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simon anholt

Competitive Identity Austria


FINAL REPORT
APRIL 2013

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Introduction to Competitive Identity

Since I coined the term nation brand in 1998, my approach to enhancing national image has
been based on international engagement, policy, strategy and organisational change rather
than on marketing communications. I call this approach Competitive Identity.
The advance of globalisation means that Austria, like other countries, must compete for its
share of the worlds consumers, visitors, investors, students and international events, as well
as for the attention and respect of the media, of other governments, institutions and
populations.
But since most people know so little about other countries, what they believe becomes critical.
Responsible governments must therefore monitor and understand their countrys image, and
develop a strategy for managing it. It is a key part of their job to build a reputation that is fair,
attractive, useful to their aims, and reflects their populations aspirations, needs and
capabilities.

Analysis
The Anholt-GfK Roper Nation Brands IndexSM shows that Austrias image is positive but weak,
especially outside its neighbourhood. Furthermore, its image is outdated, and mainly
associated with the soft factors of cultural heritage and landscape.
However, there is little evidence to support the perception of many Austrians that the country
is world-famous for classical music and that this distracts attention from its more recent
achievements: this would in fact be a nice problem to have, and there is still plenty of work to
be done in this area.
For the moment, Austria is performing well, but with the European economy unravelling and
economic power shifting to countries where Austria is largely unknown, Austria must now start
to build a stronger reputation or run the risk of becoming a minor B2B destination only known
to well-informed professional elites. The other minor German-speaking country thats not
Switzerland is unlikely to make Austria a top destination for trade, investment, education or
tourism.
As one of the more stable, equal, peaceful, prosperous societies on the planet, instead of
asking itself how it can follow the small number of countries that rank above it, Austria should
consider how it can lead some of the large number that rank below it. In doing so, Austria

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would undoubtedly do more to enhance its international image than by boasting about its
achievements.

Vision
The Austrian Model (a unique combination of nurturing, prudent, sustainable and
communitarian values which do much to explain the stability and prosperity of Austria and the
wellbeing of its population) is usually regarded as intrinsically conservative. I argue that its real
potential and its global significance have yet to be understood or achieved, and the Austrian
model could ultimately inspire a much-needed alternative to the dominant model of
aggressive Anglo-Saxon capitalism. This is, ultimately, Austrias gift to the world and the reason
why people in other countries might one day feel grateful that it exists.

Strategy
The chosen strategy is summarised in the phrase Bridge-Builders to the World. Austrias
track record in bridging the gap between developed and developing markets is also its future
mission. Moving from South-Eastern Europe to Central Asia, North Africa and beyond, Austria
is the bridge-builder, bringing a unique portfolio of experience and ideas as well as its
unique social, cultural and political model to help second-tier nations around the world
achieve sustainable progress, stability and prosperity.
The bridge-building concept also has a cultural dimension, in domains where tolerance, mutual
understanding and effective communication are lacking.

Symbolic Actions
Out of a list of nearly 100 potential Symbolic Actions, the following four were selected from
the shortlist to be implemented in the short term:
1.
2.
3.
4.

The AustriaCard
AidSurance
Twinning Buildings
Rule of Law Trust Fund

It was also agreed that five further Symbolic Actions from the shortlist would be scheduled for
implementation as a second tranche. Full descriptions of these second tranche Symbolic
Actions are inlcuded in the body of the Report.
Summaries of the four Symbolic Actions selected for the First Tranche are as follows:

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1. AustriaCard
This is a large-scale loyalty scheme for Austria, targeted at all users and consumers of the
nation: students, tourists, investors, foreign residents and consumers of Austrian products and
services around the world. It is similar to the classic airline or hotel loyalty card, except that
Austria could be the first country to create such a scheme for the entire nation.
The ultimate benefit of the card is to make Austria the first country to migrate from expensive
conventional mass marketing to relationship marketing where it builds long-term, interactive
relationships of trust and mutual esteem with its most valued visitors, investors, consumers,
visiting students and workers.
2. AidSurance
Instead of bailing out developing countries after natural disasters, Austria will negotiate an
insurance policy for each of the countries it wishes to help, and pay the premium for them
each year. This will ensure that the appropriate level and type of assistance reaches its
destination without delay. It will also enable the Austrian government to maintain predictable
contributions to disaster relief year by year.
By devising and pioneering an entirely new and completely rational approach to disaster relief,
Austria shows that it can be moral and principled without losing sight of its natural gifts of
intelligence, maturity, experience and sound business sense.
3. Twinning Buildings
Twinning buildings links Austrian cultural heritage more closely to overseas development, and
is a good example of bridge building. A selection of major historical buildings in Austria are
twinned with equally important buildings in a developing country, and the two governments
collaborate closely on preserving and sustaining their heritage.
Once the twinning has been created, a wide range of iniatives become possible, such as an
audio-video floor installed in the entrance of each building, with a live feed between the two,
so that visitors to each building, even though they might be thousands of kilometres apart, can
see each other, wave, and even enjoy a transcontinental conversation from one building to
another.
4. Rule of Law Trust Fund
Austria creates a trust fund that allows it to support other international actors to foster the
rule of law, and to send international legal experts whenever or wherever help is required.

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These experts will give their expert, unbiased advice, free of charge. An Austria-based
committee of experts would decide on the missions and the expertise required. A trust fund
would be set up and financed by the Austrian government with a 5-year initial endowment.
Austria could set up its own international Legal Aid Insurance Scheme to assist developing
countries in case they need its legal services in the future: in return for a small annual
premium, guaranteed legal help is immediately available when needed.

Systems and Structures


National Marketing Agency
The National Marketing Agency (NMA) is designed to ensure that Austria continues to produce
a constant stream of world-class Symbolic Actions in the future; to coordinate the operations
and communications of the countrys outward-facing agencies and organisations; to be the
central owner and monitor of the Competitive Identity strategy; to stimulate the
development of new Austrian consumer export brands; to be responsible for monitoring and
managing relationships with the international media; and to monitor Austrias image.
Within the NMA, the Magnet is responsible for drawing talent and ideas into the system, both
by searching the marketplace and by active recruitment, in order to create new Substance and
Symbolic Actions. The Idea Shop is a creative team, staffed with professional creative talent
from various industries and headed by a Creative Director; its roles are assessing ideas brought
in by the Magnet, and generating ideas of its own. The Support Unit is responsible for
providing or obtaining the profesional services each project needs for success at home and
abroad. The Media Centre provides a single, proactive point of contact for foreign media
covering Austria, and includes a multilingual Crisis Management section. It is also responsible
for monitoring the international media for all significant mentions of Austria and responding
where appropriate.
Public Diplomacy
Since Austria has little hard power, it urgently needs to become an effective and confident
player in the tools of soft power such as public diplomacy (PD) and cultural relations. But
Austrias PD activities are inconsistent around the world, and depend more on the personal
qualities of individual diplomats than on formal structures. This lacuna provides a real
opportunity for Austria to move to the forefront of PD practice internationally, since very few
other countries have yet adopted such measures.

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A new PD secretariat, with advisory and management boards, should be created, with expert
guidance. I have suggested ten principles of effective Public Diplomacy on which the new
structure should be based:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Diplomacy is about Issues and Territories


Creativity is our most powerful tool
Public opinion is a power, not an audience
Relevance means more than success
Power comes in many forms
The Medium is not the Message
Actions Speak Louder than Words
Fire on all Cylinders
The most effective PD is mutual
Total Diplomacy

The opportunity for Austria is to develop new PD structures and systems which are more costeffective, more flexible, and more accountable than traditional models, since a tried and
tested standard model is simply not available.
Cultural Relations
In cultural relations, Austrias impact would be increased through more coordination between
culture and other sectors, driven by a clear, unified strategy: rather than how can we raise the
profile of Austrian culture it should ask how are we using cultural relations to prove certain
things about Austria?
Austrian cultural relations need a greater focus on creativity, both in content and in
organisation and delivery. This represents an interesting opportunity for Austria to do things
differently from its competitors. A systematic framework for measuring the impact of cultural
relations activities would also be valuable.
Austria should focus its resources on a smaller number of high-impact interventions, rather
than larger numbers of smaller activities. The country could achieve more impact through
participatory cultural relations, with less emphasis on giving people opportunities to admire
Austrian culture and more on Austria helping audiences to discover their own creativity in an
Austrian context.

Conclusions
Rather than attempt to influence its global reputation all at once, Austria should begin
implementation of the Competitive Identity project through coordinated, highly focused pilot
projects in small numbers of countries or even cities, selected on the basis of their strategic

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simon anholt
interest to the maximum number of sectors. These pilot projects, incorporating clear
performance indicators, should focus on building mutually beneficial, long-term bilateral
relationships, rather than projecting a specific image of Austria.
Finally, Austria needs to recognise the importance of creativity in all its activities, especially in
the public sector. Deliberate steps need to be taken, from schools to the workplace, to foster a
new national culture of respect for courageous and original thinking, and to combat the alltoo-common habit of looking for problems rather than solutions. This is not an impossible task,
as long as it is adequately reflected in government policy.

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PART ONE: INTRODUCTION
Summary of the Competitive Identity Process

Since I first coined the terms nation brand and place brand in the late 1990s, my approach to
measuring, understanding and managing national image and reputation has been based on
international engagement, policy, strategy and organisational change rather than on marketing
communications. I call this approach Competitive Identity, which is also the title of one of my
books on the subject.
Although I have applied this approach in more than fifty countries, the content of each project
is utterly different: no standardised methodology is possible when one is dealing with nations.
So although my experience of working with other countries will certainly inform my work in
Austria and there are many important learnings to be gathered from the successes and failures
of those other countries, there is no question of us simply adapting a template from another
country: each country needs to define its own aims and ambitions, and its own path towards
them, based on its own assets, resources, values, society, politics, culture, history, and above
all its people.
The starting-point of Competitive Identity is the observation that today the world is one
market. The rapid advance of globalisation means that Austria, just like any other country,
must compete for its share of the worlds consumers, business and leisure visitors, investors,
students, entrepreneurs; international sporting, commercial and cultural events; for the
attention and respect of the media, of other governments, of the multilateral institutions and
the people of other countries. In such an environment, perceptions are everything: since
people know so little about other countries, what they believe becomes critical.
So all responsible governments, on behalf of their people, their institutions and their
companies, need to discover what the worlds perception of their country really is, and
develop a strategy for managing it. It is a key part of their job to build a reputation that is fair,
true, powerful, attractive, genuinely useful to their economic, political and social aims, and
honestly reflects the spirit, the genius and the will of their people. This huge task has become
one of the primary skills of governments in the twenty-first century.
As I mentioned in my commentary to Austrias report in the 2011 Anholt-GfK Roper Nation
Brands Index (see Appendix I to this Report), Austria already punches far above its weight: it
isnt the thirteenth largest, richest, most populous or fastest-growing country on the planet,
but it is the thirteenth most admired. Yet despite this admiration, Austria is seldom actively
considered by the majority of people in other parts of the world: my research suggests that it
is not a country which people feel they need to think about very deeply or often, because its
status, beauty and prosperity are seen as safe, permanent, and probably not very relevant to
their daily concerns.

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As we discussed during the first Friday Group, however, it is important to distinguish between
the views of people in Austrias neighbourhood and those further away. In South-Eastern
Europe, Austria is viewed rather differently; here, it occupies a far more prominent and active
role in peoples perceptions and daily lives than elsewhere. Of course all countries are better
known in their immediate environment than beyond it, but there is much we can learn about
Austrias ultimate global potential from observing the role it has forged for itself since the fall
of the Soviet Union (and, of course, long before) in its neighbourhood. Today, geography is
history and perhaps Austrias unique experience in forming a bridge between more and less
developed blocs could be adapted and utilised in relation to its geographically more distant
but economically or politically close neighbours in other regions.
Beyond its close neighbourhood, Austria appears to sit very comfortably at the back of
peoples minds the responses are positive when prompted, but unlikely to occur
unprompted. One of the core questions we addressed was how to push Austria to the front of
peoples minds at least among the key demographics and in the context of the key issues
so that its rather fixed image is actually capable of alteration. A very stable image like Austrias
is a warning sign that the country is taken for granted, and such an image is highly resistant to
external influence: only countries that are front of mind are subject to reappraisal.
During the early part of the project, we discussed the darker side of Austrias reputation: the
occasional prominence of extremist political and social currents, and even the Fritzl case, but
these were not felt to be of enormous significance by participants. I absolutely concur: in my
experience, such episodes rarely have any measurable or lasting impact on a countrys
reputation and are soon forgotten, unless they start to form a pattern over a much longer
period: if every country where a shocking crime were committed suffered damage to its
reputation, there would be no countries left with an intact reputation.
Here as elsewhere, the real answer lies with what Austria does, not with what it says. These
are not primarily communications or public relations issues: public opinion does not blame
countries for bad things that happen, but it is very interested in seeing how well they cope
with them: and this is an opportunity to prove many things about the resilience, imagination
and values of the country.
One of the reasons why Austria is not especially prominent is because it is not well-known as a
producer of consumer brands: its country of origin effect is weak, although potentially very
positive. Branded consumer products are amongst the most powerful informal ambassadors of
national image today, but even a megabrand like Red Bull fails to contribute much to Austrias
profile because so few people know (or indeed care) where it comes from.
Quantity really counts with export brands, and Austria needs to encourage and accelerate the
creation and export of many more brands during the next decades. Light industrial policy of
this sort, after decades of being discredited, is now beginning to emerge again as a necessary
and logical response to the intense competition generated by the globalisation of markets.

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As mentioned in the NBI report, we need to think about the future more than the past or the
present. Like all the Western democracies in my survey, Austrias reputation is slowly
declining, and it is already more admired by older than younger respondents. This means
problems in store for Austria, as peoples taste in other countries shifts towards the
developing world, towards the historical victims of imperial power and away from its
perpetrators.
As economic and political influence migrates towards the BRICs and other emerging nations,
their populations lack of knowledge and familiarity with Austria, its history and culture and
people, will also prove a real disadvantage when establishing social, economic, trading,
diplomatic and cultural links with them. The task of engaging with younger audiences
worldwide, and teaching the emerging populations about Austria in a way that makes the
country, its people and products and culture relevant to their needs and interests, will be one
of the priorities of our project.
International public opinion is the last remaining superpower, and this project is primarily
about enabling Austria to exercise effective diplomacy with that superpower.

Structure of the Competitive Identity Process


The Competitive Identity process is designed to answer three key questions: Identity (who are
we?), Strategy (where are we going?), and Tactics (how will we get there?).
During the first Visit, we started the process of seeking a simple but truthful characterisation of
the country and its people. This was not designed to be an overly rigorous or academic
formula, but one with a powerful ring of truth about it. Although there was a good deal of
input into this phase, a short and simple output was needed. The question to answer was
what is the genius of the Austrians?
If we know who we are, then we know what we are capable of doing. If we know this, we
know what reputation we deserve, and can plan how to achieve it.
Answering the second question is, to use an excellent if old-fashioned term, an exercise in
Grand Strategy. Its the vision of what kind of country Austria could be in five, ten, fifty or a
hundred years time, what kind of reputation it would then need and deserve to have, and the
scope and purpose of its international engagements.
Answering the third question is the implementation part of the process: this is where we
designed the delivery mechanisms for achieving the reality and the reputation we envisioned
during the second phase. As I explain in more detail later in this report, the delivery
mechanisms can be bureaucratic, technical, financial, political, procedural, structural; they may
involve creating new bodies or departments, or may involve altering existing ones. The main
purpose of the structures we design is to ensure that the country is able to continue to
develop and implement such projects of increasing quality and impact for many years into
the future: the aim, in short, is to put Austria permanently in control of its own reputation.

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A Note on Implementation
A central principle of Competitive Identity is the Strategy - Substance - Symbolic Actions
model.
Symbolic actions are a particular species of substance with intrinsic communicative power:
they might be innovations, structures, legislation, reforms, investments, institutions or policies
which are especially remarkable, memorable, picturesque, newsworthy, topical, poetic,
touching or dramatic. Most importantly, they are emblematic of the strategy: they are at the
same time a component of the national story and the means of telling it. A constant stream of
such actions is, alongside the strategic and structural work already described, the true key to
effective implementation in such projects as this one.
Some good examples of Symbolic Actions from other countries are the Slovenian government
donating financial aid to their Balkan neighbours in order to prove that Slovenia wasnt part of
the Balkans; Spain legalising single-sex marriages in order to demonstrate that its values had
modernised to a point diametrically opposed to the Franco period; the decision of the Irish
government to exempt artists, writers and poets from income tax in order to prove the states
respect for creative talent; Estonia declaring internet access to be a human right; Bhutan
fining foreign tourists to visit the country in order to establish its high self-esteem and
precious cultural and environmental status; or the Hague hosting the European Court of
Human Rights (partly) in order to cement the Netherlands reputation as a global bastion of
the rule of law.
A Symbolic Action is characterised by the following criteria:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

It should be intrinsically media-friendly (i.e. the media will want to cover the story
without payment or persuasion)
It must be a genuine piece of policy, investment, innovation (i.e. not communications
or a pure publicity stunt)
It unequivocally proves a clear point about the country/city/region (i.e. not just
vaguely expressive or impressive)
It is always on brand (i.e. is a step in the right direction vis--vis the identity
strategy of the place)
It moves on existing perceptions at the right pace (i.e. doesnt merely confirm what
people already know about the place, yet doesnt contradict or challenge existing
perceptions so dramatically that it will be rejected or ignored as anomalous or
incredible).

There is no reason why Symbolic Actions shouldnt also be profitable business ventures, and
several of the Symbolic Actions developed during the project were designed to be of

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commercial interest to the private-sector partners in the project, as this provides its own
rationale, stimulus and timetable for deployment.
Clearly, the Competitive Identity program will be most effective if Austria appears to be firing
on all cylinders: in other words, if Symbolic Actions are constantly occurring across the full
range of sectors, public and private. It is essential that however people in other countries
come into contact with Austria over the next few years, it will be because of remarkable
initiatives, people, events, programs, creations, projects, business ideas and policies in a wide
range of sectors and contexts, all telling the same basic story about the country.
For this reason it was felt to be essential that the Symbolic Actions developed during the
Competitive Identity programme were distributed equally throughout government ministries
and agencies as well as with the private sector some relating to culture, some to public
diplomacy, some to education, some to domestic and some to foreign policy, some to major
events and some to religion, welfare, sport, civil society, business, heavy industry and the
creative industries, the media, agriculture, transport, science and technology, the environment
and so forth.
Another important component of the project was the question of Austrias structures for
international engagement, since these are what will enable the model to continue to function
into the future.
Under the heading of structures, there is a lot of less strategic but equally important
organisational work to be done. Austria, like most countries, has a plethora of ministries,
agencies and bodies responsible for promoting its commercial, cultural and political
interactions with other countries, most of which do excellent work, but carry out their tasks
somewhat in isolation from each other. They are not working to a common national strategy,
and in consequence they often send out conflicting and even contradictory impressions of the
country. As a result, no consistent national picture emerges, and Austrias overall reputation
stands still or moves backwards. We discussed how the work of these stakeholders could be
coordinated, of consistently world-class quality, and harmonised to a national grand strategy
that sets clear goals for Austrias economy, its society and its political and cultural relations
with other countries, cities and regions around the world: that defines its purpose in the
community of nations.
It may be that some of the systems and structures already in place in Austria are less than
ideally suited to the age of new media, global markets, economic turmoil and intense global
competition; and this certainly presents us with exciting opportunities for cutting-edge
innovation. Austria, if the political will is there, has the opportunity to create entirely new
systems and structures for public diplomacy, cultural relations, export and investment
promotion which are designed and built for the twenty-first century and its unique challenges

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and opportunities: to be the first to step away from the legacy structures of the nineteenth
and twentieth centuries is Austrias opportunity.

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PART TWO: STRATEGY
Background to the Strategy
A consensus was quickly reached on the nature of Austrias image challenge. This can be
summarised on four axes:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Current weakness
Future risk
Future opportunity
Ongoing threat

1. Current Weakness
Participants agreed that although Austrias image is broadly positive, it remains weak,
especially outside its immediate neighbourhood. Furthermore, in common with many other
countries that arent especially prominent in the international community, Austrias image is
outdated, and what international associations it does enjoy are largely associated with the
soft factors of its classical music heritage and landscape.
Consequently, many people have difficulty associating Austria with technology or other
expressions of modernity, and tend to regard it as a picturesque heritage park. This
undoubtedly benefits some forms of tourism (especially for older visitors) and cultural
relations, but very much at the expense of foreign investment, exports, science, technology,
and non-cultural education and talent attraction. There is, of course, nothing unusual about
the conflict between trade and tourism images most countries find it challenging to make
sense of an essentially future-facing investment image and an essentially backward-facing
tourism image, but Austrias problem is that the entire image of the country tends towards the
touristic and the picturesque.
Even amongst expert observers of Austria, such as investment professionals, there appears to
be a perception that Austrias economic strengths are industrial rather than technological:
another symptom of a reputation that isnt refreshed or updated sufficiently often (it may also
be a symptom of reality). Austria is perceived as a country which, in the words of Karl Kraus,
has a great future behind it.
Certainly, a comparative analysis of the age cohorts in the Anholt-GfK Roper Nation Brands
IndexSM suggests that Austrias appeal is much stronger amongst older respondents in most
countries; this obviously represents a challenge for the countrys future relevance and profile.

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To update the image of Austria, to make it more modern, and to move it closer to the
mainstream of international perceptions, without however compromising its associations with
cultural heritage, was clearly part of our task. This will ultimately need to be planned at the
sectoral level too: the tourism sector would benefit from more products and more prominence
in the youth-adventure-extreme category, much as New Zealand has done in recent decades,
just as the culture and exports sectors would benefit from an equivalent rejuvenation. A little
more Red Bull and a little less Mozart Balls would be the appropriate formula here.
There is no doubt that the only truly global association that Austria enjoys, at least amongst a
better-educated elite, is with its classical music heritage, and whether accidental or deliberate,
this has been a moderately successful exercise in narrowband nation branding for the
country. However, I have seen little evidence that it is as powerful an effect as many Austrians
believe. Austrias overall ranking in Culture in the Anholt-GfK Roper Nation Brands IndexSM is
by far its weakest reputational dimension, and even amongst its near neighbours, those whom
one would expect to know Austria most intimately, associations with cultural heritage are not
especially strong, and in the worldwide rankings on cultural heritage, Austria ranks only
fifteenth, with about the same score as Peru, and considerably lower than countries such as
Turkey and Scotland.
It would be foolish to understate the continuing importance of Mozart for Austrias image: he
is certainly one of the most prominent brands on the planet, and is the only Western classical
composer that many people can spontaneously name. Several participants in the groups have
complained that Austrias image shows an unhealthy bias in favour of the Mozart/Strauss
legacy, but my view is that Austria is actually a very long way from reaping the full benefits of
its cultural heritage. This would in fact be a nice problem to have, but it is very far from the
truth of the situation.
However, in a more general sense, it is certainly true that Austria has an image which is more
decorative than useful, to use the terminology of the Anholt-GfK Roper Nation Brands
IndexSM and this certainly works against Austrias economic interest in a great many areas. It
would be a mistake to place too much emphasis on cultural heritage in Austrias international
engagements, but the problem is more generally one of a weak profile rather than an
unbalanced one, and any route to greater prominence and relevance is to be welcomed.

2. Future Risk
Austria, as I have already noted, has often been described as a pleasant Western backwater,
but it is important to consider how much longer this agreeable situation can persist.

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For the moment, Austria is still performing remarkably well, but with the European economy
(on which Austria depends profoundly for its prosperity) apparently unravelling on all sides,
and economic power shifting to countries where Austria is largely unknown, it seems clear that
Austria should be working now to build a stronger and more positive reputation as a bulwark
against the shocks which will inevitably come in the near future.
As the members of the Diplomatic Group confirmed, Austria does not feature in the
educational syllabuses of children currently growing up in China, India, Brazil and most other
emerging powers. Even in the cases where European history is taught, Austria is barely
mentioned. This creates a risk that future generations of economically, culturally and politically
significant individuals all of whom will at some point become international consumers,
tourists, investors and students are profoundly ignorant about Austrias existence, its place in
the world, its historical antecedents and its cultural significance. This effectively relegates
Austria to the status of a minor B2B destination for well-informed professional elites, and the
country will simply no longer feature in the cultural landscape of the global commons. The
other minor German-speaking country thats not Switzerland is hardly likely to make Austria a
desirable destination for trade, investment, education or even tourism in the future.
Informing people about a countrys past glories is certainly desirable the Opening Ceremony
of the London Olympic Games shows one country clearly tackling precisely the same challenge
that Austria now faces but it is a difficult to create real enthusiasm for historical themes
amongst broad populations, and difficult to make such lessons stick.
What makes far more sense is earning a new reputation by connecting directly with the needs,
desires, aspirations and concerns of contemporary populations. If a country can make itself
relevant to people for what it is doing today, then drawing them into a deeper engagement
with the countrys past becomes very much easier.
3. Future Opportunity
I encouraged participants in the process to consider the strategic question from a different
viewpoint: rather than thinking about opportunities for Austria to become even more
competitive, and consequently even more prosperous, one could equally well devise a strategy
on the basis of Austrias international obligations.
Austria is one of the more stable, equal, peaceful, prosperous and successful societies on the
planet, undoubtedly amongst the top 5-10% by most indicators. One could well argue that, in
such a position, the countrys international responsibilities outweigh its opportunities for
greater success: certainly there are well over a hundred countries which would give a great
deal to be as successful as Austria. So instead of asking itself how it can follow the small
number of countries that rank above itself in the various indices of prosperity, Austria might

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find it more interesting to wonder how it can lead some of the large number that rank below
it.
In doing so, Austria would undoubtedly do more to enhance its international image than by
becoming yet more successful. People dont usually admire countries simply because they are
rich and successful, and Austria is an excellent illustration of this principle: they admire
countries that they perceive as actively beneficial in the world.
Meta-analysis of the Anholt-GfK Roper Nation Brands IndexSM clearly shows that the
perception of morality is the strongest driver of overall national reputation, so there is plenty
of good sense in selecting strategies which focus on providing leadership in the international
domain, helping resolve shared global challenges, and generally behaving as a useful and
principled player in the community of nations.
4. Ongoing Threat
It was agreed by all groups that the correct approach to the occasional negative perceptions of
Austria was one of constant vigilance, and this must be one of the tasks given to the Media
Centre, which is described later in this Report. To undertake actions or communications
specifically designed to counter perceptions of extremism runs the risk of drawing unwelcome
attention to factors which currently arent front of mind for the majority of people in other
countries. It was also felt that there was much in the strategy finally chosen which had the
power to combat these negative perceptions in an indirect and thus more subtle way.

