emails from the state agencys president,
are not boycotting Israel and that, moreKevin Martingayle, announcing that the
over, they were not even aware of the Boycott, DivestJerusalem trip had been scrapped.
ment and Sanctions movement until this whole unfortuCertain members of the Virginia State Bar and other
nate business began.
individuals have expressed objections to the VSBs plan
Take it from me, this is a complicated story, so lets
to take the Midyear Legal Seminar trip in November to
begin with a chronology. On February 27, the VSB
Jerusalem, Martingayle wrote. It was stated that there
announced that it would be holding its 42nd annual
are some unacceptable discriminatory policies and
midyear legal seminar, scheduled for November, in
practices pertaining to border security that affect travthe refined surroundings of the David Citadel Hotel in
elers to the nation. Upon review of U.S. State DepartJerusalem. Anti-Israel activists quickly learned of the
ment advisories and other research, and after consultaplanned trip to the Jewish state, and by March 23, a
tion with our leaders, it has been determined that there
change.org petition demanding its cancellation was live.
is enough legitimate concern to warrant cancellation of
Signed by exactly 39 of the VSBs almost 50,000
the Israel trip and exploration of alternative locations.
members, the petition was careful to sound like a stateInevitably, Martingayles email sent on a Friday
ment of concerned professionals. Unlike the unhinged
night, traditionally regarded as a good time to dump
screeds that circulate on campus, it didnt contain any
problematic news down a black hole met with a furireferences to Israeli war crimes or apartheid, nor
ous response, much of it coming from VSB members
did it even mention the BDS campaign. Without pointappalled that the organizations president could so easing out that Israel is a Jewish state as is common
ily fall for these astonishing accusations without doing
among anti-Zionists the petition grounded its demand
his due diligence.
for cancellation on the claim that Israel discriminates
I feel that it is very important that every agency of
against those of Muslim, Palestinian, and Arab origin at
the Commonwealth take steps to demonstrate our comits border entry points. Citing advice from the U.S. State
mitment to Israel and its people, William J. Howell,
Department and the American Consulate in Jerusalem,
speaker of the Virginia House of Delegates, told Martinthe petition concluded, It is unacceptable that the Virgayle in one of many letters of protest. This decision
ginia State Bar has decided to hold a conference in a
does the opposite.
location that actively discriminates on the basis of racial,
Authoritative legal blogs, like the Volokh Conspiracy

Opinion/Letters
and Legal Insurrection, began pushing the story. Various
local and national Jewish organizations condemned the
decision and the story started to creep into the national
press a reminder, perhaps, that releasing bad news
just as the weekend kicks in doesnt guarantee that no
one will notice.
Aware of the escalating scandal, on March 29 Martingayle sent out a second email to VSB members. While
he reiterated his earlier point that the seminar had been
canceled based on a U.S. State Department advisory,
he introduced another reason into mix. We were well
short of the required number of confirmed attendees
necessary for the trip to proceed, Martingayle said.
This, however, doesnt explain why the VSB had sent
an email four days earlier encouraging sign-up, nor
does it account for the fact that the trip, priced at a full
$7,000 per head, had only been announced one month
previously.
Martingayle then added that he and VSB Presidentelect Edward Weiner had been in touch with the Israeli
embassy over security protocols. According to Legal
Insurrection, this contact seems to have consisted of
a single phone call asking whether entrance into Israel
was guaranteed for VSB members. Of course, without a
list of the travelers available, the Israeli representative
wasnt in a position to say yes or no!
Much as Martingayle might wish that this issue would
disappear, the reverse is happening, and more layers of
complexity keep appearing. For example, it now seems
that Donald W. Lemons, chief justice of the Virginia
Supreme Court, participated in a conference call with
the VSB leadership just hours before the cancellation
was made public. Yet beneath all this intrigue, a basic
question remains: Has VSB signed up to the boycott of
Israel or not?
Sadly, the VSB leadership has refused to engage with
outsiders, including representatives of the local Jewish
community. Robin Mancoll, director of the Jewish Community Relations Council in Virginias Tidewater region,
told me that VSB still hasnt responded to a request for
an apology that, she added, must acknowledge that the
VSB leadership has no reason to believe that any VSB

Letters
FROM PAGE 27

Worst of all, in Palisades Park, the public library


devotes resources both inside and out to elevating the
Comfort Women issue out of all scale to the overall
events of WWII. Pre-Joy Kurland, this shameful public
library never acknowledged the Holocaust.
Last winter, following events too long to detail here,
Joy Kurland and two local rabbis traveled to the Palisades Park library. Thanks to Ms. Kurlands efforts,
the library board agreed to put up a display about the
Holocaust the federation supplied the materials.
They also hit Ms. Kurland up for a donation of books.
(My family has paid taxes on our store, our home and
employee taxes for more than 50 years, so I find this
offensive. This library can afford to buy books.)
Last fall, the library snubbed any mention of D-Day.
Last month they put up a half-hearted exhibit to commemorate the Holocaust. Will they even acknowledge
V-E Day? Dont hold your breath.
Palisades Park remains an excellent example of what
happens when history is re-written to suit a changing
population demographic. And its very scary.
So thanks Joy Kurland. Ill never forget.
Robin Katz, Palisades Park

member would be denied admission to Israel for any


improper reason, because Israel does not discriminate.
Mancoll said, We hope that VSB will take us up on
our offer to work closely with us, in partnership with
other pro-Israel communities around the state, to offer
an educational program within the next twelve months
targeted at informing VSB membership on the nefarious
nature and dangers of the BDS movement.
I hope they will too, because then VSB will learn two
things. Firstly, Legal Insurrections Professor William
Jacobson has rightly talked about the infiltration of
the BDS movement into the VSB case. At least 40 proBDS groups, all of them committed to the elimination of
Israel as a sovereign Jewish and democratic state, loudly
praised the VSBs decision. Additionally, one of the organizers of the petition, VSB member Ashraf Nubani, has
represented Hamas terrorist leaders as well as a charity with links to al-Qaeda. So what Martingayle and his
colleagues must understand is that at a minimum, VSB
has been co-opted by a virulently anti-Zionist political
agenda.
Secondly, they will learn that Israel is a normal country with heightened security concerns that affect its
entry and exit policies. Whatever half-truths the VSB
petitioners may have concocted, there is no law mandating Israeli border officials to scrutinize or bar Muslims and Arabs more than anyone else. Indeed, 250,000
Muslim and Arab visitors from countries with no relations with Israel have visited the Jewish state since 2009.
Additionally, both Israelis and Americans know from bitter experience that terrorist outrages are often committed by those entering the country as tourists. Why then,
Martingayle should ask himself, are Israels security precautions equivalent to discrimination?
This whole unfortunate episode can, I am sure, be
resolved through dialogue. Over to you, Mr. Martingayle.


JNS.ORG

Ben Cohen writes a weekly column for JNS.org on Jewish


affairs and Middle Eastern politics. His work has been
published in Commentary, the New York Post, Haaretz,
the Wall Street Journal, and many other publications.

Speaking out against Islamists

About ADL, Jewish Dems slam congressmen for inviting Dutch pol seen as anti-Muslim (May 1). The radical
Islamists are now beheading and crucifying Christians
in the Middle East in a Christian Holocaust, and chant
Death to Israel and Death to America every day. Geert
Wilders speaks out against these militant Islamists and by
so doing he receives death threats on a regular basis.
He is a hero who is defending the Jews and freedomloving people across the globe. Abraham Foxman and the
ADL no longer defend the Jews when they talk about living up to Americas ideals of tolerance when it comes to
these murderers.
Rosalie Greenberg, Teaneck

Saying Yizkor

I will say Yizkor on Shavuot remembering my relatives


who were murdered by good Christians in the first half of
the twentieth century. I also will remember the millions
of Jews who were slaughtered by good Christians during
the last 2,000 years (The persecution of Christians and
the moral challenge for Jews, May 1).
If Rabbi Prouser has no one to remember, he might say
Yizkor for the Jews who were randomly killed in Paris.
It is a shame that we vote for anti-Semites. It is outrageous to ask us to remember them fondly.
Dr. Arthur Hirsch, Fort Lee

Jewish Federation

OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY

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A Symposium featuring
Israeli and American Doctors
What you should know about

Non-Invasive Cosmetic
Treatments
May 19

7:30pm 9:30 pm

Englewood Hospital
Medical Center

350 Engle Street, Englewood


Speakers
Dr. Herbert Feinberg
Chief of Dermatology Center, Englewood
Dr. David Abramson
Chief of Plastic Surgery,
Englewood Hospital Medical Center

Israeli physicians from the


Medical Center of the Galilee
Dr. Leonid Kogan, MD, PhD
Chief of Plastic Surgery
Dr. Assi Drobot
Attending General
and Reconstructive Surgeon
For information, please contact
Ethan Behling | ethanb@jfnnj.org
201.820.3955
Sponsored by
Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey
and
Englewood Hospital Medical Center

TRANSFORMING LIVES.
INCLUDING YOURS.
JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015 33

Jewish World

Back in power, charedi parties aim


to dismantle religious reforms
BEN SALES
TEL AVIV Israels last governing coalition, divided on war, peace and economics, did agree on one thing: Israels religious policies had to change.
Now it appears that the incoming coalition will be organized around the opposite
principle: Those changes must end.
A coalition agreement signed last week
between the Likud party led by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and the charedi
Orthodox United Torah Judaism faction
promises to dismantle a raft of legislation
enacted in the last two years that chipped
away at several longstanding entitlements
enjoyed by the charedi community. Shas,
the Sephardic charedi party, signed its
own coalition agreement with Likud this
week. That will cement the power of religious parties in the next government.
Led by the upstart Yesh Atid party, the
last government passed laws to include

charedim in Israels mandatory military


draft and encourage the teaching of math
and English in government-funded charedi
schools. The government, which did not
include the charedi parties, also allowed
dozens of municipal Orthodox rabbis to
perform conversions, vastly increasing
the number of conversion courts from the
four controlled by the charedim. Other
laws cut subsidies to charedi yeshivas and
large families, many of whom are charedi.
The Likud-UTJ agreement promises to
repeal the conversion decision, increase
subsidies to yeshivas and large families,
and relieve charedi schools of the obligation to teach secular subjects. The agreement also gives the incoming defense minister sole authority to decide whether to
implement the draft law, effectively allowing him to choose not to enforce it. A UTJ
lawmaker will head the powerful Knesset
Finance Committee, while Shas will control the Religious Services Ministry, which

handles most religion-state policies.


In the last Knesset, people tried to blur
Judaism and to strengthen democracy at
Judaisms expense, said Yair Eiserman, a
spokesman for UTJ lawmaker Uri Maklev.
We have an opportunity in the present
government to strengthen Israels definition as a Jewish state.
Charedi Israelis are celebrating the
agreements as a return to a comfortable
status quo, but advocates for religious
pluralism are struggling to figure out how
to advance their cause, which has significant public backing. A September poll
by the religious pluralism advocacy NGO
Hiddush found that two-thirds of JewishIsraelis back legalizing civil marriage, and
64 percent support recognizing Conservative and Reform conversions. A 2011 Hiddush poll found that 87 percent of JewishIsraelis supported drafting charedim into
the Israel Defense Forces.
The public needs to tell its leaders what

it wants, Knesset member Ofer Shelach of


Yesh Atid said. The publics role doesnt
end with voting in the election. The public needs to make clear that if a majority of the public thinks there needs to be
partnership in IDF service and work, they
need to express it.
The draft law, which passed in March
2014 despite mass charedi street protests, aimed to right a historic imbalance
in Israeli society. Mandatory military service is a rite of passage for most Israelis,
one from which charedi Israelis had been
exempt since the states founding in 1948.
Yesh Atids chairman, Yair Lapid, touted
the law as a realistic compromise that
would equalize the burden in Israeli
society.
But the three-year delay in its implementation its toughest provisions were
not due to go into effect until 2017 made
many Israelis skeptical about whether
the law would ever have a real effect.

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Jewish World

Yaakov Litzman, left, head of United Torah Judaism, and Shas leader Aryeh Deri
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to take part in equalizing the burden, but in


a fair way and not in a populist way, said
Shmuel Drilman, CEO of WeBetter, a new
media company focused on charedi advocacy. Its a process, and United Torah Judaism is committed to it, as opposed to Lapid,
who just wants to fight.
When he called elections last year,
Netanyahu said he wanted to partner
with the charedi parties, which have long
protested Yesh Atids reforms. Now religious pluralism activists who welcomed
the reforms hope to forestall their repeals
through grassroots mobilization, lobbying,
and legal action. Hiddush CEO Uri Regev
hopes that Israels Supreme Court will rule
a renewed charedi draft exemption illegal,
as it did in 2012.
There will be multifaceted litigation
launched on a variety of issues, Regev
said. The coalition agreements are violating core principles of Israeli constitutional
law and any notion of equality.
But Yizhar Hess, CEO of Israels Conservative movement, said the reforms
hardly affected non-Orthodox Jews, so
neither will their repeal. The conversion
reform only expanded Orthodox conversion, keeping Conservative and Reform

ceremonies unrecognized. Yesh Atid have


focused on civil unions rather than the
draft, Hess said.
They should have been insisting on
a reform in marriage, he continued. If
there were civil unions, it would have
touched the lives of so many Israelis that
no government would have been able to
change it. Instead they dealt with things
that were marginal.
Shelach said that Yesh Atid hopes to
mobilize the Israeli public to oppose the
coalition agreements, but secular Israelis
have yet to fill the streets in protest. To
pressure the Israeli government, Regev
and Hess instead are looking across the
ocean. They hope the coalition agreements will convince American Jewish leaders, who began to organize a campaign for
Israeli marriage reform in 2013, to increase
their activism.
Hiddush plans to partner with Jewish
diaspora leadership and American leadership in pointing to the fact that these issues
are not just an Israeli concern, Regev
said. They are a matter of global concern
because they will determine the face of
Israel in the next chapter.


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Jewish World

Talking with Alan Dershowitz


Lawyer blames Obama for falling out with Bibi
WARREN BOROSON

ome years ago, Bibi Netanyahu


was chatting with the noted
criminal lawyer Alan Dershowitz
in Israel. He took him aside and
asked, in a whisper, So, did O.J. do it?
Dershowitz, now retired from Harvard
Law School, had joined O.J. Simpsons
defense team after Simpsons wife was
murdered and O.J. was charged with her
death.
The lawyer thought about Bibis question, then responded, also in a whisper, Tell me. Does Israel have nuclear
weapons?
Although hes been friendly with both
men, Dershowitz who calls himself a
Zionist is foursquare behind Netanyahu
in his feud with President Barack Obama.
In a recent telephone interview with this
newspaper, Dershowitz explained why he
sides with Netanyahu and answered
such questions as Why do lawyers have
such a bad a reputation? And Would he
have defended so evil a man as the Nazi
physician Josef Mengele? Or the convicted Soviet spies, the Rosenbergs?
Dershowitz is quick-thinking, funny,

Alan Dershowitz thinks President Barack Obama acted out of personal pique
toward Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

courteous (hearing me start to say something just as he did, he always let me go


first), and surprisingly candid. Many of
his positions are well-known: He favors a
two-state solution with the Palestinians,
has criticized Israel for its expanding settlements, endorsed Obama for president,
favors (limited) animal rights, and wants

almost complete freedom of expression.


