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Color, Value and Hue

9. The Square Tetrad relationship uses four colors that are chosen
from every third color on the color wheel. Like the triad
relationship, the name tetrad comes from the shape made
between the colors. Orange/yellow-green/blue/red-purple is just
one example.

Color, Value and Hue


Despite having one more color than the triad color relationship,
tetrads are remarkably similar to triads. They work for the same
reason triads work theres a balance to this relationship because
of the way the colors are methodically chosen.

Color, Value and Hue


Like a triad, use a tetrad grouping when you want a more complex
color scheme that still feels balanced and harmonious.

Color, Value and Hue


One variation on a tetrad relationship would be to use double
complements, no matter the positioning of each pair. Instead of
orange/yellow-green/blue/red-purple, you could do redpurple/red-orange/yellow-green/blue-green. So long as each pair
is a complementary pair, your color scheme will work no matter if
the second pair sits 90 degrees away from the first, or if they sit
side-by-side. Since it still uses four colors that create a rectangular
shape, this falls under a tetrad relationship.

Color, Value and Hue


Neutral colors don't usually show up on the color wheel. Neutral
colors commonly are associated with black, white, gray, brown
and its close shades like beige, tan and taupe. They are
sometimes called earth tones.
When complements are mixed with one another in paint, the
resulting muted tones de-saturate or dull the hues, create neutral
shades.

Color, Value and Hue


Neutral colors are colors that lack hue, usually they are desaturated colors such as gray, ivory, beige, tan and taupe
(brownish-gray). They may be dark or light.
Neutral colors are usually dusky in nature and may be called
achromatic.

Color, Value and Hue


In the world of design the term neutrals is used, typically, to refer to
three categories of colors:
1. Black, White, and Gray. In the first category are the achromatic
colors of near pure black, white, and gray. Black, white, and gray
are the ultimate, you might say, in terms of neutrality. The
variations of whites and blacks used in interiors, however, are not
typically referred to as neutrals, but as off-white or offblack.

Color, Value and Hue


2. No Discernable Hue. The second class of colors we call neutrals
are those that we cant easily discern what colors they were
mixed from. Colors like brown, cocoa, beige, taupe, sand,
driftwood, or ivory are examples. Theyre arrived at by mixing
complementary colors to the point that neither color is apparent.
Or, they can be a mix of many colors that also cancel out the hue
of the other colors in the mix.
These colors have been sufficiently dulled to the point that a hue
is not recognizable. These neutrals may have black and white
added as well. Earthy.

Color, Value and Hue


3. Muted Colors. The third type of neutral colors are those in which
we can still recognize the dominant hue. To arrive at colors in this
group, a pure color has been neutralized, dulled, or muted by the
addition of another color, often its complement.
A color can also be diluted by the addition of gray, and in the
design world we typically call these colors neutral as well.
With sufficient white added to otherwise dulled colors, we get
what can be called muted pastels.

Color, Value and Hue


Discernable Vs. Muted

Color, Value and Hue


Neutral colors such as beige, ivory, taupe, black, gray, and
white appear to be without any color hue, and yet in many
applications these hues might have undertones of color.
Be aware of these underlying tones as you match colors or
choose paint. For example, beige might have an undertone of
pink or tan or gold. White might be slightly ivory, yellow, bluish, or
peachy.

Color, Value and Hue


Beige may be described as a brown color with a cream colored
tone, an off- (sometimes dark) tan color, or an extremely pale
yellowish brown color. The term originates from beige cloth, a
cotton fabric left un-dyed in its natural color. It has since come to
be used for a range of light tints chosen for their neutral or pale
warm appearance.

Color, Value and Hue


Ivory is an off-white color that resembles ivory, the material of
which the teeth and tusks of animals (such as, notably, the
elephant and the walrus) is made. It has a very slight tint of
yellow.

Color, Value and Hue


Taupe is a dark brown/tan-ish grey color. Taupe is a vague,
unscientific color term which may be used to refer to almost any
grayish-brown, brownish-gray, or warm gray color. It often
overlaps with tan.

Color, Value and Hue


We can divide neutral colors in two convenient categories:
1. Warm Neutrals - Yellow, orange, or red added.
2. Cool Neutrals - Green, blue, or violet added.
If you simply mix all the Primary colors, the result will be a
Neutral that tends towards 'warm' or 'cool' depending on the
proportion of Red or Blue in the mix.

Color, Value and Hue


Neutral colors help to put the focus on other colors or serve to
tone down colors that might otherwise be overpowering on their
own.

Color, Value and Hue


To some extent blacks, browns, tans, golds, and beige colors are
considered warm. While white, ivory, silver, and gray are
somewhat cooler colors.
Yet these warm and cool attributes are flexible and more subtle
than that of reds or blues.

Color, Value and Hue


Neutral paint colors are often characterized as bland, boring, and
non-offensive. One purpose of neutral paint colors is to avoid
offense. When real estate home stagers go so far as to apply
paint, it will almost certainly be a neutral color. When a home
remodeler aims to feature a room's structural or architectural
elements, she or he will choose a neutral wall color to let those
features stand out.

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