Vision: Re-evaluating the Austrian Model


My first proposal for Austrias strategic direction was discussed in detail with all four groups
and met with almost universal approval. Not surprisingly, several people expressed doubts
about how, and whether, it could be executed in practical terms, but this was not of
immediate concern since in my experience finding the correct strategic direction is more
difficult and more important than finding ways of implementing it.
The strategic narrative runs like this:
If one looks at Austrian society from an external perspective, it is relatively easy to characterise
as a societal model which is unique to Austria: most of the individual components of this
model can be found in other societies, but the combination is unmistakably Austrian. The main
components of the model are, I would argue, the following:
Work/Life Balance:
Strong family and neighbourhood ties; societal cohesion at many levels

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Diligence and industry, but not at the expense of family. Early to work, early home; holidays
and mealtimes are sacred
Avoidance of anything hectic or rushed (haste is not gemtlich); important decisions are taken
slowly and carefully
Humanity/Planet Balance:
Only the Austrians are culturally environmental: several other European populations have
learned to comply with a wide range of environmental regulations, but I would argue that the
Austrians are culturally predisposed towards sustainability: Austria is their pristine garden, and
their desire to keep it pristine needs little official encouragement
Food consists of locally sourced, natural, organic ingredients, freshly prepared (although I
remain to be convinced that Austrian cuisine has the potential to become a truly global
phenomenon, alongside Indian, French, Italian, Chinese, Mexican, Japanese or even Korean,
because unlike them it doesnt form a complete, unmistakably distinctive culinary oeuvre,
rather a medium-sized collection of excellent dishes which are characteristic of a broader
region rather than a specific nation).
Individual/Society Balance:
The Social Partnerships is a unique model which quite possibly needs some updating but is
basically very sound and highly distinctive
Savings and prudence (the almost universal Sparkonto is certainly good for families even if it is
bad for economic growth)
A rather rigid set of rules at the bureaucratic level combined with great flexibility and
adaptability of application at the citizen level
Consensus is seen as important, even if this characteristic is sometimes driven more by conflict
avoidance and results in unsatisfactory compromise rather than a true, worked-out consensus
An understanding of the proper role of culture in society: culture, especially music, is seen as
part of a rich life, which contributes just as much to personal and societal happiness and
wealth as does money and success.
From an external perspective, and at first glance, much of this model seems to confirm the
view that Austria is a conservative if not mildly fundamentalist society. These look to many like
very old-fashioned values, which like so many other aspects of Austrias current image might
suggest a pleasant tourist destination, a temporary escape from the chaos and crisis of the
real world, but not a model that anyone might wish to emulate; not a model that suggests
leadership or particular relevance to the problems of the modern world.
And yet, I maintain that a slightly different perspective on the same model casts it in a
dramatically different light.

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We live in an age in which the model that has guided the economic, social, cultural and
political activity of much of the world is undergoing intense scrutiny and a good deal of
criticism. Today, every pundit and columnist can recite the failings of the Washington
Consensus: our politicians treated economics as a monotheistic religion when society, in
reality, depends on many gods for its happiness. People, culture, happiness and the planets
resources were left out of the equation; the system was predicated on what Edward Abbey
called growth for the sake of growth . the logic of the cancer cell.
We are all experts at criticising the old order but as yet there is no working proof of a viable
alternative. Retreating into an archaic fantasy of slow-food, no-global or even anti-capitalist
localism is seductive to many, but fundamentally unrealistic.
The Austrian Model which I have described above provides a working model of a viable
alternative: point by point, it responds to the failings of the aggressive Anglo-Saxon model of
capitalism:
AUSTRIAN MODEL
Work/life balance
Family and neighbourhood values
Culturally environmental
Avoidance of hectic; make decisions
slowly
Go to work early, go home early
Savings; prudence
Boring (= trustworthy)
Food: fresh, local ingredients
Social partnership
Culture as integral part of a rich life
The Sound of Music
Harmony
Consensus/compromise

WASHINGTON CONSENSUS
Work, work, work
Selfishness, individualism
Ignored finite resources of planet
Instant decision-making, esp. in financial markets
You can rest when youre dead
Debt-fuelled growth
Exciting (= unpredictable)
Fast food for fast living; expensive exotica
Government vs. business vs. workforce
Culture as entertainment product
Wall Street
Power
Winning

It would be a gross exaggeration to claim that the Austrian Model provides everything that the
American model lacks, just as it would be an exaggeration to claim that the Anglo-Saxon model
is entirely worthless. Both are far from perfect, and far from complete. The Austrian Model, as
it stands, contains some of those same elements of inertia and rigidity, lack of enterprise and
adaptability which are endemic to the sclerotic and increasingly discredited European Model.
There is no place for xenophobia, anti-globalism or corruption in such a model. Much needs to
be improved and even rebuilt.

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But the model works, and Austrias success and prestige give it the credibility to be a serious
contender for Capitalism 2.0, or perhaps Europe 2.0.
The Austrian Model is, I believe, closer to providing a working alternative model than most
others currently available, and this provides Austria with its main opportunity to demonstrate
some real leadership in the international sphere, should it choose to do so.

Final Strategy Choices


During the programme, I presented three alternative strategic proposals to the Friday and
Saturday Groups, the first of which had been developed during the Second Visit and is
described in the previous paragraphs. These three strategies can be summarised as follows:
Strategy #1: The Austrian Model.
Summary: The distinctive features of Austrias social, cultural and (to some extent) economic
model are, contrary to current perceptions, in fact far from old-fashioned and irrelevant: they
could well be positioned as a perfect, point-by-point and unmistakably European antidote to
the broken model of aggressive Anglo-Saxon capitalism, and consequently represent the future
rather than the past.
Strategy #2: Bridge-Builders to the World.
Summary: Austrias track record in bridging the gap between developed and developing
markets, forged between the fall of Communism in 1989 and the 2004 Enlargement, is also its
future mission. Firstly in the laggard states of South-Eastern Europe, and then on to Central
Asia, North Africa and beyond, Austria is the bridge-builder, bringing a unique portfolio of
experience for accelerating progress and prosperity to second-tier nations around the world.
Helping developing countries to become developed countries, in a sustainable way, is a fine
and substantial mission for Austria, for the foreseeable future.
Strategy #3: Making Modern our Middle Name.
Summary: The third strategy was more of a classic nation branding approach, and was based
on the assumption that (a) Austria needs to be perceived as more modern and more relevant
in order to trade more effectively, and (b) it deserves to be perceived as such. This strategy
would therefore be a comprehensive medium-term programme of initiatives designed to
establish Austrias credentials as a modern, relevant, cosmopolitan and technologically
advanced nation.

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Responses to the Strategic Proposals
Strategy #1: The groups unanimously agreed that this concept is, in fact, more of a vision than
a strategy. The decision was taken to retain it as the ultimate vision for Austrias purpose in the
world: a direction of travel rather than a specific objective.
Strategy #2: The idea of Austria as bridge builder achieved unanimous support in both the
Friday and Saturday groups, and was felt to be credible, justifiable and motivational, as well as
being sufficiently broad-based that it would not marginalise or exclude any significant sectors
of industry, business or society.
One member of the Friday Group pointed out that Austria was not the only country which
could claim such a positioning, but in my view this perennial question of the unique selling
proposition is only relevant in the commercial sector, where there is a real risk of one product
being confused with another functionally similar one. In reality, it is impossible for very many
people to genuinely confuse one country with another, since they are self-evidently different.
What matters for countries is the direction they choose to pursue, and how effectively and
visibly they pursue it.
Another contributor commented that he was relieved that the strategy was reassuringly
familiar and not something too ambitious or alien to Austrias culture and current situation
and activities. This is entirely deliberate. Indeed, the idea of Austria as bridge builder is one
that has been discussed in various sectors in the past, a fact which is extremely reassuring to
me. The art of national strategy is far more a question of recognising who we are than
deciding who we are. Again, in the commercial sector its possible and desirable to develop
a surprising, innovative and original strategy in order to give a company a unique and
distinctive positioning in the marketplace: companies can sometimes achieve this because they
are relatively small and relatively undemocratic. Countries cant because its impossible for
them to change their direction or nature except over many generations, and this is almost
never the consequence of a deliberate policy or executive decision.
Some discussion took place relating to the geographical domain where such bridge-building
activity could be focused, and the general consensus was that the logical place to focus in the
first place was in Austrias own immediate neighbourhood of South-Eastern Europe, where it
already has experience, credibility, awareness and a strong track record.
There is still enormous potential in this region, and plenty to be achieved, particularly amongst
those countries which are hoping to achieve EU membership in the longer term (such as
Serbia) and those which have already acceded but are still in need of significant development
(such as Romania). It was felt that this strategy provides an opportunity for the Austrian State
to catch up with Austrian private sector activity in the SEE region, since much of Austrias

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achievement to date has been largely private-sector driven: the new strategic focus provided
by the Competitive Identity exercise should enable Austria to operate in a more coordinated,
cross-sector and public-private basis in the region, and consequently achieve better, more
noticeable and more lasting results. There is of course a significant element of self-interest in
this approach, since if it puts sufficient effort into it, Austria could dominate the huge
investment opportunities in these markets.
The bridge-building concept of course has a cultural dimension too, and here there are great
opportunities, for example in the Muslim world; in Orthodox-Catholic reconciliation, and in
many other domains where tolerance, mutual understanding and effective communication are
lacking.
It is important that this strategy is not interpreted in a narrow way as helping emerging
countries to access the European Union, since the potential of such a task could gradually
become more and more limited; because it could easily become derailed by major changes
within the European Union (a possibility not to be excluded in the current, uncertain
environment); and because it would exclude Austrian organisations and individuals whose
interests lie in other parts of the world. The Bridge-Builder should be framed as an effectively
unlimited, global mission for Austria.
The point about sustainability is obviously critical, since if Austria merely helps more emerging
nations to become consumers and emitters on the same scale as the current developed world,
it is doing humanity and the planet no favours at all. For this reason it must contain a very
emphatic element of leadership in sustainability, and preferably be able to promote its own
distinctive economic approach to development, both in terms of sustainability and foreign
assistance.
I carried out some comparison and evaluation of the various trends and current best practice
in sustainable economic theory, and I believe that the Global Footprint concept may be the
ideal sustainability agenda for Austria to endorse, adopt and champion, both for its own
economic planning and as part of the development package which it will offer to developing
countries under the bridge building approach. This idea was further developed as one of the
Symbolic Actions which are outlined later in this Report.
Strategy #3: This strategy was rejected by the Saturday Group, on the grounds that it wasnt
considered sufficiently visionary or exciting; that it didnt provide a clear sense of direction
for the country; that it was unlikely to be supported or sustained by Austrian government and
society; and that it would be a waste of this rare opportunity for a total re-purposing of the
nation.

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However, it was felt that some of the implementation techniques described in the outline to
this strategy were too good to waste and should certainly be revisited during the final phase
of the Competitive Identity project as possible tools for executing the chosen strategy. These
techniques included the following:
1. Enhanced and harmonised communications in business and leisure tourism, culture,
export and trade promotion, public diplomacy, major events, etc., based on a series of
sector-specific themes.
2. Highly visible partnerships with other countries and cities which are already associated
with the desired attributes.
3. Targeted research and development activity in selected sectors.
4. Restyle all external communications to the strategy, across all public sector platforms.
5. Showcase existing leaders in appropriate sectors, back winners, encourage champions
at home and abroad.
6. Fund major prizes for cutting-edge R&D in appropriate sectors.
7. Host appropriate international events.
8. Pick a quintessential global challenge and devote sufficient resources to becoming
universally identified with it, in a distinctively Austrian way.
9. Educational support to schools in key growth markets, stressing the bridge-building
activity of the country and its industries and academia.
10. Invest in science diplomacy on a major scale.
11. Major events strategy, focusing on appropriate industries and sectors.
12. Create or identify a body able to identify next-generation opportunities before they
become mainstream or too heavily populated. Become known for funding and other
support in such sectors. Seize high ground opportunities in these sectors, creating
global hub infrastructure and institutions in Austria.

Strategy, Substance and Symbolic Actions


It will be recalled that the Competitive Identity methodology uses the concept of strategy,
substance and Symbolic Actions in order to provide dramatic evidence that the country
deserves a higher profile than it currently has.
Rather than transmit a series of messages or arguments to the media that Austria is a better
and more relevant place than people think an approach which I believe is likely to be ignored
or rejected the idea is to develop and deliver an unbroken stream of inherently remarkable
and newsworthy projects, policies, products and people, all of which prove Austrias relevance
and appeal to people in Europe and around the world.

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Symbolic Actions are generated in two ways: they are created from scratch, or converted from
existing projects. Generating Symbolic Actions from scratch is, at least in principle, a
straightforward creative process, which needs to be carried out by competent and experienced
professional creatives. Ideas are developed using the core strategy as a brief, and are then
assigned to an appropriate government agency, ministry, entrepreneur, company, charity or
other body for development and execution.
The conversion approach, on the other hand, involves identifying suitable projects already
planned within government or the private sector and converting them to Symbolic Actions (a
process which I call giving them a twist).
The BMWFJ Secretariat worked with all the stakeholders in the project to identify projects,
policies, products and people with actual or potential symbolic power, from as many sectors as
possible. This was carried out in a remarkably efficient and productive way, and the Secretariat
produced no less than 77 suitable projects in a very short space of time certainly a record in
my experience.
I then led two creative sessions in Vienna, using creative people from Austrian advertising and
communications agencies, a series of workshops with the Friday Group participants, and finally
a number of creative sessions in the UK, to convert a selection of these projects into Symbolic
Actions.
The projects I chose for conversion were the ones which best lent themselves to enhanced
creativity, and had the potential to provide the most dramatic evidence that Austria deserves a
higher profile around the world. This does not of course mean that the projects which I left out
were considered less good, less interesting or even less true to the bridge-builder strategy
almost all of them, if well executed, could play a role in enhancing Austrias international
engagements.
The kind of treatment which the chosen projects needed varied from case to case. In some
cases, the symbolic aspect of the project was already in place and simply needed some
imaginative and effective promotion or communication; in other cases, the project lacked any
dramatic or communicative components, but was nonetheless of world-class importance or
quality: in such cases, I simply devised a symbolic front end in order to help it capture the
imagination of the media and public opinion. In some cases, the most potent symbolic effects
were achieved by linking, cross-fertilising or even dismantling and reassembling different
projects from different sectors.
Clearly, the process of earning a new image for Austria doesnt finish now that my consulting
engagement has finished: it starts now that Austria is in a position to build the systems and
structures for implementing these Symbolic Actions, and for generating a regular supply of

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new ones in the future. The design for these systems and structures are discussed in the final
section of this Report.

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PART THREE: SYMBOLIC ACTIONS
The Symbolic Actions
There are four distinct types of Symbolic Actions illustrated in this document, each with its
own particular function. The largest category is of course Pure Bridgebuilder Symbolic
Actions, all of which are strongly rooted in the multilateralist, cosmopolitan spirit of the
bridgebuilder strategy. Seven further ideas are designed as communications vehicles designed
to allow Austria to achieve more bridge-building activities and messages around the world;
two are strategic support techniques designed to help the Austrian government implement
the strategy more effectively; and the three last Symbolic Actions are designed to support the
classical music sub-strategy.
My inclusion of Symbolic Actions designed to reinforce the idea of classical music relates to
one of my key recommendations during the strategic process. To quote my earlier comment:
Several participants in the groups have complained that Austrias image shows an unhealthy
bias in favour of the Mozart/Strauss legacy, but my view is that Austria is actually a very long
way from reaping the full benefits of its cultural heritage. This would in fact be a nice problem
to have, but it is very far from the truth of the situation.
It really seems as if Austria does not fully own the idea of classical music around the world,
and it needs to keep working in order to achieve and sustain this reputation. My
recommendation, therefore, is to maintain a small proportion (say, about one-tenth as
illustrated in this list) of Symbolic Actions that specifically promote Austria as the global
capital of classical music, instead of (or preferably as well as) advancing the bridgebuilder
strategy.

Pure Bridgebuilder Symbolic Actions


1. Amadeus Music Academy (ABA Invest in Austria; Hexagon Point: Investment &
Immigration)
This is a good example of how a commercial project can be developed into a Symbolic Action.
The original project is a private-sector initiative created by a foreign investor in Austria, but
with a few small twists it can play a useful role in communicating and enhancing Austrias
Competitive Identity, whilst improving the investors business by making it more media
friendly and consequently marketing itself, and achieving a much higher profile than the
original version might have been able to expect. In consequence, its also a good example of
how agencies like the Austria Business Agency can add real value to their clients investments
simply by applying appropriate creativity.

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The basic idea behind the Symbolic Action is to provide the Amadeus Music Academy with
more striking, media-friendly and dramatic user benefits, beyond the mere fact that the school
is located in Vienna. After all, young musicians in East Asia regularly acquire levels of technical
excellence which are in every sense the equal of what they can achieve in Europe, so
additional incentives and arguments have to be provided. What is it that a gifted young
musician from Asia can learn in Vienna that he or she cannot learn back home?
The obvious answer is that its impossible to interpret European music properly without a deep
understanding of European culture and history: out of its cultural context, classical music
becomes simply a technical accomplishment. Without the qualities of interpretation, depth,
intelligence, taste, refinement and a strong cultural frame of reference, even the most
talented musician is unlikely to progress very far in the professional world. So what the
Amadeus school needs to provide is European music tuition in the European context, and
where better than Vienna to do this?
Consequently, the syllabus must be well balanced between musicianship and cultural
background. This could involve all kinds of unusual and media-friendly innovations, including
the following suggestions:
-

Learning to feel the emotions that give rise to great music. Weekly seminars on
romantic love, religious awe, existential doubt, poverty and solitude, political
oppression, could all be delivered in a strongly experiential, non-academic style.
Learning what it was like to live in the eighteenth or nineteenth century; total
immersion experiences, where students must live for a day in period costumes and
without modern conveniences, would be one unforgettable experience.
Bridging between tradition and modernity, and learning the hard way about public
performance. A partnership could be created with the Frequency Festival, where the
Amadeus students are given a 20-minute performance slot (its likely that both the
Frequency audience and the Amadeus students will benefit from the experience).
It would also be original and useful to appoint a prominent American rapper, for
example, as Visiting Professor he would have much to share with Asian classical
music students and the experience would be enriching for both parties.
The students could also spend a day each month busking in the airport, as part of the
Flash Mops described later in the Vienna Airport Refresh Symbolic Action (see
below).

2. Congress of Megacities based on Sustainable and Emerging Cities in Latin America


and the Caribbean (Federal Ministry of Finance / Inter-American Development Bank;
Hexagon Point: Investment and Immigration)

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This simple idea shows an opportunity for Austria and Vienna to show some international
leadership in a critical topic that at the moment lacks a central focus, and lacks a clear source
of global leadership: the future of the Megacity.
Everyone knows that more than half of humanity is now city-dwelling, and that megacities are
an important dimension of the future of humanity. But they are also extremely problematic for
many reasons, and Vienna could take the lead in guiding constructive global thinking in this
area.
Austrias unique take on this huge problem would be to start small, and go to the oldest,
tiniest villages to seek solutions to the biggest, newest challenges. Having a global Congress of
Megacities in Seoul or Tokyo or New York is rather obvious, and holding it in a medium-sized
city like Vienna might seem irrelevant or inappropriate: but holding it as a series of high-level
workshops in a string of tiny mountain villages in rural Austria is much more surprising and
more appealing too.
The appeal of tiny wisdom, and finding small solutions for big problems seems highly
appropriate for Austrias bridge-building mission.

3. Adomi Bridge (Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Hexagon Point: Governance)


Aid, according to the bestselling Zambian author Dambisa Moyo, is dead. Much has been
written during the past ten years by myself and others about the failure of traditional
development assistance: weakening governance, choking off local enterprise, stimulating
corruption and creating a culture of dependency without even beginning to narrow the gap
between rich and poor. As I have often pointed out in my own writing, aid also fatally damages
the economic prospects of recipient countries for generations, by branding them as desperate
basket-cases. China and the other developing giants in their search for raw materials are
beginning to crowd out traditional donors by making vast but often morally unsound
investments in poor countries.
Its time for a change, but nobody seems prepared to break with the old system, even though
it is clearly unfit for purpose. Austria should be the first country to abandon conventional
donations (except in the cases of emergency assistance which should of course be ringfenced). It should entirely replace its foreign assistance programs with a new model called
Chain Aid.
Inspired by the Adomi Bridge project which Austria is carrying out in Ghana, this Symbolic
Action takes a single conventional aid project and develops it into an entirely new model of
overseas development assistance. This opens the door to a new leadership position for

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Austria, and endless opportunities for bridge-building both literal and figurative around the
world.
The idea of Chain Aid is based on a new form of conditionality. Austria will help countries like
Ghana with its development projects, but only on condition that whatever skills, techniques
and experience Ghana acquires during the project must one day be passed on to others in the
form of further overseas development. So, through the Adomi Bridge project, our Ghanaian
partners acquire a wealth of knowledge and experience in managing, funding and
implementing major civil engineering projects: we then require them to build on this
experience, and in due course to become donors themselves, offering the benefit of that
experience to other countries where similar projects need to be carried out.
Of course we dont expect the Ghanaians to be able to deliver such assistance projects on their
own after just one project, and for the next few projects we expect them to bring along their
Austrian colleagues too, as well as external funding, but gradually they will acquire sufficient
confidence and expertise to be able to become donors in their own right. Perhaps the
Austrians would even choose to invest in the Ghanaian team and retain a long-term interest in
their success.
There is no reason why the chain of aid should remain in the developing world: one day, Id
like to see the Ghanaian government offering its skills and expertise in bridge-building to a
Canadian province or a Japanese prefecture and of course this export of skills can one day
become a valuable source of revenue for Ghana, and perhaps provide a return on the original
Austrian investment.
The implication of Chain Aid is that it promises and end to the fragmentary and
inconsequential nature of traditional development projects, by building chains that stretch
around the world.
The often-repeated mantra of overseas development is: give a man a fish and you will feed
him for a day. Teach him to fish and you feed him for life. Chain Aid adds a new element to
this tired formula: Teach him to teach others and you might end poverty.

4. FMA University Programme in Financial Market Supervision / FMA Supervision


Conference (Austrian Financial Market Authority (FMA) and Oesterreichische
Nationalbank (OeNB); Hexagon Point: Investment & Immigration)
The excellent and timely work being carried out by the FMA and OeNB would benefit greatly
from a higher profile, since it cuts right to the heart of one of the greatest problems facing
society today: uncontrollable market forces. Obviously the difficulty with this kind of activity is

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that its complex and technical and doesnt generally reach a mass audience. So the challenge
is to bring these issues alive to ordinary people, in order to show that Austria is playing an
important role in setting the world to rights.
One noticeable and unexpected project would be to introduce the topic to Austrian
schoolchildren at a very early age. Arguably, the current failure of the Washington Consensus
is partly cultural in cause, and for this reason, the best way to tackle the root causes of the
malaise is by addressing basic values and principles in society through primary education. A
course in financial prudence suitable for five- and six-year olds would be a fascinating project
for the FMA/OeNB to commission, and would provide significant profile for their mainstream
activities.
An even more prominent approach would be for the FMA to name and shame the most
flagrant examples of rampant capitalism worldwide. They could launch an annual Gordon
Gecko Award (named in honour of the callous financier memorably played by Michael
Douglas in Wall Street) for the greediest capitalist of the year, and offer free courses in
Financial Market Supervision to the winners and runners-up.
5. Preserving and Sustaining the Unique Historic State-Owned Architectural Heritage
(Federal Ministry for Economy, Family & Youth; Hexagon Point: Culture)
The Ministry could adopt a new way of twinning buildings which links its work on Austrian
heritage more closely to the overseas development agenda, and consequently to bridge
building.
The idea is that each major building is twinned with a building in a developing country, and
they collaborate closely on preserving and sustaining their heritage. The twin buildings could
be selected because of some shared history; because they have a similar public function; a
similar architectural style; present particular conservation challenges as a result of their similar
construction style or materials or location; or simply because they were built in the same year.
For example, Schnbrunn Castle could be twinned with Raniji ki Baori, an important stepwell in
Rajasthan, since both were built in 1699; Stefansdom and the Majusri Hall at Foguang Temple
in Shanxi Province were both completed in 1137. One could even have fun selecting buildings
because they happen to start with the same letters: the Technisches Museum and the Taj
Mahal would form an agreeably random couple which otherwise might never have anything to
do with each other, but might be able to assist each other in innovative and unpredictable
ways.
The final selection from a list of candidate twinnings could be made by visitor votes (giving
each visitor a token which they then drop in a slot to select their chosen building is one simple
way of doing this).

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Once the twinning has been created, an audio-video floor could be installed in the entrance of
each building, with a live feed between the two, so that visitors to each building, even though
they might be thousands of kilometres apart, can see each other, wave, and even enjoy a
transcontinental conversation from one building to another.
When the twinning is announced, and later when restoration works are being carried out, a
construction hoarding would be used to protect the faade in the usual way (a mesh building
wrap printed with a full-size photographic image of the building), but instead of the printed
image simply reproducing the real building underneath, half of the wrap should show the real
building, and half should show the faade of the twin building.

6. Vienna International Christian-Islamic Summer University (University of Vienna;


Hexagon Point: Governance/People/Culture)
This excellent initiative is right at the heart of one of the topics that matter most to people
around the world, and with a little creative enhancement could easily form a good example of
cultural bridge-building, Austrian-style.
Whilst the topic and the approach of this event are to be commended, it is unlikely to produce
very much reputational benefit for Vienna or for Austria since the project is primarily an
academic one, and has relatively little outreach to broader audiences worldwide. This is a
shame, since its a topic that has an impact on billions of people worldwide, many of whom
really would value the opportunity to share in its learnings and conclusions.
Part of the problem is that there appears to be relatively little incentive for the programme to
produce any definite conclusions. Unless the participants are working towards a definite, and
ideally public-facing outcome, the overwhelming probability is that the event will produce
discussion and nothing else.
In order to change this dynamic, the groups deliberations should end with a public
performance of their findings. To create the script for this event, a number of poets,
speechwriters, slam poets, rap artists, composers and dramatists would join the group towards
the end of the discussions and work with the participants to produce performance versions of
their best findings, provocations, ideas and projects. These outputs would then be performed
in a mixed programme of words and music (played by the Austrian Building Bridges Orchestra
from Graz University, another of the projects listed in the original list of 77).