Q. Could you have predicted a fallingout between Obama and Netanyahu?
AD: Yes. Theyre both very strong personalities, both no-nonsense types. But I
think the falling-out is almost exclusively
the fault of Obama. He has acted childishly. There may have been opportunities

for private criticism, but Obama has taken


every opportunity to publicly insult Netanyahu, either directly or through his surrogates. And its a very serious failing on the
part of Obama, and his foreign policy, to
make this issue [keeping Iran from making nuclear weapons] so personal and to
be so petulant.
Q. Can there still be a reconciliation?
AD: Between the two countries, obviously. I dont know whether there will be
any personal reconciliation.
Q. If Hillary gets elected, might she have
similar trouble with Netanyahu?
AD: Not at all. I believe that Hillary will
learn the lessons of the Obama administration. Look, any objective observer and
Ive heard this from Democrats, Republicans, and close friends of Obama
believes that hes acted immaturely toward
Netanyahu. And he has personalized it far
too much. Ill give you an example.
When Prime Minister Netanyahu said
that during the election that this is no time
for a two-state solution, and after the election he said hes still open to a two-state
solution, Obama instead of welcoming
the second point repeatedly condemned
the first point. That was just dumb. And

Defending Alan Dershowitz


Some misconceptions cleared, some questions clarified
WARREN BOROSON
So many misconceptions have been
floating around about Alan Dershowitz that its hard to know where to
begin.
Accusation: He will blindly defend
Israel against any criticism whatsoever.
Actually, he has written about (for
example) the misguided continued
occupation and the wrong-headed
expansion of settlements.
Another accusation: He will defend
anyone so long as he gets a huge
fee.
Actually, he turns down lots of potential clients professional criminals, such as drug dealers and gang
leaders. And he takes on about half his
cases on a pro-bono basis (no fee).
Other things you may not know
about Dershowitz:
He helped John Lennon avoid
deportation on charges of using
marijuana in 1975. (His fee: a record
album signed by Lennon. Alas, it was
lost.)
He declined to represent the man
who killed Lennon: I didnt feel comfortable helping a defendant who had
killed my former client. He also declined to defend Yigal Amir, accused
36 JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015

of assassinating Yitzhak Rabin, prime


minister of Israel. One reason: He
deeply admired Rabin.
He discouraged Frank Sinatra from
hiring him to bring suit against Kitty
Kelley, who had written an unflattering
book about the singer.
Norman Mailer, the late novelist,
asked Dershowitz to represent Jack
Henry Abbott, who was serving time
for murder and who became a bestselling author. Dershowitz once asked
Abbott whether he had snitched on
other prisoners, as was rumored.
Abbott leaped across the table and
grabbed Dershowitz by the neck. The
guards rescued him, but his last words
to Abbott were: No way Im becoming your lawyer!
He was consulted by the lawyers
for Edward Kennedy after the Massachusetts senator drove his car off a
bridge on the island of Chappaquiddick, resulting in the death of a young
woman. If the full truth were to be
known, he has written, it would not
tarnish the senators well-deserved
reputation as one of the great political
figures of the last half century. (Later,
he worked closely with Senator Kennedy on various legal matters.)
He helped represent O.J. Simpson,
who never paid his fee.
He also was consulted about Angela

Alan Dershowitz was on O.J. Simpsons defense team; the football player
was acquitted, to most onlookers chagrin. Jeremy Irons played Claus von
Bulow, whom Mr. Dershowitz defended on appeal, in Reversal of Fortune.
Mr. von Bulow was acquitted.
Davis, a leader of the American Communist Party, when she was charged
with being an accessory to murder
in connection with a shootout at a
courthouse. Years later, while she was
visiting the Soviet Union, Dershowitz
wrote to ask if she would help a list
of (mainly) Jewish Soviet prisoners.
Some were charged with trying to
immigrate to Israel. Daviss secretary
called back to say that the people
on the list werent political prisoners:
They are all Zionist fascist opponents
of socialism.
Yes, he has lost cases. He was the
appellate lawyer for Mike Tyson in his
prosecution for rape, suggesting that
the young woman who had accused

him had been out for money.


Its interesting how Tyson chose
him as his lawyer. When Dershowitz
met with him, Tyson asked: What
do you think of me? Replied Dershowitz, If youre innocent, youre a
schmuck. For visiting a woman in a
hotel at 2 in the morning without any
witnesses, a woman who could accuse him of rape. Tyson turned to his
entourage and said, This mans calling me a schmuck. Hes right. I want
to know why you guys didnt call me a
schmuck. Hes hired. I need somebody
whos willing to call me a schmuck
when I am a schmuck.
The judge in the case seems to been
SEE DERSHOWITZ PAGE 38

Jewish World
Obama is very smart. So you cant explain
that on the basis of policy or intelligence.
It can only be explained on the basis of the
fact that Obama has put personal pique
ahead of national policy.
Q. What do you think of the U.S. governments recent agreement with Iran with
regard to nuclear weapons?
AD: I think its a terrible deal, and I
think the way it was negotiated put us
in an extraordinarily weak position to
either accept a bad deal or to reject it. Its
the process of negotiation that has been
so amateurish. What mostly concerns me
about Obamas foreign policy is its amateurism. It seems to be based more on
personal considerations rather than the
national security of the United States.
Q. Youve said you hope that Hillary
doesnt approve of the agreement?
AD: I hope she doesnt.
Q. Do you want Hillary elected
president?

AD: At the moment I do. I favored her


when she ran against Obama.
Q. What about Elizabeth Warren?
AD: I would not vote for Elizabeth Warren. Because she would not attend Netanyahus speech. And for me that was a disqualifying act.
Q. You object to the agreement partly
because you dont think Iran can be
trusted?
AD: Even the Obama administration
knows that Iran cant be trusted. They
think that they can postpone the inevitable, Irans getting a nuclear weapon, by
eight or 10 years. Its a change.
When President Obama called me into
the Oval Office and sat with me eyeball
to eyeball, and told me that the policy of
the United States was that Iran will never
develop nuclear weapons, I think he
meant it at that time, but that that policy
has been changed and its been changed
without the consent of the American

people or the Congress. And I think its a


terrible mistake. I think the policy should
still be that Iran should never develop
nuclear weapons. And I think this administration has now said, we shall not stop
them from developing nuclear weapons
after a period of time.
Q. Youre still in favor of a two-state
solution?
AD: I am, and I think its not only possible, but that it will happen. I think its the
only plausible result, and Ive advocated
that since 1970, well before the Israeli government advocated that.
Q. Why have you never run for public
office?
AD: Im too controversial.
Q. Have you ever been asked?
AD: Sure, when I was young. But I like to
be controversial, I like to express my views
openly and not worry about any impact
my views might have on any election.
Q. I read that you turned down Bobby

Fischer, the chess champion, as a client.


[Fischer wanted Dershowitz to represent him at no cost; but he wouldnt play
a quick game with one of Dershowitzs
young sons.] Any there any other famous
people youve turned down?
AD: Ive turned down a lot of famous
people who wanted me to do things for
them that I didnt think was in their best
interest. I never make the decision to take
a case based on someones celebrity.
Q. Would you have turned down someone like Josef Mengele, the monstrous Nazi
physician?
AD: I probably would have strangled
him before he had the opportunity to ask
me the question! Then Id need someone
else to defend me.
Q. Is there anyone in history you wish
you had had an opportunity to defend?
AD: Of course. Jesus. Imagine if a Jewish lawyer had won an acquitted for Jesus!
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JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015 37

Jewish World
avoided. No Crusades. No Inquisition! So
I would love to have defended Jesus in
front of the Roman authorities.
Q. What would your defense have
been?
AD: Free speech. He was a Reform
rabbi basically, calling for changes in
Jewish law. He said, I come not to destroy
the law but to validate it. So he had the
right to say what he said. Much evil has
been done in his name, and much good,
but Jesus himself was just a nice Jewish
boy from Nazareth who didnt like some
of the rabbis. I understand that very
well. I didnt like some of my rabbis.
Q. Would you like to have defended
the Rosenbergs?
AD: Yes, but I would have put on a
very different defense. Julius Rosenberg
was clearly guilty, and Ethel was not.
And I think I could have saved Ethels
life Im not so sure about Juliuss.
Q. Why are so many liberal Jews
against Israel?
AD: First of all, theyre not liberals.
Its radical leftist Jews who are against
Israel. Im a liberal Jew. Most of my liberal friends are supportive of Israel.
Usually its the same radical left that
hates America that hates Israel, and
often they hate Israel because Israel is
so close to America. That would be true
of [Noam] Chomsky, [Norman] Finkelstein all of them hate America, and
their hatred of Israel is derived from
their hatred of Western values. I think
that recently there have been some
liberal Jews, like J Street, who are antiIsrael but they dont admit it. Take their
position on Iran. Theres virtually no

Dershowitz
FROM PAGE 36

blatantly biased against Tyson; she


refused to admit exculpatory evidence. An appeal was turned down.
In his career, Dershowitz has written, he has never seen a less fair
trial and appeal than that accorded
Mike Tyson.
Among the other people whose
defense he joined: Michael Milken,
the money manager who went
to prison; Patty Hearst, the kidnapped heiress convicted of bank
robbery and using a firearm in a
felony; Claus von Bulow, accused
of murdering his wife, Sunny; Mia
Farrow against a lawsuit brought
by Woody Allen; Leona Helmsley,
the real-estate tycoon, who (he has
written) was boring and rather
stupid, and Natan Sharansky, a Soviet dissident arrested in the Soviet
Union in 1977 on charges of spying
for the United States. (Dershowitz
may have saved Sharanskys life.)
Born in Brooklyn 76 years
ago, Dershowitz graduated from
Brooklyn College, then from Yale
Law School, where he was first in
his class. He joined the faculty of

38 JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015

one in a leadership position in Israel


who likes the deal. J Street supports the
deal. I dont think its fair for J Street to
call itself pro-Israel when it doesnt represent even the liberal part of the Israeli
political spectrum.
Q. Any comments on the causes of
anti-Semitism?
AD: I think that anti-Semitism often
results from jealousy of Jewish success.
I think it often grows out of hatred for
Israel for example, Muslim anti-Semitism, which is rampant in many parts
of the world. Many Muslim extremists
take the view that even if Israel were the
size of a postage stamp, it would be in
violation of Islamic law, that there cant
be even a tiny Jewish state on what is
regarded as holy Muslim land. There
are some Jewish extremists who take
the same view about Muslims, that there
should be no non-Jewish presence or
sovereignty over the land that was historically part of Israel. And I think that
both of those extreme views have to be
rejected.
Q. Another general question: Why
do lawyers in general have such a bad
reputation?
AD: Because they deserve it! Too
many lawyers are just in it for the
money and dont pay adequate attention to their clients needs. There are
just too many bad lawyers out there,
and the bar doesnt do a good enough
job in monitoring them bad lawyers,
crooked lawyers, deceptive lawyers,
lawyers who cheat their clients, lawyers
who victimize people. So I think the bar
has to do a better job.

Harvard Law School and in 1967


became, at 28, the youngest full
professor in Harvard Laws history.
He retired from Harvard in 2013.
Dershowitz has a good sense of
humor, too which helps account
for the fact that a few of his many
books, like Chutzpah, have been
best-sellers.
Hes a a secular Jew, but he and
his family observe Jewish holidays.
At one time he defended the
preacher Jim Bakker, and in gratitude Bakkers then wife, Tammy
Faye, sent him a Passover Haggadah. It had been written, as it
turned out, for use at seders conducted by Jews for Jesus.
At a Dershowitz seder, he mischievously had one guest solemnly
read from Fayes Haggadah: This
is the bread of affliction that the
people of Israel had to eat when
they fled from Egypt. Then the
reader continued: The holes in the
matzoh represent the wounds on
the body of our Savior, Jesus Christ,
who in his body was punctured
during his crucifixion.
The seder was delayed for quite
a long time, derailed by hysterical
laughter.

A woman holds up a sign during a rally led by faith leaders in front of Baltimore
City Hall calling for justice in response to the death of Freddie Gray.

ANDREW BURTON/GETTY IMAGES

After Baltimore
How Jews are trying to make things better
RON KAMPEAS AND
MELISSA APTER
WASHINGTON From roundtable discussions to protests and prayers to candid
talk with law enforcement officials, Jewish communities are joining in the debate
about community policing in the wake of
several high-profile deaths of unarmed
black men while in police custody.
Officials were short on specifics, but
several said that protests in Baltimore in
response to the death of Freddie Gray on
April 19 have sparked a determination to
confront the tensions between police and
minority communities.
The Jewish Council for Public Affairs,
the umbrella public policy body, last week
called for a new national conversation
about police tactics.
At this critical time in our nations history, it is abundantly clear that a conversation not only needs to be had between law
enforcement and disenfranchised communities, particularly the African American
community, but within our own communities, JCPA President Rabbi Steve Gutow
said in a statement.
In several communities, Jewish organizations with strong ties to both the AfricanAmerican community and law enforcement see themselves as well positioned to
help bridge differences.
In Baltimore, where violent protests
led the mayor to impose a curfew on the
city for several days after Grays death,
the local chapter of Jews United for Justice
appealed to its members in the legal profession to volunteer as a legal observer,
jail care, or hotline volunteer during the
protests.
In Detroit, the Michigan Round Table,
an umbrella body for minorities in which
local Jewish groups take part, called an
emergency meeting in response to the

Baltimore protests. Heidi Budaj, the AntiDefamation Leagues regional director,


said the meeting mainly was an opportunity to share reactions to what was unfolding in the Maryland city.
These incidents are bringing to the
forefront in our discussions feelings that
may have been hidden for many, many
years, Budaj said. All of us want to
resolve any issues before it turns into Ferguson or Baltimore.
Through its various law enforcement
training programs addressing bias and
hate crimes, among other topics, the ADL
long has forged close relations with local
police departments. At its national conference here over the weekend, the ADL featured a session about police-community
relations and the organizations role in
improving them.
In Detroit, Budaj said the Jewish community is also part of a coalition, Advocates and Leaders for Police and Community Trust, that has held monthly meetings
with area police about police brutality
and other touchy issues. The group rallied
members, including 14 rabbis from Baltimore and Washington, to join in protests
in Baltimore on May 1.
In Ferguson, in suburban St. Louis, protests following last summers shooting
of Michael Brown by a local police officer were a major catalyst for a renewed
national debate about police relations with
the African-American community.
What were focusing on is healing
whats broken and building a St. Louis that
is safe, equal, and just for all, said Batya
Abramson-Goldstein, the executive director of the Jewish Community Relations
Council in St. Louis, which helps organize
an annual 9/11 commemorative concert
that last year made reconciliation its focus.
The Ferguson protests also drew attention to the increased militarization of local

RCBC
RCBC

Jewish World
police departments.
To suggest we need police looking
like they did in Ferguson, its outrageous, Gutow said. When you see the
blue uniform of police it should be a sign
of friendship.
The expanded availability of militarygrade hardware to local police departments coincided with a growing concern about counterterrorism following
the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001. John Cohen,
who until last year was a senior counterterrorism official at the U.S. Department
of Homeland Security, said the war footing police departments adopted after the
attacks put community policing on the
back burner.
After race riots in the early 1990s,
there really was a broad and energized
movement within the policing discipline
to expand local community cooperation
focused on preventing crime, improving life, said Cohen, now a professor at
Rutgers Universitys School of Criminal
Justice, who is helping to direct a project
examining attacks on faith communities.
But after 9/11, he said, there was a shift

in priorities.
Jewish groups benefited greatly
from the shift, according to Paul Goldenberg, the director of the Secure Community Network, the security arm of the
national Jewish community. Concerned
that Jewish institutions were prime targets for terrorism, Jewish groups won
significant grant money from the Department of Homeland Security including 97 percent of all funds doled out in
2012 under the departments Non-Profit
Security Grant Program, according to a
report that year in the Forward.
Goldenberg praised law enforcement
agencies for the extraordinary amount
of time spent assisting Jewish communities. A degree of militarization was
inevitable, he said, to face terrorists at
home and abroad.
Police officers a decade ago were carrying 357s with six shots and rounds on
their belts, and they found themselves
being confronted by adversaries with
automatic weapons, Goldenberg said.
The paradigm has changed.

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Jewish World

Why Ethiopian-Israelis took to Tel Avivs streets


BEN SALES

Protesters in Tel Aviv demonstrate against violence and racism directed at Israelis of Ethiopian descent on May 3.

BEN KELMER/FLASH90

intersection and then marching down Tel Avivs central Ayalon highway.
Protesters chanted slogans like Whether black or
white, were all people and Every violent police officer needs to be put away. They held signs with slogans
such as Being black is not a crime. Some waved Israeli
flags.
Clashes began as police cleared protesters from the
highway, and violence intensified as thousands of demonstrators filled the central Rabin Square. Fighting
escalated as protesters threw glass bottles and stones
at police, and police responded with stun grenades and
a water cannon. Demonstrators began to chant police
state and remained past midnight.
By the time the crowds dispersed, dozens of people
had been injured, including 56 police officers. Blood
stained the usually tranquil square.
Despite challenges, some Ethiopian-Israelis remain
optimistic.
Even as protesters vented frustrations, many of them
said they felt a sense of belonging in Israel. A large
Israeli flag waved over the demonstrations early hours,
and Ethiopian-Israelis at the protest proudly referenced
their military service. Protesters said that after serving
in the Israel Defense Forces and living in the state as
loyal citizens, they didnt feel the state treated them as
they deserved.
I gave to the state because Im part of the country,
said Avi Sabahat, 27, who immigrated to Israel from
Ethiopia at age 4. Theres some hidden discrimination.
Its in the conscious and the subconscious. Theres been
a little improvement, but you dont feel it. Theres integration in society, but not enough.
Dana Sibaho, a 29-year-old Ethiopian-Israeli, said that
a decade ago, the older generation, who had come to
Israel as adults, were too focused on their absorption
to demand better treatment from the state. But she
said younger Ethiopians, either born in Israel or having
arrived as small children, feel empowered to demand
their rights.
Things will change, she said. They wont silence
us. Not like our parents, who accepted things. We know
what were up against. Now we wont shut up. 
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TEL AVIV A historically disadvantaged black minority is galvanized when one of its members appears to
suffer brutality at the hands of police and the episode
is caught on video. Peaceful mass protests devolve into
violence. Police crack down in an attempt to control
crowds.
Its not Baltimore or Ferguson. Its Tel Aviv, which
was rocked by unrest Sunday after a video of a uniformed Ethiopian-Israeli soldier, Demas Pakada, being
beaten by Israeli police made the rounds online. Here
are four things you need to know about the Israeli
demonstrations.
A police beating sparked the protests.
The video that triggered the Tel Aviv protests shows
Pakada holding his bicycle on an empty sidewalk. A
police officer approaches him, grabs him, punches
him, and pushes him to the ground. Pakada then stands
up and exchanges words with the officer.
Chanting on Sunday in Tel Aviv, protesters invoked
the name of Yosef Salamsa, a 22-year-old EthiopianIsraeli man who committed suicide in July. Salamsa
killed himself four months after police approached
him in a public park and accused him of breaking into
a house, then tased him before he was released. Shlomi
Salame, the deputy mayor of Salamsas coastal hometown, Binyamina, said the police broke his spirit,
according to the Israeli news website Walla.
But unlike the United States, where a series of highprofile law enforcement killings of unarmed black
youths and men have made headlines, until now there
have been no known parallel cases with Ethiopians in
Israel.
On Monday, Pakada met with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, along with a delegation of EthiopianIsraeli community leaders.
But the protests also are responding to Ethiopians
systemic challenges.
Pakadas beating triggered protests, including one
in Jerusalem several days earlier, but it also unleashed
long-simmering grievances in the Ethiopian community. Protesters said they were troubled by lagging educational opportunities, discrimination when applying
for government jobs, and high rates of Ethiopian-Israelis in military prisons.
Israel has celebrated the approximately 125,000
Ethiopian immigrants who arrived beginning in the
mid-1980s through 2013. And Israels government has
provided a range of benefits to Ethiopian-Israelis, from
free college tuition to lower mortgage rates. But challenges remain.
Ethiopian-Israelis are overrepresented in military
prisons and underrepresented at the nations universities. And in 2012, the average Ethiopian familys income
was just over half the Israeli average.
We want to receive rights just as we fulfill our
duties, said Yosi Minyuv, 27, an Ethiopian-Israeli who
served four years in the Israeli army, including as a combat officer. Were second-class citizens. We want good
work and they block us.
The Tel Aviv demonstration began peacefully but
ended in violence.
When protesters Ethiopian and others first
gathered in Tel Aviv on Sunday afternoon, they
chanted and held signs as police stood at a distance.
As the protest swelled beyond 1,000 people, the demonstrators formed a giant circle, blocking a major

JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015 41

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Jewish World

Jewish artists Lincoln portrait


gets a brief moment in the sun
PENNY SCHWARTZ
BOSTONMost days, a little-known 19thcentury portrait of Abraham Lincoln by Solomon Nunes Carvalho (1815-1895) is tucked
away in archival storage at Brandeis Universitys Rose Art Museum.
But on April 28, the deeply allegorical
portrait, painted in 1865 by the AmericanJewish artist, made a rare public appearance, the first in a decade. The painting is
the only known portrait of Lincoln by a Jewish contemporary.
The occasion was a home-turf book
launch for Brandeis professor Jonathan
Sarnas Lincoln and the Jews, co-written
with Benjamin Shapell, a collector of rare
manuscripts and historical documents
and the founder of the Shapell Manuscript
Foundation.
The rich allegorical painting, which is
reproduced in Sarna and Shapells book,
reveals the cultural milieu of Carvalho,
an observant Jew of Spanish-Portuguese
descent. Born in Charleston, South Carolina,
in 1815, Carvalho was part of a highly cultured and esteemed family, Sarna said.
The 44-by-34-inch oil painting captures a
deeply somber Lincoln, seated, gazing away
from viewers. In his right hand, he clutches
a scroll with the words from his famous second inaugural address, with malice toward
none, with charity for all. To his left, a
statue of George Washington looks over his
shoulder. To his right, beyond the folds of a
deep burgundy drape, is the ancient Greek
Cynic philosopher Diogenes, who has suddenly dropped his lamp in amazement, a
reference to his endless search for an honest man. In the far distance, the dome of the
Capitol is bathed in golden light, suggesting
an allusion to national unity.
The dramatic portrait anticipates many
themes now taken for granted, Sarna noted:
The pairing in national stature of the first
president and Lincoln, and the exaltation of
Lincolns second inaugural address, something that was not clear in March 1865, when
he delivered it.
Theres some debate about whether the
painting was completed before or after
Lincolns assassination. If it was completed
post-assassination, it echoes an earlier
work Carvahlo did of his childhood synagogue Beth Elohim, which he painted in
extraordinary detail from memory after
it burned during Charlestons great fire of
1838, Sarna said.
Carvahlo, who was living with his wife,
Sarah, and their four children in New York
City and working as a portrait artist and photographer in 1865, had an unusual career. In
1853, he joined explorer John Fremont on
his search for a western railroad route to the
Pacific Ocean. That made him the first Jew
42 JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015

Above, at a Brandeis event on April


28, visitors look at Solomon Nunes
Carvalhos portrait of Abraham Lincoln.
 ASHLEY MCCABE, COURTESY OF BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY
At right, Jewish artist Solomon Nunes
Carvalho, whose portrait of Lincoln is on
display.
WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

appointed as an official photographer for an


exploration of the American West, according to Arlene Hirschfelder, author of Photo
Odyssey: Solomon Carvahlos Remarkable
Western Adventure.
While his collection of daguerreotypes
from the expedition have been lost, the
Lincoln portrait, initially in private hands,
eventually was acquired by Justin Turner of
Los Angeles, who, with others, donated the
painting to Brandeis in 1958.
The painting was on display for years
at the American Jewish Historical Society,
when the organization was housed on the
Brandeis campus. Since AJHS relocation (it
is now in New York City), the painting has
been in storage. Sarna thanked outgoing
Brandeis President Frederick Lawrence for
arranging for the paintings display.
Its wonderful to bring it back for this
anniversary, he said, referring to the 150th
anniversary of Lincolns assassination. The
painting, he said, is an important example
of how Jews participated in the history of
JTA WIRE SERVICE
the time.

Jewish World

Gifts from mom that money cant buy


EDMON J. RODMAN
LOS ANGELES What gifts do our mothers give us?
Not the kind we see in the mirror. Like me, youve probably already accounted for where your eye color, nose
shape, and eyebrows that seem too close to each other
come from.
Im talking inner gifts, those money cant buy our proclivities, opinions and even character traits, called middot
in Hebrew.
One year on Mothers Day, in an 11th-hour hunt for a
gift at the Los Angeles County Museum of Arts store, I
found myself drawn to a beautiful umbrella printed with
a design taken from a painting by the French Impressionist Gustave Caillebotte. But as I stood in the checkout line
admiring my find, I wondered: Was I buying this for my
mother or myself?
Yes, Ive seen the articles about women who are horrified to suddenly realize that they have become their Jewish mothers. But I was trying hard not to buy into that. Just
because I loved Impressionist art didnt mean I shared my
moms taste. Well, maybe a little. OK, a lot. But even so,
was that reason for panic?
One of the Ten Commandments does tell us to honor
thy father and mother, I reasoned, and in Leviticus the
order is reversed, if we needed a reminder of who comes
first. Recognizing the things that our mothers have passed
on to us I think is a way of honoring, as well as reckoning
with, their influence.
For me, the gift list begins at the supermarket. Every
time I go shopping, my mother, Pearl, is with me, even
though she died a few years ago. She was never a lover of
packaged bread, and as I push the cart down the bakery
aisle, its almost as if I hear her epithet for many of the
products she found there vile coming from the PA
system. Thus I usually frequent Jewish bakeries, where
the sound I hear is more like kvelling.
Its the same at department store sales. Even though
she wasnt particularly thrifty, when Mom found something she thought useful and stylish, the credit card came
out. As a teenager, I vividly recall her reaction when she
brought me before a sales rack of perfectly fine clothes
but I couldnt find anything to my taste. In total frustration she tossed several shirts and pants to the floor and
walked away.
Today, to make amends, I find it difficult to pass up a
sale and have a closet of tasteful yet somehow slightly offcolor and oddly patterned apparel to show for it. And in
what I believe to be a twist from the usual husband-wife
arrangement, Im the one exhorting my wife to buy things
at a good sale. Why is it that she sometimes walks away?
Mom also comes with me to shul, where she was an
unapologetic shusher. Woe to anyone talking in her
vicinity.
As an adult I feel compelled to uphold my heritage. Not
a shusher, I am more of the fish eye type or, if that is
ignored, a cold stare guy. Lets not even talk about my
reaction to your cellphone going off.
In terms of middot, Rabbi Yisroel Salanter (Lipkin), the
founder of the Musar movement, encouraged people to
work on a list of traits that includes honor, patience, and
humility. Without being exposed to his teachings, Mom
had me working on these three, as well as a few others.
Like Rabbi Salanter, tops on her list was truth, and
she definitely was one to tell it like it is, especially if she
thought you were falling short in some area or werent
coming clean about something, like What was that explosion I heard coming from your bedroom?
Mom also was big on two additional traits from the

rabbis list: cleanliness and order. In her home, every room was
dust free and every box labeled. She tried her best to mold me
in her pattern, but apparently only influenced me to go in the
opposite direction. Where she liked clear tabletops, I have stacks
of books, papers and broken bibelots. Where she had drawers of
neatly folded wrapping paper, boxes of note paper and thankyou cards, my tastes run more to stationery store in a twister.

Have I passed on any of these traits to the next generation,


my own children? A few, I hope. But isnt that what ldor vdor
is all about?
As for the art-covered umbrella, I have it now. But that day,
understanding the influences that had drawn me to it, I gave
it to my mom. Every time I open it, the umbrella reminds me
JTA WIRE SERVICE
of her gifts.

March with

Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey

New Yorks

Celebrate Israel Parade


Sunday, May 31

Meet at the JCC of Paramus


E. 304 Midland Ave., Paramus

Bus departs at 11:30am (subject to change)


Cost: $18 per person | $65 per family
Fee covers bus, Celebrate Israel t-shirt
and snacks
No large backpacks or strollers, please

Jewish Federation

OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY

To register, please call Joyce at 201-820-3907 or


e-mail JoyceG@jfnnj.org to register by May 14

r
u
o
y
Bring s!
friend
JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015 43

Jewish World

Free-spending Miami Marlins


Sabbath-observing exec says it now makes sense
HILLEL KUTTLER
MIAMI For Joel Mael, the Shabbat-observing vice chairman of the Miami Marlins, the
teams free spending in the offseason was
wise from a financial perspective.
Signing Giancarlo Stanton, 25, to a record
13-year, $325 million contract, and fellow
outfielder Christian Yelich, 23, to a 7-year,
nearly $50 million deal were parts of a
plan to retain the clubs budding talent and
vault it into playoff contention while saving
money down the line.
But this was the Marlins, who had a track
record of dumping high-salaried players
or those about to reap riches. The Stanton
contract stunned the Major League Baseball
community.
The Marlins offseason also included
hefty contract offers to such young stars-inthe-making as pitcher Jose Fernandez, 22,
outfielder Marcell Ozuna, 24, and infielder
Adeiny Hechavarria, 25.
We assembled a group that we think has
real all-star talent on it, and the way salaries
have been going and the way the market
has been going, some of these numbers will
get even higher as you go down the road,
Mael said during an offseason interview in
the spacious office he shares at Marlins Park
with team president David Samson. Were
willing to take the risk of buying them out
of a couple of years of free agency and their
arbitration years.
Mael, 57, is neither a lifer in the game
nor a raw finance-industry professional
recruited for the sports analytics revolution. He brings a Wall Street sensibility as a
partner in two investment companies and
a career in the junk bond business. The
Marlins new philosophy involved input

throughout the franchise, he said, primarily the baseball department.


Mael spoke while visiting Miami, where
he goes twice monthly, staying in hotels,
which he prefers to having a second home
here. He lives with his family in Lawrence,
a Long Island suburb in the heavily Jewish cluster known as the Five Towns; he is
the towns deputy mayor. Mael is an active
member of the Young Israel of Lawrence,
and his four children graduated from a local
Jewish school.
Shabbat observance kept Mael from
attending the 2009 groundbreaking for
Marlins Park and from watching key games
on television over the years. Nor will he
walk to games, at home or on the road,
from nearby hotels doing so is not in the
spirit of Shabbat, he said.
Since Ive been [Shabbat observant] my
whole life. I dont find it a challenge at all,
the Boston-raised Mael said. Its a red line
I dont cross.
Last summer, his passion for bicycle riding Mael estimates logging 3,000 miles
in 2014 included a 185-mile overnight
trek from New Jersey to the Pennsylvania
camp of Chai Lifeline, a Jewish organization that assists seriously ill children. He
raised $41,888 in the charity ride, in which
more than 300 bicyclists participated. That
effort his daughter had worked at the
camp and the Marlins charitable efforts
are something we need to do as Jews and
as involved citizens, Mael said.
Hes a solid community guy, with a good
reputation and he has a World Series ring
and I dont, said Stuart Mehl, a neighbor
who rides occasionally with Mael.
On this day, Mael wasnt wearing that
Marlins 2003 World Series championship

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44 JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015

Joel Mael, at Marlins Park in Miami, predicts long-term success for his club.

HILLEL KUTTLER

ring, earned soon after Jeffrey Loria


bought the team and brought Mael with
him from Montreal, whose Expos Loria
had owned. But Mael enjoyed discussing his teams quest for more jewelry.
With Fernandez, the National
Leagues 2013 Rookie of the Year, who
made just eight starts in 2014 before suffering an elbow injury requiring Tommy
John surgery that will sideline him into
this season, what youre risking ...
youre making up with the [character]
of this kid, said Mael, speaking admiringly of Fernandezs escape from his
native Cuba.
The kid is just a very, very special
person, he remarked.
As to locking up Stanton, runner-up
in the N.L.s 2014 Most Valuable Player
Award voting, Mael said, We needed to
gain credibility back in the market. He is
going to be the main piece we are putting into place, and then were going to
sign around him.
Following the Marlins championships in 1997 and 2003, though, the
organization unloaded their best, highest-salaried players.
Fans were miffed, and the lower
attendance accentuated a self-fulfilling
prophecy that Florida cannot be a baseball region. Then, within months of its
2012 move to the new, publicly funded
Marlins Park, Miami did it again, jettisoning stars like shortstop Jose Reyes
and starting pitcher Mark Buehrle.
But youngsters like Hechavarria,
obtained from Toronto in the ReyesBuehrle trade, have returned the team
to respectability. Despite opening this

season with two losses the opener


attracted a sellout crowd, and that was
followed the next night by a Passover
at the Park promotion featuring a pregame performance by the Maccabeats a cappella band the Marlins now
appear ready to contend. Last year it
finished second in the N.L. East with a
77-85 record, 15 wins more than in 2013.
The Marlins latest rebuilding plan is
brilliant, veteran baseball journalist
Mel Antonen said.
They potentially have one of the
best teams in the National League,
Antonen said. I think there should be
renewed excitement in southern Florida, because its fun to watch a young
team grow.
Mael sees things similarly.
The off-season moves were a financial decision as [much as] a credibility
decision, he said, adding that signing
up-and-comers to long-term deals carries risk, but could be much more economic over time.
With that, Mael led a visitor downstairs. The late-afternoon sun shone
through an open roof and onto grass
being irrigated by sprinklers. Mael
lifted the cover of an enormous tank
near home plate and peeked at the fish
swimming there.
He ducked into the dugout, strolled
past an indoor batting cage, and arrived
in the Marlins clubhouse. Mael turned
on the lights, darkness giving way to
empty lockers whose occupants could
soon fill the room with more victory
cheers than the Marlins have recently
JTA WIRE SERVICE
known.