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Amongst other more obvious benefits of this approach, it would help to prove an important
concept at the heart of Austrias long-term Competitive Identity strategy: that music lies at the
heart of public life, and is functional rather than merely entertaining.
The group would then travel with this performance package to major events around the world.
A short version could be produced for performance at the General Assembly of the UN in New
York, for example. The performance would also of course be freely available online, on DVD,
and so forth. Kits would be made available so that other groups could repeat the formula and
produce their own contrasting results.
Both the discussions and the final public performance would be virtually linked with other
centres worldwide, creating a networked global resonance for the event.
The purpose of the combined event is not, of course, to impose solutions on these difficult
problems, but to introduce fresh and unexpected viewpoints, inputs, insights and provocations
into the debate, so that others can be more effectively stimulated into developing real
solutions over the longer period. A combination of music and words is the best medium for
delivering this kind of input, since it isnt required to have the intellectual rigour and finality of
an academic paper or a policy proposal, but does need to affect people at a deeper, spiritual or
emotional level which can so often provide the inspiration for new solutions to old problems.
7. European Forum Alpbach (European Forum Alpbach; Hexagon Point: Governance)
The key task facing Europe at this time of crisis is primarily an internal one: to define what its
job must be for the next fifty years, and to generate consensus, passion and ambition around
this. Unless this purpose is relevant, credible and inspiring to people in the areas that they care
about most, then solidarity and commitment, not to mention democratic participation, will
remain a distant dream.
When the memory of two world wars was still fresh in peoples minds, Europe did not have
this problem because its founding principles of ensuring lasting peace and prosperity were
highly relevant. Today, the EU is partly suffering the price of its own success: it has gone so far
towards creating peace (and, on the whole, prosperity too) that it may have done itself out of
a job, or at least done itself out of a defining purpose.
Yet in my opinion Europes universal defining purpose is plainly still there, and merely needs to
be named, updated and crystallised. Europe finds itself once again at the heart of the issues
which threaten global security and stability indeed, the future of the species just as surely
as the Second World War did in the first half of the twentieth century.

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We are living in the age of the long crisis, in which globalisation throws up an unending series
of shocks and challenges to the global system. Every one of these problems is a shared
problem, a problem that doesn't respect borders, a problem that demonstrably cannot be
solved by individuals, corporations, governments or multilateral institutions on their own. In
fact, all these problems are symptoms of a deeper problem: the fact that we still haven't
learned how to run ourselves as a single species living on a single planet.
Europe is surely mankinds most ambitious and most successful experiment in global
governance, the master problem facing humanity today. Europes duty and destiny is
therefore to continue the experiment and perfect the techniques of multilateralism.
My deliberately ambitious proposal is that the Alpbach Forum should adopt this as its role: to
do whatever is necessary and possible to help Europe redefine itself according to this mission.
In doing so, Alpbach will help to redefine Austria as a leader within Europe (a role it is perhaps
uniquely configured to play, since it has much of the credibility, wealth and sophistication of
the Great Powers but is far more acceptable to the smaller and poorer member states, and far
less politicised).
This is a large task, and it will certainly be necessary for Alpbach to partner, network and
collaborate with other Austrian institutions (such as the Vienna Economic Forum) in order to
achieve the influence it needs.
In order to rise above the mass of think-tanks and conferences currently operating, however, a
big mission is not sufficient: careful thought needs to be given to developing an entirely
innovative format for the organisation and its meetings. The scope of the Competitive Identity
project unfortunately doesnt permit this degree of detailed product development, but with
the right participants in the discussion, it is possible, necessary, and certainly fun, to develop a
completely new way of running an international forum. Alpbach should seize this challenge as
a matter of urgency.
8. Adopt CoderDoJo as State Educational Policy (New Project; Hexagon Point:
People/Governance)
CoderDojo1 is a much-admired free programme for teaching computer programming skills to
children as young as seven in a club environment, which has achieved notable successes in
Ireland and a number of other countries.

See http://www.guardian.co.uk/technology/blog/2012/dec/05/coderdojo-programming-kids

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I have spoken to the Founder of CoderDojo, Bill Liao, who would love to see Austria developing
a national programme. This would then form part of Austrias bridgebuilding package for
working with developing countries. If Austria executes the programme at a big enough scale,
with appropriate Symbolic Actions, and shows international leadership in doing so, it is likely to
generate significant international profile.
9. Become Lead Country for the Global Footprint (New Project; Hexagon Point:
Governance)
The Global Footprint Network2 is working to establish the Ecological Footprint as the standard
resource accounting tool for countries, in an effort to ensure that humanity lives within the
available resources of the planet. This tool compares human demands on nature to the
regenerative capacity of nature: thus it can show, for example, how much humanity takes
compared to what the biosphere can renew, or how much a nations population consumes
compared to what the countrys ecosystems can provide.
The Footprint is rapidly gaining acceptance in many countries, and has been endorsed by the
United Nations, the European Union and many multilateral organisations, NGOs and
governments worldwide. Its momentum is clearly gathering, and my strong sense is that it will
soon be accepted as the standard metric for sustainability.
A number of developing countries are already working closely with the Ecological Footprint:
Ecuador, for example, committed in its 2009 National Plan to maintain its Ecological Footprint
at a level within what its ecosystems can renew. It has also adopted a Presidential mandate to
manage ecological assets by developing physical indicators such as the Footprint to track
ecological supply and demand, and inform long-term decision-making.
There is still an opportunity for a developed country, such as Austria, to be the first to adopt
the Footprint as a standard measure, and thus to become the international champion of this
form of resource accounting. In this way, Austria could gain almost unlimited opportunities to
build bridges of sustainable national development with other countries, helping them to adopt
the same metrics and aspire to the same targets.
In September, I convened a 2-day workshop in London with Mathis Wackernagel, President
and Founder of the Global Footprint Network, and his colleagues, so that they could present
their work, and their recommendations for Austria. Following our extensive and wide-ranging
discussions, I feel confident in recommending further discussions between Dr Wackernagels
organisation and the Austrian Government, as I believe there are significant mutual benefits
and opportunities for a special relationship between the two.
2

See http://www.footprintnetwork.org/en/index.php/GFN/

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For Austria to become the global standard-bearer for a new kind of sustainable accounting,
based on available resources rather than purely on credit and debit, is a prime example of
bridge-building, and is a really significant opportunity for Austria to raise its profile worldwide.
It is the perfect illustration of the kind of behaviour which I described at the start of the
Competitive Identity process in Austria: making people feel glad that Austria exists.
10. No income tax for people living within their global footprint (New Project; Hexagon
Point: Governance)
This project is inspired by one of my favourite Symbolic Actions, the Irish governments 1969
tax break for artists. Waiving personal income tax for citizens who are living on less than 1.8
Global Hectares (gha) is likely to provide the Austrian Government with significant symbolic
power in return for very little loss of revenue: the majority of people living within 1.8 gha
today are homeless, and it's relatively unlikely that people who have money will move to small
apartments, get rid of their cars, stop eating meat, refuse to take planes, and so forth. It would
send an interesting signal, however, since essentially only the people who are living at the
(ecological) expense of others are taxed.
We could also discuss the legal possibility of creating a tax-free haven in Austria for people
who want to live within their footprint a footprint community, rather like a free trade zone.
These havens could eventually be adopted in many different countries, with Austrias help,
thus forming a global network, and eventually become a standard feature in all countries.
11. Luxury in a resource constraint world is security, and vice versa (New Project; Hexagon
Point: Governance/People)
Just as most people feel better about owning their home then renting it, people will feel good
about owning their energy and food supplies. Interestingly, one of the more innovative
projects in Austria today is the Brger Solarkraftwerk3, a solar power plant that individuals can
buy small shares in.
Austria should become the first country to offer people who care about their future a way to
lead their lives with their fair share and own this share in perpetuityfood and energy will be
local and free forever.
12. A Green Revolution through Gestures (New Project; Hexagon Point: People)

See www.buergersolarkraftwerk.at

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A tiny, but possibly viral idea: in order to start a grass-roots movement against ostentatious
cars with excessive CO2 emissions, we could invent and disseminate a simple gesture which
anybody and everybody can easily use as a peaceful protest: inspired by a social media
campaign, everybody in Austria should simply hold their nose whenever a 4x4 or overpowered
sports car drives past.
Such gestures can, with a lot of careful management and a bit of luck, spread like wildfire not
just across the nation but around the world.
13. Hotel Commissionaires Made in Austria (New Project; Hexagon Point: Exports)
The Union Internationale des Concierges dHotels, with its distinctive crossed keys badges worn
by almost every concierge worldwide, is a virtual global monopoly which is many decades
overdue for a challenge. It is a monopoly worth challenging since the symbol is viewed by
travellers on countless occasions every day, and any change in such a static landscape is likely
to be noticed and commented on.
Austria, with its particular ethic of welcome, and its strength in the hospitality industry, is well
placed to launch a competing or complementary organisation perhaps for waiters, ancillary
staff, room service or housekeeping personnel.
14. BILAT-USA (FFG Austrian Research Promotion Agency Division European & International
Programmes; Hexagon Point: Investment & Immigration)
This excellent project is, probably, only going to be of direct interest to the academic and
scientific worlds, but it can certainly be communicated to a wider audience simply through
some appropriate imagery, and the use of friendlier language, designed to capture the
imagination of ordinary people.
The basic visual idea is that, as a consequence of this collaboration, Europe and North America
become the two lobes of earthbrain: a planet-sized superthinker which is capable of
calculating huge solutions to huge problems. Like the well-known NASA image of the earth at
night, in which clusters of light show the worlds cities and other concentrations of human
activity, earthbrain can be illustrated by the constant movement of lighted particles travelling
across the Atlantic cortex, by night and day.
15. Reinventing Alpine Health and Wellness (New Project; Hexagon Point: Tourism /
Investment & Immigration)
This symbolic action is predicated on the increasingly widespread understanding that cuttingedge healthcare technology is only half the picture: social, human and family contact, the right

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environment, diet, culture, lifestyle and many other soft factors play a significant role in
speeding convalescence and even enhancing the effectiveness of pharmaceutical and technical
interventions.
In other words, health isnt just about science: its also about human relationships. Austria has
an opportunity to reinvent and re-brand what used to be considered the worlds leading
wellness experience: the traditional Alpine cure of mountain air and spa waters. Today, these
soft factors and their role in wellness are no longer associated very strongly with the
European Alps, and fashion has drifted towards East Asian cultures such as Thailand and
Indonesia. However, there is now an opportunity to reinvigorate an offering that is less alien
and more reassuring for Western patients, and more exotic and stimulating for Eastern ones.
Austria can strike an exciting and relevant balance between its world-class, cutting-edge
capabilities in medical science, and its traditions of family, warmth, cuisine, music,
sustainability, hospitality, medical springs, spas and thermalbder. Austria should build
bridges in its region so that a wider range of options can be made available in neighbouring
countries too.
This offering could take the form of an enhanced medical tourism platform, including staying
with families in smaller mountain and rural communities. A regime of healthy Austrian food,
modernised traditional spa regimens, social activities designed to help the patient bond with a
wider social group, physical exercise and a full programme of family and social life would
complete the program.
16. Rule of Law Trust Fund (Ministry of Foreign Affairs; Hexagon Point: Governance)
Austria may no longer be a superpower, but strengthening the rule of law is one of its foreignpolicy trademarks, an area in which it enjoys worldwide reputation and credibility. For
decades, Austrias foreign policy has been guided by the aim to foster a rules-based
international system, and this was one of the main reasons why it was elected to the United
Nations Security Council in 2008 and to the Human Rights Council in 2011. Austria was
instrumental in creating the UNs Rule of Law Unit which coordinates all rule of law activities of
the UN system. In the Security Council, Austria has helped strengthening the rule of law in
sanctions regimes and in securing an efficient follow-up to the Tribunals on Ex-Yugoslavia and
Rwanda. In the field of international criminal law, Austria is one of the key supporters of the
International Criminal Court and various mixed tribunals. Austrias legal expertise is frequently
called upon: in South Sudan regarding questions of state succession and citizenship; in the
Caribbean, regarding questions of international treaty law, law of immunities and international
human rights law as well as in many other situations questions .

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Austria is rightly perceived as an honest broker which does not link its rule of law focus to
other interests or hidden agendas of its own: it is not a global player, nor a former colonial
power, nor a threat, nor a resource-hungry benefactor just a neutral country in the heart of
Europe with a longstanding legal tradition that tries to help make things better for everyone.
Austria could set up a trust fund that allows it to support other international actors in the field
and to send international legal experts whenever or wherever help is required. These experts
will give their expert, unbiased advice, free of self-interest, and best of all, they will do so free
of charge. An Austria-based committee of experts would decide on the missions and the
expertise required. A trust fund would be set up and financed by the Austrian government
with a generous endowment for an initial 5-year period. Each individual request will be
decided on its merits with an emphasis on speed (he who helps fast, helps twice). Austria will
thereby strengthen the international legal reputation it already enjoys and build up additional
Austrian expertise.
Austria could set up its own international Legal Aid Insurance Scheme to assist a large number
of selected developing countries in case they need its legal services in the future: in return for
a small annual premium, guaranteed legal help is immediately available when needed. The
revenue from these premiums will help to ensure that Austrias coverage is truly global, and
that resources wont be overstretched in case of a significant increase in demand.

Communications Vehicles
1. The Sound of Music Redux (New Project; Hexagon Point: Culture)
It is often mentioned, but as little more than an amusing curiosity, that the primary association
with Austria amongst Americans and many other English-speaking people around the world is
the 1965 Rodgers & Hammerstein film The Sound of Music. The film is largely unfamiliar to
Austrians, even though it replaced Gone With The Wind as the highest-grossing film of all time,
and still resonates strongly with American audiences: the Sound of Music sing-a-long has been
a sell-out event at the Hollywood Bowl every year since 2005.
It seems to me that this 50-year-old movie is far more than a curiosity: it is a true international
media phenomenon, with the potential to rebrand Austria as powerfully as Crocodile Dundee
branded Australia.
My suggestion is to hold a nationwide competition in Austria for a rewrite of the movie, and to
provide whatever funding, connections and assistance the Austrian state is able to muster up
in order to ensure that the remake is produced.

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Of course, there are lessons to be learned from other countries attempting to brand
themselves by backing a major motion picture (the movie Australia is one of the most recent
flops of this sort, in sharp contrast to the Lord of the Rings franchise for New Zealand), and the
project needs careful planning in order to maximise its chances of success.
2. The Doppler Show (New Project; Hexagon Point: Culture)
This idea for an international TV show format was developed during the Education, Research
and Development Workshop. The programme, named in honour of Christian Doppler, would
include regular features on practical science, as well as exploring the future of science.
Part of its purpose would be to encourage children to consider science as a career, and to
stimulate their interest would include attractive and realistic portrayals or dramatizations of
Real Life in the Lab. This latter idea was stimulated by the observation that almost no
depictions of the real daily life of working scientists are ever shown on television, with the
exception of heavily over-dramatised forensic and medical science.
3. The AustriaCard 4(New Project; Hexagon Point: Exports/Culture/Investment &
Immigration)
This is a large-scale loyalty scheme for Austria, targeted at all users and consumers of the
nation: students, tourists, investors, foreign residents and consumers of Austrian products and
services around the world. In concept, it is basically identical to the classic airline or hotel
loyalty card, except that Austria would be the first country to create such a scheme for the
entire nation.
Some of the basic components of the scheme would be as follows:
Students: visiting students would earn points for all study modules completed in Austria, and
for buying approved goods and services within the country, such as internal flights on
participating airlines, rail travel, rented accommodation, meals, etc. Rewards would include
discounts on books, travel, and Mozart Points which would add up to free or discounted
tickets to selected cultural events, restricted-entry guided visits to museums and galleries
during certain hours when they are closed to the public. Significant bonus points would be
accrued by referrals, using for example a Friend get Friend scheme to attract additional
students to Austria.

A company in Austria already exists with this name, so it would be necessary to negotiate with them or
find an alternative name before implementing this project. The sterreichCard from Austrian Railways
could also be a partner project to this one.

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Tourists and business travellers: here, the scheme would operate exactly as the student
scheme, but with rewards and incentives more geared towards a leisure/business audience.
Compatibility with hotel, airline and car-hire loyalty schemes would be essential in this market.
Rewards would include Mozart Points, the usual range of discounts on travel and
accommodation, medical and other kinds of insurance, Friend get Friend referral schemes,
and special incentives for return visits to Austria.
Foreign investors could enter the scheme at an advanced level, and major investments would
trigger corporate membership, providing bonus points, savings and rewards for all employees
based in Austria or having dealings with Austria from abroad.
Consumers abroad: the idea is to extend the scheme to users and consumers of Austrian
products and services in other countries through participating exporters, to widen the net
and recruit students, business and leisure visitors into the scheme. A modern and functioning
version of the Made in Austria label is badly required, and the old idea of the Country of
Origin Mark is long overdue for an overhaul. One of the many useful functions of the
AustriaCard would be the simple addition of a hang-tag on exported Austrian products which
informs purchasers that they could have saved e.g. 10% if they bought the product with their
AustriaCard, and directing them to the till where they can apply for immediate membership.
The enrolment process for the AustriaCard would need to be quick and simple. As with most
airline loyalty programmes, it should be instant and free of charge at the base membership
level, so that members can start earning points as soon as their holiday is booked (travel
agencies would need to recruited as resellers of the scheme) or on the inbound flight. The card
is swiped by the arriving visitor at immigration, and points automatically added on every
arrival. Upgrades to higher membership levels would then follow depending on usage and
points earned. At the elite levels, special privileges could extend to exclusive use of a special
Privilege Channel at arrival airports, gala receptions for cardholders, privileged access to major
national events, etc.
The main asset that the AustriaCard scheme will eventually create is a gigantic database of
past, present and potential consumers for Austria and its businesses. This database would
need to be managed according to the highest international standards of integrity and
effectiveness to provide a growing resource for understanding, stimulating and maintaining
Austrias international customer base and reputation. It would eventually provide a valuable
resource for polling on changing attitudes towards Austria by its users, lapsed users and
potential users.
4. Wallet Cards for Citizen Ambassadors (New Project; Hexagon Point: People)

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Another mini-idea is to produce very large numbers of durable, attractive wallet cards, each
printed with a list of, say, twenty Key Facts about Austria. These could be distributed to
journalists, diplomats, prominent commentators and handed out at the airports to all
Austrians leaving the country. These cards will arm them with exactly the right information to
communicate, delight and astound people with real and surprising facts about the reality of
modern Austria.
5. Austria Centres (New Project; Hexagon Point: Exports/Governance/Culture/Investment
& Immigration)
Certain embassies, especially in countries where a full-service embassy is harder to justify,
could over the longer term be replaced with Austria Centres. These are commercial buildings
located in downtown areas in larger towns and second cities, designed with a consumer
audience in mind: space is rented out to Austrian companies on the ground floor to supply
products for sale, restaurants or other mass-market retail activity; a cultural centre and
exhibition space on the first floor; tourist office and travel agency services on the second floor;
meeting rooms, conference facilities and commercial, consular and political offices on the
upper floors. The rental of the real estate would be paid for by the businesses on the ground
floor, and all departments would share back office, IT, accounting and other services.

6. World Mozart Day (New Project; Hexagon Point: Culture)


Mozart is certainly one of the best-known figures who has ever lived, yet his association with
Austria appears not to be as strong worldwide as many Austrians believe, and indeed may be
diminishing. He is by any measure one of the countrys most valuable cultural and perceptual
assets, and Austria needs to work hard to reinforce this valuable connection before it is lost.
The relevance to the Bridgebuilder strategy is simply that with Mozart, a truly global figure,
and music, a truly global language, we can build bridges across time, class, nationality,
language, culture and religion.
One of the best-known parts of the Mozart story is that Mozart was a child prodigy. World
Mozart Day could involve a global search for super-talented youngsters in other countries who,
because they come from poor families and/or poor countries, might not otherwise get a
chance for their talent to be nurtured.
A moral and sustainable purpose behind the World Mozart Day is essential in order to ensure
that it exemplifies the Bridgebuilder ethic and isnt seen as purely self-interested or
promotional. Perhaps the most natural purpose for World Mozart Day is using music to build

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bridges in conflict situations the idea of a musical truce is worth exploring further. Thus, the
acronym WMD changes from Weapons of Mass Destruction to Wolfgang for Mass Dtente.
7. The Slam Jam (New Project; Hexagon Point: Culture/Tourism)
Inspired by the highly successful slam poetry of Shane Koyczan and especially his piece We
are More, a poetic tribute to Canadas identity which was such a prominent and admired
feature of the Vancouver Olympics5, my suggestion is to commission Shane to do a slam poem
about Austria, in English, from the point of view of a North American (much more credible
than a Austria writing yet another poem in praise of Austria), and we could then use it as a
highly original TV commercial for cultural promotion rather than for tourism and for
various other purposes.
Then we can commission a whole series of poems by different poets in different countries, all
in English, about how they perceive the essence and attraction of Austria. Thus we have a
pretty original tourism and cultural campaign, unlike anything that any other country has done
before.
The way to go about this is to invite Shane to Austria for a couple of weeks, have him tour
around and visit the country, meet and discuss with a wide range of poets, historians,
academics, performers, actors, movie directors, even academics, and get a flavour of the
country and its people, culture, cuisine, history and landscape. Then wed sit down with him
for an afternoon and work out how to crystallise and summarise it all into a few simple
essences and themes. Then he can sit in a little house somewhere in the Austrian mountains
and produce the poem. Then well record it with a Willy Sousa video background (specially
commissioned of course) and broadcast it around the world.
Then we move on to the next poet from the next country, and so forth.

Strategic Support Techniques


1. Presidents Prize for Citizen Diplomacy (New Project; Hexagon Point:
Governance/People)
In order to provide additional incentives for people to participate actively in Austrias
Competitive Identity Project, a cash prize should be offered by the President of the Republic
for any individual or organisation which does anything judged to enhance Austrias
international standing or reputation.

See: http://www.myspace.com/video/maren/shane-koyczan-quot-we-are-more-quot/102978019

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2. Head of Revolution (New Project; Hexagon Point: Governance/People)
In a systematic effort to produce more imaginative thinking, the post of Head of Revolution
could be created in ministries or agencies. The only role of this individual would be to attend
all meetings and challenge the participants when their thinking threatens to descend into the
conventional, the predictable, the timid or the repetitive.
This kind of Symbolic Action provides excellent value for money: firstly, if done properly, it can
produce a significant improvement in the functioning of government departments for the
relatively low investment of one salary, or indeed a fraction of one salary. Secondly, it is
sufficiently unusual and picturesque (as well as counter-intuitive in the context of Austria) for
it to attract interest.
I would recommend starting with a pilot programme in one or two departments, and if the
programme is successful, it can form part of the package of assistance which Austria then
provides and promotes to other countries.

Symbolic Actions for Classical Music Sub-Strategy


1. Vienna Airport Refresh (Vienna Airport; Hexagon Point: Tourism/Culture)
This Symbolic Action isnt directly related to the bridge-building strategy, but is geared instead
towards establishing Vienna as the world capital of classical music a separate task which, in
my opinion, is equally important and needs to be addressed alongside the main strategic
thrust of the Competitive Identity project. Classical music is one of the principal soft power
tools by which Austria can exercise international influence, and its credentials in this area need
to be substantially reinforced in order for the main strategy to be effective.
At present, there are few clues to travellers arriving at Vienna International Airport that they
have arrived in the world capital of classical music: some large posters of original manuscripts
facing arriving passengers is about the extent of the musical theme in the airport.
My recommendation, next time there is an opportunity for a redecoration, refurbishment or
redesign of the airport, is to create a complete immersion experience so that no travellers
can possibly miss that they are in the worlds capital of classical music (or forget that they have
been there).
Clearly, simply playing endless recordings of Mozart or Strauss would be neither original, nor
bearable for passengers or airport workers: the communication needs to be more subtle and
more original than this. Some of the ideas discussed during the creative sessions were as
follows:

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Flash-mop performances. Music students are given part-time work as airport


cleaners, carrying concealed musical instruments. At regular intervals, they exchange
their mops for instruments and play impromptu classical recitals for the entertainment
of passengers. On occasions, groups of performers may find themselves in the same
part of the airport at the same time, and perform as ensembles.
Musical stairs. Certain staircases in the airport have touch-sensitive keys embedded in
the steps so that walking up or down the staircase produces a series of notes. A
hurrying crowd will produce a sensational discord.
Art/music stamps at passport control. Passport stamps are often carefully observed by
travellers but are seldom if ever used to communicate anything: a stamp from Vienna
Airport should certainly be properly designed, have a musical theme, and carry a
welcoming message for the passport owner.
The Custom of Welcome. When border control officials key the nationality of each
visitor into their terminal, a welcome message is automatically printed in the visitors
own language, which they can then insert into the visitors passport. The terminal
could even prompt them how to greet each visitor in the correct language.
YouTube Sensation. A fifth idea was generated which is better not described in a public
document, but which stands an extremely good chance of going viral on the internet
if properly executed. I will explain this during my next visit.

2. Austrian Service (Austrian Airlines; Hexagon Point: Tourism/Culture/Exports)


A single gimmick or design element is unlikely to produce any very significant or lasting impact
on the image of Austrian Airlines or on Austria, but a strong, clear, single-minded theme
running consistently through all the companys activities and communications stands a greater
chance of achieving both.
As explained in the previous Symbolic Action (Vienna Airport Refresh), the task of firmly
establishing Austria as the global capital of classical music is an important subsidiary task of the
Competitive Identity process, and I recommend that this sub-strategy is treated as a priority by
the tourism and culture sectors.
The Austrian Airlines onboard service offering, along with Vienna Airports refresh, provide an
excellent opportunity for establishing this sub-theme very emphatically. Some ideas for
executing the musical theme on board might include the following:
-

Musical Design Theme. Staves and musical notation could form the design key for
many parts of both corporate and aircraft livery, from meal tray liners printed with
musical staves to aisle carpets woven with a melody running the length of the cabin.