Jewish World
BRIEFS

Hamas cracks down


on pro-Islamic State groups
Hamas, the Palestinian terrorist organization that governs the Gaza Strip, has launched a widespread crackdown on pro-Islamic State groups in Gaza. The crackdown includes the deployment of masked gunmen into
Salafi extremist strongholds and the establishment of
checkpoints, the Associated Press reported.
The tensions between the two terrorist groups began
on May 3 when Hamas destroyed a mosque belonging to
a group known as the Supporters of the Islamic State in
Jerusalem. The group responded by issuing a statement
in which it threatened to kill Hamas members unless
Hamas released several men, including a local Salafi
sheikh, who were detained by Hamas.
In a statement, the Salafi group said Hamas had
demolished the mosque in a manner that even the Jewish and American occupation has not done, the Egyptian daily newspaper Al-Masry al-Youm reported.
The Salafi group added that in the light of Hamass
new behavior, we renew our loyalty to Abu Bakr alBaghdadi [leader of the Islamic state] and call on him
to strengthen his influence and to launch a campaign in
Palestine and to unite in the fight against the Jews and
their accomplices.
Ironically, the pro-Islamic State Salafi groups consider Hamas, which fought a 50-day war against Israel
last summer, as being too soft on Israel and for failing to
JNS.ORG
impose stricter Islamic laws in Gaza.

Lauryn Hill bows to BDS,


cancels Israel concert
American hip-hop and R&B singer Lauryn Hill
announced the cancellation of a scheduled concert in
Israel only three days before the performance, following
pressure from the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions
movement.
Ive wanted very much to bring our live performance
to this part of the world, but also to be a presence supporting justice and peace, Hill said in a statement on
her website. It is very important to me that my presence or message not be misconstrued, or a source of
alienation to either my Israeli or my Palestinian fans.
Hill added that she would seek a different strategy to
bring my music to all of my fans in the region.
After rising to fame in the 1990s as a member of
the hip-hop group The Fugees, Hill won five Grammy
Awards for her solo album, The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill, in 1998.
Pro-BDS groups have pressured many artists, musicians, and academics to boycott Israel over its policies
toward the Palestinians. But a number of prominent
musicians and bands such as Madonna, Paul McCartney, Elton John, and the Rolling Stones have rejected
those calls and forged ahead with performances in the
JNS.ORG
Jewish state.

Islamic State claims


responsibility for
attack in Texas
The Islamic State terror group claimed responsibility
for the shooting attack at a free speech event in Texas
on Sunday night that featured cartoons of the Prophet
Muhammad, marking the first time the group has admitted to carrying out an attack on U.S. soil.
Two of the soldiers of the caliphate executed an
attack on an art exhibit in Garland, Texas, and this

exhibit was portraying negative pictures of the Prophet


Muhammad, Islamic State said in a statement broadcast on
its official radio station.
We tell America that what is coming will be even bigger
and more bitter, and that you will see the soldiers of ISIS
(Islamic State) do terrible things, the group added.
On Sunday, two gunmen opened fire at an event hosted
by the American Freedom Defense Initiative called Jihad
Watch Muhammad Art Exhibit and Cartoon Contest, in

Garland. One security guard was wounded, and the gunmen were subsequently killed by police officers.
The FBI identified one gunmen as Elton Simpson from
Phoenix. Simpson was previously charged in 2010 by federal prosecutors for attempting to travel to Somalia for the
purpose of engaging in violent jihad. The other gunmen is
identified as Nadir Hamid Soofia, 34, from the same apartment complex in Phoenix.

JNS.ORG

Honor Diaries is the first film of its kind to bring together an international group of womens
rights champions to break the silence on honor violence. In the face of one of the worlds most
widespread human rights disasters, join us as we kick off a global movement proclaiming
Culture is No Excuse for Abuse

SPEAKER

Raheel Raza, One of the Stars of Honor Diaries

Wednesday, May 27
7:30 PM

Teaneck Cinemas

503 Cedar Lane, Teaneck, NJ

Buy Tickets
www.jfnnj.org/honordiaries
Admission is $20

HOSTED BY:
Jewish Federation of Northern New Jerseys Jewish Community Relations Council & Womens Philanthropy
CO-SPONSORED BY:
National Council of Jewish Women Bergen County Section | Northern NJ Region of Hadassah
Bergen County Alternatives to Domestic Violence | Center for Hope and Safety | Project Sarah
Jewish Women International Johannes Post | Jewish Women International Skyview
Jewish Family Service of Bergen and North Hudson | Jewish Family Service of North Jersey | Manavi
NJ Coalition for Battered Women | National Council of Jewish Women Jersey Hills Section
YWCA Bergen County healingSPACE

Jewish Federation

OF NORTHERN NEW JERSEY

JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015 45

Gallery
1

n 1 Gan Aviv Fair Lawns Dvorim class showed their


pride in Israel for Yom Haatzmaut. COURTESY GAN AVIV

n 4 Sinai students at Joseph Kushner Hebrew Academy celebrated Yom Haatzmaut. COURTESY SINAI

n 2 The Anshei Lubavitch Womens Circle in Fair Lawn enjoyed a challah-baking workshop. COURTESY ANSHEI LUBAVITCH

n 5 To celebrate Israels Independence Day, students in the Paul and Shirley Pintel preschool at
the Fair Lawn Jewish Center/CBI visited a kibbutz and made orange juice. COURTESY FLJC/CBI

n 3 Seventh grade religious school students at the JCC of


Paramus/Congregation Beth Tikvah learned about the Bergen County High School of Jewish Studies. Adults, in back
row, from left, are the schools principal, Bess Adler; Rabbi
Arthur Weiner, teacher Ellen Azizollahoff, and the director of
the JCCs religious school, Marcia Kagedan. COURTESY JCC/CBT

46 JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015

n 6 Holocaust Remembrance Day was observed at Five


Star Premier Residences of Teaneck on April 16. Because
many residents are Holocaust survivors, poems, songs, and
personal stories were shared. Resident Jean Strauss, joined
others in lighting yahrzeit candles. COURTESY FIVE STAR

Dvar Torah
Emor: We are not alone

ver the past 10 years, I have


attended six AIPAC Policy
Conferences in Washington
D.C. This annual gathering of
pro-Israel supporters offers an outstanding array of experiences. You hear and
meet important world leaders and key
decision makers. You learn from experts
on almost any topic affecting the Middle
East, Israel, and U.S.-Israel relations.
You marvel at demonstrations of Israeli
technology and know how. But the experience that always leaves the deepest
impression on many is the presence of
so many articulate and caring non-Jews
in the crowd and on stage.

There are
strangers among
us whom we
should not fear.
There are
strangers we
should welcome
and thank.
Yes, AIPAC does a great job recruiting
people of many different backgrounds
to attend its Policy Conference. Presidents of student bodies from colleges
around the country are recruited. African American leaders, young and old,
are recruited. Representatives of the
Hispanic community are recruited. They
come, learn, support, and contribute.
And, truly, they come not only because
they are recruited, they come because

they care deeply about Israel and the


Jewish people.
Its amazing. After six years of attending the largest annual gathering of Jews in
the Western Hemisphere, I am still most
impressed by the presence of so many
non-Jews. And I am not alone. When I
asked some of our college students who
attended what impressed them the most
about the Policy Conference, they also
said the presence of so many non-Jews.
Why is this case? Why are we so
amazed when non-Jews show love and
support for Israel and the Jewish people?
I suppose its because we Jews are convinced that we are alone. The prophecy
of Balaam has proven true. The Jews are
a nation that dwells alone Ahm lvadad
yishkon. Of course, our history has given
us good reason to feel this way pogrom,
expulsion, and Holocaust. But, the truth
is, and its an important truth, a vital
truth, we are not alone.
There are strangers among us whom
we should not fear. There are strangers
we should welcome and thank. There are
strangers among us who are a blessing.
And, of course, we Jews ask Why?
Why would a non-Jew join our cause,
support our people, defend our nation?
Its difficult for we embattled Jews to
understand. But understand we must.
For if we misunderstand their motivation, we might come to reject their help
and that would be very dangerous. The
simple truth is that we cant survive without them
Why would a non-Jew support our
cause and stand by our side. Our Torah
portion gives us an answer. Leviticus
22:18 says Eesh eesh mibayt Yisrael
oomin hager byisrael asher yakriv korbanoh When any man of the house of
Israel or of the stranger in Israel presents

3.023
MORTGAGES AS LOW AS

No Points

a burnt offering Rabbi


of Israel and the Jewish
Harold Kushners commenpeople even when I receive
tary from the Etz Hayim
hate mail and even when it
Chumash explains, Nonseemed that the world does
Israelites living among the
not understand. Even when
Israelites will be motivated
I am called a Jew lover in a
to worship the God of Israel
negative sense. I will continue to stand with Israel
and their offerings will be
and the Jewish people.
welcome.
Rabbi
Israel needs friends who
Non-Israelites, gerim,
Benjamin
are not Jewish and who
strangers among us, will be
Shull
can lobby Congress on her
motivated to worship the
Temple Emanuel of
behalf. Relationships matGod of Israel. I understand
the Pascack Valley,
ter. And so as long as I have
this to mean, in modern
Conservative
breath in my body, I will
parlance, that when nonalways be a friend to Israel
Jews get to know us and
and never, ever turn my back on the land
come close to us, they will be motivated
of Israel, nor the people of Israel.
by the God we worship that is, our values, our practices, our most cherished
Rev. Flowers loves Israel because he
ideals. Thus we Jews, when we are most
was a devotee of Dr. Martin Luther King,
Jewish, not when we are assimilated, but
who loved Israel. Rev. Flowers loves
when we are worshipping our God, when
Israel and the Jewish people because he
we are living our highest ideals, then and
has known Jews living out their highest
only then will we be an inspiration to the
ideals by helping his community through
strangers among us, not all but many,
riots and earthquakes. Rev. Flowers loves
and those strangers will become friends.
Israel and Jews because the God he worships has an enduring covenant with
I believe this with all of my heart. We
the people of Israel, a covenant that is
Jews are most influential when we are
eternal.
living out our highest ideals. Those hundreds of non-Jewish leaders at AIPAC
Israel faces many daunting challenges
and, yes, the thousands, even hundreds
an almost-nuclear Iran, terrorists at
of thousands, even millions of non-Jewthe borders, hostile neighbors, millions
ish Zionists, Christian Zionists, Evangeliwho will undermine her very reason
cal Christian Zionist support us because
for being. AIPAC certainly does a good
they are motivated by our God.
job of reminding us of these challenges.
The following are the words of Rev.
But AIPAC also reminds us that we Jews
Kenneth Flowers, a black pastor from Los
and the Jewish state have many friends,
Angeles, who spoke at a past conference:
from powerful politicians to thoughtful young people. They are our friends,
God has ordained me as one of his
not because they want to convert us or
ambassadors to Israel and to the Jews,
undermine us; they are our friends, the
and for that I am eternally grateful. I cannot help but speak out on behalf of Israel
strangers among us, because they are
and the Jewish people because it is in my
motivated by our God and by us living
DNA. And I will continue to be a friend
out our highest ideals.

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JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015 47

Paramus Antiques
Estate Buyers

Paying Cash for:

Crossword
FIRST LADIES BY ALAN OLSCHWANG
EDITOR: DAVIDBENKOF@GMAIL.COM
DIFFICULTY LEVEL: MANAGEABLE

FREE
APPRAISALS

Dishes Glassware Watches


Stamp Collections Old Toys Lamps
Paintings Dolls Hummels
Jewelry - Rings, etc. Flatware Coins
Antique Furniture Trains
Pocket Watches Diamonds Rugs
Buying Musical Instruments of All Kinds

We will turn your old stuff into cash!


Please call or stop in.

Buying Anything Old!


One Piece or a House Full
Will Travel - House Calls
201-334-2257 Ask for Paul
by appointment

Across
1 Complied with a request from 40D during
services

RAISE A KIDDUSH CUP FOR BROADWAYS


NEWEST MUSICAL COMEDY HIT!

4 Its well known in what might be called


Silicon Wadi

9 Cave of Machpelah contents


14 Bk. before Esther
15 Jack Tramiel bought it from Warner

IRRESISTIBLE CAST!
IRRESISTIBLE PRICE! 75!

Communications in 1984

G
O R C HR E AT
A S LO S E AT S
W AS

16 Chuck Schumer might take it to work


17 Reaction of Moses upon seeing the

golden calf

18 First female to chair the U.S. Federal


Reserve

20 Haifa, e.g.
22 Beershebas place
23 Bk. after Amos
24 With 6D, one of Jennifer Anistons

I LOVED EVERY SECOND. YOU GOTTA GO SEE IT!


LIVE WITH KELLY & MICHAEL

co-stars in Marley & Me

26 Luise Rainers 1936 and 1937

Photos: Andrew Eccles and Joan Marcus

acquisitions

A MADCAP MUSICAL WITH AN ALL-STAR CAST!


TIME OUT NY

THE FRESHEST, FUNNIEST MUSICAL OF THE SEASON!


USA TODAY

YOULL LAUGH. YOULL CRY. YOULL BE HOME BY 10.


Brooks Atkinson Theatre, 256 W. 47th Street (Between Broadway & 8th Avenue)
Ticketmaster.com 877-250-2929 ItShouldaBeenYou.com

Like us on Facebook
facebook.com/jewishstandard
48 JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015

Down
1 Sound heard eight days after many births
2 ___ Sol: Israeli electronics company
3 Body known for its parting
4 ___ Gen: Sharons rank during the Six
Day War

5 Slow down the first plague, perhaps


6 See 24A
7 Sen. Ron Wydens state
8 Word with archaeological or Web
9 ___ Kwon Do (Sport in which Israel won
gold in the 2010 Youth Olympic Games)

10 One ___ Jump: Jazz standard frequently played by Benny Goodman

11 Toast served with chopped chicken livers


12 ___-eyed (kind of priest disqualified
by Leviticus)

13 Hotel known for the performances of


Joey Bishop, Sammy Davis, Jr., etc.

19 De Carlo who performed with Al Lewis


in The Munsters

28 First female American astronaut


33 Map close-up of central Jerusalem, say
34 Chris who starred with Ari Graynor in

21 What Leona Helmsley was in 1989


25 Cousin ___: Character along with Carolyn

Whats Your Number?


35 Max Fleischer frame
38 Jacob and the angel did it in the break
of dawn
39 It might relieve you after listening to
a yenta
40 Deuteronomy directive
41 Bond girl player Green
42 When Tu bShvat sometimes occurs in
Madrid
43 Maker of the golden calf
44 First American female cantor
46 Optimistic comment by girl receiving
well wishes before her bat mitzvah
service
49 Mount from which Moses saw Canaan
50 Judahs second son
51 Tel Aviv vis-a-vis Haifa on a map,
poetically
55 Followers of Zion?
58 First Jewish Miss America
61 Georges lyricist brother
62 Ulan ___: Capital city nearly 5,000
miles NNE of Jerusalem
63 Herbie Flam contemporary Fraser
64 Israeli hill
65 Its apparent in some sermons
66 Where some sukkot are built
67 Not ___ (Franz Rosenzweigs answer
whether he wears tefillin)

27 Leah to Rachel, briefly


28 Ghetto language other than Yiddush
29 Technion Israel Institute of

The solution to last weeks puzzle


is on page 55.

Joness Morticia in a 60s TV series

Technology, briefly

30 Keep the tenement rented


31 2010 Liev Schreiber movie ___ Day
32 Enjoy some schnapps
35 Feeling that motivated Eve to bite into
the forbidden fruit

36 Musk who succeeded Zeev Drori as


CEO of Tesla Motors

37 Key component at the Wise


Observatory in the Negev

39 Burtons character opposite Taylors


Cleopatra

40 Hes at your service


42 Some Brandeis grads
43 Vigoda of Barney Miller
44 First sitcom for Seinfeld
45 Like a devout persons work during
the Shabbat

46 Bernard Malamuds Natural Roy


47 Ryan of Love Story
48 Kugel ingredient, perhaps
52 Start of a decision as to who gets to eat
the last hamantasch

53 Israels is just slightly larger than New


Jerseys

54 Nicholas who introduced the Cantonist


Decrees, e.g.

56 Forbidden fruit holder


57 The Dead Sea: Sea of ___
59 A star of Joel Schumachers D.C. Cab
60 Super ___: game console featured on
an episode of The Goldbergs

Arts & Culture

Horst von Wachter, left, and Niklas Frank at the site of a mass grave outside Zolkiew, Ukraine. Philippe Sands is in the background.

A Nazi Legacy
Two sons diverge on mass-murdering fathers
URIEL HEILMAN

ts hard not to get emotional watching the superbly rendered A Nazi


Legacy: What our Fathers Did.
But unlike many Holocaust documentaries, the overwhelming feelings arent
sadness and loss, though there are those,
too. They are exasperation and anger.
In the film, which premiered at the
Tribeca Film Festival in New York last
month, British-Jewish lawyer Philippe
Sands tells the story of two men, both the
children of high-ranking Nazi figures.
Niklas Frank is the son of Hans Frank,
Hitlers lawyer and the governor-general
of Nazi-occupied Poland. The elder Frank
was hanged in 1946, after being found
guilty at Nuremberg for complicity in the
murder of Polands 3 million Jews.
Horst von Wachter is the son of Otto
von Wachter, an Austrian who served as
the Nazi governor of Galicia (now Lviv,
Ukraine) and died in hiding in 1949 while
under the Vaticans protection.
Frank, an author and journalist, is well
known in Germany because of his controversial 1987 best-seller, The Father: A Settling of Accounts, which detailed his revulsion toward the man who became known
as the Butcher of Poland. Frank keeps a
wallet photograph of his fathers corpse

taken right after he was hanged.


By contrast, Wachter holds his own father
in high esteem, refusing to acknowledge his
role in the mass murder of the Jews, even as
Sands presents him with increasingly clear
and disturbing evidence of it.
Sands, whose grandfather is from the
area that fell under Wachter and Franks
command, and who lost most of his family during the Holocaust, narrates the story
of what happens when a sons love for his
father collides with the immutable facts of
history.
Both Frank and Wachter who knew
each other as children and have remained
friends were born in 1939. Wachter
describes an idyllic childhood shattered
by Germanys defeat in 1945. In his home,
he shows Sands a family photo album that
intersperses shots of family outings with
photos of his father and his Nazi associates. Theres his father with Heinrich Himmler, the SS military commander. Under
another photo, the scrawl reads A.H.
for Adolf Hitler.
I was transported back 70 years to the
heart of an appalling regime, but Horst
was looking at these images with a different eye from mine, Sands narrates. I
see a man whos probably been responsible for the killing of tens of thousands of
Jews and Poles. Horst looks at the same

photographs and he sees a beloved father


playing with the children and hes thinking
that was family life.
By contrast, Franks memories of his
parents are mostly bitter. The couple had
a loveless marriage, and his father wanted
a divorce. But Franks mother appealed to
Hitler, who forbade the divorce until after
the war. Hans Frank obliged.
My father loved Hitler more than his
family, Frank says.
Frank recalls visiting the Krakow ghetto
as a young boy with his mother, who went
to shop for furs because she knew the
Jews could not refuse whatever price she
named. Frank is unsparing in his assessment of his father.
My father really deserved to die at the
gallows, he says.
The film intersperses interviews with
Frank and Wachter with film and photos
from the war. Some of the archival material is astonishing, including footage of
Hitler and other top Nazis. Sands goes
with Frank to the cell at Nuremburg that
held his father until the day of his execution. The three men visit the remains of
the synagogue where Sands own family
likely spent their last Shabbat before the
Nazis, under Wachters fathers command,
burned it to the ground.
Wachter cannot bring himself to

acknowledge his fathers crimes at any


point, offering one excuse after another
and relying on vague generalities to rebut
evidence that he bore responsibility for
the deaths of tens of thousands of Jews.
For us, the facts are irrefutable. Otto von
Wachter established the Jewish ghetto in
Lviv, then known as Lemberg. He ran the
transportation that shipped Jews off to concentration camps. He passed up Himmlers
offer to return to his native Vienna, choosing to stay put and see his job through.
For Wachter, none of that is enough to
change his fundamental belief that his
father was a good man, who played but a
small part in the Nazi regime.
He was absolutely somebody who
wanted to do something good, Wachter
says. His fault was that he believed Hitler
would change his politics.
Several pivotal scenes anchor the film,
each intensifying the effort to get Wachter
to come to terms with his fathers crimes.
In one, a panel discussion with Sands,
Frank, and Wachter, the audience turns
on Wachter for his unapologetic admiration of his father. Wachter squirms in his
seat but holds firm.
In another, the three men visit the hall
in Lviv where Franks father announced
the implementation of the Final Solution
in 1942, crediting Wachters father for
his work. Within a month of that speech,
75,000 local Jews were killed.
In the third, the three men visit the killing field in Galicia where some 3,500 Jews
were shot by the Nazis, and Sands own
family members met their fate. Wachter
wanders around, maddeningly resisting
all efforts to admit his fathers culpability
in the mass murder.
There must be tens of thousands of
Austrians lying dead around here, too,
Wachter argues. I see this as a battlefield,
you see.
The film has its flaws. Were told practically nothing about Frank and Wachter
apart from the war, including what they do
for a living or anything about their spouses
or children. But these shortcomings arent
central to the narrative.
Near the end of the film, the three men
attend a memorial ceremony for Ukrainian
nationalists who fought the Soviets during
World War II. They talk with a middleaged man who wears a swastika around
his neck and tells them how proud he is of
his divisions wartime legacy.
Then they run into an elderly World
War II veteran. When the man is told who
Wachters father was, he shakes his hand
enthusiastically, telling him that his father
was a decent man.
Wachter, pained for so much of the film,
finally seems at ease. He smiles.
JTA WIRE SERVICE

JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015 49

Calendar
Cholent, Cugel, and
Conversation. Kinder
Shul for 3- to 8-year-olds,
while parents attend
services, 10:30-11:45. In
conjunction with the
centers monthly simcha
kiddush. 70 Sterling
Place. (201) 833-0515 or
www.jcot.org.

Moroccan Cooking
with Merav Dahan at
Chabad of Teaneck,
8 p.m. $25. 513 Kenwood
Place. (201) 907-0686 or
rivkygoldin@gmail.com.

Thursday
MAY 14

Sunday
MAY 10
Benefit run in Tenafly:
The Kaplen JCC on the
Palisades hosts its annual
Rubin Run, a familyfriendly community race.
Half marathon, 7:30 a.m.;
10K at 8:30; 5K at 10.
www.jccotp.org/rubinrun
or email rubinrun@
jccotp.org. Race day
registration available.
Breakfast, giveaways,
free babysitting, warmups, and trophies.
411 E. Clinton Ave.
(201) 408-1412 or
mkleiman@jccotp.org.

Three-time
Emmy
nominee,
comedian,
writer, producer, and actress Carol
Leifer, is guest speaker at the
upcoming Womens Philanthropy
events in Rockleigh. The Jewish
Federation of Northern New
Jersey holds its annual spring
philanthropy lunch on Tuesday,
May 12, at 10:15 a.m. Reservations,
(201) 820-3958 or loisg@jfnnj.
org. Womens Philanthropy, a
division of the Jewish Federation
of Rockland County, hosts a
spring outreach and fundraising
event on Thursday, May 14,
at 6 p.m. Reservations, www.
jewishrockland.org/spring-gala.
Both parties are at the Rockleigh,
26 Paris Ave., Rockleigh.

MAY

12 & 14

Friday
MAY 8
Shabbat in West
Nyack: The Rockland
Jewish Academy offers
Pancakes & Pajamas
Preschool Shabbat,
5 p.m., at RJA on the JCC
Campus in West Nyack.
Email orlee.krass@gmail.
com.

Shabbat in Tenafly: The


Temple Sinai Rock Band
performs during services,
7:30 p.m. 1 Engle St.
(201) 568-3035.

Toddler program
in Tenafly: As part
of the shuls Holiday
Happenings program,
Temple Sinai of Bergen
County offers music,
stories, crafts, and snacks
for pre-k students and
their parents, 9:30 a.m. 1
Engle St. (201) 568-3035.

Saturday
MAY 9
Shabbat in Teaneck: The
Jewish Center of Teaneck
offers services at 9 a.m.;
then congregant Barbara
Schneider moderates
a discussion, Whats
in a Jewish Name? as
part of the Three Cs

50 JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015

One Book One


Community climax
in Teaneck: Helene
Wecker, author of this
years Jewish Federation
of Northern New
Jerseys One Book One
Community selection,
The Golem and the
Jinni, discusses her
book at Temple Emeth,
7 p.m. Dessert reception
follows. 1666 Windsor
Road. (201) 820-3904,
nancyp@jfnnj.org, or
www.jfnnj.org/oboc.

MAY 12
Tribute dinner in
Washington Township:
The Jewish Historical
Society of North Jersey
honors Moe Liss at its
annual dinner at the
Bergen County YJCC,
6:30 p.m. 605 Pascack
Road. inahar@optonline.
net.

JoJo Rubach
Cooking in Tenafly:
Chef JoJo Rubach
teaches Mediterranean
Vegetarian Made
Easy at the Kaplen
JCC on the Palisades,
7 p.m. 411 E. Clinton Ave.
(201) 408-1457.

Get rid of clutter:


Pascack Valley/Northern
Valley Hadassah says its
Time to Get Organized
with Gayle Gruenberg,
at the Bergen YJCC,
7:30 p.m. Refreshments.
605 Pascack Road.
Susan, (201) 573-8351.

COURTESY CHABAD

Friday

Decoding Judaism in
Woodcliff Lake: Valley

Shabbat in Closter:

Rabbi Dov Drizin

Chabad continues a sixsession course, Judaism


Decoded: The Origins
and Evolution of Jewish
Tradition, led by Rabbi
Dov Drizin at Chabad,
7:45 p.m. 100 Overlook
Drive. (201) 476-0157
or ValleyChabad.org/
AdultEd.

Moroccan cooking in
Teaneck: The Chabad
Womens Circle presents

Saturday
MAY 16
Music in Leonia: Eugene
Marlows Heritage
Ensemble performs
original compositions
and arrangements
of Jewish melodies
in various jazz, AfroCaribbean, Brazilian,
and classical styles at
Congregation Adas
Emuno, 7 p.m. Featured
band members include
Grammy Award-nominee
Bobby Sanabria and
Michael Hashim. Wine,
coffee, and dessert. 254
Broad Ave. (201) 592-1712
or www.adasemuno.org.

Comedy and theater


in River Edge: Temple
Avodat Shalom
presents a collection
of hilarious one-act
plays and surprises
from The Company
Theatre Group, 8 p.m.
Dessert reception. $18.
385 Howland Ave.
(201) 489-2463
or Brotherhood@
avodatshalom.net.

Comedy in Emerson:

Tuesday

Shabbat in Closter:
Temple Beth El offers
confirmation services
led by Rabbi David S.
Widzer and Cantor Rica
Timman, 7:30 p.m. 221
Schraalenburgh Road.
(201) 768-5112 or www.
tbenv.org.

Helene Wecker

1666 Windsor Road.


(201) 833-1322 or www.
emeth.org.

MAY 15
Temple Beth El offers
services led by Rabbi
David S. Widzer and
Cantor Rica Timman with
the Shabbat Unplugged
Band, featuring
congregants, 7:30 p.m.
221 Schraalenburgh
Road. (201) 768-5112 or
www.tbenv.org.

Shabbat in Teaneck:
Temple Emeth offers
musical services, 8 p.m.

Congregation Bnai
Israel hosts three
comedians from Headline
Entertainment, Moody
McCarthy, Robyn Schall,
and Johnny Lampert,
8:30 p.m. Tickets include
two margaritas or
beers. Soft drinks and
munchies. BYO kosher
wine. 53 Palisade Ave.
(201) 265-2272 or www.
bisrael.com.

recovered precious art


and artifacts stolen by
the Nazis during WWII.
East 304 Midland Ave.
(201) 262-7691 or www.
jccparamus.org.

Preschool program in
Woodcliff Lake: Temple
Emanuel of the Pascack
Valley holds Club Katan
for children who will
begin kindergarten in
September, 10:15 a.m.
87 Overlook Drive.
(201) 391-0801, ext. 12.

Family concert in
New City: Rick Recht
performs at a Yom
Yerushalayim (Jerusalem
Day) family concert for
PJ Library in Rockland
County at the New City
Jewish Center, 1 p.m.
47 Old Schoolhouse
Road. (845) 362-4200,
ext. 180 or lepstein@
jewishrockland.org.

Homage to the Catskills


in Franklin Lakes:
Temple Emanuel of
North Jersey salutes
the Catskills, aka the
Borscht Belt, with a
screening of Rise and
Fall of the Borscht Belt,
2 p.m. Refreshments.
The second and third
parts of the series will be
shown in June and July.
Ice cream and popcorn.
558 High Mountain Road.
(201) 560-0200 or www.
tenjfl.org.

In New York
Monday
MAY 11

Sunday
MAY 17
Benefit walk in Wyckoff:
The Temple Beth Rishon
community hosts the
annual Murray Prawer
walk; later, congregant
Stephanie Naphtali talks
about living with MS for
20 years. All funds raised
benefit the Multiple
Sclerosis Center at Holy
Name Medical Center
in Teaneck. Registration
begins at 9 a.m.; walk at
9:45. 585 Russell Ave.
(201) 891-4466.

Monument Man
speaking in Paramus:
Harry Ettlinger, the
last of the original
Monuments Men,
speaks at a breakfast
sponsored by the Mens
Club of the JCC of
Paramus/Congregation
Beth Tikvah, 9:15 a.m.
The Monuments Men

Mark Podwal
Podwal at JTS: Artist,
author, physician, and
former New York Times
op-ed illustrator Dr. Mark
Podwal discusses his
exhibit, featured at the
Ghetto Museum at the
Terezn Memorial in 2014,
at the Jewish Theological
Seminary, 7:30 p.m.
Preceded by a screening
of All This Has Come
Upon Us, a documentary
by Jaroslav Hovorka that
offers a glimpse into the
creative process behind

Calendar
Dr. Podwals artwork.
JTS, 3080 Broadway
(at 122nd Street) in
Manhattan. Reservations
and photo ID required.
Email heguzman@jtsa.
edu to register. www.jtsa.
edu.

Thursday
MAY 14
Choir at Carnegie Hall:
The 30-voice Dessoff
Chamber Choir is
featured in the world
premiere of The Ethics
by acclaimed Israeli
violinist/composer Ittai
Shapira at Zankel Hall in
Carnegie Hall, 7:30 p.m.
Concert commemorating
the 70th anniversary
of the liberation
of Theresienstadt
concentration camp.
CarnegieCharge,
(212) 247-7800 or go to
carnegiehall.org.

Singles
Saturday
MAY 9
Lag BaOmer in NYC:
JSTF (Jewish Singles
Thirty Five to Fifties)
celebrates Lag BaOmer
at 230 Fifth, the 20th
floor ballroom at 230
5th Ave., Manhattan,
10 p.m.-3 a.m. DJ

entertainment, cash
bar, dancing, snacks,
and novelties. www.
JSTFEVENTS.com.