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Such features are easy and fun to devise, and any competent design agency could
produce many more.
Crew Badges. The cabin crews name badges, in addition to the usual national flags
showing which languages they speak, could also carry a treble or bass clef to indicate
the wearers singing voice.
Musical Offers. On selected flights, a seat lottery could award Opera tickets to
passengers by randomly-selected seat numbers. An in-seat video showcases the prize
to all passengers before the draw takes place, and this short promotion for the opera
house or music venue will provide enough of an incentive for the venue to pay the
costs of the lottery and the free tickets.
Classy Classics. Disposable MP3 players, pre-recorded with works by Strauss, Mozart
and other Austrian composers, can be given to passengers in Business Class. The unit
cost of these gadgets is now sufficiently low for this memorable gift to be entirely
affordable.
Unique Traditions. The airline could adopt a new tradition: as the plane crosses the
Danube on its way in or out of Vienna, the pilot plays a pre-recorded jingle of a couple
of bars of the Blue Danube and makes the brief announcement that the flight is
Crossing the Danube, and welcomes passengers to the City of Music or wishes them
a speedy return, as appropriate.
Canned Music. Although music played over the public address system quickly becomes
tedious and can only be used for brief periods before take-off and after landing, there
seems to be no reason why Mozart and Strauss should not play quietly in the toilets
throughout the flight, and this would certainly be an unusual and pleasant experience,
not to mention a touch of luxury, for all passengers.

3. Music Breaks in Parliament (New Project; Hexagon Point: Culture/Governance)


To show that music holds a special and not merely decorative function in Austrian society, the
Austrian Parliament could institute super-short music breaks at regular intervals in its
proceedings, featuring live classical and modern performances from a selection of the many
fine musicians living and working in Vienna.
This is not as eccentric an idea as it might at first sound: it has often been noted in the
academic literature of neuroscience as well as social and political science, that deliberately
interrupting adversarial debates and encouraging the participants to engage collectively in
some right brain activity, such as listening to music or poetry, can have a dramatic effect on
the quality of their subsequent discussions, and their ability to reach satisfactory compromises.

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This effect was memorably noted by the British diplomat Carne Ross, who used musical
interruptions to great effect during UN Security Council debates on the Oil for Food
programme in Iraq6.
Where better than Vienna for this remarkable experiment to find a permanent home?

Postscript: the Brookenbower Concept


Although I normally caution countries against making obvious public references to their
attempts to improve their international profile, I believe that an exception should be made in
this case: I think Austria should deliberately brand its bridge-building mission.
This has to be done subtly and gradually, of course, but my feeling is that international public
opinion will need some help to join up the dots and understand Austrias real role and
purpose in the world.
For this reason, I think it would be a good idea for Austria to coin the Anglo-German neologism
brookenbower, as a way of introducing this rather unique concept, and to explain and link the
many strands of its international engagement. It hardly matters whether it is a book, a
television documentary, a magazine, a theoretical model or a combination of all of these that
establishes the word brookenbower in the international discourse: the important thing is that
people should find plenty of opportunities to come across the word, learn its meaning, and
learn to associate it with Austrias mission to the planet.

Selection of Symbolic Actions for Immediate Implementation


During the Fifth Visit, the Saturday Group unanimously selected the following four Symbolic
Actions for implementation:
-

The AustriaCard
AidSurance
Twinning Buildings
Rule of Law Trust Fund

In addition, it was agreed that the remaining Symbolic Actions on the shortlist presented to the
Saturday Group could be scheduled for implementation as a second tranche. These included
the following:

See http://www.opendemocracy.net/globalization-institutions_government/security_ross_4382.jsp

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-

Nanchang
European Forum Alpbach
Adomi Bridge / ChainAid
Footprint
VICISU

The remaining Symbolic Action from the shortlist, Sound of Music Redux, was rejected by the
Saturday Group and is thus eliminated from the final list of nine.
Executive Summaries for these nine Symbolic Actions are included in Appendix III to this
report.

Implementation of First Tranche Symbolic Actions


1. The AustriaCard
The first stage of development for the AustriaCard should be a Feasibility Study which aims to
produce a definitive yes/no to the viability of the scheme, and assuming a positive outcome, a
set of proposals for its implementation. This should be carried out within a relatively short
time-frame, e.g. six months. I recommend that a small task-force is assembled to achieve this,
consisting of 10-15 individuals with a good mixture of the following backgrounds:

Individuals with direct experience of managing a customer loyalty scheme, such as a


hotel, airline or store card programme. The majority of these individuals should have
been involved with international loyalty schemes, and thus are familiar with the sales,
marketing, distribution and administration challenges of a multi-country scheme.

Individuals with technical expertise in the creation and management of large-scale


customer databases and/or database marketing.

Individuals with detailed knowledge of national and international theory and practice
on database management, privacy, direct marketing and information regulation.

Individuals with knowledge of the key sectors that will be represented by the scheme,
i.e. travel and tourism, exports, culture and education (especially relating to foreign
students studying in Austria).

Individuals who currently manage, or have recently managed, the major regional
loyalty programmes in Austria.

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-

One or two representatives of major tour operators and/or destinations and/or


tourism providers within Austria.

Representation from the appropriate ministries.

Banking, insurance and finance sector.

In addition, a small research group should conduct desk research to identify existing models in
other countries and regions; and to produce a complete list of all the current and recent
loyalty schemes operating in Austria, with details of their ownership, history, scale, success
and main characteristics.
These existing Austrian initiatives should all be contacted by the team and invited to share
their experience in the field. Discussions should take place to explore the potential mutual
benefits (or competitive threats) of merging, incorporating or simply partnering with these
schemes. Ideally, as many as possible of them would agree to merge their operations, perhaps
over a number of years, into the AustriaCard scheme. However, if there is little appetite for
this kind of solution, the possibility of an affiliation scheme should be explored, i.e. other cards
and programmes which are visibly compatible with the AustriaCard, with shared accrual and
spending of points much as some airline loyalty schemes are compatible with others in the
same airline group.
A number of workshops should be convened to generate as many creative suggestions as
possible for the following content:
1. Business model (how the scheme will generate revenues, where initial funding will
come from, the optimum form of ownership and management public, private or
mixed).
2. Customer Rewards (whether these are cultural, educational, retail, travel or financial;
who gives them, and on what terms).
3. Accrual Methods (how points are earned, whether in Austria or abroad, via travel,
retail purchases, education and training, attending conferences or other events,
spending money with partner organisations, buying approved Austrian products, etc).
4. Characteristics and scope of the AustriaCard system (how many different types of
membership are possible, the relative benefits of each tier, and future possibilities for
the card including VAT refunds, etc).
5. Use of the member database (how customer data is shared between partners; the
legal constraints; how it can best be used to benefit both customers and Austria as a
whole).
6. Sales, marketing, promotion and customer service (how the scheme can acquire as
many members as possible, as quickly as possible, and how it can deliver the necessary

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levels of value, service and satisfaction to produce this rapid growth; this group will
also write the brief for the corporate identity of the AustriaCard).
If the Feasibility Study produces a positive response, a tender should be created for the
submission of creative proposals for the logo and visual identity of the AustriaCard scheme.
This work should also include a comprehensive brand strategy which determines the market
positioning and brand personality of the programme, not merely its visual aspect.
A matrix should be created showing all the existing loyalty schemes within Austria and their
suitability and preparedness to participate in the scheme ranging from no affiliation to total
merger within the new brand.
An international marketing plan should be drawn up, listing the main target markets and
customer demographics, together with media and creative proposals for targeting these
segments. The roles played by the principal distribution partners (airlines, key Austrian
exporters, retail partners, etc) should form part of this plan.
Suitable partners for database management, card and membership pack production, customer
service support, and other key functions of the project, should be appointed. These services
might be outsourced to specialised providers, shared with existing partners loyalty schemes,
or created in-house, depending on the available resources.
2. AidSurance
Since the AidSurance programme is, like the AustriaCard, an innovative project, a Feasibility
Study would also be the recommended first step.
Having said this, there is experience within the insurance industry of providing major
catastrophe insurance to national governments, so the innovative component of this Symbolic
Action isnt the policy itself, but the idea of a donor country paying the premiums on behalf of
the insured country. For this reason, the feasibility of the project depends purely on identifying
the appropriate country to insure, the nature of the risks, and the affordability of the
premiums.
Should the premiums prove significantly greater than Austrias current budget for this type of
overseas assistance, a collaborative effort might well be the answer, and in such a case Austria
would need to identify one or more partner countries prepared to join in the scheme, perhaps
as a 2-3 year pilot. The ultimate collaboration would be a situation where, following successful
pilots, EU member states eventually agree to migrate their separate overseas disaster relief
operations to a shared European model.

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One of the advantages of this project is that once the decision is made to execute, it becomes
a relatively straightforward commercial transaction, and most of the implementation of the
project becomes the responsibility of the insurance firm or firms which are appointed to
deliver the policy.
As regards the initial Feasibility Study, the Expert Panel would consist of the following
individuals:
1. Insurance and reinsurance experts, with experience of designing and providing major
international policies, especially in the public sector.
2.

Loss adjusters and actuaries with experience of major international projects,


especially in the public sector.

3. Foreign assistance and disaster relief experts with backgrounds in multilateral


institutions, government and NGOs.
4. Representatives of a selection of recipient nations, especially those with a history of
major natural disasters.
In the first instance, I would recommend a meeting with Stefan Lippe, the CEO of Swiss Re
from 2009-2012 (I will provide contact details on request) since he has direct experience of
arranging major insurance policies for sovereign states against natural disasters. I consulted
with Mr Lippe while developing this Symbolic Action, and he would be happy to advise the
Austrian Government on the realisation of the project, and would also be useful in
recommending appropriate experts for the Feasibility Study and later implementation.
Assuming that the outcome of the Feasibility Study is that the model is basically viable (i.e. an
affordable and effective substitute for conventional response-based disaster relief), the next
stage would be to identify one or more suitable recipient countries. Clearly, it would be ideal if
these happened to be countries where Austria already has a donor relationship. With some
desk research and advice from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and NGO specialists, a matrix of
suitable recipients should be drawn up, based on their susceptibility to insurable natural
disasters and general level of need. One or two pilot countries or regions should then be
selected from this matrix.
At this point, a range of suitable insurers (or a consortium of insurers, depending on the size of
the risk) can be approached to provide proposals. These proposals would then be evaluated by
independent experts, by the Austrian government, and by the recipient nations government,
and a final appointment made.

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Clearly, the reputational benefits to Austria of this highly innovative idea are significant but
only if Austria succeeds in maintaining first mover advantage. Speed and discretion during the
feasibility stage are therefore of paramount importance, and I would recommend that all
parties to the process are required to sign non-disclosure agreements.
Having said this, one of the advantages of the project is that it is perfectly possible and
legitimate for Austria to announce the project as soon as it is reasonably certain to be
implemented. In this way, Austria can quickly take the credit for forward-thinking and
innovative foreign assistance, and win the right to lead the debate on the way that disaster
relief is conceived by donors around the world.
3. Twinning Buildings
This Symbolic Action consists of two main components: the diplomatic and the technological. I
would therefore suggest two working groups be set up in the first place in order to achieve
launch without unnecessary delays.
Working Group A is the diplomatic and partnership group. Its first task is to build a longlist of
suitable buildings in Austria and a longlist of suitable twin buildings in other countries.
As mentioned in the outline, candidate buildings in other countries can be selected on the
basis of a number of different criteria, these criteria being chosen because they are unusual,
memorable, thought-provoking and simple to understand. Clearly, these criteria are not
exclusive, and a twinning should be based on more than one criteria at the same time
indeed, the more features they have in common, the stronger the argument for twinning
them:
1.
2.
3.
4.

Both buildings were built in the same year.


Both buildings have significant amounts of materials, functions or design in common.
Both buildings face similar conservation challenges.
The names of both buildings, or even their architects names, start with the same
letters (this device really only works if the names of both buildings are at least two
words, both of which start with the same letter).
5. Their owners or architects share significant characteristics.
6. Both buildings are the same colour (if the colour is a distinctive one).
Further criteria can certainly be added to this list, but buildings should not be selected purely
on the basis of unremarkable criteria, such as common functions (e.g. both are museums),
common periods of construction (e.g. both were built in the nineteenth century: a specific year
is a good story to tell, but two buildings which happen to date from the same century or even
decade is less interesting), or common basic features (e.g. both are large public buildings).

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If desired, the longlist of candidate buildings can be developed after first producing a shortlist
of candidate countries: this could be based on existing relationships with these countries, or a
desire to create stronger ties with them.
Following consultation with a wider group of diplomats, overseas development experts,
architectural and conservation experts, historians, curators and media experts, the longlist of
candidate buildings can be reduced to a shortlist. The overseas authorities responsible for the
buildings on the shortlist can then be contacted to identify the potential for collaboration: in
the first case, a basic interest in the potential for twinning with an Austrian building, and in the
second place, a shared interest in one or more of the following criteria:
-

Conservation or other technical challenges


Funding challenges, including marketing, fundraising, sponsorship and entrance fees
Changing use (e.g. from religious to secular use or vice-versa)
Development, reconstruction, modernization or enlargement to cope with changing
use or demand
Educational challenges (e.g. teaching visitors about the historical or social context of
the building and its original purpose)

Once these areas of common interest have been established, and a basic agreement to
consider twinning has been achieved, then meetings can take place between the authorities
responsible for both buildings to discuss the terms of their partnership.
Working Group B is the technology and creative group, and its primary function is to conceive,
evaluate and plan the visible symbols of the twinning arrangement. The membership of this
group should include individuals with specific skills such as architects, designers, engineers,
event managers, artists, IT specialists, and so forth. Depending on the nature of the initiatives
developed, it may be desirable to bring in more specialised experts at a later stage.
The symbols I have recommended, the audio/video floor and the illustrative building wrap, are
two examples of the kind of action I would recommend: they are technologically feasible and
reasonably affordable, yet sufficiently unusual and striking for them to achieve media coverage
without a great deal of additional expenditure on public relations and other forms of
promotion. They are examples of the kind of initiative which people are likely to discuss
spontaneously with their networks once they have seen them, and which consequently have
the ability to achieve a viral marketing effect on their own.
The first task of Working Group B should be a series of creative brainstorming events to
develop a large number of original technical initiatives of this sort. These can then be reduced

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down to a shortlist, and then passed on for costing and general feasibility and evaluation to
appropriate external or internal providers.
4. Rule of Law Trust Fund
An outline implementation plan for this Symbolic Action has already been devised by the
BMeiA team which proposed it, and further development work would be best carried out
under their continued supervision.
Clearly, the kind of additional expertise they will need to draw in for this project will include
legal and diplomatic experts, individuals with experience in international law, and people who
have worked or are currently working for multilateral institutions. Certainly, some thought
should be given to collaboration with existing international legal organisations and institutions
such as the European Court of Human Rights, the relevant United Nations bodies, the
International Criminal Court and others.
Appointing a prominent international figure from the legal world as spokesperson and
champion of the initiative would certainly help in creating a high profile for the initiative, and
the usual range of white papers, regular publications, conferences and awards, interactive
tools, indices and research, will provide additional noise around the project.
More than any conventional marketing activities, however, high profile case studies are what
will ultimately determine the success and reputation of this Symbolic Action, and a certain
proportion of the cases taken on each year should be selected partly with this aim in mind.

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PART FOUR: SYSTEMS AND STRUCTURES
A Note on the Use of Creative Teams
The Competitive Identity project has shown beyond doubt that the Creative Team format,
which processes policies, products, people and projects (or stuff as I call it) into Symbolic
Actions, and then briefs these initiatives back to their owners for execution, is an effective and
robust system.
There are three key challenges to making this process work:
(1) Obviously the quality of the creative team and consequently of its output is a primary
concern, as it is for any firm in the creative industries.
(2) Protecting the creative ideas from becoming normalised, misunderstood,
miscommunicated or inadequately executed after they leave the creative team.
(3) Increasing the capacity of the system, so that Austria can start producing the larger
quantity of Symbolic Actions it needs in order to start creating a bigger and more positive
profile for itself in the international domain.
These three challenges are significant, and need carefully designed structures and sensitive
and careful hiring in order to be met. They also need something of a cultural change within
government, as respect for creativity and imagination is not currently hardwired into the
culture (it almost never is within governments). The importance of creativity needs to be
properly recognised, properly encouraged, and properly incentivised, and these changes will
not occur overnight.
I originally suggested that there were two possible structures for meeting these challenges: a
centralised structure and a devolved structure.
The centralised structure is illustrated in diagrammatic form in the following section: it
provides for centralised collection of suitable projects, policies and people in all sectors; the
creative twisting of these projects into true Symbolic Actions; and centralised government
support for their implementation and international roll-out. It also provides the potential for
the centralised creation and development of entirely new Symbolic Actions.
Within the unit, a creative department (the Idea Shop) should be set up, with permanent
management and creative direction, but freelance creative talent. This will enable the creative
output of the unit to remain constantly fresh, and for it to be able to expand or contract as
needs dictate. This use of temporary or short-term creative talent is necessary, since my own
experience from other countries of hiring creative professionals to work in government
suggests that long-term contracts seldom work well: the fundamentally different culture of the

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workplace generally results quite quickly either in a loss of inspiration or the departure of the
creative people.
According to this centralised model, most or even all new government policies would
ultimately pass through the creative department, preferably soon after their initial
development, to see if they can be twisted into true Symbolic Actions. There is also no reason
why the same team shouldnt be developing new policy proposals on their own initiative,
rather as the skunkworks7 in some major corporations brainstorms new product ideas.
As regards the debriefing of the completed Symbolic Actions to their owners and
implementers, this could periodically be done in a format that I call an Ideas Fair: rather than
in the obvious format of one-to-one briefing, representatives of the creative team pitch their
ideas in one session to a larger, mixed group of ministries, agencies and private sector
organisations. This encourages cross-fertilization and lateral thinking, and will often result in
very productive new collaborations.
I also outlined a devolved structure, which would involve hiring an individual to work as a
Creative Director in each Ministry or agency, and who would be responsible for forming and
running an in-house creative team to create and oversee the implementation of ideas created
specifically for the projects carried out by that Ministry. This Creative Director would be at
liberty to bring in freelance creative talent to assist him or her in the creation of new ideas,
and again, the use of temporary talent would be my recommendation, rather than attempt to
create a permanent in-house creative team.
The benefit of the Devolved Approach is that it doesnt impose the process on all ministries
and agencies, and allows each of them to develop their new, more creative style of working at
their own pace. The disadvantage is that it is likely to be more expensive, harder to control,
slower to take effect, and tends to create more problems of disconnected and off-strategy
behaviour among sectors and ministries, rather than reducing them.
Following a discussion of the relative merits of these two approaches, it was agreed that the
centralised structure was preferable in Austrias case.

A skunkworks is a group of people who, in order to achieve unusual results, work on a project in a way that is
outside the usual rules. A skunkworks is often a small team that assumes or is given responsibility for developing
something in a short time with minimal management constraints. Typically, a skunkworks has a small number of
members in order to reduce communications overhead. A skunkworks is sometimes used to spearhead a product
design that thereafter will be developed according to the usual process. The name is taken from the moonshine
factory in Al Capp's cartoon, "Lil' Abner."

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Structures: National Marketing Agency
The diagram below, which shows a typical structure for the National Marketing Agency, was
presented for discussion during the Fifth Visit:

The Magnet
This unit is responsible for drawing talent into the system. It will do this in two basic ways: by
searching the marketplace, and by active recruitment.
Searching the marketplace mainly involves media monitoring at a very local level (right down
to school and church newsletters) and is basically a talent scouting activity.
Active recruitment involves running advertising, promotions, media appearances, conferences,
competitions and other incentives both at local and national level to encourage participation in
the project. It is recommended that the Magnet engages agents at a very local level,
throughout the country, to carry out its work.

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A Brookenbower Project website, designed to encourage people around the country to
submit their bridge-building ideas and projects to the NMA, would be an important
component of the Magnets work for active recruitment in Austria.

The Idea Shop


This unit is something like the creative department of an advertising agency but should be
staffed with professional creative talent from a wide range of industries and sectors, including
marketing communications (PR, advertising, direct marketing, brand and design etc), the arts,
film, product design, architecture and other creative industries. It should be headed by a
Creative Director. Its two key roles are: (1) assessing the creative content of all external ideas
brought in by the Magnet, and (2) generating creative ideas of its own.
Like all creative departments, the Idea Shop needs to be a very carefully constructed
environment the right people, the right ambience, the right briefing, the right incentives.
Only someone with an acknowledged track record in building and running a world-class
creative department can be trusted to design, build and manage such a facility.
As a regular activity, the Idea Shop should bring together the best and brightest talent from
the public and private sectors and civil society, and encourage them to exchange ideas. Many
successful new ideas are not in fact new, but have simply been transplanted from one sector
or industry to another, where they have prospered in an unexpected way. These serendipity
functions could be highly productive, as well as helping our entrepreneurs to mentor and
support each other, and exchange experiences.
The Idea Shop should also spend a certain amount of time developing its own ideas. These
might occasionally be purely promotional ideas, requiring funding by government or private
sector, but more frequently would be economically feasible commercial, social, cultural,
industrial, academic or policy projects. The Idea Shop should host regular Idea Dumps where
the best of these ideas are offered to entrepreneurs, established firms, venture capitalists,
university or college faculties or anyone else interested in carrying them out with the usual
support of the Idea Shop and Support Unit, of course.
Occasionally, the Idea Shop might decide to own and implement some of these ideas itself, if
they are considered sufficiently important. In such cases, the Implementation Unit can be
configured and brought into play.
It should be remembered that Austrias reputation will be built by a constant stream of both
ordinary creative ideas, and more occasional and more powerful Symbolic Actions. On a
quarterly basis, the Idea Shop should hold Symbolic Action Days where these more ambitious
projects are developed. A very special environment is needed for this kind of creativity, and

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much thought should be given to creating the strongest possible sense that the future of the
country is being cooked up in these sessions. Having guest contributors from a wide range of
very different fields is an important component of the process.
Another crucial function of the Idea Shop is in passing on ideas from the Magnet to the
Support Unit. Basically, this is a matter of seeing what each project needs in order to be built
up to export quality, and sending them on to the Support Unit with a series of
recommendations.
These kinds of decisions are built around a simple operational questionnaire which guides the
Idea Shop when evaluating new ideas:
a. The Mission Filter (does it resonate with the Bridge-Builder strategy and fit
with Austrias future engagement)
b. The Identity Filter (does it fit with the longer term values of the Austrian
Model as described earlier)
c. Is it a good idea? (this deceptively simple question is one which only very
experienced creative and business people are able to answer with any
reliability)
d. Does it have the Human Factor? (Do the people fronting the project have
sufficient star quality to be real faces of Austria abroad and, if not, can we
mix and match them with people who do?)
e. Is it relevant to consumers in other countries? (If its simply nation branding,
Austria promoting local initiatives that dont clearly correspond with real
needs in other countries, then it should be rejected).
f. Is it World Class? (Good for Austria or It makes us feel proud isnt good
enough. It must compare with the best of the best anywhere in the world).
g. Is it mind changing about Austria? (In other words, will it reinforce or
challenge existing stereotypes about Austria? If the former, it should be
rejected).
h. Inseparable Country of Origin Effect (In other words, how can we make quite
sure that the Made in Austria label sticks?)
i. What do they need from us? (e.g. finance, organisation, people, marketing,
networking, cross-fertilisation)

The Support Unit


The Support Unit is responsible for providing either from its own resources or from external
networks whatever services that the Idea Shop (or the Support Unit itself) determines that
each project requires in order to make it succeed at home and abroad. These services are likely

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to include accountancy, finance, management, human resources, marketing, design, legal
services, real estate, and so forth.
The ideal scenario for the National Marketing Agency is that it is able to back promising ideas
from its own development fund, through the Support Unit, or at least to offer seed funding to
help the best ideas get started. If neither of these are possible in the early stages, excellent
relationships with national and international funding bodies and Venture Capital funds are
essential, and the National Marketing Agency should strive to build a solid reputation for
backing winners as quickly as possible so that its trust and credibility with external funders is
high. Having its own funds to distribute will help enormously in building the National
Marketing Agencys credibility and establishing it as the place to go for anyone with a suitable
project or idea. In the end, however, its the track record of successful incubation which will
build the National Marketing Agencys reputation, both with entrepreneurs and with external
financiers, buyers, exporters and so forth.
The Support Unit should be in a position to offer high-quality professional advice at subsidised
or no cost to promising initiatives, including IP protection and other forms of legal advice,
marketing, accountancy, export, human resources, and so forth.
Connections with overseas importers and agents, as well as all the usual services of export
promotion agencies and chambers of commerce, are equally important. In addition to formal
professional advice, every opportunity should be created to encourage networking between
emerging and mature entrepreneurs in every field, including mentoring from past alumni of
the National Marketing Agency, twinning and adoption of new firms with larger ones, and so
forth. Another useful service of the Support Unit is what I call godfathering, where highly
experienced managers are loaned to projects for mentoring and advice. For this reason, the
National Marketing Agency needs to create good working relationships with top managers in
Austria, so that they can be loaned for a few days each year to provide advice and guidance
to promising startups, and perhaps even take up board positions in these organisations for the
longer term.
Direct media support, using the Media Centre, is also a likely service of the Support Unit, as
most projects will need advice, strategy and direct assistance in promoting themselves in
Austria and abroad.
In addition to finding the existing and emerging talent, the whole National Marketing Agency is
responsible for ensuring that the supply of talent and good ideas is constantly renewed in all
sectors, and that promising ideas have the best possible chance of achieving sustained success.
Austria will only achieve a sustainable Competitive Identity if it can create a society where
innovation is prized and cherished. This must be done through promoting the idea and the

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practice of innovation through its academic links, through events, competitions, through the
media and in many other ways. Most importantly, the habit and respect for innovation and
creativity must be enshrined in the educational system at primary level.

The Media Centre


Although the emphasis in this project is on creating substance rather than communications, I
have received various comments from participants during the project that Austria doesnt
really play the game as far as dealing with the international media is concerned. Although
some sectors are relatively sophisticated in their dealings with the media, much of it appears
to be reactive rather than proactive, and it is certainly highly disconnected between the
private and public sectors, and between sectors.
The creation of a national, centralised Media Centre, available to all the partners in the
Competitive Identity structure, is well worth considering. This would provide a single point of
contact for all foreign media interested in covering Austria in any context, and would thus be a
great help in harmonising the messages going out to the media from the country. In cases of
negative coverage, the Media Centre would have a sophisticated, multilingual Crisis
Management section which could issue accurate and timely rebuttals, consistent and
responsible statements from all key players, and ensure that the media deals with Austria as
consistently and respectfully as possible.
The Media Centre should also be responsible for monitoring the international media for all
significant mentions of Austria, so that it can identify problems with as much advance warning
as possible, and help all the relevant players to develop a consistent and effective strategy for
dealing with the issue.
As the Media Centre will be equipped with media monitoring and other forms of polling and
research expertise and resources, it makes sense for it also to be the body responsible for
overall performance monitoring of the Competitive Identity project. This means, amongst
other things, that it would take over the management of the Anholt-GfK Roper Nation Brands
IndexSM and other survey instruments that are related to tracking and measuring Austrias
international image.
The Media Centre should also look into the possibility of carrying out some light messaging
coordination between the countrys major communicators (tourist board, investment
promotion agency, main exporters, Ministry of Foreign Affairs etc), and if acceptable to all
parties, even some quality control. There are benefits of scale to be made in this area as well,
via pooled media buying, the creation of a common national image bank for high-quality
photographic images of Austria and other similar approaches, which should make the unit
highly cost-effective and could save its partners a good deal of money.