Sunday
MAY 17
Senior singles meet in
West Nyack: Singles
65+ meets for a social
get together at the
JCC Rockland, 11 a.m.
450 West Nyack Road.
Refreshments. $3. Gene
Arkin, (845) 356-5525.

Singles meet in
Caldwell: New Jersey
Jewish Singles 45+ meets
for fun, an original group
game with prizes, and to
mingle at Congregation
Agudath Israel, 12:45 p.m.
$10. 20 Academy Road.
Sue, (973) 226-3600, ext.
145, or singles@agudath.
org.

Middle Eastern food/


mingling in Manhattan:
YUConnects, in
conjunction with the
Yeshiva University
Sephardic Community
Program, presents Dine,
Chat, Meet, for modern
Orthodox singles, 22-32,
at the Edmond J. Safra
Synagogue, 5:30 p.m. 11
E 63rd St. yuconnects.
com/upcoming-events or
yuconnects@yu.edu.

Rabbi Saul Berman

Program commemorates
the Voting Rights Act
The Jewish Federation of Northern New Jersey and the
Bergen County NAACP invite the public to a free program
commemorating the 50th anniversary of the passage of
the Voting Rights Act, at the Dr. John Grieco Elementary
School on Monday, May 18, at 7:30 p.m.
Rabbi Saul Berman, an active participant in the civil
rights movement who was present during the 1965 demonstrations in Selma, Ala., and Richard Smith, New Jersey
State NAACP Conference president, will speak.
The school is at 50 Durie Ave., Englewood. For information, call Natalya at (201) 227-1875.

This Jewish Home Outing golf foursome includes, from left, Paul Traub, Steve Jutkowitz, event co-chair
Warren Feldman, and Woodcliff Lake Mayor Jeffrey Goldsmith.
COURTESY JHF

Golf/tennis/card outing will bolster the JHF


The Jewish Home Foundation of North Jersey holds its
21st annual Golf, Tennis, and Card Outing at the Montammy Golf Club in Alpine on Monday, May 18. This
years outing honors the centennial of the Jewish Home
Family. Howard Chernin and Warren Feldman are the
outing co-chairs, Howard Blatt is the golf co-chair, and
David Edelberg, Susan Penn, and Barry Wien are the
tennis co-chairs.
The day begins with brunch at 9:45 a.m.; golf begins
with a shotgun start at noon; and tennis is at 1 p.m.
Cards and other games, including mah-jongg and social
and A.C.B.L.-sanctioned bridge are at 12:45. Cocktails
and dinner follow at 5:30. The daylong fundraiser will
benefit the programs and services the JHF provides to

the elderly in the community.


Companies can sponsor the event or send participants. Personal support can be doubled if a company
has a matching gift program.
The Jewish Home Foundation is a 501(c)(3) not-forprofit organization responsible for aiding and supporting the Jewish Home at Rockleigh, the Jewish Home and
Rehabilitation Center, Jewish Home Assisted Living,
Jewish Home at Home, and the Gallen Adult Day Health
Care Center.
For information, call Molly Shulman at (201) 784-1414,
ext. 5539, or email her at mshulman@jewishhomefdtn.
org.

Play depicts Jewish soldier


who fought for Hitler
The Mitzvah, an original
one-person Holocaust drama
conceived, co-written, and performed by Roger Grunwald, an
actor who is a child of a Holocaust survivor, tells the story of
a German half-Jew who became
a decorated officer in Hitlers
army. The play is co-authored
and directed by a Broadway
veteran, Annie McGreevey.
Roger Grunwald
It will be performed on
Thursday, May 14, at 7:30 p.m.,
at the Hilton Woodcliff Lake, and is sponsored by Eternal
Flame at Valley Chabad, an organization by the George and
Martha Rich Foundation and Valley Chabad committed to educating the next generation of the Holocaust.
Valley Chabad teens who have participated in the Eternal
Flame fellowship program also will be honored. There will also
be a post-performance lecture.

Tickets on sale
for Itzhak Perlman
and David Sedaris
Tickets went on
sale this week for
upcoming shows
at the Bergen
County Performing Arts Center.
David Sedaris is
appear on Saturday, October
10, at 8 p.m.,
and Israeli-born
Itzhak Perlman
violin virtuoso
Itzhak Perlman
will perform on
Sunday, October 11, at 7 p.m., as part of the
Wilmington Trust Cultural Arts Series. For
information, call (201) 227-1030 or go to www.
bergenpac.org or www.ticketmaster.com.
JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015 51

THE THIRD ANNUAL

CH AM PIO NS O F JE WISH VA LU ES
INT E R N AT IO N AL AWARDS GA LA
Presents a Once in a Lifetime Opportunity to hear from

J A C Q U E L I N E VA N M A A R S E N
A N N E F R A N K S BEST FRI END, WHO FEATURES PROMINE NT LY IN H E R DIARY

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THURSDAY, MAY 28
10 SIVAN 5775
5:00 PM
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info@thisworld.us
201-221-3333
RABBI
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J U DY & M I CHAEL
ST EI NHARDT

Jewish Standard MAY 8, 2015 52

Obituaries
Carmen
Esquero-Eskenasy

Carmen Esquero-Eskenasy,
ne Russo, of Harrington
Park died on April 28.
Born in Paris, she was
a Holocaust survivor and
came to New York at age
18. She was vice president
of exports for Dedeco
International Inc., in Long
Eddy, N.Y., for over 20
years before retiring.
She is survived by a son,
Alan Russo (Patricia Massimo) of Harrington Park,
nieces, and a nephew.
Donations can be sent
to the Humane Society or
the ASPCA. Arrangements
were by Gutterman and
Musicant Jewish Funeral
Directors, Hackensack.

Henry Hamburger

Henry Isaac Hamburger,


81, died on May 2.
He graduated from
Haverford College and
Columbia University
School of Law and was a
labor lawyer. He worked
for the National Labor
Relations Board and was in
private practice representing labor unions in New
York and New Jersey.
He is survived by his
wife, Teresa, children,
Martin, Eleanor, Susan,
and Sarah Bowman, and
six grandchildren. Donations can be sent to HOPE
Community Services, New
Rochelle, N.Y. Arrangements were by Eden
Memorial Chapels,
Fort Lee.

David Lipkin

Dr. David I. Lipkin, 82, of


Washington Township, formerly of Hackensack, died
on May 5.
He was a Cornell University graduate and received
a doctorate in dentistry
from Temple University.
He served as a captain
in the U.S. Army before
opening a dental practice
in Washington Township
in 1959. He was a trustee
and volunteer at the David
Goldberg Childcare Center
and was its Man of The
Year in 2003.
He is survived by his wife
Carol, ne Lazovick, his
children, Larry (Sherry),

Susan Stine (Richard), and


Robert (Illisa), and grandchildren, Jeff, Elana, Jared,
Sara, and Lindsay.
Donations can be sent to
Pascack Valley chapter of
Hadassah or the National
Parkinsons Foundation.
Arrangements were by
Robert Schoems Menorah
Chapel, Paramus.

Jocelyn
Nissenbaum

Jocelyn Levner Nissenbaum, 41, of Oakland, formerly of South Fallsburg,


N.Y., died on May 4.
She graduated SUNY
Geneseo and received
a masters from Nova
Southeastern University in
Florida. She was a speech
pathologist in New York
and in the Elmwood Park
schools.
She is survived by her
husband, Eric, her parents,
Howie and Dolly Levner, a
6-year-old son, Sam; brothers, Joe ( Julia), and Jeremy,
and a niece.
Services were at Temple
Avodat Shalom, River
Edge. Arrangements were
by Louis Suburban Chapel,
Fair Lawn.

Jean Robbins

Jean H. Robbins, ne
Cohen, of Fort Lee,
formerly of Newark and
Teaneck, died on April 29.
Born in Newark, she
volunteered for ORT and
Meals on Wheels.
Predeceased by her
husband of 53 years, Jack,
an original owner of J&J
Pharmacy in Teaneck, and
a sister, Ruth Baron, she is

survived by her children,


Marc (Renee), and Susan
Barish (David); a brother,
Leonard Cohen; grandchildren, Jason, Joshua (Pam),
Amy Kelly (Matt), and
great-grandchildren, Jack
and Sarah.
Contributions can be
sent to ORT, Meals on
Wheels, or a charity of

choice. Arrangements were


by Gutterman and Musicant Jewish Funeral Directors, Hackensack.

Anne Schupak

Anne Irmgard Schupak,


ne Gunzenhauser, 93,
of Coconut Creek, Fla.,
and Bergenfield died on
April 14.

Born in Germany, she


was a dental assistant.
Predeased by her first
husband, Willi Sachsendorfer, she is survived
by her husband, Irving
Schupak, children,
Judy Lempert, Edward
Sachsendorfer, Debra
Mendeloff (Gary), stepchildren, Steven Schupak,

Daniel Schupak (Barbara),


and Michele and Lenore;
and grandchildren and
great-grandchildren.
Contributions can be
sent to Congregation Beth
Shalom, Cocount Creek,
Fla. Arrangements were
by Gutterman and Musicant Jewish Funeral Directors, Hackensack.

Robert Schoems Menorah Chapel, Inc


Jewish Funeral Directors

Family Owned & managed


Generations of Lasting Service to the Jewish Community
Serving NJ, NY, FL &
Throughout USA
Prepaid & Preneed Planning
Graveside Services

Our Facilities Will Accommodate


Your Familys Needs
Handicap Accessibility From Large
Parking Area

Gary Schoem Manager - NJ Lic. 3811


Conveniently Located
W-150 Route 4 East Paramus, NJ 07652

201.843.9090

1.800.426.5869

The Christopher Family


serving the Jewish community
since 1900

Paterson Monument Co.


MAIN
Paterson, NJ 07502
317 Totowa Ave.
973-942-0727 Fax 973-942-2537

BRANCH
Pompton Plains, NJ 07444
681 Rt. 23 S.
973-835-0394 Fax 973-835-0395

TOLL FREE 800-675-0727


www.patersonmonument.com

201-791-0015

800-525-3834

LOUIS SUBURBAN CHAPEL, INC.


Exclusive Jewish Funeral Chapel

Sensitive to Needs of the Jewish Community for Over 50 Years


Serving NJ, NY, FL & Israel
Graveside services at all NJ & NY cemeteries
Prepaid funerals and all medicaid funeral benefits honored

The Five Wishes booklet,


a simple Living Will guide
on how to document
desired care for medical
needs, including emotional
and spiritual needs as well.
To obtain your
complimentary Five Wishes booklet
or to learn more about preplanning
options, call or visit us.

Always within a familys financial means

13-01 Broadway (Route 4 West) Fair Lawn, NJ


Richard Louis - Manager
George Louis - Founder
NJ Lic. No. 3088
1924-1996

A Traditional Jewish Experience


Pre-Planning Specialists
Graveside and Chapel Services

Barry Wien - NJ Lic. No. 2885


Frank Patti, Jr. - NJ Lic. No. 4169
Arthur Musicant - NJ Lic. No. 2544
Frank Patti, Sr. Director - NJ Lic. No. 2693
327 Main St, Fort Lee, NJ

GUTTERMAN AND MUSICANT


JEWISH FUNERAL DIRECTORS
800-522-0588

WIEN & WIEN, INC.


MEMORIAL CHAPELS
800-322-0533

402 PARK STREET, HACKENSACK, NJ 07601


ALAN L. MUSICANT, Mgr., N.J. Lic. No. 2890
MARTIN D. KASDAN, N.J. Lic. No. 4482
IRVING KLEINBERG, N.J. Lic. No. 2517
Advance Planning Conferences Conveniently Arranged
at Our Funeral Home or in Your Own Home
GuttermanMusicantWien.com

201-947-3336 888-700-EDEN
www.edenmemorial.com

JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015 53

Classified
Vacation Home For Rent

Cemetery Plots For Sale

SHORE HOUSE FOR RENT


On LBI 7/9 Bdrms, 7.5 Bths with
LARGE POOL & HOT TUB.
Remaining openings in 2015:
Memorial Day Weekend
4 days
$3,950.
Week June 27-July 4 ( call)
Week Aug. 29-Sept 5 (call)
Full details & pictures:
http://www.njshorerental.net
Email:
inquire@njshorerental.net
Tele: 908-315-3217

ABRAHAM & Sarah, Paramus,


N.J. 4 gravesites, section 2, map
#1455. 561-483-1850

CEDAR PARK-BETH EL
Four plots for $5000.00
Buyer to pay
all fees required
Details:
Carl Rod at 603-991-3304
ab1ig@yahoo.com

(201) 837-8818

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

HEICHAL HATORAH
English Teaching position
for
2015-2016
Full and Half positions in
English, three years
experience at the secondary or community college
level and a strong interest
in teaching writing required.
Please send resume and
supporting documents to
mrichman@
heichalhatorah.org

Help Wanted
KINDERGARTEN TEACHER
Growing preschool seeks a dynamic, energetic and nurturing
Head Kindergarten Teacher for the coming school year. Responsibilities include planning and implementing both Hebrew
and English curricula, providing differentiated instruction in a
center-based environment, building positive relationships with
students and parents, and being part of a collaborative team.
Candidates must have previous relevant Head Teaching experience and degree, and display warm, patient, and nurturing
sensitivity to all children.
Resumes can be emailed to franandaviva@rynj.org

LAMDEINU,

Adult Torah Learning Center,


seeks Administrator,
beginning June 2015.
People skills, computer literacy, flyer design, program planning, financial, clerical duties.
Car required.
PT M-F, some eves/weekends
Salary tbd.
Email resume to:
lamdeinujob@aol.com

Call us. We are waiting for your


classified ad! 201-837-8818

Situations Wanted

TEACHERS
With Experience
Creativity & Commitment

DAUGHTER
FOR A DAY, LLC

Choice Openings
At Yeshiva Ktana
of Passaic-Girls
Secular Studies

LICENSED & INSURED

COMPANION: Experienced, kind,


trustworthy person seeking part
time work. Weekends OK. Meal
preparation, laundry, housekeeping. Will drive for doctors appointments; occasional sleepovers. 973519-4911

Afternoons Only
sschloss@ykop.org
Fax: 973-365-1445

Situations Wanted
CERTIFIED Home Health Aide. I
take care of elderly people! Liveout. Day or night. Experienced!
Good references! Call for more
particulars. 201-313-6956
CHHA -live-in/out, own transportation, to care for elderly, clean
house, cook. References upon request. Call 973-517-4719
CNA-HHA looking to care for elderly. Live-in/out. 25 years hospital
and home care experience. CPR
training! Reliable! Very caring! 848219-4785

NEEDED:

Yavnah Academy seeks dynamic, caring, dedicated and


professional educators commited to our mission of providing
academic excellence in a warm, nuturing evironment for the
2015-2016/5776 school year.
Current opportunities include positions in:
Early Childhood
Lower School General Studies
Middle School Judaic Studies
Interested candidates should please submit their cover letter
and resume to: rebecca.gordon@yavnehacademy.org

Situations Wanted

ELDER/ CHILD CARE/ HOUSEKEEPING. Livein/out. 20 plus


years experience. Intelligent. References. 201-362-9098

Top Dollar For Any Kind of Jewelry &


Chinese Porcelain & Ivory

ANS A

Over 25 years courteous service to tri-state area

We come to you Free Appraisals

Call Us!