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National Marketing Agency as Brand Factory
One of the most critical operations of the National Marketing Agency is the stimulation of new
Export Brands that are Made in Austria.
Since branded goods and services, especially consumer goods, are critically important vectors
for national image surely the most effective form of informal ambassadors that the
globalised world has to offer when their country of origin is explicit and strongly linked with
the brand in the mind of the consumer it makes sense when developing industrial policy to
ensure that the creation of these brands is actively encouraged and facilitated.
For this reason, an important activity of the NMA is to encourage the submission of ideas for
new export consumer brands, and to assist in the development, export and marketing of these
brands in the coming years. The aim is simply to ensure that in the years to come, Austria will
have more than just Red Bull and Swarowski to represent the nation amongst global
consumers: it may ultimately have several in every product and service sector.

Summary: Function of the NMA


The function of the National Marketing Agency, therefore, is: to enable Austria to identify,
encourage, assist and enable those innovative projects and people which best exemplify the
qualities of Austria that we want the world to know about.
Communication is obviously an essential tool for making these projects succeed abroad, but it
is not the main function of the National Marketing Agency to communicate: it is a talent
agency, incubator and coordinator, not an advertising agency. It is assumed that most of the
projects will have their own individual marketing strategies and campaigns just as they will
have their own business plans, and these will be carried out by the appropriate professionals,
not usually by the National Marketing Agency itself.
Having said this, the National Marketing Agency should also be constantly monitoring the
country for important and distinctive facts about Austria, in addition to actual projects. Using
exactly the same selection criteria, it will find facts about the country and its people and
institutions which have some power to create interest, awareness and knowledge of Austria in
other countries. In such cases, the Media Unit will act as a communications agency (probably
more like a PR agency than an advertising agency) and attempt to get these stories told in the
international media. These kinds of facts are a very useful way of filling the gaps between
projects, and helping to maintain the unbroken stream of dramatic evidence which I
described earlier.

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I have also mentioned the possibility that after a year or two of successful project
development, there might be a case for the National Marketing Agency to commission one or
more international or multinational PR campaigns in order to help public opinion in other
markets to join up the dots between the projects to which they have been exposed, and help
them to understand the bigger story that these projects are telling them about Austria.
If so, the emphasis should always be on channels of communication that are inherently trusted
and considered as legitimate such as documentaries rather than commercials, art and culture
rather than commerce, education rather than promotion. However this kind of telling should
only ever be seen as an accessory to the National Marketing Agencys real business of proving
things, never as a substitute or short cut for it.
The basic principle that acquiring a reputation is more a matter of proving that telling
needs to be constantly reinforced in the work and communications of the National Marketing
Agency. Otherwise, the danger is that we can lapse into merely descriptive activities nation
branding which is not in line with the stated goals of the project as I have defined them.

Internal Campaign
One part of the project where these principles dont apply directly is when we are directly
targeting domestic public opinion, in order to inform and motivate them about the work of the
National Marketing Agency: the Internal Campaign. This campaign will need to be put into
place once the National Marketing Agency is designed and built and ready to start operations.
The main functions of the Internal Campaign are as follows:
1. To inform Austrians about the existence and purpose of the National Marketing
Agency
2. To show them that they are the means by which Austria will build its competitive
identity
3. To create more motivation and pride by showing examples of Austrians who are
already helping to improve Austrias international reputation
4. To encourage them to bring their ideas to the National Marketing Agency.
This being so, it is of course necessary to use some descriptive techniques e.g. describing
how certain people and projects are doing great things for Austria of the sort I have warned
against in other contexts. However, the difference here of course is that we are not trying to

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change the minds of an indifferent foreign public, but to generate interest and excitement
amongst Austrians. In this context, such work is not only appropriate but necessary.

The Special Projects


In addition to the creation of the National Marketing Agency, my recommendations for
Austrias Long-Term Competitive Identity Strategy also include two substantial sector-specific
projects to be tackled during the next 2-3 years. The two Special Projects which I believe to be
useful if not essential for the creation of a solid, durable and positive international image for
Austria are as follows:
1. To ensure that Austria has a fully joined-up and world-class cultural relations function
and strategy in order to establish Austria as one of the worlds Top 10 cultural heritage
locations. Connecting state and private institutions would be an important part of this
operation.
2. To design and build a world-class global Public Diplomacy function within the Foreign
Ministry, equal to the best in the world today.
Clearly, the design and creation of a new Public Diplomacy function and a revised Cultural
Relations framework for the Austrian Ministry of Foreign Affairs cannot form part of this
project, since these are major organisational projects in their own right. However, for the
purposes of the current project I have set out some basic principles to guide this process, and
have suggested some further operational pointers.

Public Diplomacy
Although Austria is rightly acknowledged for the quality of its foreign service, its public
diplomacy activities tend to be a little less consistent around the world, and depend more on
the personal qualities of individual diplomats and missions than on any formal structure for
public diplomacy training, planning, implementation and measurement.
This provides an opportunity for Austria to move to the forefront of public diplomacy practice
internationally, since very few other countries have yet adopted such measures which in my
mind are absolutely essential in the modern world, and perhaps particularly for smaller players
like Austria. As Austria has little hard power to achieve international influence, it urgently
needs to become an effective and confident player in the tools of soft power such as public
diplomacy and cultural relations.
Public diplomacy simply recognises that foreign public opinion is as important to a countrys
interests as elite opinion. So diplomacy must concentrate on creating positive and productive
relationships of trust, respect, mutual understanding and knowledge in bilateral relations, and

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do so as much between general populations as between the official representatives of those
countries.
Public diplomacy could and should be one of the primary instruments of establishing a new
profile for Austria overseas: more engaged, more modern, more principled, more active and
more relevant to people in other countries. It is one of the primary mechanisms by which the
Competitive Identity strategy can be implemented.
A small public diplomacy secretariat, with a senior board, is probably the only organisational
requirement within the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in order to start to migrate Austrias public
diplomacy activities towards a more coordinated, more professional and more systematic part
of its diplomatic structure.
If it doesnt already exist, then some form of regular (and world-class) public diplomacy
training should be rolled out amongst all foreign service personnel.
As with cultural relations, the creative and strategic elements can be achieved simply by
effective coordination with the National Marketing Agency.
I would regard the ten key principles which Austrian public diplomacy needs to espouse as the
following:
1: Diplomacy is about Issues and Territories
In a connected and ever-changing world, it often makes more sense to form teams, networks
and expertise around shared issues (climate change, economic crisis, immigration, education,
employment, etc) rather than around capitals or regions.
Some specific actions or developments which would be worth considering in order to respond
to this principle are as follows:
-

Appoint Sectoral Ambassadors and/or issue-specific ambassadors with wide-ranging


geographical remits, responsible for leading and coordinating the global network
around their sector/theme.
Create a flexible structure that can be quickly and temporarily configured around an
issue or event
Adopt a regular habit of bringing in, and learning from, external experts
Ultimately, there should even be a re-think about where Austria actually needs
permanent bricks-and-mortar missions.

2: Creativity is our most powerful tool


We are dealing with vast numbers of people and many competing sources of interest and
information. No budget on earth can buy enough media to compel all those people to pay
attention to our message: the ability to capture their imagination is the only resource that
counts.

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Some specific actions or developments which would be worth considering in order to respond
to this principle are as follows:
-

A creative unit with an independent culture, staffed by professional creative thinkers,


kept deliberately at arms length from the MFA: this could be designed along similar
lines to the PD Lab, a structure which I devised for the UKs Foreign and
Commonwealth Office in 2008.
A culture that praises imagination and rewards risk
Deliberate use of staff from many countries: more creative thinking; better
understanding of the international environment; avoidance of groupthink
The deliberate separation of creative thinking from processes of rational deliberation,
problem-solving and especially challenging feasibility.

3: Public opinion is a power, not an audience


It is a mistake to consider public opinion as a passive recipient of our messages and policies:
even distant foreign publics wield real power over us, and ultimately shape Austrias destiny.
So, like good marketers, we need to design our product with the needs and aspirations of
our consumer in mind just as much as our own.
Some specific actions or developments which would be worth considering in order to respond
to this principle are as follows:
-

Researching international attitudes, opinions and concerns should be the first stage of
every initiative
Understanding and even predicting changes in values and opinions becomes a driver of
policy, not merely a technique for more effective communications
Set up a semi-independent institute or think tank to read and interpret these signals
continuously, perhaps in partnership with another country.

4: Relevance means more than success


With few exceptions, countries are admired and trusted more because they appear relevant to
the end user than because they are rich, successful or even powerful. In order to exercise
influence, it is more important to establish this bond of mutual relevance than simply to
promote our attractions, resources or successes.
Some specific actions or developments which would be worth considering in order to respond
to this principle are as follows:
-

Every initiative must be conceived on the basis of a credible shared concern or interest
with our interlocutors: where do our interests coincide?
Image-building should be conducted on the basis of common concerns: the
Bridgebuilder strategy.
Activities designed to showcase Austrian assets or achievements should be
reconfigured on the basis of shared agendas.

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5: Power comes in many forms


Non-state actors are more numerous, more complex and in total more powerful than the
governments of other nations. Our diplomacy must have the experience, skills, resources,
configuration and credibility to engage with society in all its forms and groupings; we can no
longer treat these targets as less important than foreign officials.
Some specific actions or developments which would be worth considering in order to respond
to this principle are as follows:
-

Officers and units with specific experience, training, credibility and mandate to interact
continuously with NGOs; business and industry; civil society; prominent individuals;
religious communities and leaders; entertainment, sport and media figures; informal
opinion leaders such as bloggers and their networks; trades unions; academia; schools;
multilateral institutions.

6: The Medium is not the Message


Its easy to fall into the trap of thinking that credibility and even success come from embracing
the latest communications technologies. But the basic principle never changes: no matter how
influential the channel, the only thing that really matters is content. And just because a
channel is new doesnt mean its the right one for us.
Some specific actions or developments which would be worth considering in order to respond
to this principle are as follows:
-

Employ a professional media planner or channel expert to work with all teams on all
projects.
Choose the correct channel for communications according to the demographic profiles
and media consumption habits of the specific audience.
Avoid blanket policies like all ambassadors must have Twitter accounts.
Always focus on earned media rather than bought media.

7: Actions Speak Louder than Words


The moment Public Diplomacy becomes a communications add-on to policy, it becomes
propaganda and propaganda cannot work in a globalised world. Austria should think less
about how to communicate its actions, and more about what its actions communicate. PD and
foreign policy must be one seamless whole, or both will fail.
Some specific actions or developments which would be worth considering in order to respond
to this principle are as follows:

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-

Plans and discussions about policies and communications should be the same plans
and the same discussions learn not to treat communications as a separate add-on.
Think Symbolic Actions, not messages.
Abolish posts, projects and discussions which are purely geared towards press, public
affairs, PR or communications: absorb these functions into policy making.

8: Fire on all Cylinders


The more proactive, long-term relationship building activities with other countries should
always be carried out with as many other Austrian sectors and partners, public and private, as
possible. The MFA doesnt stand a chance of influencing public opinion in other countries if it
always acts alone.
Some specific actions or developments which would be worth considering in order to respond
to this principle are as follows:
-

Create regular forums, shared strategies and regular channels of communication


between BMeiA and other ministries, private sector, civil society, academia, etc.
Try to find countries of common interest with other partners and focus on these for
fixed periods.
Deliberately cross-fertilise plans, ideas, experiences, successes and failures across
sectors; pool best and worst practice centrally from the entire system.
Become a learning organisation.

9: The most effective PD is mutual


Unilateral public diplomacy can never be as effective as bilateral: wherever possible, we should
attempt to carry out our operations by agreement, in equal partnership with our counterparts
in other countries. We must facilitate access to public opinion at home in order to obtain it
abroad.
Some specific actions or developments which would be worth considering in order to respond
to this principle are as follows:
-

Pick a few countries with clear shared interests and open discussions with MFA and
government on shared access to each others institutions, media, public and
government.
Pick these countries on the basis of how useful Austria is likely to be to them: this will
ensure a productive discussion.
Supporting other countries with weaker diplomatic resources is itself a form of PD.

10: Total Diplomacy

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Public diplomacy is no simple add-on to private diplomacy: international relations today is
about engaging on many fronts and on many issues; more about the exercise of soft power
than sovereign will. So the very idea of building a PD function is arguably contradictory: its
more about redesigning our international engagement.
Some specific actions or developments which would be worth considering in order to respond
to this principle are as follows:
-

The PD project could be implemented in two phases: the creation of a PD function as


outlined here; then, once tested, the adoption of its principles, practices and
structures throughout the MFA and diplomatic service.
At this point, PD is no longer considered or treated as a separate function, but
becomes the blueprint for the entire operation, creating a total diplomacy approach
for the country.

It should be borne in mind that following best practice is not a satisfactory approach when it
comes to modern public diplomacy and cultural relations, since both fields are still far from
achieving their real potential. There are, in my opinion, no models of 100% successful public
diplomacy currently in operation, but it is perfectly possible to cherry-pick features from a
range of partially successful models in order to contribute to the design of a structure which is
ideal for Austrias needs and capabilities.
The real opportunity here is to develop new structures and systems which are more costeffective, more flexible, and more accountable than traditional models; a tried and tested
standard model is simply not available.

Cultural Relations
Im not convinced that Austria needs a totally new approach to cultural relations, but there is
certainly room for improvement. In cultural relations, as in most other aspects of Austrias
international engagements, impact would be increased in the following ways:
1. More coordination between culture and other sectors (diplomacy, business, tourism,
exports, etc) at both the strategic and executional level. Much is already being done in
this area, but the more the better.
2. A clearer sense of underpinning strategy: not simply how can we raise the profile of
Austrian culture but how are we using cultural relations to prove certain things about
Austria?
3. An even greater focus on creativity, both at the level of content and
organisation/delivery. All the European cultural agencies are basically delivering
cultural relations in the same way, using the same tools and approaches: only the
content differs. This represents an opportunity for Austria to do things very differently

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indeed, given the limited resources which Austria has available for cultural relations,
doing things differently is arguably a necessity.
4. One thing that appears to be missing at the moment is a systematic framework for
measuring the impact of cultural relations activities, and without this its difficult to
pursue a policy of continuous improvement. Of course measuring impact in cultural
relations is notoriously difficult, but its certainly not impossible.
5. It is almost always better to focus planning and resources on a smaller number of highimpact interventions, which are 100% on-strategy, and offer the potential to be
communicated virally by participants to a much wider audience, than to try to cover
more ground or reach more audiences with larger numbers of smaller activities. It may
be wise to plan the cultural relations calendar with this principle in mind; and
obviously, as always, the more courage and imagination used in conceiving of the
events, the more impact they will achieve for the smallest expenditure.
Although Austrian cultural relations correctly focuses on collaboration and partnership, I
believe that there is a deeper message in the concept of mutuality than simply collaborating
with other countries and cultures. Collaborating with artists and performers from other
countries is perfectly fine as a principle but it actually runs the risk of diluting the Austrian
message towards the end user: for me, collaboration refers to collaboration with the
audience, rather than with other cultural providers.
Participatory cultural relations is one of the ways in which a smaller player like Austria can
achieve a bigger impact: by designing more of its cultural activities as consumer-focused
interactive experiences, where the consumer out-take is not merely admiring the creativity of
Austrian artists, but participating in an unforgettable and personally rewarding cultural
activity. In other words, its less about giving people opportunities to admire Austrian culture
and more about Austria helping people to discover their own creativity.
Engaging the audience wherever possible, in innovative and direct ways, should certainly
become one of the operating principles of Austrian cultural relations.
Cultural relations has the unique characteristic that it is almost always trusted as the true
voice of the country: unless its very obviously propagandistic in tone and intent, people
usually assume that what its telling them about the country is the truth. For this reason,
cultural relations has significantly more power to persuade people about Austria than almost
any other activity. Cultural relations, especially of the participatory kind, has the power to
make friends between populations, creating a lasting bond of trust and familiarity which
impacts every other area of the countrys international engagement.
At this point I dont think it would be appropriate to recommend a new organisational
structure for cultural relations, unless of course the decision was taken to significantly change
the level of budgetary support (upwards or downwards).
However, I do believe that close collaboration between the cultural relations sector and the
National Marketing Agency will greatly benefit this sectors activities: by facilitating closer

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strategic and executional coordination with other sectors (and identifying new opportunities
for collaboration), and by making new creative thinking resources available to the BMeiA for
its cultural relations activities (the Ideas Shop), it should be able to achieve much more impact
from the same level of resources.
If there is a serious appetite for radical restructuring of all Austrias international engagement
mechanisms, then a complete redesign starts to make more sense, and there are undoubtedly
huge opportunities here should this direction be taken. I am however assuming that such a
root-and-branch reorganisation of cultural relations is not currently on the cards.
Next steps should include the following:
a) Incorporate the Competitive Identity strategy into current and future cultural relations
plans and activities
b) Incorporate cultural relations into the National Marketing Agency framework and
operating system
c) Consider current and possible evaluation mechanisms for cultural relations
d) Look for opportunities for increased participatory activities in cultural relations
e) Look at opportunities for smaller numbers of more creative, more courageous, biggerimpact activities with the potential for activating wider networks via social and
conventional media.

Pilot Projects: the advantage of starting small and coordinated.


In Austria as in many other countries, nobody really doubts the desirability of practising
joined-up government: it is logical to suppose that if many of Austrias outward-facing sectors
were able to coordinate their activities and messages, then Austrias overall image would
stand a better chance of developing in consistent and powerful way.
However, the question of what form such coordination would actually take should be
considered in some detail. Experience shows that simply asking or even requiring different
bodies, ministries and agencies to work together, share best practice and share information, is
not sufficient. Not surprisingly, each of these bodies tends to focus all its efforts on achieving
its own business objectives by its own means not to mention communicating with its own
audiences using its own messages and asking them to collaborate with other bodies who
have different objectives, and are promoting different products and services to different users
via different channels, is asking a great deal.
In my opinion, coordination between the sectors should not involve any harmonisation of
messages, logos or business strategies this is always unwelcome, exceptionally difficult to
sustain, and likely to compromise the effectiveness of the partners individual marketing
efforts.
What is actually required to get started on a more joined-up approach is actually much simpler
and less contentious: a broad agreement between the sectors to try something new; to
underpin their operations with a common underlying vision (the Bridgebuilder Strategy); and

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above all to try targeting a few of the same markets for a short period. After this period, the
success of the venture clearly measured with previously agreed metrics will be the sole
criterion for whether it makes sense to continue the exercise, or not.
Rather than attempting to manipulate Austrias global image, which is an ambitious aim to say
the least, I would recommend a more limited, more focused and more collaborative approach.
Instead of targeting the planet, Austria should concentrate on building strong bilateral
relationships of trade, cultural and diplomatic relations, citizen engagement, education, twoway tourism and business travel, and do it one country or even one city at a time. These
partner locations (as opposed to target markets) should be selected on the basis of their
commercial interest or potential for Austria of course, but also and equally on the basis of
their commercial interest in Austria. In other words, the emphasis is on bilateral engagement
rather than one-way promotion.
In this way, it will be possible for Austria to build new traditions of friendship and collaboration
with suitable and desirable new locations, and maintain them over time. This is the basis of
true reputation: people knowing and trusting another place because they have a tradition of
engagement with that place, at many levels and in many fields. Such relationships of direct
familiarity (as opposed to transmitted image) are more durable, require less maintenance and
produce more mutually beneficial results than any form of branding exercises.
In cases where these pilot projects are in locations where Austria does not already possess a
fully-fledged diplomatic presence, it would make sense to consider the option of designing and
building Austria Centres. These would be commercial buildings located in downtown areas in
larger towns and second cities, designed with a consumer audience in mind: space is rented
out to Austrian companies on the ground floor to supply products for sale, restaurants or other
mass-market retail activity; a cultural centre and exhibition space on the first floor; tourist
office and travel agency services on the second floor; meeting rooms, conference facilities and
commercial, consular and political offices on the upper floors. The rental of the real estate
would be paid for by the businesses on the ground floor, and all departments would share
back office, IT, accounting and other services.

Last Word: The Importance of Creativity for Austria


It has become increasingly clear to me during the last year that the gap separating Austria
from a stronger, more positive international and domestic reputation is in some ways smaller
than I anticipated at the start of this project from some points of view it seems almost paperthin. The countrys reputation may be a little weak but the reality is exceptionally strong,
whether we are talking about the nation of Austria (its assets, resources, human capital,
culture, history and topography) or the state of Austria (the policies implemented by
successive governments and the solidity of its institutions and systems of both federal and
regional governance).
This gives me much hope: the proof that Austria deserves more respect, interest and esteem is
abundant, and hidden from public opinion behind a fairly thin veil of indifference, perceived
irrelevance and ancient clichs. The power of this indifference must not of course be

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underestimated and in some senses this has been the mistake until now but the proof
simply needs to be activated and multiplied and brought to life. It may seem like a rash
statement, but I am convinced of it: all thats separating Austria from the reputation it
deserves is the institutionalised habit and skill of creativity.
Austrian agencies and institutions regularly cite innovation as one of the countrys strengths
in their promotional materials but I remain to be convinced that this quality is really a natural
or significant part of Austrias behaviour or even its modern DNA. Of course there is innovation
in Austria, and it would be extraordinary if this were not so, but this does not make it one of
the countrys particular or unique strengths (Austria only ranks 22nd in the latest
WIPO/INSEAD Global Innovation Index, for example).
Compared to many other countries I have studied, my sense is that Austria is rather held back
by a natural aversion to risk, a suspiciousness of original thinking, and a distinct preference for
approaches which have worked well in the past over approaches which might conceivably
work better in the future. Of course there are honourable exceptions to this pattern, but they
are exceptions which tend to prove the rule.
During the dozens of meetings and workshops which I have run during this project, I could not
fail to notice that the unquestioned and unquestioning habit of the overwhelming majority of
participants whether old or young, private or public sector, male or female, from business or
government or academia or the creative industries, from Vienna or from other parts of the
country was to treat all creative suggestions simply as an invitation to point out their flaws.
Many participants, perhaps the majority, clearly had an ingrained habit of demonstrating their
experience and intelligence to the groups by being very quick and incisive in pointing out why
ideas or projects wouldnt work: suggestions about how they might be made to work, even
when explicitly asked for, were exceptionally difficult to obtain.
Not surprisingly, the tiny minority who had the courage to propose new suggestions very
quickly stopped doing so, probably for fear of being humiliated again in front of their peers.
This kind of one step forwards, two steps backward behaviour is, sadly, common to much of
humanity: but it was noticeably more pronounced in Austria than in any other country I have
studied during the last fifteen years. Its effect, multiplied and compounded in thousands of
businesses, schools, universities, government departments and other institutions day after
day, month after month, year after year, decade after decade, is absolutely fatal to a nations
progress. It is symptomatic of Europes inertia, and lies absolutely at the heart of the regions
apparently inexorable decline.
Fortunately, it is relatively simple to eradicate, and it is by no means the unavoidable destiny
of those countries like Austria where it seems to have become an entrenched behaviour. The
justly celebrated Six Hats method of Edward de Bono is just one highly effective example of
how this kind of corrosive anti-creative behaviour can be quickly eliminated from meetings: if
such approaches are used on a wide scale, regularly enough and for long enough (and
especially if compatible approaches are used in schools) entire societies really can kick these
habits.

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And Austria needs to. We live in a world where the old solutions are patently inadequate, and
where the value of courage and imagination grows ever greater. For far more reasons than
simply achieving a better international profile, Austria needs more creativity in everything it
does. It needs to ask itself, dispassionately and by objective comparison with other nations,
whether it really does appreciate the critical and central importance of creative thinking in
society, in education, in business and in government.
Obviously creativity cant be guaranteed by structures or produced by committees, but a
critical first step would be at least to ensure that its importance is properly and officially
recognised. This is, in my opinion, the single most valuable policy step which the Austrian
government could take as a consequence of this project.

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Appendix I: Anholt-GfK Roper Nation Brands IndexSM Report on Austrias International
Image, 2012.

Introduction to 2011 NBISM


The way a country is perceived can make a critical difference to the success of its business,
trade and tourism efforts, as well as its diplomatic and cultural relations with other nations.
Simon Anholt and GfK Roper Public Affairs & Corporate Communications are pleased to bring
you the 2011 Anholt-GfK Roper Nation Brands IndexSM Report. The Anholt-GfK Roper Nation
Brands IndexSM represents a unique collaboration combining the heritage and authority of GfK
Roper's three-quarters of a century of experience in public affairs research with the expertise
of Simon Anholt to offer a unique barometer of global opinion.
Since 1996, when he coined the term 'nation brand' and gave birth to this important new field,
Simon Anholt has been helping governments plan the policies, strategies, investments and
innovations which lead their country towards an improved profile and reputation. Anholt
developed the Nation Brands Index in 2005 as a way to measure the image and reputation of
the world's nations, and to track their profiles as they rise or fall. In 2008, Simon Anholt
entered a partnership with GfK Roper Public Affairs & Corporate Communications to offer the
Anholt-GfK Roper Nation Brands IndexSM an expanded Nation Brands Index providing
governments and their agencies with a one-of-a-kind resource for actionable insights needed
to more effectively manage a countrys reputation.
The Anholt-GfK Roper Nation Brands IndexSM
Conducted annually with GfK Roper beginning in spring 2008, the Anholt-GfK Roper Nation
Brands IndexSM measures the image of 50 nations. Each year, approximately 20,000 adults
ages 18 and up are interviewed in 20 core panel countries.
The Anholt-GfK Roper Nation Brands IndexSM measures the power and appeal of each countrys
brand image by examining six dimensions of national competence. Together, these
dimensions make up the Nation Brand Hexagon.
Exports: This is what marketers call the country of origin effect whether knowing where
the product is made increases or decreases peoples likelihood of purchasing it, and whether a
country has particular strengths in science and technology, and has creative energy. Perceived
associations with particular industries round out that countrys image in this space.
Governance: This aspect incorporates perceived competency and honesty of government,
respect for citizens rights and fair treatment, as well as global behaviour in the areas of
international peace and security, environmental protection, and world poverty reduction.
Respondents also select one adjective that best describes the government in each country.