Shommer
Shabbas

201-861-7770 201-951-6224
www.ansantiques.com
54 JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015

Handpicked
Certified Home
Health Aides
Creative
companionship
interactive,
intelligent
conversation &
social outings
Downsize
Coordinator
Assist w/shopping,
errands, Drs, etc.
Organize/process
paperwork,
bal. checkbook,
bookkeeping
Resolve medical
insurance claims
Free Consultation

RITA FINE

201-214-1777

www.daughterforaday.com

Help Wanted

Established 2001
SPECIAL EDUCATION SCHOOL

seeking motivated and experienced special education teachers to


work in self contained elementary and high school classes as part
of an interdisciplinary team.
Qualified minorities and/or women are encouraged to apply, EEO.
Please e-mail resumes to careers@sinaischools.org

Antiques

We pay cash for


Antique Furniture
Used Furniture
Oil Paintings
Bronzes Silver
Porcelain China
Modern Art

FOR YOUR
PROTECTION

Antiques Wanted
WE BUY
Oil Paintings

Silver

Bronzes

Porcelain

Oriental Rugs

Furniture

Marble Sculpture

Jewelry

Tiffany Items

Chandeliers

Chinese Art

Bric-A-Brac

Tyler Antiques

EXPERIENCED, reliable CHHA


woman with excellent references
seeks
Full-Time,
Part-Time,
day/night, live-out position to care
for elderly. Call 201-681-7518
MATURE woman seeks job to care
for sick or elderly. live-in/out.
Years of experience. Excellent references.
201-926-9003 or 201647-1814
WARM, loving, caring Aide available to do elder care. Experienced,
reliable, excellent references. Livein or out. 908-342-9422

EXPERIENCED
BABYSITTER
for Teaneck area.
Please call Jenna
201-660-2085
Cleaning Service
AVAILABLE Monday and Thursday, every two weeks o clean your
home. Excellent references .201600-6247

Home Health Services

BERGEN HOME CARE &


NURSING, INC.
For all
your Home Care
and Nursing Needs
We have the best
RNs and HHAs
Free Consultation
Competitive rates
CHHA Classes

201-342-3402

ROYAL HEARTS HEALTHCARE


Home Care Agency
Rate: $16.00 to $18.00 per hour
Live-in $150/day
Best Care with Compassion,
Kindness, Humility, Gentleness
and Patience.
862-250-6680
care@rhhealthcare.com

Antiques

NICHOL AS
ANTIQUES
Estates Bought & Sold

Fine Furniture
Antiques
T
U
Accessories
Cash Paid

201-920-8875

Get results!
Advertise on
this page.
201-837-8818

Sterling Associates Auctions


SEEKING CONSIGNMENT AND OUT RIGHT PURCHASES
Sculpture Paintings Porcelain Silver
Jewelry Furniture Etc.

Established by Bubbe in 1940!

TOP CASH PRICES PAID

tylerantiquesny@aol.com

201-768-1140 www.antiquenj.com
sterlingauction@optonline.net
70 Herbert Avenue, Closter, N.J. 07642

201-894-4770
Shomer Shabbos

FREE APPRAISALS TUESDAYS FROM 12-2


IN OUR GALLERY. CALL FOR APPOINTMENT.

Classified
cleAning & HAuling

lAndscAping

JIMMY
THE JUNK MAN
Low Cost
Commercial
Residental
Rubbish Removal

Solution to last weeks puzzle. This weeks puzzle is


on page 48.

HEDGE TRIMMING
SHRUB SHAPING
201-384-3026

201-661-4940

PARTY
PLANNER

tree serVice

VAL-KAM
TREE SERVICE

cleAning & HAuling

RICKS SAME DAY SERVICE


CLEANOUT, INC.

201 390-8400

Call Dovid
for your best price
Free Estimate

RUBBISH REMOVAL

We clean up:
Attics Basements Yards
Garages Apartments
Construction Debris
Residential Dumpster Specials
10 yds 15 yds 20 yds

Jewish Music with an Edge


Ari Greene 201-837-6158
AGreene@BaRockorchestra.com
www.BaRockOrchestra.com

pAinting/WAllpApering

Give Your House


A New Look
For The New Season

201-342-9333

www.rickscleanout.com

SENIOR CITIZENS 10% OFF

Painting Interior Exterior Wallcovering


Staining Power Washing Tiling
Install, Sand & Refinish Wood Floors

HAndymAn

Residential Commercial

Call for FREE estimate

Your Neighbor with Tools


Home Improvements & Handyman

NEW IMAGE PAINTING


Clovis

Shomer Shabbat Free Estimates


Over 15 Years Experience

201-290-9572

Adam 201-675-0816 Jacob

Fernando

862-588-8844

plumBing

Lic. & Ins. NJ Lic. #13VH05023300


www.yourneighborwithtoolshandyman.com

APL Plumbing & Heating LLC

Complete Kitchen &


Bath Remodeling

Home improVements

BESTof the BEST

BH

Boilers Hot Water Heaters Leaks


EMERGENCY SERVICE

Home Repair Service

Fully Licensed, Bonded and Insured

Painting
Carpentry
Kitchens
Decks
Electrical
Locks/Doors
Paving/Masonry
Basements
Drains/Pumps
Bathrooms
Plumbing
Maintenence
Tiles/Grout
Hardwood Floors
General Repairs

201-358-1700 Lic. #12285

NO JOB IS TOO SMALL!

Call us.
We are waiting
for your
classified ad!

NO JOB IS TOO SMALL


24 Hour x 5 1/2 Emergency Services
Shomer Shabbat
Free Estimates

1-201-530-1873

MAZON IS ending hunger making a difference tikkun olam


keeping kids healthy nutrition for seniors sustenance
tzedakah fostering responsibility raising awareness soup
kitchens food banks food pantries social justice selfempowerment partnering for change advocating for people in
need building a robust emergency food network encouraging
public policy reform a legacy of giving promoting health and
well-being tribute cards fulfilling a jewish tradition making
an impact optimism nourishment pursuing justice working
to end food insecurity meeting basic human needs nutrition
and health education initiatives a strong safety net providing
assistance and support concern for others a voice for people
who are hungry enhancing quality of life jewish values in action
THE AMERICAN JEWISH COMMUNITY
WORKING TOGETHER TO END HUNGER

201-837-8818

cAr serVice

A PLUS

Limo & Car Service

The most reliable and efficient service


at all times for your transporation needs.
Our professional and courteous team works together for you.

Serving the Tri-State Area, New York and Bergen County

EWR $39 LGA $42 JFK $59


Tolls, parking, wlt, stops & tps are not included Extra $7 Airport Pickup
Prices subject to change without prior notice. Price varies by locations.

Fuel surcharge may add up to 10% Additional charge may be applied to credit card payment

201-641-5500 888-990-TAXI (8294)

Visit us online at: www.apluslimo1.com E-mail: apluslimo@earthlink.net

rooFing
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HACKENSACK
ROO
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OOFING
CO.

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INC.

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Roof
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Tel 310.442.0020 | 800.813.0557 | mazon.org


10495 Santa Monica Blvd., Ste. 100, Los Angeles, CA 90025

83 FIRST STREET
HACKENSACK, NJ 07601

JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015 55

Real Estate & Business


New Listings in Teaneck
Lovely center hall colonial
with 4 bedrooms, on a
double lot on a desirable
street. Updated kitchen,
den, hardwood floors. Close
to transportation, houses of
worship, parks.
184 Johnson Ave. $479,000
Elegant, large 2 bedroom
co-op with stunning kitchen.
Generously sized rooms.
Updated bath, hardwood
floors, 9' ceilings. Close to
transportation, houses of
worship, shopping.
985 Teaneck Road $199,000

Call Ilene for a


free home analysis
or a buyers
consultation.
Service is my specialty.

ATLANTIC BEACH , NEW YORK


Why go to The Hamptons when
you can be only 23 miles from NYC

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY MAY 10 11:30 1:30


1996 Bay Blvd. Atlantic Beach, NY

Ilene Dorn Pollack

Weichert, Realtors
ilenedpollack@gmail.com
201-214-0399 201-569-7888

Incomparable bay views from any of the 9 rooms! Great room


features walls of glass overlooking your own private dock
and pool. Chefs kitchen includes center island seating 6,
2 Sub-Zeros, 2 sinks, 2 dishwashers, 6 burner stove, double
oven. 5 bedrooms, 3.5 state of the art bathrooms. Paradise in
your own backyard! Heated pool, deck and dock for your boat
and jet skis. One block to the ocean and boardwalk.
ASK $3.8m or RENT WITH AN OPTION TO PURCHASE

For Tour visit us at annettcellis.com

Annett C. Ellis Realty Inc.

Like us on Facebook.
facebook.com/jewishstandard

56 JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015

The Go To Broker in Atlantic Beach is Annett C. Ellis


O: (516) 239-2846 C: (516) 448-9738
www.annettcellis.com

Milestones are marked


by two Fountain Spas
The Fountain Spa was one of the first pioneers to venture into the true day spa business. Each location has 24
treatment rooms, private Jacuzzis for two or one, luxurious locker rooms with steam rooms, relaxing tranquility rooms where a client can rejuvenate in serenity with
light refreshments or have spa cuisine. It offers couples
experiences with side-by-side massages, body treatments, and facials.
This year marks the 20th anniversary of its Ramsey
location, and the 10th anniversary of its opening in Hackensack at The Shops at Riverside.
In Ramsey, the celebration will take place Monday,
May 18, from 5 to 9 p.m. At The Shops at Riverside, the
celebration will be two weeks later, on Monday, June 1,
from 5 to 9 p.m.
During the celebrations, guests will receive free mini
services, including chair massage, mini facials, mini makeup applications, mini eyelash extensions, airbrush tanning (face or legs), hair and hair extension consultations,
hand treatments, hand reflexology, foot reflexology, and
product samples.
Vendor tables will feature Botox, fillers and laser information, permanent makeup demonstrations, blood pressure and body composition, life-coaching information,
tennis camp information, and advanced performance
wellness demonstrations with RRT for relieving muscle
spasms.
There will be snacks and beverages, drawings for spa
packages, and everyone will receive a discount coupon.

Real Estate & Business


ZingCycle offers state-of-the-art spinning studio in Tenafly
Combining style with a killer workout, the ZingCycle studio
looks and feels like a New York City nightclub.
ZingCycle was founded by two long-time spinners, Laurie
Spiropoulos and Lior Haramaty. Realizing there was a need
for a high-end cycling studio in the area, they decided to
open their own boutique in Tenafly dedicated exclusively to
indoor cycling.
Ms. Spiropoulos brings decades of fitness experience and
knowledge to ZingCycle, including many years as a group fitness instructor, sporting events manager, and professional
organizer. Mr. Haramaty contributes over 30 years of entrepreneurship and business experience combined with vast technical and design knowledge.
The result? A modern state-of-the-art cycling studio. At
over 1,600 square feet, it is much larger than most. ZingCycle is equipped with new top-of-the-line Schwinn AC Performance PLUS bikes with the Echelon MPower Console,
which provides rpm and power measurements. Every rider
also enjoys plenty of comfortable space and an excellent
view of the instructor. The customized audio system features a twelve channel power amplifier and mixer. Each
loudspeaker can be balanced individually to create the perfect audio experience for each rider.
A fast-acting climate control center includes not only a
central and local cooling and heating component, but also
features several of the latest in-ceiling fan technology the

VERA AND NECHAMA REALT Y


A DIVISION OF V AND N GROUP LLC

bladeless Exhale Fan which boasts a virtually noiseless


and efficient air circulation system that does not directly
blow air at any one location.
The most unique design feature is the lighting system
featuring dozens of remote controlled LED bulbs that
change colors individually or in tandem, all controlled by
the instructor with an iPad making this indoor cycling
studio the envy of any night club.
Modern dcor, towel service, convenient parking, inviting cool down areas, and large locker rooms with showers provide top-notch service.
We wanted to create a place we can enjoy ourselves,
so we cut no corners, said Ms. Spiropoulos With everything from wireless headsets, power measuring bikes, a
Web signup system, to the dcor, lighting and audio, ZingCycle is designed to make every class in our studio a workout party.
We have designed an exciting and unique studio space
and are thrilled to be working with the areas top instructors. That combination promises a killer workout and an
amazing experience, she said.
ZingCycles website is www.ZingCycle.com and currently offers unlimited $5 classes for your first week of riding. ZingCycle is located at 145 Piermont Road in Tenafly.

TEANECK FIRST TIME OFFERED!


$569,000 286 Winthrop Rd Elegant Tudor
Colonial on 125 foot deep property in popular
location. Hardwood floors, updated kitchen
7 years, new patio, newer summer kitchen in
basement. Call for appointment.

FOR ALERTS ON OFFICE EXCLUSIVES


& NEW CONSTRUCTION:

vera-nechama.com/contact-us

201-692-3700

TM

BANK-OWNED PROPERTY

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-4 P.M.

TEANECK STRONG!
ACTIVE LISTINGS

Bring Mom!
942 Country Club Drive
Teaneck

$428,900
Martin H. Basner, Realtor Associate
(Office) 201-794-7050 (Cell) 201-819-2623

GARDEN STATE HOMES


25 Broadway, Elmwood Park, NJ

Let Us Finance Your


House Purchase

1480 Gaylord Terrace ....................... $199,900


376 Birch St ........................................ 299,000
210 Lees Ave ...................................... 337,000
614 Wyndham Rd .............................. 380,000
1041 Alpine Dr ................................... 389,000
78 Lindbergh Blvd .............................. 389,800
51 Herrick Ave ................................... 415,000
1058 Lincoln Pl .................................. 445,000
520 Martense Ave .............................. 599,000
622 Winthrop Rd ............................... 998,900

MLO #58058
ladclassic@aol.com

790 George St
1309 Somerset Rd
714 Rutland Ave
272 Edgemont Terrace

Classic Mortgage, LLC


201-368-3140

www.classicmortgagellc.com

MLS
#31149

136 Ward Plaza

568-1818

2-4 PM

Just Listed! W Englewd Area. Beautifully Updated 3 Brm


Tudor. Liv Rm/Fplc, Din Rm/Slid Doors to Deck, Beaut new
Eat In Kit, 2.5 New Baths. C/A/C. $459,000

ALL CLOSE TO NY BUS / HOUSES OF WORSHIP /


HIGHWAYS / SHOPPING / SCHOOLS & NY BUS

Orna Jackson, Sales Associate 201-376-1389


666-0777

$389,000

BY APPOINTMENT
TEANECK

TENAFLY
TENAFLY ALPINE/CLOSTER RIVER VALE ENGLEWOOD CLIFFS CRESSKILL

768-6868

1-3 PM

Lovely Expand Cape. LR/Fplc, Mod Kit, Den. Spectacular


Master Suite w/ Vaulted Ceil, Priv Bath, & Priv Balcony + 3
more Brms + 2 more Baths.

FriedbergProperties.com
894-1234

$309,000

Charm Colonial features H/W Flrs, Stained Glass Wins. LR/


Wood Burning Stove, FDR, Mod Kit. 2nd Flr: Lg Master Brm,
2nd Broom w/ Tandem 3rd Brm, Mod Bath.

150 Englewood Ave


210 Lees Ave
1079 Congress Ave
378 Woodbine St
191 Sherman Ave
896 Belle Ave
1632 Fairfield St
375 Hickory St
605 John St
676 W Englewood Ave
742 Rutland Ave
264 Grayson Pl
77 Lindbergh Blvd
80 Garden St
971 Wilson Ave
152 Grayson Pl

MLO #6706
dshlufman@classicllc.com

25 E. Spring Valley Ave., Ste 100, Maywood, NJ

OPEN HOUSES SUNDAY, MAY 10


TEANECK

578 Tilden Ave.

SOLD PROPERTIES

Daniel M. Shlufman
Managing Director

Serving NY, NJ & CT

Mother's Day

UNDER CONTRACT

Direct lender
2 to 3 day approval
Closings within 30 days
Northern NJ Appraisers
FHA loans w/55% debt ratio
Credit scores as low as 580

Larry DeNike
President

Hapy

871-0800

For Our Full Inventory & Directions


Visit our Website
www.RussoRealEstate.com

2014
READERS
CHOICE

FIRST PLACE
REAL ESTATE AGENCY

(201) 837-8800

JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015 57

Real Estate & Business


William Paterson University previews summer pre-college youth programs
Learn to spin records like a real DJ, write
novels like a published writer, or sell your
business idea like a contestant on Shark
Tank. These are just a few of approximately
100 courses and workshops offered during William Paterson Universitys Summer
Youth Programs to be held on the campus
in Wayne from June 29 to August 7.
This summer new programs include Destination Science for students age 5 to 11 and
sport programs for middle and high school
students featuring: cross country, LETs TRI
(Athlon), soccer clinic, swimming lessons,

and tennis and wrestling.