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Culture: Cultural aspects measured are perceptions of a countrys heritage, its contemporary
cultural vibes from music, films, art and literature, as well as the countrys excellence in
sports. Various cultural activities are presented to respondents to gauge their strongest
images of a countrys cultural product.
People: The general assessment of a peoples friendliness is measured by whether
respondents would feel welcome when visiting the country. Additionally, we measure the
appeal of the people on a personal level whether respondents want to have a close friend
from that country as well as human resources on a professional level, that is, how willing
respondents would be to hire a well-qualified person from that country. Respondents are also
asked to select adjectives out of a list to describe the predominant images they have of the
people in each country.
Tourism: Respondents rate a countrys tourism appeal in three major areas: natural beauty,
historic buildings and monuments, and vibrant city life and urban attractions. Tourism
potential is also asked: how likely they would be to visit a country if money is no object and the
likely experience represented by adjectives such as romantic, stressful, spiritual, etc.
Immigration and Investment: Lastly, a countrys power to attract talent and capital is
measured not only by whether people would consider studying, working and living in that
country but also by the countrys economic prosperity, equal opportunity, and ultimately the
perception that it is a place with a high quality of life. The countrys economic and business
conditions whether stagnant, declining, developing or forward-thinking complete the
measurement in this space.
The NBISM score is an average of the scores from the six indices mentioned above. There are
between 3 and 5 ratings questions for each of the indices. Ratings are based on a scale from 1
to 7 with 7 being the highest and best, 1 being the lowest and worst, and 4 being the middle
position which is neither positive nor negative. Each hexagon point also has a word choice
question which helps enrich the understanding of the properties of a nations image.

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The 2011 NBISM Survey
The 2011 NBISM survey has been conducted in 20 major developed and developing countries
that play important and diverse roles in international relations, trade and the flow of business,
cultural, and tourism activities. Given the increasing global role played by developing
countries, the survey strives to represent regional balance as well as the balance between
high-income and middle-income countries. The core 20 panel countries are:
Western Europe/North America: The U.S., Canada, the UK, Germany, France, Italy, Sweden
Central and Eastern Europe: Russia, Poland, Turkey
Asia-Pacific: Japan, China, India, South Korea, Australia
Latin America: Argentina, Brazil, Mexico
Middle East/Africa: Egypt, South Africa
In all, 20,337 interviews have been conducted with at least 1,000 interviews per country for
the 2011 NBISM Survey. Adults age 18 or over who are online are interviewed in each country.
Using the most up-to-date online population parameters, the achieved sample in each country
has been weighted to reflect key demographic characteristics such as age, gender, and
education of the 2011 online population in that country. Additionally, in the U.S., the UK,
South Africa, India and Brazil, race/ethnicity has been used for sample balancing. The report
reflects the views and opinions of online populations in these 20 countries citizens who are
connected to the world. Fieldwork was conducted from July 6th to July 25th, 2011.
The NBISM measures the image of 50 nations. In each panel country the list of 50 nations is
randomly assigned to respondents, each of whom (except Egypt) rates 25 nations, resulting in
each nation getting approximately 500 ratings per panel country. In Egypt, where respondents
are not as familiar and experienced with online surveys, survey length was reduced, resulting
in each nation getting approximately 250 ratings.
The list of 50 nations is based on the political and economic importance of the nations in global
geopolitics and the flow of trade, businesses, people, and tourism activities. Regional
representation and, to some extent, the diversity of political and economic systems are taken
into consideration to make the study truly global. NBISM subscription members interests are
also reflected in the selection of the countries.

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The list of 50 nations8 is as follows, listed by region:
North America: The U.S., Canada
Western Europe: The UK, Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Ireland, Scotland, Sweden, Denmark,
Holland, Belgium, Switzerland, Finland, Austria, Luxembourg
Central/Eastern Europe: Russia, Poland, Czech Republic, Hungary, Turkey, Slovakia, Latvia*
Asia-Pacific: Japan, South Korea, China, India, Thailand, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore,
Taiwan, Australia, New Zealand
Latin America: Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Chile, Peru, Cuba, Colombia
Middle East/Africa: United Arab Emirates, Iran, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, Angola,
Kenya, Nigeria*

Chinese respondents are asked of all nations except their own.

* Nations new to the NBISM 2011. Two nations measured in 2010 but not in 2011 are: Romania and Flanders.

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Highlights and Implications

Austria is a strong, well-rounded nation, ranking 13th on the 2011 Nation Brands Index

Austria ranks in the 2nd tier on all six dimensions globally, and consistently ranks in the
top-tier in the eyes of German respondents

At 12th, Austria is best ranked on the Governance and Immigration/Investment indices,


garnering 3rd place ranks from Germany on both indices

With overall rankings ranging from 10th-13th on the Governance questions, the Index is
Austrias most consistently high-ranked dimension

Austrias strongest Immigration/Investment question is for its quality of education


(11th), whereas its lowest are for respondents willingness to work and live there (14th)
and its investment appeal (14th)

Ranking 15th, People is neither a particular strength nor weakness for Austria, though
the countrys workforce ranking higher than its peoples friendliness

Globally, Austrias weakest indices are Exports, Culture, and Tourism, all ranking 17th.
Interestingly Austrias Exports ranks among its highest in the eyes of American
respondents (13th)

Similarly, Brits appreciate Austria for its Tourism appeal (13th), more so than the
average global citizen, and more so than Austrias five other indices

All 20 panel countries are favourable towards Austria, with favourability levels higher
than their respective all-nation average, with India and Egypt the least enthusiastic and
Germany the most

Insights from Simon Anholt


How one reads Austrias results in the Anholt-GfK Roper Nation Brands IndexSM depends on
whether one sees them as a snapshot in time in which case they are very creditable indeed
or whether one projects some clear trends forward a few years, in which case they raise
certain concerns.
However one reads the results, it cannot be denied that Austria still wields significant soft
power around the world: Austria is certainly not the thirteenth largest economy in the world,
nor does it possess the thirteenth largest land area, the thirteenth largest population, the
thirteenth most powerful armed forces, nor is it posting the thirteenth fastest economic
growth and yet it has the thirteenth best reputation of any country, at least as measured by
the Anholt-GfK Roper Nation Brands IndexSM.
But could it do better in the future, and might it do worse?

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This year for the first time, our report contains an analysis of the ways in which different age
cohorts rank the countries in the Anholt-GfK Roper Nation Brands IndexSM (see Section 8) and
this analysis is particularly revealing of the challenges which lie ahead for Austria. Older
respondents around the world show significantly more brand loyalty towards Austria than
younger ones, and clearly Austria has a major task on its hands to find ways of building that
loyalty and esteem amongst the rising generations. This problem is common to all the
countries at the top end of the NBISM, as the old loyalties begin to shift. Can Austria find a way
to engage and connect with young people around the world? If not, it appears condemned,
along with all its Western neighbours and partners, to sink ever downwards in the global
pecking-order.
The challenge is clear, but the means for resolving it remain uncertain. Only a clearly stated,
properly shared and consistently pursued policy direction can achieve this kind of national
realignment: for, as is always the case when we are talking about mere reputation or mere
image, these are not issues of communication, but issues of policy. The degree of attraction
and admiration which Austria undoubtedly wields brings as much responsibility as opportunity,
and a country which is held in such high esteem has a corresponding capability for influencing
values, perceptions and behaviours both in Europe and beyond. I would argue that the best
way for Austria to leverage this power is also the best way to preserve and even enhance it: by
influencing international public opinion in favourable directions.
If one considers Austrias reputation not as a store of value to be increased, but an asset to be
utilised, the picture changes somewhat. Whether Austrias project is helping its European
partners to build a new ethic of capitalism more prudent, more mature and less profligate
than the Anglo-Saxon model which is now undergoing so much scrutiny or developing a more
responsible and sustainable approach to the environment in business, politics and daily life,
both are guaranteed a high degree of acceptance as a result of Austrias strong international
standing.
Although one can always wish for a higher profile, the fact remains that Austria is some way
beyond the usual concerns of the vast majority of countries as regards its national image. Its
reputation is, for the time being, stronger than its tangible assets and real power would
indicate, and that reputation appears to be both stable and secure. The biggest question is
how the rest of humanity can benefit from Austrias soft power and, in the same measure as
Austria succeeds in exercising this kind of benign influence, so its good name will be further
enhanced and consolidated.
I feel that the most useful and productive question to ask is not what Austria can do in order to
increase or sustain this power, but how it proposes to use it for the benefit of humanity. Never
has humanity faced greater shared, borderless challenges than in this century, and yet the
other great powers seem either unable or unwilling to look beyond their own borders, or at
least their own narrow interests. Austria could, and should, help to break this paradigm, and
demonstrate that such influence can be used for the benefit of all, without compromising on
the first responsibility of any government to cater for its own citizens.

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Austria, in partnership with its European neighbours, has the power to turn Europe from an
example of the failure of multilateralism into a model for principled and functional
multilateralism on a much grander scale.
Austrians are frequently heard to complain that people now confuse their country with
Australia, and its a mark of how the hierarchy of nations, and values and tastes in general,
have changed during our lifetimes, that the confusion is only ever in this direction. Few if any
foreigners would now confuse Australia with Austria. The huge task now facing Austria is to
see whether it can contribute to humanity and to the planet in such a way as to re-connect
with a younger franchise around the world, and make its own international standing as
contemporary, as relevant, and as compelling as Australia has succeeded in doing during the
last generation.
We live in an age where heroes are needed as never before. This could be Austrias moment to
step forward, and simply by focusing on its responsibilities rather than its opportunities, it
could certainly maximise those opportunities.

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1. Overall Rankings
Overview of Nation Brands Index
Table 1.1 shows the 50 NBI target nations in rank order based on their overall NBI Index
scores. The most notable change this year, and indeed one of the two greatest shifts in the
four NBI waves since 2008, is a six-position downward movement for Egypt, a country that
captivated the world with its popular uprising but now faces the daunting tasks of
transformation and stabilization.
The top 10 nations of 2010 continue to lead the NBI world this year. Despite sluggish
economic growth, the U.S. has solidified its hold on #1, enlarging its lead over 2nd place
Germany, with clear gains on Governance and Tourism, reaffirming its top spot in Culture and
Immigration/Investment, and closing in on Japan on Exports. Frances gradual downward
movement continues, from 2nd place in 2009 and 3rd place in 2010, to 4th place this year, now
overtaken by the UK. This swapping of places is due in part to a warming of perceptions of
UKs welcoming citizens and a corresponding drop in rank for France on the Governance
dimension (of note, fieldwork was completed before the London riots). Japan rounds out the
top five at 5th, although in light of the nuclear disaster and recovery, not surprisingly, global
citizens desire to visit, work, or live in the country is decidedly down. Australia, pursuing a
strategy of economic integration with emerging regional powers, has inched up one position to
8th, overtaking Switzerland. Notably, Australias image is much improved among key AsiaPacific markets, including South Korea, India, and China. Canada, Italy, and Sweden have kept
their 2010 ranks, although Italy has not seen the type of score gain enjoyed by the two
northern nations who are less affected by debt problems.
While the second tier rank order is remarkably unchanged from 2010, the two leaders of this
group, Spain and Holland, have seen their NBI scores contract slightly the only nations in the
top half of NBI to do so. Among this group, financially troubled Ireland and Belgium have also
stalled, with hardly any score gains. Brazil has held its top 20 position, the only developing
country in this tier, which is populated by mid-sized and smaller Western economies.
While Brazil leads the developing world, the rest of the BRIC countries are not far behind:
Russia (21st), China closing in at 23rd, and India rounding out the group at 28th. Although the
ranks are largely unchanged, China has the most momentum of the group, up nearly a point
(.96) the third-largest increase in NBI score registered this year with particularly impressive
gains on, not surprisingly, Exports and Immigration/Investment, but also notably, Governance
(up 1.57 points). Last years big mover, Brazil, has cooled somewhat, growing the least among
BRIC countries (up .23 points). For their part, Russia and India have registered large NBI score
gains (.61 and .54, respectively) higher than all Western European nations save for the UK
(up .77 points) and Scotland (up .63 points). Sharing positions in the 20s are two small city
states prosperous and stable Singapore and Luxembourg alongside BRIC giants and other
major developing economies, two each from Latin America and Central Eastern Europe, plus

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South Korea which has made strides and joined this group for the first time (27th), rising from
30th in 2010, 31st in 2009, and 33rd in 2008.
Table 1.1: Overall Nation Brands Index
2011 rank
order
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

2010 rank
order
1
2
4
3
5
6
7
9
8
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

Nation
United States
Germany
United Kingdom
France
Japan
Canada
Italy
Australia
Switzerland
Sweden
Spain
Holland
Austria
New Zealand
Scotland
Denmark
Finland
Ireland
Belgium
Brazil
Russia
Luxembourg
China
Argentina
Singapore

SM

2011 NBI
score
68.88
67.85
67.39
66.96
66.72
66.44
65.58
64.89
64.86
63.87
63.21
62.00
60.81
60.43
60.30
59.89
59.37
58.64
58.23
57.91
57.00
56.18
55.79
55.28
54.79

2011 rank
order
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50

2010 rank
order
26
30
27
29
31
32
33
27
35
34
37
38
36
39
41
44
43
n/a
46
45
47
48
n/a
49
50

NBISM scores range from 1-100


*In 2010, Flanders was 40th and Romania was 41st. These countries are not included in 2011.
Increasingly playing the role to bridge East and West, Turkey is up one spot to 32nd on the
strength of the sixth-best Exports score improvement, and gaining in a diverse range of
countries in North America and in the UK, as well as Egypt and South Africa, and China.
Elsewhere in the 30s and 40s, Thailand and Cuba both have moved up and are tied for the
largest NBI score gain (up 1.01 points) of all nations, the former having come out of intractable
bitter political conflict and the latter starting to relax state control and enjoying more open
incoming travel conditions. Cubas momentum is driven by solid gains on Tourism and
Immigration/Investment, and is especially evident among its regional neighbours particularly
Brazil, with which it has strengthened ties on educational exchanges, health care technology,
and relief efforts in Haiti. The other lowest-ranking nations in Latin America have also shown
largest score gains: Peru (40th, up .62 points) and Colombia (46th, up .64 points), compared to
smaller increases accorded Mexico (30th) and Chile (39th).
Even after a sharp drop in rank, Egypt remains the strongest-positioned nation (33rd) in Africa
and the Middle East retaining top 20 ranks on Tourism and Culture slightly ahead of South

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SM

Nation
2011 NBI score
Poland
54.04
South Korea
54.02
India
53.95
Hungary
53.44
Mexico
53.24
Czech Republic
53.13
Turkey
52.97
Egypt
52.36
Thailand
52.16
Taiwan
51.86
South Africa
51.36
Malaysia
51.09
Slovakia
50.82
Chile
50.76
Peru
50.55
Indonesia
49.54
United Arab Emirates
49.17
Latvia
48.70
Cuba
48.07
Saudi Arabia
46.95
Colombia
46.78
Kenya
45.77
Nigeria
43.09
Angola
42.89
Iran
39.59

simon anholt
Africa (36th) and well past other measured nations, such as Saudi Arabia (45th) and Nigeria
(48th), which is new to NBI this year. While Kenya is only one rank ahead of Nigeria, the
economically vibrant East African nation bests Sub-Saharas largest country by more than 2.5
points. Also new to NBI this year, Latvia (43rd) is the lowest-ranked nation in a region led by its
powerful neighbour Russia; Latvia trails the nearest ranked in the region the small nation
Slovakia by five positions.
Austrias NBISM Rankings
Austria has a strong and well-rounded reputation among global citizens, ranking 13th on NBI.
While ranking among premier countries including Spain, Holland, and New Zealand globally,
Austrias reputation varies across panel countries. India, for instance, ranks Austria as low as
23rd, just barely in the top half of countries. Germany, on the other hand, is Austrias most
favourable ranker, at 5th. Straddling Western and Eastern Europe, Austria appears to have
more popularity among its Eastern neighbours than its Western (save for Germany), earning
12th and 14th place rankings from Russia and Poland. There is a fair amount of divide within
Western Europe: in contrast to Germany, France ranks Austria only 18th, tied with panel
countries from diverse regions such as Egypt, Argentina, and the U.S. for giving Austrias
second lowest rank on NBI. Italy, Sweden, and the UK all rank Austria from 14th - 16th.
Table 1.2: Austrias NBISM Rankings by 20 Panel Countries
Panel countries
Germany
Russia
Italy
Japan
Poland
Sweden
South Africa
Turkey
Australia
Brazil

Austrias rank
5
12
14
14
14
14
15
15
16
16

Panel Countries
Canada
China
United Kingdom
Mexico
South Korea
Argentina
Egypt
France
United States
India

Austrias rank
16
16
16
17
17
18
18
18
18
23

NBISM rankings range from 1-50

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2. Exports
Exports Index
SM

About the Exports Dimension of the Nation Brands Index :


The first point of the hexagon we look at is the Exports dimension. It is made up of three questions which
address the following concepts:

The countrys contribution to innovation in science and technology

The effect of a product or services country of origin on peoples attitudes towards purchasing
it

The degree to which the country is a creative place with cutting-edge ideas and new ways of
thinking

Each of these addresses a key component of a countrys economic strength and potential. Leadership in
innovation is an important aspect of a countrys economic power. This concept gets at a nations
investment in research and development and its past and present contribution to the worlds progress in
science and technology. The second item focuses on the change in value that is associated with a product
or service coming from a particular country. Countries that do well in this dimension export well-known
high quality brands. The cutting edge concept, measures a countrys potential for future economic
success. Countries that score well on this question are perceived to be dynamic and forward thinking
places where creativity is encouraged.

Table 2.1 shows the 50 NBI target nations in rank order based on their Exports Index scores.
While there are no changes in rank order among the top 10 and minimal shifts among the
remaining 40 nations, we are noticing unmistakable, if nuanced, patterns occasioned by the
global economic recession. The top 10 nations in Exports, unchanged from last year, include
eight Western Europe and North American nations. While Japan retains its #1 ranking, the
United States at #2 continues to close in on the top spot, now separated with Japan by only .26
points (from .75 in 2010 and a hefty 2.2 in 2008). The U.S. has also expanded its score margin
over #3, Germany, by .37 points, due in large part to gains on the feel good about buying
products and creative place questions. In fact, on the feel good about buying products
question, the U.S. has now moved into the #2 spot, edging out Japan not surprising given the
sensational success of iPads and all things Apple. While Germanys relatively stable market
stands in relief to the jittery and debt-ridden economies of France and Italy, its score has
hardly budged, standing still just like the other two Euro zone partners. In contrast, over in the
Asia Pacific region, Australia (10th) has reaped reputational benefit, showing the largest score
increase of 1.11 points among the top tier nations. Australia has improved on Exports in a
number of countries including BRIC countries and South Africa.
Table 2.1: Exports Index

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2011 rank
order
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

2010 rank
order
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
14
11
12
16
13
14
18
17
19
20
21
23
22
24
25

SM

Nation
Japan
United States
Germany
United Kingdom
France
Canada
Switzerland
Sweden
Italy
Australia
China
Holland
Russia
South Korea
Spain
Finland
Austria
Denmark
Belgium
New Zealand
Singapore
Scotland
Taiwan
Ireland
India

2011 NBI
score
76.48
76.22
72.23
67.38
66.08
64.87
64.76
62.56
62.14
61.64
58.51
58.30
57.60
57.43
57.41
56.74
56.68
56.46
55.00
54.98
54.29
53.97
53.47
52.86
52.50

2011 rank
order
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
38
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50

2010 rank
order
26
27
28
29
34
32
31
30
33
35
36
38
39
37
41
40
42
n/a
45
46
47
48
49
n/a
50

Exports scores range from 1-100


*In 2010, Flanders was 43rd and Romania was 44th. These countries are not included in 2011.
Contrasting to a general lack of momentum for most of the top 10 nations in Exports, the
second tier has experienced some shuffling. China and South Korea have enjoyed two of the
three largest gains on Exports among the measured nations this year (1.43 and .96 points,
respectively). China has jumped three positions, from 14th in 2010, overtaking not only Spain,
but two other relatively sound economies Holland and Russia and breaking a 2010 rank-tie
with Finland. Chinas forward march is due to across-the-board gains in Exports questions;
while the perception of product quality is still low at 44th, it is one spot higher than last year.
South Korea has bolstered its already-strong reputation as an incubator for science and
technology and cutting-edge products, from electronics to automobiles, with gains on the
creative place and science and technology questions.
Russia, at 13th, is the second-highest ranked emerging market after China. India and Brazil are
still sitting at the middle point of 50 nations (25th and 26th respectively). Outside the BRIC
countries, the Central Eastern European group is led by Poland at 28th, with Latvia bringing up
the rear at 43nd; and Latin American countries have a similar range, with Argentina and Cuba
bracketing the pack (29th and 45th respectively).
Looking at scores, we see that a number of emerging markets have also narrowed the gap
between themselves and the leaders, in addition to the ones discussed earlier. Seven of the

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Nation
2011 NBI score
Brazil
52.11
Luxembourg
51.67
Poland
49.38
Argentina
48.80
Turkey
48.34
Czech Republic
48.25
Hungary
48.21
United Arab Emirates
48.03
Malaysia
47.84
Thailand
47.39
Mexico
46.97
South Africa
46.56
Egypt
45.68
Slovakia
45.68
Indonesia
45.27
Saudi Arabia
45.12
Chile
45.01
Latvia
43.36
Peru
42.80
Cuba
42.57
Colombia
41.48
Kenya
38.57
Iran
38.17
Nigeria
37.44
Angola
37.37

simon anholt
top 20 movers in terms of Exports scores hail from outside Europe, North America, or the Asia
Pacific region, including the big movers South Africa (37th, up .94 points), Cuba (45th, up .91
points), and Turkey (30th, up .76 points). Turkeys momentum is especially noteworthy: the
country has leaped four index positions, passing Central European competitors Hungary and
the Czech Republic, as well as Malaysia and the UAE due to clear improvement on the feel
good about buying products question. Turkey has experienced noteworthy gains among
major nations in the West and the East, such as the UK, U.S., and to a lesser extent, China.
Less impressive are the index performances by Iran and oil-rich Saudi Arabia soaring energy
prices have not translated into high praise. Sub-Saharan African nations Kenya, Nigeria, and
Angola reside in the bottom tier, most with miniscule score movements and with bottom-tier
ranks from respondents in both developed and developing countries.
Austrias Exports Rankings
At 17th, Exports is one of Austrias weaker indices (tied with Culture and Tourism for last).
While all 20 panel countries rank Austria in the top half of countries, five rank the country in
the 20s. Austria receives its strongest rank from neighbour Germany (8th), and its weakest
from India (23rd). Western Europe shows a fair range in ranks, ranging from 8th to a low of 19th
(the UK). In contrast, Exports is considered an Austrian strength among Americans the 13th
rank is Austrias highest rank from the U.S. across the six indices. Close-by important markets
Poland, Russia and Sweden all rank Austria with excellent positions.
Table 2.2: Exports - Austrias Rankings by 20 Panel Countries
Panel countries
Germany
Poland
Russia
Sweden
United States
Italy
Canada
Japan
Turkey
Australia

Austrias rank
8
12
13
13
13
15
16
16
17
18

Panel Countries
Brazil
South Africa
France
South Korea
United Kingdom
China
Mexico
Argentina
Egypt
India

Austrias rank
18
18
19
19
19
20
20
22
22
23

Exports rankings range from 1-50


Exports: Question Rankings and Word Associations
Austria ranks in the top 20 on all three measures that comprise the Export Index. While not
particularly outstanding for exhibiting creativity or strong contributions to science (both 18th),
Austria is better known for the quality and integrity of its products, ranking 13th on feel good
about buying products, a pattern that holds true across most panel countries rankings of
Austria. Of note, India is an exception; while typically ranking Austria poorly, India ranks
Austrias contribution to science and technology at 18th, one of Austrias more favourable
ranks on this question; however, Indians give Austria only a 30th rank on the feel good

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question. The Chinese are also relatively less positive, ranking Austria at 20th for the same
question (second lowest after India).
Looking within the comparison set, Canada and Sweden show a clear advantage, both ranking
in the top 10 on all three questions. South Korea and Austria are closer competitors: South
Korea wins on contributes to science and technology and creative place, but Austria beats
it regarding feel good about buying products. Latvia is not yet in the same league, trailing by
a large margin on all three questions, ranking in the bottom tier. However, it is important to
keep a close eye on Latvia as it certainly has established a fairly good reputation on product
quality in some important markets: Germany, Poland, and Sweden rank the country in the 20s
on feel good about buying products.
Table 2.3: Exports Question Rankings
Concept
Contributes to science
and technology
Feel good about buying
products from country
Creative place with
cutting-edge ideas and
new ways of thinking

Austria

Sweden

South Korea

Latvia

Canada

18

10

11

44

13

20

42

18

14

43

Table 2.4 shows the products and services that are associated with Austria and its chosen
competitive set's industries and exports. At 17%, Austrias top association is for banking,
followed by agriculture, and to a lesser extent, high technology, crafts, and food.
However, none is unique to Austria.
Looking at the competitive set, the home of Samsung and Hyundai South Korea stands out
for high technology and automotive, and Canada for agriculture, food, oil, and film
and television. While Sweden betters Canada on automotive, given the Volvos and Saabs,
Canada surprisingly is ahead of Sweden on high technology. On the other hand, Latvia only
records associations by more than 5% of respondents for crafts and agriculture. Across
the board, high technology is the comparison sets greatest association (save for Latvia).
Austrias associations are relatively weak, as a result, its crafts, agriculture, and food
associations end up among the better known traits in terms of its profile.

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Table 2.4: Exports Word Associations


Products and services
associated with these
countries
High technology
Banking
Automotive
Advertising
Crafts
Agriculture
Fashion
Food
Oil
Film and television

Austria
%
13
17
8
8
13
15
8
13
*
6

Sweden
%
27
21
25
13
14
13
12
14
3
9

South Korea
%
40
8
32
10
12
12
9
13
3
12

Latvia
%
3
3
3
4
10
12
3
5
*
*

Canada
%
31
22
14
17
12
27
11
18
12
19

*2% or less

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simon anholt

3. Governance
Governance Index
SM

About the Governance Dimension of the Nation Brands Index :


The second point of the hexagon we analyze is the Governance dimension. It is made up of five questions
which address the following concepts:

The country is competently and honestly governed

The country respects the rights of its citizens and treats them with fairness

The country behaves responsibly in the areas of international peace and security

The country behaves responsibly to protect the environment

The country behaves responsibly to help reduce world poverty

The first two concepts focus on a nations domestic governance. That a country is seen as being
competently and honestly governed is obviously hugely indicative of that governments reputation. The
second concept assesses whether or not a government is providing its citizens with the basic rights of a
free society. The last three items of the Governance dimension are directed towards a countrys
behaviour in three areas of global policy: international peace and security, the environment, and the
problem of world poverty. The final two concepts, behaving responsibly to protect the environment and
to help reduce poverty, are both items that have become more and more important components of
national reputation in the last few decades. We can expect these governmental responsibilities,
particularly the need to have sound environmental policy, to continue to increase in importance in the
future.

Table 3.1 shows the 50 measured nations scores on the Governance dimension. Governance is
one of two indices on which Western mature democracies exclusively compose the top 20
nations (the other is Immigration/Investment). Western Europe is particularly well
represented, with 15 of 20 nations in the top tiers and none lower than 20th position (Italy).
Three Asia pacific nations Australia (5th), New Zealand (11th), and Japan (13th), along with #1,
Canada, and the United States (16th) round out the top 20. While still ranking low compared
to other Western democracies, the U.S. has finally shed the title of the lowest ranked among
this group, rising from 20th to 16th, passing a troika of beleaguered European nations Spain,
Italy, and Ireland, as well as Luxembourg. The increase is coming mainly from the "protects
the environment" and "peace and security" questions. Having taken a multi-lateral approach
regarding Libya and continuing with its plan to draw down troops from Iraq and Afghanistan,
the U.S.s improvement on peace and security is reflected in higher ranks from NATO partners
including France and Turkey. The UK and Germany have, likewise, earned plaudits on
Governance over the past 12 months. While their ranks are unchanged, the UK (6th) has made
strides on all index questions, up 1.19 points; though, it is important to note that fieldwork
concluded before news broke about the phone-hacking scandal and London riots. Germany
(3rd), the driving force behind regional financial rescue efforts, boasts a bump of nearly a point

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simon anholt
(.81) on the Index. In contrast, Southern European nations yet to come up with solutions to
their piling debt France (9th), Spain (17th), and Italy (20th) suffer on Governance, singularly
on the competent and honest government question. Japan, while keeping its 13th position,
has experienced slippage, not surprisingly, on the protects the environment question,
particularly in countries with heightened sensitivity toward nuclear power: Russia and
Germany, along with neighbours China and South Korea.
Table 3.1: Governance Index
2011 rank
order
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

2010 rank
order
1
2
4
3
5
6
7
9
8
10
11
12
13
14
15
20
16
17
19
18
21
23
22
24
26

Nation
Canada
Switzerland
Germany
Sweden
Australia
United Kingdom
Holland
Denmark
France
Finland
New Zealand
Austria
Japan
Scotland
Belgium
United States
Spain
Luxembourg
Ireland
Italy
Poland
Singapore
Hungary
Czech Republic
Brazil

SM

2010 NBI
score
65.89
65.55
64.71
64.63
63.66
63.23
62.05
61.57
61.35
61.17
61.04
60.73
60.09
59.92
59.01
58.89
58.39
58.29
57.50
57.40
52.83
52.62
52.56
51.84
51.25

2011 rank
order
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50

2010 rank
order
27
28
30
n/a
29
34
32
33
38
37
41
35
39
42
43
40
44
36
46
48
45
47
49
n/a
50

Governance scores range from 1-100


*In 2010, Flanders was 25th and Romania was 31st. These countries are not included in 2011.
Two decades removed from the Communist bloc, Central Eastern European countries are
tightly bunched in the 20s, with Poland sitting just outside of the top tiers at 21st and Latvia at
29th. Russia is fully five places behind Latvia, though this 34th rank represents a three position
improvement from 2010. At 30th, Turkey, with its unique geopolitical role, ranks between the
Central European countries and Russia. African countries are clustered, as well, albeit in the
bottom tier and with most showing negative movement this year. The continent is led by
South Africa at 41st, down two positions with a slip on the peace and security question
notably, among South Africans themselves and IBSA partners Brazil and India.
Contrasting to the tightly-packed Central Eastern European and African countries, Latin
American countries show a much wider variation in ranks, from 25th (Brazil) to 48th (Cuba). As

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Nation
2011 NBI score
Slovakia
50.51
Argentina
50.20
South Korea
49.06
Latvia
48.94
Turkey
48.69
Taiwan
48.20
Chile
47.96
Malaysia
47.92
Russia
47.31
Peru
46.87
Thailand
46.65
United Arab Emirates
46.29
Mexico
46.09
Indonesia
45.69
India
45.36
South Africa
45.31
Saudi Arabia
43.43
Egypt
42.75
Colombia
42.01
China
41.52
Kenya
41.41
Angola
40.46
Cuba
40.31
Nigeria
38.40
Iran
33.50

simon anholt
the only one-party system among measured nations in the region, Cuba, not surprisingly,
achieves its poorest ranking on Governance. Historic friendships and animosities are
somewhat evident in the panel country ranks for Cuba, from higher ranks from Turkey (35th)
and China (41st) to the poorest rank from the U.S. (49th). Having managed through a hotlycontested presidential election in June, Peru (35th) has inched up this year passing the UAE and
Egypt. Thailand (36th) has also moved up three positions its 1.43-point increase on
Governance being the third largest on the Index following Julys relatively smooth elections
promising to end several years of bitter civil unrest. Other improvements in the Asia Pacific
region come from South Korea (28th, up two positions), and Taiwan (31st, up three).
The Arab Spring has not accrued to the benefit of measured nations in North Africa and the
Middle East, due in part to domestic instability and heightened uncertainty about the rules of
governance. As with sub-Saharan Africa, countries from these areas are bunched in the
bottom tiers with declining scores. Egypt has experienced the largest score depreciation
(down 3.97 points) and a precipitous drop of 8 positions. Egypt's hard-line neighbours, Saudi
Arabia (42nd) and Iran (50th) keen to prevent similar unrest in their own streets, and ranked
poorly to begin with saw slight drops in scores as well. The highest-ranked Middle Eastern
nation, the UAE (37th), has also dropped several ranks, seeing its scores decline across each
Governance question.
Looking closer at the group of BRIC, Brazil is the model on Governance at 25th, nearly one tier
ahead of the next BRIC country (Russia, 34th) and fully 20 positions ahead of China, one of the
few one-party systems standing, and one that keeps in prison a Nobel Peace Prize winner. In
fact, the gaps of Chinas rank on Governance (45th) with Exports (11th) and Culture (8th) are
striking by far the largest gaps in NBI. Interestingly, coming from a low rank, China and Russia
account for two of the largest score gains this year (1.13 and 1.57 points, respectively)
Chinas gains include reduce world poverty, perhaps due to increased investment and
pledged aid in Africa; and Russias gains include rights and fairness. As the worlds largest
democracy, India (40th) enjoys a comparatively stronger rank on competent and honest
government, but bottom-tier ranks on the reduce world poverty and protect the
environment questions weigh down its Index rank.
Compared to other indices, Governance is one in which global citizens are not shy about
criticizing their own. We see this especially on the competent and honest governance and
protects rights and fairness questions, and in some places the poverty and environment
questions. For example, Italians rank Italy 48th on competent and honest government due to
both idiosyncrasies (such as P.M. Berlusconis legal troubles) and structural challenges (such as
Italys chronic political gridlock). There are, however, citizens who are more complimentary,
such as the Swedes and Canadians, who give their respective homelands top ranks on all
Governance questions.
Austrias Governance Rankings
Governance is a strong point for Austria, ranking 12th globally (tied with Immigration and
Investment for its two highest indices) and within the top ten in six panel countries. In fact,

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every panel country ranks Austrias Governance in the top 20 countries. Austria receives its
highest Governance rank from Germany (3rd), followed by Central Eastern European countries
Russia, Turkey, and Poland (8th, 9th, and 10th), Italy, and Argentina (both 10th). Austrias lowest
Governance rank, 20th from India, is its highest from Indians (tied with Immigration and
Investment). Asian-Pacific countries lack enthusiasm towards the Austrian government,
offering lower ranks on the Index (14th-20th). Austria fares relatively well in Latin American
countries compared to other indices, with ranks ranging from 10th-13th.
Table 3.2: Governance - Austrias Rankings by 20 Panel Countries
Panel countries
Germany
Russia
Turkey
Argentina
Italy
Poland
South Africa
Sweden
Brazil
Egypt

Austrias rank
3
8
9
10
10
10
11
11
12
13

Panel countries
Mexico
Australia
Canada
France
South Korea
United Kingdom
China
Japan
United States
India

Austrias rank
13
14
14
14
14
14
15
15
17
20

Governance rankings range from 1-50


Governance: Question Rankings and Word Associations
Commensurate with its 12th place ranking on the Index, Austria ranks in the top 15 countries
on all five questions that make up the Governance Index. Austrias strength within the Index is
for behaving responsibly to help protect the environment, and indeed this is Austrias top
strength overall the one question in the survey that produces a top 10 ranking for the
country. Austrias other domestic and international behaviours are also outstanding: ranking
12th for both rights and fairness and peace and security, and 13th for competent and
honest government and helping to reduce poverty.
With no rank below 3rd and three 1st place positions, Canada is a world leader in Governance.
Not far behind is Sweden with all top-four positions. While trailing both, Austria sits only just
outside the top tier on most questions in the Index. Austria leaves South Korea and Latvia far
behind. It should be noted that Latvia gets higher rankings from respondents in all E.U.
countries than its global average, on all questions. Behaving responsibly to protect the
environment is a common strength, albeit to different level, for Austria, Sweden, and Latvia,
that is, it is the strongest trait out of all questions for each country.
Table 3.3: Governance Question Rankings
Concept
Competently and
honestly governed
Respects the rights of
citizens and treats them
with fairness
Behaves responsibly in

Austria

Sweden

South Korea

Latvia

Canada

13

27

31

12

28

29

12

38

28

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the areas of
international peace and
security
Behaves responsibly to
protect the
environment
Behaves responsibly to
help reduce world
poverty

10

30

28

13

25

30

Table 3.4 shows that Austria, Sweden, and, to a lesser degree, Canada share very similar
profiles. They are seen as reliable, trustworthy, and, to a lesser extent, reassuring. A
second tier of descriptors for the three countries includes transparent but also
unpredictable. Very few respondents (3% or less) associate these countries with
dangerous, corrupt, or unstable. Canada shows a slight advantage on three positive
attributes, with the three tied on the last.
Newer democracies Latvia and South Korea have vastly different profiles, with both most
associated with unpredictable. South Koreas second tier of descriptors includes a mix of
positive and negative associations: dangerous, trustworthy, and reliable. Latvia is not
highly associated with any other term, with trustworthy the only other to crack the double
digits. South Korea and Latvia are the only countries in the set to be associated with
unstable and dangerous, while also leading on corrupt.
Table 3.4: Governance Word Associations
Adjectives that most
accurately describe the
government
Reliable
Unpredictable
Transparent
Trustworthy
Dangerous
Corrupt
Reassuring
Unstable

Austria
%
23
7
9
21
*
*
11
*

Sweden
%
27
6
9
22
*
*
11
*

South Korea
%
11
17
6
11
12
8
6
8

Latvia
%
8
15
6
11
5
5
6
8

Canada
%
28
6
9
23
*
3
12
*

*2% or less

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4. Culture

Culture Index
SM

About the Culture Dimension of the Nation Brands Index :


The culture point of the hexagon is made up of three questions covering the following concepts:

The country excels at sports

The country has a rich cultural heritage

The country is an interesting and exciting place for contemporary culture such as music, films,
art and literature

The first question in this dimension focuses entirely on one of the widely recognized expressions of
modern culture sports. Countries that have had success in the Olympic Games and in international
soccer competitions tend to have the highest ratings for sports. The second concept, having rich cultural
heritage, focuses on the depth and richness of a countrys cultural history. This dimension is strongly
associated with the antiquity of the nation, where countries with older civilizations fare better. The final
concept, contemporary culture, refers both to modern mass media culture and to high culture.

As Table 4.1 illustrates, the Culture Index is one of the more egalitarian in NBI. The gap
between the worlds #1 Culture power, the United States, and the lowest-ranking nation, Iran,
is 26.67 points, compared to 39.11 points on Exports. As with last year, the top 10 includes
nations from four NBI regions, save for Africa and the Middle East. The top half includes all
regions, with Egypt occupying the 20th position. The United States retains its #1 position in
2011, expanding its lead over #2, France, by roughly half of a point. The U.S. has made
noticeable improvement on the cultural heritage question, a perennial weakness for the
nation (23rd this year, up from 26th in 2010) compared to its top ranks on both the sports and
contemporary culture questions. The next five nations hail from Western Europe, with the
UK (4th) making the longest strides, particularly in panel countries Canada, China, and Sweden.
The UK is up two positions, overtaking Germany (5th) and Spain (6th) with clear improvement
on sports excellence, as the country gears up for the 2012 Summer Olympics. By the same
token, #7, Japan, has improved its Culture score with a sizeable increase on sports, likely
fuelled by the countrys inspiring 2011 womens World Cup victory in July9. Rounding out the
top 10 are three of the BRICs China (8th), Russia (9th), and Brazil (10th) unchanged from last
year.

The World Cup final was held on July 17th. Fieldwork was conducted July 4th to July 25th.

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simon anholt
Table 4.1: Culture Index
2011 rank
order
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

2010 rank
order
1
2
3
6
4
5
7
8
9
10
11
13
12
14
15
17
16
18
20
19
21
22
24
23
27

Nation
United States
France
Italy
United Kingdom
Germany
Spain
Japan
China
Russia
Brazil
Canada
Australia
Holland
Argentina
Sweden
India
Austria
Scotland
Switzerland
Egypt
Mexico
Ireland
New Zealand
Denmark
South Africa

SM

2011 NBI
score
70.38
69.76
69.30
68.21
68.14
66.82
65.81
64.49
64.42
63.19
61.31
60.95
59.35
59.30
59.17
58.33
58.28
58.01
57.62
57.36
57.13
56.47
55.74
55.60
55.06

2011 rank
order
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
38
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50

2010 rank
order
29
25
26
28
30
31
32
34
37
36
35
38
40
39
41
42
45
43
46
n/a
n/a
48
47
49
50

Culture scores range from 1-100


*In 2010, Flanders was 44th and Romania was 33rd. These countries are not included in 2011.
The second tier between 11th and 20th represents an interesting mix of countries. The usual
top-tier rich and mostly mid-sized nations, such as Canada, Australia, Sweden, and Switzerland,
sit behind the emerging giant soft powers, namely Brazil and China, while other nations that
typically fall in the second tier, such as Holland and Austria, have kept similar slots on Culture.
In contrast, several nations generally ranking lower on other indices make an entrance among
this higher-tiered group, including Argentina, India, and Egypt. Situated in the heart of the
worlds largest religions, Egypt (20th), for example, has a clear bright Culture spot, taking 1st
position on the cultural heritage question.
Sitting in the 20s are a few Western countries with less recognized cultural distinctions, such as
New Zealand, Denmark, Belgium, and Finland. Most Central Eastern European countries are
bunched in the 30s, with Latvia dropping out of the tier at 46th. Asia-Pacific nations are more
dispersed, with East Asian and Oceanic nations tending to perform better on Culture than
Southeast Asian countries. For example, Japan (7th) and China (8th) reside in the top tier,
supported by top-five ranks on cultural heritage. South Korea, just outside the top half at 26th,
is up three positions, with improvements on the cultural questions (historic and
contemporary). In contrast, Southeast Asian nations, such as Malaysia (41st) and Indonesia
(43rd), reside in the bottom tier, pulled down by poor ranks on sports in particular.

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SM

Nation
2011 NBI score
South Korea
54.86
Belgium
54.61
Turkey
54.46
Finland
54.36
Poland
54.08
Czech Republic
53.59
Hungary
52.81
Peru
52.04
Thailand
51.64
Cuba
51.63
Chile
51.16
Slovakia
50.54
Kenya
50.47
Luxembourg
50.47
Singapore
50.04
Malaysia
48.94
Taiwan
48.90
Indonesia
48.77
Colombia
48.65
Nigeria
48.14
Latvia
47.90
Saudi Arabia
46.65
United Arab Emirates
46.45
Angola
44.15
Iran
43.71

simon anholt
Although developing nations tend to rank in the bottom half on Culture, these parts of the
world are catching up as evidenced by an incremental compression of the index scores. To wit:
the highest score gains this year have been among developing nations (16 of the top 20),
including Singapore (40th, up 1.32 points), Taiwan (42nd, up 1.19 points), and Colombia (44th, up
1.20 points). For example, Taiwan has seen marked improvement on the sports excellence
and contemporary culture questions, particularly from neighbours China, Japan, and South
Korea. In Latin America, Cuba (35th, up 1.07 points) has overtaken neighbour, Chile, with
marked improvement on contemporary culture.
Despite rich cultural heritage and emerging sporting brands, several African and Middle
Eastern nations, such as Iran (50th) and Nigeria (45th), find themselves in the bottom tier.
Bucking the trend somewhat, Kenya is a bright spot for the region, graduating out of the
bottom tier to 38th, with decisive gains on its singular cultural strength, world-class sports (18th
on this question).
Austrias Culture Rankings
Culture is one of Austrias weaker indices (17th). Not only does its most favourable ranking
barely crack the top ten (10th from Germany and Japan), Austria receives third-tier ranks, i.e. in
the 20s, from seven panel countries, more than any other index. Each of Austrias Western
European neighbours, save for Germany, ranks its Culture below 15th place. Eastern European
neighbours and Turkey, however, offer relatively strong ranks (ranging from 12th-13th).
The bright spots are China and Japan, both of which not only offer higher ranks on Culture
than any other Index (12th and 10th, respectively), but Japans rank is the only Asian-Pacific
Index rank in the top 10 for Austria. Despite strong roots in classical culture, Austrian culture is
appreciated by Japanese respondents for contemporary culture, ranking 6th.
Table 4.2: Culture - Austrias Rankings by 20 Panel Countries
Panel countries
Germany
Japan
China
Poland
Russia
Turkey
Canada
Italy
South Korea
Egypt

Austrias rank
10
10
12
12
13
13
14
16
16
17

Panel countries
United States
France
Sweden
Australia
Mexico
United Kingdom
Brazil
South Africa
Argentina
India

Austrias rank
17
18
18
20
20
21
22
22
24
25

Culture rankings range from 1-50


Culture: Question Rankings and Word Associations
Though one of Austrias weaker indices, the country fairs relatively well on the individual
Culture questions when compared to the competitive set. Recognized for its rich cultural roots

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and historic achievement, Austria leads the comparison set on cultural heritage. Though
Canada leads on contemporary culture, Austria is neck-and-neck with Sweden, at 14th.
Sports seem to take a toll on Austrias Culture ranking, at 20th and behind the competitive
set, save for Latvia.
There is no clear leader of the pack on all questions. Canada ranks highest on two of the
questions and is the only country to rank in the top tier on any Culture question, but its
cultural heritage rank is bested by both Sweden and Austria. Sweden does not lead on any
question, falling behind Canada on sports and contemporary culture and Austria on
cultural heritage. Looking at the average, that is, rankings on the Cultural Index overall,
Canada is the leader at 11th, but Sweden and Austria are quite competitive at 15th and 17th
respectively.
Table 4.3: Culture Question Rankings
Concept
This country excels at
sport
This country has a rich
cultural heritage
Interesting and exciting
place for contemporary
culture such as music,
films, art, and literature

Austria

Sweden

South Korea

Latvia

Canada

20

15

17

39

11

14

18

31

48

24

14

13

30

43

Table 4.4 shows why Austria is very competitive on the Culture Index: Austria is strongly
associated with museums and opera, both chosen by over one in four respondents.
Austria is associated with these activities more than any other comparison country, followed
fairly closely by Sweden and Canada on museums, and, a reflection of the popularity of the
Vienna State Opera, leading both by a large distance on opera. A second tier of descriptors
includes music and sculpture, slightly besting the competitive set on the latter. Despite
being the home to the Musikverein, music is not unique to Austria, tying with Sweden and
trailing Canada. Less than one in seven respondents associate Austria with film, despite
promotions of Austrias famed silent movies.
In terms of profile, Austria is most similar to Sweden, albeit with several exceptions. Austrias
association with opera is nearly double that of Sweden, and the country has a slight lead on
museums as well. Sweden, however, leads on pop videos, films, sports, and modern
design. Canada, with all double-digit associations, has the most diverse set of cultural
associations, associated with sports, films, museums, music, and modern design by
between one-quarter and one-third of respondents. Latvia, on the other hand, does not have
any strong associations; it is most associated with museums at 14%. South Korea shows
some strength in sports and films.
Table 4.4: Culture Word Associations
Cultural activity or
product most expected
to be produced in this
country
Opera
Pop Videos

Austria
%
26
8

Sweden
%
13
15

South Korea
%
5
11

Latvia
%
5
5

Canada
%
14
21

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simon anholt
Circus
Sculpture
Museums
Street Carnival
Films
Sports
Modern design
Music

9
18
31
10
13
15
13
20

8
17
28
10
19
21
24
20

9
10
15
12
17
20
15
15

8
9
14
8
6
8
5
8

13
16
27
13
29
33
24
25

*2% or less

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simon anholt

5. People

People Index
SM

About the People Dimension of the Nation Brands Index :


The people point of the hexagon is made up of three questions which explore the perceptions of the
people of a country from three different perspectives:

If I visited the country, the people would make me feel welcome

I would like to have a person from the country as a close friend

A well-qualified person from the country would be a valuable employee

The first concept how welcoming the people of a country are indicates perceptions of a countrys
overall friendliness and manners. It expands beyond tourism to serve as an indicator of what the
experience of interacting with the people of that country might be like. The second concept goes beyond
manners, encompassing characteristics that we want in our close friends fun, loyal, interesting, and in
many cases, sharing our interests. The last concept assesses whether the people of a country would be
valuable assets as employees. The responses to this question relate to preconceived notions of the
intelligence, competence, and work ethic of a countrys people.

Table 5.1 shows the 50 NBI target nations in rank order based on their People Index scores.
The People Index is distinguished from the other indices in that it has the smallest difference
between the best-ranking and worst-ranking nations scores, at 23.98. But unlike the Culture
Index, which showed a modest compression in scores between the top and bottom halves of
the index, we see largely the opposite pattern on the People Index: the score gap, especially
between the top and bottom tiers, is expanding. The top three largest gains, for example,
come from Western European nations in the top 20, the UK, Denmark, and Scotland, while all
but one score decline (Brazil) comes from a nation situated firmly in the bottom half.
Moreover, the People Index is one of the most volatile, having the largest number of nations
changing their rank position across the indices (29 nations).
The top 10 remains the same as in 2010, yet as with other tiers there have been some notable
movements. Canada and Australia retain the top two positions, and the U.S. holds onto the
3rd-place ranking that it assumed from Italy in 2010. Italy continues its slide this year, falling
one position to 5th (from 4th in 2010 and 3rd in 2009). Up two positions to 5th, the UK has seen
a marked increase in perceptions of having welcoming people, and in quite a few panel
countries especially China, South Korea, Egypt, and Brazil. In contrast, Germany (8th) has
slipped two positions on account of weaker scores on welcoming people, particularly in
South Korea and Egypt on this question.

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simon anholt
Table 5.1: People Index
2011 rank
order
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
16
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

2010 rank
order
1
2
3
6
4
5
8
6
9
10
12
13
11
15
18
14
17
16
19
20
22
21
23
25
24

Nation
Canada
Australia
United States
United Kingdom
Italy
Japan
Switzerland
Germany
Sweden
Spain
France
New Zealand
Holland
Scotland
Austria
Brazil
Finland
Ireland
Denmark
Belgium
Argentina
Luxembourg
Singapore
India
Mexico

SM

2011 NBI
score
68.72
67.62
66.85
66.70
66.58
66.39
65.90
65.84
65.73
65.20
64.90
64.68
64.64
63.77
62.88
62.84
62.84
62.82
62.69
61.40
60.17
59.96
59.37
59.18
58.93

2011 rank
order
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
44
46
47
48
49
50

2010 rank
order
26
30
27
29
32
33
35
36
31
34
28
37
39
38
40
41
44
n/a
46
45
47
48
49
n/a
50

People scores range from 1-100


*In 2010, Flanders was 42nd and Romania was 43rd. These countries are not included in 2011.
The top two tiers are dominated by Western Europe, North America, and Oceania. At 6th,
Japan is the only Asian nation in the top 20 and People represents its strongest index Japan is
#2 on having people other nations would want to employ even though the country has
slipped one index position this year. At 16th, Brazil is the only Latin American nation in the top
20, with a 7th-place rank on the welcoming people question. Denmark (19th) holds its
position this year, with a notable score rise of .88 points the second-largest gain on People
thanks to a double-digit rank gain in Turkey, but Egyptians still hold the cartoon grudge
against Denmark, ranking the nation dead last on People for the second year in a row.
Across the indices, we see much more variation in attitudes among panel countries. Animosity
between China and Japan, Turkey and the UK, and Egypt and Denmark are plainly evident on
People. Chinas tension with India is also reflected in a low 48thplace ranking China gives India
on People, compared to 18th for Russia and 21st for Brazil. Indians, for their part, are
noticeably cool toward Australia, ranking the nation a relatively low 20th, still smarting from
violence against Indians in the country in the recent past. On the other hand, we see emerging
partnerships, such as between Turkey and South Korea, and among IBSA partners India, Brazil,
and South Africa, reflected in mutual high rankings.