Also new this summer, Middle School
Resident Experience will help prepare the
middle school student (students entering
sixth grade in September 2015) for success,
with the option to stay on campus and experience college life.
Registrations submitted before June 1
receive a 10 percent discount. The PreCollege Program for High School Students
immerses students entering grades 9 to 12
in a unique university summer experience
from July 6 to July 31. Participants may

reAdy to sell? reAdy to buy?


Call Dana to Get Results!

CRESSKILL - $3,488,000

DEMAREST - $2,850,000

Classic & timeless col set high on the East Hill on a pvt acre
has an amazing pool w/3 waterfalls & custom lighting, a blend
of urban sophistication and comfortable family living, chefs
kitch w/sunny brkfst room opens to covered patio, 7 BRs, 6.5
baths, 4 fplcs, skylights & heated 3-car garage.

Stunning new col on lovely tree-lined street, gourmet kitch


w/quartz cntrs, 2 islands & 2 pantries, 2-story great room
w/gorgeous fplc & magnificent windows, main level guest
suite. Upper level has 4 BRs, ea w/bath + mstr ste w/fplc &
luxurious spa bath. Lwr lvl is exquisitely finished.

Friedberg
ProPerties
& AssociAtes

Dana Yehuda

Realtor, Sales Associate

Cell: 917-412-0606
danalyehuda@yahoo.com

20 W. Clinton Avenue, tenAfly


201-894-1234 WWW.friedbergProPerties.Com

EQUALHOUSING
EQUAL
HOUSING
OPPORTUNITY
OPPORTUNITY

SELLING YOUR HOME?

Call Susan Laskin Today


To Make Your Next Move A Successful One!
BergenCountyRealEstateSource.com

Cell: 201-615-5353

2015 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Coldwell Banker is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.
An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Owned and Operated by NRT LLC.

58 JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015

choose from more than 40 exciting programs, and stay in the residence halls
or commute. The Pre-College Program
workshops give students a sampling of
different career possibilities in order to
discover their abilities and talents, and
explore the career paths that best fit
them. Courses include Songwriting and
Music Industry Camp; Digital Photography; Future Teacher Academy; Academic Writing for College; Genetic Engineering, CSI, and Bioethics; Astronomy;
and 3D Printing Scaled Organic Models.
There are some scholarships available.
High school students who have completed there sophomore or junior year
may be able to earn college credits.
Middle School Workshops for students entering grades six through eight
in September are designed to stimulate
pre-teen and teen imaginations and
creativity.

The Summer Life on Campus Program


is a unique summer day camp for students entering fifth through ninth grades
in September. A typical week includes
well-supervised enrichment and academic workshops, indoor and outdoor
activities using university facilities, and
a weekly field trip. This is an ideal program for working parents who prefer to
place their child in a safe, well-managed
environment where both academic and
recreational activities are offered. The
program is scheduled to run Monday to
Friday, 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., from June 29 to
August 7. Lunch is included.
The Summer Youth Programs are
sponsored by the Universitys Center
for Continuing and Professional Education. For additional information, call
(973) 720-2354, visit the website at www.
wpunj.edu/cpe, or email youthprograms@wpunj.edu.

Residents of Village Apartments


of the Jewish Federation attend
a senior prom hosted by
students at Seton Hall University
Seton Hall University was the site for
the first South Orange Senior Prom,
hosted by the advocacy group South
Orange Seniors (SOS) and the universitys Division of Volunteer Services
(DOVE) on April 12. Approximately
40 residents from Village Apartments
of the Jewish Federation and South
Orange Bnai Brith Federation House
attended the event. Both senior residences are owned and managed by
the Jewish Community Housing Corporation of Metropolitan New Jersey
( JCHC). South Orange Bnai Brith Federation House residents Nan Samons,
Peg Cinberg and Tonia Moore, who are
active SOS advisory committee members, were among the coordinators
who worked with the DOVE office to
make it happen.
There were refreshments, dancing
and musical entertainment by singer
Peri Smilow and husband Budd Mishkin,
a NY1 television personality; the couple
performed classic rock songs, followed
by more music and dancing courtesy of
a DJ who played tunes specially selected
by Mark Pressel, a former Broadway
musical director and resident of Village
Apartments of the Jewish Federation.
Admission was free with the donation of
a can of non-perishable food for the Our
Lady of Sorrows food bank, which is supported by Seton Hall University.
We found that older people really
wanted a social activity and without
question, the South Orange Senior
Prom filled a need in the community,
said co-coordinator, Nan Samons. It
was spectacular and everyone walked

out with a smile on their face. People


already want to sign up for next year.
The Senior Prom provided an opportunity for older adults to socialize with
their peers as well as foster a stronger
connection with Seton Hall University.
SOS coordinators worked with Michelle
Peterson from DOVE to arrange the
dance. This winter, student volunteers
from DOVE shoveled out residents cars
at the two South Orange senior communities. Seton Hall offers senior discounts
on its regular courses and also offers
classes specifically for area seniors.
We are thrilled to be working with
the dynamic leaders of the South Orange
Seniors, who are filled with energy and
vision, said Michelle Peterson, director of Seton Halls Division of Volunteer
Efforts. DOVE aims to serve our community through love and outreach. Our
collaboration with SOS has been a wonderful experience for the seniors and
Seton Hall students alike.
Samons agreed. Of the 25 or so college students who participated, she
noted that, The kids who volunteered
helped make the day; there was a
wonderful intergenerational feeling
of warmth and camaraderie that they
generated. It was just incredible. She
added that SOS hopes to continue holding intergenerational programs, either
with Seton Hall or with Columbia High
School in South Orange.
South Orange Seniors was created
last May to address concerns and needs
of older adults in South Orange. Harold
Colton-Max, CEO of the JCHC, is also on
the organizations advisory committee.

The Art of Real Estate


NJ:
NY:

Jeffrey Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NY
BROOKLYN HEIGHTS

J
SO UST
LD
!

201.266.8555
T: 212.888.6250
T:

CENTRAL PARK

LIS JUS
TE T
D!

Gorgeous 3 BR/3.5 BTH renovated brownstone. The Hermitage. Incredible condo. $1,050,000

GRAMERCY

J
SO UST
LD
!

MIDTOWN WEST

J
SO UST
LD
!

201.906.6024
M: 917.576.0776

Ruth Miron-Schleider
Broker/Owner
Miron Properties NJ

M:

CLINTON HILL

CHELSEA

J
SO UST
LD
!

J
SO UST
LD
!

2 BR/2 BTH brownstone-style condo.

The Marais. Luxury penthouse. Fab location.

UPPER WEST SIDE

WILLIAMSBURG

J
SO UST
LD
!

SO

LD

The Peter James. Full-service co-op bldg.

Modern design. Open floor plan.

The Bromley. Corner 2 BR condo w/views.

Stylish luxury bldg. Heart of Brooklyn.

ENGLEWOOD

ENGLEWOOD

ENGLEWOOD

ENGLEWOOD

LIS JUS
TE T
D!

LIS JUS
TE T
D!

LIS JUS
TE T
D!

SO

LD

Updated 4 BR/2.5 BTH Side Hall Col. $435K

Inviting 5 BR/3.5 BTH Col. $1,175K

Gorgeous 7 BR/5.5 BTH Victorian. $1,740K

Amazing custom designed 1.7 acre retreat.

TENAFLY

TENAFLY

TENAFLY

TENAFLY

LIS JUS
TE T
D!

J
SO UST
LD
!

DU YOU
PL NG
EX
!

J
SO UST
LD
!

Unique Contemp. Fab open floor plan. $1,890K

Storybook lush property with gazebo.

Lovely 3 BR/3.5 BTH townhouse. $4,500/mo

Gorgeous 4 BR/4 BTH Colonial. Prime area.

ORADELL

PARAMUS

CLOSTER

CLOSTER

SO

LD

Beautifully appointed 5 BR/3.5 BTH Colonial.

J
SO UST
LD
!

Spectacular, top-of-the-line construction.

SO

LD

Magnificent construction on a cul-de-sac.

J
SO UST
LD
!

Beautiful East Hill Center Hall Colonial.

Contact us today for your complimentary consultation!

www.MironProperties.com
Each Miron Properties office is independently owned and operated.

JEWISH STANDARD MAY 8, 2015 59

STORE HOURS

646 Cedar Lane Teaneck, NJ 07666

SUN - TUE: 7AM - 9PM


WED: 7AM - 10PM
THURS: 7AM - 11PM
FRI: 7AM - 2 HOURS
BEFORE SUNDOWN

Tel: 201-855-8500 Fax: 201-801-0225

Sign Up For Your


Loyalty
Card
In Store

Sale Effective
5/10/15 - 5/15/15

69

$ 69
lb.

69

lb.

California

Green
Cabbage

Local
Spinach

25

Bunch

MEAT DEPARTMENT

lb.

Whole Only

Yellow
Nectarines

Red Ripe
Watermelon

$ 29

$
FOR

Fresh

Fresh!

89

4 3

lb.

Organic

Tomatoes Sugar Baby


on the Vine Watermelons

English
Cucumbers

Beauty
Eggplants

Apricots

SUPER SAVER Fresh

Hot House

Black

Loyalty
Program

ORGANIC ORGANIC ORGANIC

SUNDAY SUPER SAVER


New Crop

CEDAR MARKET

39

lb.

lb.

69

lb.

Organic

Mangoes

4 5
$

FOR

Chicken
Stir Fry

Whole Chicken
Pullets

$ 99

$ 99

$ 99

Regular

99

5.25 OZ BAG

Kikkoman
Light Soy
Sauce
10 OZ

4 5 2 $4

Fage
Yogurt

2 $5
17.6 OZ
FOR

2 5

Assorted

2 $7
59 OZ

FOR

Assorted Excluding Swiss

Les Petites
Cheese Slices

2 $6
6 OZ

FOR

Assorted

Dannon
Yogurt

5 $2
6 OZ
FOR

Assorted

Turkey Hill
Teas & Lemonades

2 $3
64 OZ

FOR

2.75 OZ

Save On!

Osem
Mini
Mandel
14.1 OZ

FOR

Save On!

Bodek
Broccoli Cuts

$ 49

32 OZ

Wishbone
Italian
Dressing

8 OZ

2 5
FOR

45
$

FOR

Asparagus or Pepper Only

Birds Eye
Stir Fry

2 $5
14.4 OZ
FOR

Original

Super
Pretzel

6 PK

$ 79
FOR

ea.

Teaneck
Roll

1195

ea.

FISH
Family Pack

Tilapia

$ 49

LB.

Breaded
Flounder

$ 99LB.
Mock Crab
Cakes

Whole

Bronzini

$ 99

LB.
Check Out Our New Line of Cooked Fish

HOMEMADE DAIRY

Eggplant
Klik Parmesan

Assorted

Chocolate $ 99
Bags
BAG

2 $3

EACH

Sandwich
Cake

$ 99

15 oz

Brownie
Cake

$ 99

Save On!

Kosherific
Fish Sticks

16 OZ

PROVISIONS

$ 99

25 OZ

Chocolate Peanut Butter


or Chocolate Fudge Only

Enlightened
Bars

EACH

BAKERY

17.5 - 21.2 OZ

Ossies
Soup

499

FOR

$ 99

FOR

Regular or Robusto

Tivall Pizza
& Red Lentil

40 CT

4 $5

Lb

Save On!

Eggo Homestyle
Mini Waffles

16 OZ

695

Lb

ea.

Salmon Roll

$ 99

Save On!

Richs
Coffee Rich

95
3
Grilled Teriyaki
$

Ground
Beef Kebabs

Lb

15 OZ

Original Only

Cucumber
Roll

Ready To Grill

99 2 $5

FOR

Tropican Orange
Juice

99

Glicks
Chick
Peas

16 oz

FISH
`
SUSHI

Save On!
Save On!
Goodmans
Glicks $ 99LB.
Onion Soup
Mushroom
Mix Stems & Pieces
8 OZ

Save On!

FROZEN

$ 99

DELI, SOUPS, SALADS, KUGELS, DIPS, APPETIZERS & MUCH MORE

FOR

FOR

7 OZ

Sweet Potato
Souffle

8 oz.

24 45

17 OZ

16 oz.

Kugels & Souffles

$ 99

FOR

Assorted

Savory Dips

Save On!

Gefen
Bread
Crumbs
15 OZ

$ 29

$ 99

Qt.

Mayo Garlic Dip


Mushroom Red
Grape Leaf Dip

Ready To Bake

Original

Paskesz
Good Grains
Crackers

Macaroni Salad

$ 99

$ 79

Save On!

$ 99

12 OZ

(Reg. & Diet)

$ 99

General Mills
Carolina
Honey Nuy Extra Long Grain
Cheerios
Rice
32 OZ

Gourmet Salad

CucumberSalad

Deckle
Roast

Save On!

FOR

Assorted

Pine Belt
Eggs

99

646 Cedar Lane Teaneck, NJ 07666


201-855-8500 Fax: 201-801-0225
www.thecedarmarket.com
info@thecedarmarket.com

Beef Yemenite
Yellow Pea

Lb

2 $4 2 4

9 OZ

Sabra Hummus 10 OZ
or Classic Guacamole 8 OZ

18 Pack

Assorted

Lb

6.5 OZ

Pure Bites
Pop
Cakes

DAIRY

Aromaville
Cafaccino Iced
Coffee

DELI SAVINGS

American Black Angus Beef

Save On!

Assorted

FOR

2 5

5 LB

FOR

$ 79

Save On!

FOR

FOR

FOR

Purpose & High


Gluten Flour

2 5 2 6
1

2 $7 2 $4
Haddar
Tirosh
Biscuits
6 OZ

at:
Visit Our Website om
et.c
www.thecedarmark

646 Cedar Lane Teaneck, NJ 07666


201-855-8500 Fax: 201-801-0225
www.thecedarmarket.com
info@thecedarmarket.com

Homemade Soups

$ 99

Blooms Real Jolly Rancher


Chocolate
Twosome
Chips
Chews

Osem Salad
Croutons

Save On!

Glicks All

Semi Sweet

Caesar or Onion
Garlic Only

FOR

Save On!

16 OZ

Save On!

$ 99

Lb

Gefen
Marinara &
Pizza Sauce
26 OZ

Nabisco
Ritz
Crackers
10.3 OZ

MARKET

Breaded Chicken
Cutlets

Beef
Patties

Classic

Ronzoni
Spaghetti or
Rotini

5.5 OZ

Fresh Made 6 Pack

$ 99

GROCERY

Single Pack

Thin Cut

Lb

99

Lb

Boneless Fillet
Steak

$ 99

American Black Angus Beef

Boneless Cholent
Meat

Wacky
Mac &
Cheese

Loyalty
Program

Cut in 1/4s or 1/8s

White Meat

Lb

American Black Angus Beef

Save On!

CEDAR MARKET

Fresh

Fresh

Butterfly Chicken
Cutlets

MARKET

TERMS & CONDITIONS: This card is the property of Cedar Market, Inc. and is intended for exclusive
use of the recipient and their household members. Card is not transferable. We reserve the right to
change or rescind the terms and conditions of the Cedar Market loyalty program at any time, and
without notice. By using this card, the cardholder signifies his/her agreement to the terms &
conditions for use. Not to be combined with any other Discount/Store Coupon/Offer. *Loyalty Card
must be presented at time of purchase along
with ID for verification. Purchase cannot be
reversed once sale is completed.

Cedar Markets Meat Dept. Prides Itself On Quality, Freshness And Affordability. We Carry The Finest Cuts Of Meat And
The Freshest Poultry... Our Dedicated Butchers Will Custom Cut Anything For You... Just Ask!

Fresh

ORGANIC ORGANIC ORGANIC

PRODUCE

Fine Foods
Great Savings

$ 99

4 PACK

Oven & Smoked

Empire
Sliced Turkey

$ 99
8 OZ.

Original Only
No Nitrate

A&H Beef
Franks

$ 99

14 OZ.

We reserve the right to limit sales to 1 per family. Prices effective this store only. Not responsible for typographical errors. Some pictures are for design purposes only and do not necessarily represent items on sale. While Supply Lasts. No rain checks.

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