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SM

Nation
2011 NBI score
Poland
58.66
Thailand
58.61
Hungary
58.25
Russia
58.24
Turkey
57.74
Czech Republic
57.64
South Korea
57.40
China
57.37
South Africa
57.25
Malaysia
57.19
Egypt
56.96
Taiwan
56.74
Peru
56.71
Chile
56.66
Slovakia
56.05
Indonesia
55.87
Cuba
55.37
Latvia
54.23
Kenya
53.41
United Arab Emirates
53.41
Colombia
53.24
Saudi Arabia
51.35
Angola
50.64
Nigeria
50.49
Iran
44.74

simon anholt
Central European and Asian nations largely find themselves in the middle tiers, the 20s and
30s. The regions differ markedly in terms of trajectory, with the former showing very little
score improvements this year compared to noticeable bumps for several Asian nations.
Thailand (27th, up two positions) and South Korea (32nd, up three positions) have posted gains
across the questions that compose the People Index. Similarly, China has climbed three index
positions to 33rd due largely to a clear warming of perceptions on the welcoming people
question, especially in the UK, the U.S., and in BRIC partner nations including India.
Latin America has two loose tiers of countries, with Brazil (16th), Argentina (21st) and Mexico
(25th) in the top half and the remainder at 38th-place or worse. The poorest-ranked of the
group, Colombia (46th) and Cuba (42nd), however, have posted across-the-board improvements
on the index questions and narrowed the gap with their regional counterparts.
Nations from Africa and the Middle East are firmly situated in the bottom tiers, and their
scores have taken a modest turn for the worse this year as well. Still recovering from dramatic
events of the Spring and working to restore social and civic order, Egypt has seen the most
noticeable erosion. Now down eight positions and nearly one point in score, Egypt has seen a
significant drop on perceptions that people would want an Egyptian as a close friend a
feeling most evident in the U.S. and Germany, as well as in South Africa and India. Other
countries from the Middle East and Africa, such as Saudi Arabia and Angola, have little room to
drop, ranking poorly on each index question. Newcomers to this years survey, Latvia (43rd)
and Nigeria (49th) find themselves in a similar position.
Austrias People Rankings
At 15th, Austria narrowly bests Brazil and Finland on the People Index (by .04 points). As a
middling reputation dimension for Austria, the People Index does not show the strengths of
Governance and Immigration/Investment, nor the relative weaknesses of Exports, Culture, or
Tourism. Though, several panel countries do not share this perception; neighbours Poland and
Italy rank Austria lower on People than on any other dimension in the hexagon.
The range of rankings for Austria is the largest on People, with 20 points between top and
bottom. Once again, Austria receives its highest panel-country rank from Germany, at 6th.
After Germany, no other country ranks Austrians in the top tier. For the second time in NBI,
the U.S. joins Austrias more favourable rankers, bestowing 15th place. As in the other indices,
Western European countries are fairly mixed; following Germany is Sweden at 15th, the UK at
17th, Italy at 19th, and France outside the second tier at 21st. Austria receives its only index
rank outside the top half of countries, 26th, from India.
Table 5.2: People - Austrias Rankings by 20 Panel Countries
Panel countries
Germany
Russia
Canada
Sweden
United States

Austrias rank
6
11
15
15
15

Panel countries
Australia
South Korea
United Kingdom
South Africa
Argentina

Austrias rank
17
17
17
18
19

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simon anholt
China
Japan
Mexico
Poland
Turkey

16
16
16
16
16

Brazil
Egypt
Italy
France
India

19
19
19
21
26

People rankings range from 1-50


People: Question Rankings and Word Associations
Looking at the individual questions that comprise the People Index, it is clear that Austrias
People rank is largely driven by its excellence at creating a strong, well-qualified work force
(12th). In contrast, Austria does not rank as highly on the friendliness-related measures;
making people feel welcome (17th) and desire to have an Austrian as a friend (18th) a
pattern that largely holds across the panel countries. Of note, Polish respondents rank
Austrians employability 7th, 12 places ahead of their appeal as a close friend and 13 ahead of
their welcoming nature. Turks and Italians show a similar pattern, with Turks displaying as
much as an 18-place gap, and Italians a nine-place gap between the questions.
With two 1st-place ranks and one 3rd-place rank, Canada is by far the leader within the set.
Sweden follows with all top-tier ranks, excelling in making people feel welcome and in
employability. Austria leads South Korea and Latvia by a large margin on all questions. It is
important to point out, however, that countries which know Latvia rank it much higher on
employability than the 20-country average of 41st, e.g., Germany (22nd), Poland (25th), and
Sweden (29th). Latvia has also made inroads in the U.S., UK, and China, although Austria still
has a large margin over Latvia even in these strong markets for the latter. Like Austria, South
Koreas strength is in producing strong, well-qualified employees, relative to welcoming and
desirability as close friends.
Table 5.3: People Question Rankings
Concept
People would make you
feel welcome
Like to have a person
from this country as a
close friend
Willing to employ a
well-qualified person
from this country

Austria

Sweden

South Korea

Latvia

Canada

17

39

44

18

10

36

44

12

24

41

Table 5.4 shows the percentage of panellists who believe that each adjective describes a
countrys inhabitants. Around one in four respondents associate Austrians as being hardworking, honest, and skilful, supporting their employability ranking. A second tier of
descriptors includes rich, tolerant, and fun. Though associated mostly with positive
attributes, none is exclusive to Austria; Canada leads on honest and skilful, and South
Korea on hard-working.
Austria is not highly associated with any negative attribute, the most substantial being
unreliable and aggressive, neither unique to Austria. Both Latvia and South Korea garner
8% associations with unreliable, and South Korea 9% for aggressive. Of note, Austria has

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simon anholt
the lowest association with lazy among the set and ties with Sweden for lowest on
ignorant.
In terms of profile, Austria most resembles Sweden as an honest and hardworking, yet fun and
tolerant nation. Though, Sweden has higher associations across the board, with the most
notable being honest, skilful, tolerant, and rich. Austrians are also slightly less
associated with lazy, and more associated with aggressive.
Table 5.4: People Word Associations
Adjectives that describe
the people of each
country
Honest
Hard-Working
Lazy
Ignorant
Unreliable
Skilful
Fun
Tolerant
Rich
Aggressive

Austria
%
23
28
*
*
4
23
11
13
13
3

Sweden
%
29
30
3
*
4
27
12
17
17
*

South Korea
%
15
40
3
6
8
26
8
10
6
9

Latvia
%
11
18
4
5
8
11
7
7
3
4

Canada
%
31
33
3
3
3
30
18
21
19
3

*2% or less

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simon anholt

6. Tourism

Tourism Index
SM

About the Tourism Dimension of the Nation Brands Index :


The tourism point of the hexagon is made up of four questions which measure several concepts that
indicate the strength of a countrys brand as a tourist destination:

Would like to visit the country if money were no object

The country is rich in natural beauty

The country is rich in historic buildings and monuments

The country has a vibrant city life and urban attractions

The first component of the tourism hexagon point measures a countrys tourism potential by asking
panellists to evaluate their interest in tourist destinations without considering the practical restraints of
distance and cost. The following three questions address the three most important qualities that
vacationers look for in a destination. The natural beauty of a country can refer to attractive beaches,
pristine wilderness, serene farmland, natural wonders, or any variety of landscapes that make a location
desirable. The ancient ruins, architectural assets, and historic landmarks that make certain countries
prime tourism locales are included in the historic buildings and monuments concept. The third question
assesses the contribution of a nations cities to its tourism image.

For the first time since 2008, the top three Tourism slots are not monopolized by Southern
European destinations around the Mediterranean. Italy and France still lead but economically
troubled Spain has slipped to #5, overtaken by the United States (3rd) and the UK (4th). In the
lead-up to the 2012 Olympics, host country the UK has seen noticeable improvements on the
visit if money were no object and vibrant cities questions. Natural disasters and their
aftermath have moved Japan down one position to 9th overtaken by Germany; and social
unrest and risks have knocked Egypt (11th) outside the top 10, trading places with peaceful
Switzerland (10th).
Of note, the top five on Tourism accounted for some of the largest shares of tourist arrivals in
2010, according to UNWTO10. However, perceptions diverge from reality when it comes to
China (3rd in 2010 arrivals, 19th on Tourism), Turkey (7th in 2010 arrivals, 28th on Tourism), and
Malaysia (9th in 2010 arrivals, 35th on Tourism)11, due to bottom-half ranks on several

10

UNWTO Tourism Highlights. UNWTO, Accessed Sept. 14th, 2011.

11

Tourism. Wikipedia, Accessed August 19th, 2011

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simon anholt
questions that make up the index, such as natural beauty and would like to visit if money
were no object.
Table 6.1: Tourism Index
2011 rank
order
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

2010 rank
order
1
2
4
5
3
6
7
9
8
11
10
12
13
14
15
17
16
18
19
21
20
22
23
25
24

Nation
Italy
France
United States
United Kingdom
Spain
Australia
Canada
Germany
Japan
Switzerland
Egypt
Scotland
Brazil
Sweden
Holland
New Zealand
Austria
Ireland
China
Russia
Mexico
India
Denmark
Argentina
Thailand

SM

2011 NBI
score
75.68
74.44
72.69
72.18
71.97
70.94
70.51
69.90
69.47
69.34
68.38
67.83
67.54
67.19
67.02
66.82
66.75
65.97
65.80
64.75
64.68
64.09
63.75
63.71
63.42

2011 rank
order
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50

2010 rank
order
26
27
28
29
30
31
34
32
35
32
36
37
38
42
39
41
43
44
46
n/a
47
48
n/a
49
50

Tourism scores range from 1-100


*In 2010, Flanders was 45th and Romania was 40th. These countries are not included in 2011.
Some top-ranking nations have well-balanced profiles, including Italy and France, which rank in
the top 10 on all index questions. Other nations trade on particular strengths, suffering
deficits on at least one question. For example, the UK ranks in the top six on three questions
yet the countrys reputation for overcast weather perhaps overshadows its natural beauty
(22nd). Australias 6th-place rank on Tourism is anchored in top ranks on visit if money were
no object and natural beauty but a 29th-place rank on historic buildings depresses its
overall position. Japan is credited with having some of the worlds most vibrant cities (5th on
this question) and historic buildings (10th) but it ranks lower on natural beauty (24th). In
several cases, nations ranked in the middle tiers perform very well on one or two dimensions,
such as top-10 ranks on historic buildings for the homes of the Great Wall, the Kremlin, and
Taj Mahal, but the overall positions of China, Russia, and India still just hover around the 20th
mark.
There is somewhat more dispersion in Tourism ranks by region compared to other indices, as
all regions have at least one representative nation in both the top and bottom halves of the

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Nation
2011 NBI score
Finland
63.10
Belgium
62.28
Turkey
62.19
Peru
61.50
Singapore
60.96
Luxembourg
60.20
Hungary
59.56
Poland
59.53
South Africa
59.47
Malaysia
59.20
Chile
58.75
Czech Republic
58.62
Indonesia
58.49
Cuba
57.47
Taiwan
57.41
South Korea
57.12
Slovakia
55.71
Colombia
54.99
United Arab Emirates
53.85
Latvia
53.24
Kenya
53.06
Saudi Arabia
51.76
Nigeria
48.54
Angola
48.17
Iran
44.78

simon anholt
index often two or three. Western Europe is spread between Italy (1st) and Luxembourg
(31st); the Asia-Pacific ranges from 6th (Australia) and 9th (Japan) to 40th (Taiwan) and 41st
(South Korea); Russia provides the best rank for Central and Eastern Europe (20th), while Latvia
offers the worst (45th); Latin America ranges from 13th (Brazil) to 43rd (Colombia); and Africa
and the Middle East is spread between 11th (Egypt) to 50th (Iran).
As Tourism arrivals in 2010 show a reversal of decline compared to the previous year,
according to the 2011 UNWTO report, Tourism Index scores, on average, have grown
compared to previous years and perceptions on Tourism have improved across a diverse set of
nations. Four of the top 10 movers hail from Latin America, including Cuba and Argentina with
the largest improvements of the group, at 1.18 and .88 points, respectively. Cuba, known for
both natural beauty and vibrant coastal cities, has graduated from the bottom tier, its 39th rank
on Tourism second only to its Culture rank (35th). Despite somewhat relaxed travel restrictions
to its neighbouring country, the U.S. has shown just a slight improvement, still ranking Cuba
low at 45th. This is in contrast to an interesting mix of countries Argentina, Italy, and Turkey
which give Cuba high rankings in the 20s. Much improvement of Cubas tourism reputation
has also been registered among Brazilian panellists. In terms of desire to visit a country if
money were no object the closest question gauging intent to travel the largest gains have
been registered by the UK, Thailand, Colombia, Cuba, and Argentina.
Austrias Tourism Rankings
At 17th, Tourism ties with Exports and Culture as Austrias weakest indices, although out of the
three, panel-country ranks are a bit more favourable on Tourism: Austria receives 10 ranks
that are 15th place or better and only four third-tier ranks on Tourism. Once again, Austria
receives its highest panel-rank from Germany (9th), and its lowest from India (24th).
As on other indices, Western European countries have diverse opinions of Austrias tourism
appeal. The UK is among Austrias top-raters on Tourism offering its highest rank across the
indices, largely driven by appreciation for Austrias natural beauty. Fellow Alpine competitor
Italy, however, ranks Austrias Tourism 16th, largely dragged by the countrys natural beauty.
Table 6.2: Tourism - Austrias Rankings by 20 Panel Countries
Panel countries
Germany
Russia
Japan
United Kingdom
South Korea
Canada
China
Poland
Sweden
Turkey

Austrias rank
9
11
12
13
14
15
15
15
15
15

Panel countries
Australia
Italy
United States
Egypt
Mexico
South Africa
Argentina
France
Brazil
India

Austrias rank
16
16
17
18
19
19
21
21
22
24

Tourism rankings range from 1-50

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Tourism: Question Rankings and Word Associations
As Table 6.3 demonstrates, Austrias appeal as a travel destination is driven by its historic
buildings and monuments and natural beauty, indicating appreciation for the Austrian Alps
and churches, as well as Viennese splendour of the empire past. Though, as mentioned,
neighbouring Italians feel differently about Austrias natural beauty, offering stronger ranks on
the other three questions, as do the nearby Polish. Appreciation for Austrian monuments is
fairly widespread, with ranks ranging from 8th (Germany) to 17th (distant India). Austria ranks
16th on the overall desire to visit if money were no object question, suffering the most in
Latam countries, India, and Poland. Austrias city life of present day is also not particularly
recognized.
Within the competitive set, Canada has an advantage on the Index, except for historic
buildings on which it trails Austria by fully 15 positions and places behind Sweden. Austria
and Sweden are very competitive: Austria places well ahead on historic buildings and just
behind on natural beauty, but Austria trails Sweden by three places on vibrancy and five
on desire to visit if money were no object.
Table 6.3: Tourism Question Rankings
Concept
Strongly like to visit if
money was no object
This country is rich in
natural beauty
This country is rich in
historic buildings and
monuments
This country has a
vibrant city life and
urban attractions

Austria

Sweden

South Korea

Latvia

Canada

16

11

41

46

13

12

44

46

12

21

37

44

27

16

13

30

45

Table 6.4 shows the adjectives that are most commonly associated with the experience of
visiting each country. Among all traits, Austria is most readily associated with fascinating,
followed by educational, and, to a lesser extent, romantic, exciting, and relaxing. All of
which, save for romantic, are not unique to Austria. The birthplace of Vienna waltz, Austria
leads on romantic, with Sweden and Canada trailing. Canada takes the lead on the
remaining positive attributes, tying with Austria and South Korea on spiritual (though, none
is particularly high).
In terms of negative attributes, 7% of respondents associate Austria with boring, although
hardly any with depressing or stressful. Latvia and South Korea are both more highly
associated with boring and depressing in the comparison set. While Austria, Sweden and
Canada are hardly associated with risky (3%), 15% of respondents believe South Korea to be
risky, by far the comparison sets highest association with a negative attribute. South Korea
is also most highly associated with stressful, with Austria garnering the lowest association
with that term.

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Table 6.4: Tourism Word Associations
Adjectives that describe
the experience of
visiting each country
Romantic
Depressing
Exciting
Boring
Fascinating
Risky
Educational
Stressful
Spiritual
Relaxing

Austria
%
20
3
20
7
26
3
23
*
6
18

Sweden
%
17
*
23
6
26
3
23
3
5
22

South Korea
%
5
7
20
8
20
15
19
9
6
7

Latvia
%
6
7
12
12
14
8
13
4
4
7

Canada
%
16
*
32
5
33
3
26
3
6
25

*2% or less

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7. Immigration/Investment

Immigration/Investment Index
SM

About the Immigration/Investment Dimension of the Nation Brands Index :


The immigration/investment point of the hexagon measures the potential of a country as a place to live,
work, study, and invest in. This dimension asks about five components of a countrys potential for
immigration and investment:

Willingness to live and work for a substantial period in the country

Quality of life

Good place to study for educational qualifications

The country has businesses Id like to invest in

Equal opportunity

The component questions of this hexagon point are designed to capture a countrys power to attract
talent and capital through immigration and investment. With most international migration being
primarily motivated by work or educational opportunities, the first and third questions reflect a potential
immigrants interest and willingness to move to a foreign country for a substantial period of time. The
quality of life in a nation and its equal opportunities are also central concerns for anyone contemplating
living in a new country. The final aspect of this dimension measures the perception of a countrys
economic prosperity and business opportunity, both powerful draws on human capital and financial
investment.

After considerable place trading between 2009 and 2010, the top 10 tier on Immigration and
Investment has stabilized, with all 10 nations keeping their ranks identical to 2010.
The United States retains top position, expanding the lead over 2nd-place Canada the top
spot occupant in 2008 and 2009 by roughly half of a point this year (.52). The U.S. has
improved on its perennial weakness commitment to equality in society, in particular in
Turkey, China, Argentina, as well as in its southern neighbour Mexico.
The UK and Germany, having moved ahead of Switzerland (and France in the case of Germany)
the previous year, have kept their 3rd and 4th positions.
Australia, remaining in 7th place, has posted a score gain of .41, resulting in a narrowing of the
gap with 6th place France, albeit not large enough to surpass it. Japan at 10th rounds out the
group, holding its position and in fact creating a wider buffer against Holland at 11th, which has
dropped .24 points especially on the desirable place to live and work and quality of life
questions perhaps reflecting the countrys tightened social policies and growing antiimmigrant sentiment.

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Table 7.1: Immigration/Investment Index
2011 rank
order
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25

2010 rank
order
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
14
12
13
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
25
26

Nation
United States
Canada
United Kingdom
Germany
Switzerland
France
Australia
Sweden
Italy
Japan
Holland
Austria
Spain
New Zealand
Denmark
Scotland
Finland
Belgium
Luxembourg
Ireland
Singapore
Brazil
Poland
Russia
Argentina

SM

2011 NBI
score
68.23
67.34
66.67
66.32
65.97
65.21
64.54
63.96
62.37
62.06
60.61
59.53
59.49
59.32
59.24
58.29
58.01
57.06
56.49
56.21
51.43
50.54
49.78
49.69
49.49

2011 rank
order
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50

2010 rank
order
24
27
30
34
29
31
32
33
35
36
40
37
n/a
43
42
41
44
45
39
47
46
48
49
n/a
50

Immigration/Investment scores range from 1-100


*In 2010, Flanders was 28th and Romania was 38th. These countries are not included in 2011.
Austria, with its sound economic performance rare in the Euro zone, has jumped two positions
to 12th, with slight improvements on perceptions of equality and educational opportunities.
On the other hand, with the regions highest unemployment rate, Spain has slipped nearly half
of a point, moving down one position to 13th mirroring the countrys slide elsewhere in NBI
with clear declines on quality of life and business investment questions. Respondents
from fellow European countries France, Sweden, and Poland account for a significant portion
of Spains downward movement on this index. The remainder of the top 20 nations is made of
smaller high-income Western European countries and New Zealand. Ireland, despite its
financial debacle, has managed to hang on to the 20th rank, the lowest of all Western European
countries, yet still ahead of the up and coming Singapore (21st) by a wide margin of 4+ points.
However, Singapore is narrowing that gap significantly. Ranked #1 in the World Banks Doing
Business 2011, the small city state is up three-quarters of a point on this index, with wellrounded gains on all questions.
Singapore (noted above) and Brazil, with drastically different population and territory sizes,
but both benefiting from attractive social policies and sound economies, are at the head of the
developing country half of the world. Among this half, China shows another impressive

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Nation
2011 NBI score
Hungary
49.26
Czech Republic
48.84
South Korea
48.27
China
47.03
United Arab Emirates
46.95
Slovakia
46.43
Taiwan
46.42
Turkey
46.39
Mexico
45.61
Malaysia
45.44
Thailand
45.27
Chile
44.98
Latvia
44.56
South Africa
44.53
India
44.23
Saudi Arabia
43.40
Peru
43.37
Indonesia
43.16
Egypt
43.03
Cuba
41.04
Colombia
40.32
Kenya
37.70
Angola
36.53
Nigeria
35.53
Iran
32.63

simon anholt
upward march of four ranks, with dramatic improvement on the quality of life and
educational qualifications questions, but it has not made progress on perceptions of equal
opportunity nor has it increased others desire to work and live in the country. Russia, on the
other hand, shows clear gains in perceptions of equality, along with those of quality of life,
pushing the nation up a rank. While India is still low at 40th, it too is up .62 points, passing
Saudi Arabia and Egypt, having improved on the quality of life question. Of note, the BRICs
have variable strengths: China ranks highest for business investment, Russia for educational
qualifications (ahead of China by one position), and Brazil for quality of life, desire to live and
work, and equality dimensions. All rank in the bottom half on equality a historic weakness
for each that high growth has not fully ameliorated.
Although most emerging economies and developing nations reside in the bottom tiers, the
rate of growth both in terms of hard metrics such as GDP, as well as perceptions among
global citizens is clearly evident. Seven nations have posted score gains of one point or
more, and the top 14 fastest-growing nations on Immigration/Investment all come from
developing regions. This includes Thailand, up several positions including on the quality of
life and equality questions; and South Africa, which has passed IBSA partner India. South
Africas rise has been driven by decisive gains on both quality of life and educational
qualifications questions, the latter particularly driven by European nations France, Germany,
and Italy. Although Turkey (33rd) has moved little on this index, its mediating role between
East and West is underscored by improvements in a diverse set of panel countries, including
Egypt and China (as in 2010) as well as the UK and South Africa.
One notable downward movement is with post-revolution Egypt, losing its 2010 lead over six
nations including Saudi Arabia, as the country continues to restore stability and investor
confidence. Neighbouring UAE has also slipped two ranks. In Central Eastern Europe, Hungary
(26th) has seen its three rank lead over Czech Republic (27th) narrow, while Slovakia remains
four positions behind Czech Republic. In Latin America, except for Argentinas rise of one rank,
Chile, Mexico, Peru have kept their relative positions while Cuba (45th) has leaped over
Colombia (46th).

Austrias Immigration/Investment Rankings


At 12th, Immigration and Investment is tied with Governance for Austrias strongest dimension.
However, while global citizens rank Austrias Governance and Immigration/Investment equally,
several panel countries see Immigration/Investment as a weaker dimension. For instance, Italy
places Austria 15th on Immigration/Investment, five positions below its Governance rank and
while Germany offers equal ranks (3rd) on both indices for Austria, the ratings differ greatly
(over a four-point difference in favour of Governance).
With a high rank of 3rd from Germany and only one rank in the 20s (20th from India),
Immigration and Investment appeal in Austria is recognized by a diverse set of countries.
South Africa and Egypt are two of Austrias more favourable raters on this index, ranking the
country 13th and 14th respectively. At the other end of the spectrum, both the UK and France

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are among the countrys harsher critics; ranking Austria 17th and 18th respectively, so is the U.S.
which provides Austria with its third worst rank on the Index, 17th.
Table 7.2: Immigration/Investment - Austrias Rankings by 20 Panel Countries
Panel countries
Germany
Russia
Poland
South Africa
Sweden
China
Egypt
Japan
Mexico
Turkey

Austrias rank
3
9
11
13
13
14
14
14
14
14

Panel countries
Argentina
Canada
Italy
South Korea
Australia
Brazil
United Kingdom
United States
France
India

Austrias rank
15
15
15
15
16
16
17
17
18
20

Immigration/Investment rankings range from 1-50

Immigration/Investment: Question Rankings and Word Associations


From Table 7.3 we see that Austrias high Immigration and Investment rank is well-rounded,
with ranks in the front of the second tier on all five questions and ranging from 11th-14th.
Austrias strong academic institutions are most recognized (11th on good place to study for
educational qualifications), trailing Italy for a top-tier spot. The country receives its two lowest
ranks on willingness to live and work and has businesses Id like to invest in, though
respondents in Germany and Russia see the former as Austrias top strength in the Index
(ranking 3rd and 9th, respectively).
Looking at the comparative set, Canada, once again, has a clear advantage ranking 1st on
willing to live and work and cares about equality, and within the top five on the remaining
questions. Sweden follows, with all top 10 ranks and a sterling 2nd place on cares about
equality. Austria is not far behind Sweden, save for cares about equality, which is a 10
position gap. South Korea trails Austria by a large margin, although on the business
investment question, it gets higher rankings than 25th from important trading partners
including Australia, China, India, Japan, Russia, and Mexico. Latvia rounds out the group with
two bottom-tier ranks but its ranking on cares about equality rivals that of South Korea, in
the 20s.
Table 7.3: Immigration/Investment Question Rankings
Concept
Willing to live and work
for a substantial period
in this country
High quality of life
Good place to study for
educational
qualifications

Austria

Sweden

South Korea

Latvia

Canada

14

35

43

13

28

34

11

25

36

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Has businesses Id like
to invest in
Cares about equality in
society

14

25

43

12

29

28

Table 7.4 shows the adjectives that are most commonly selected to describe each countrys
current economic and business conditions. All comparison countries have some association
with stagnant, and declining, although the association is stronger with Austria and Latvia.
Canada and Sweden are the two countries in the set with no association with being isolated.
Latvia and South Korea are the only countries with associations of backward.
Canada and Sweden share very similar profiles, both differing from Austria on the same
attributes; in general, Canada and Sweden are seen as more forward-thinking and modern
than Austria, and less stagnant, isolated, and developing.
Table 7.4: Immigration/Investment Word Associations
Adjective that describes
each countrys current
economic and business
conditions
Backward
Developing
Forward-Thinking
Ambitious
Modern
Declining
Isolated
Stagnant

Austria
%
*
12
15
10
23
3
3
8

Sweden
%
*
10
20
10
29
3
*
4

South Korea
%
5
19
15
14
15
3
4
4

Latvia
%
8
19
7
7
9
5
6
7

Canada
%
*
10
21
10
29
3
*
5

*2% or less

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8. Nations Momentum Analysis

Generational Momentum: Overall NBI Score by Age Groups


On the surface, and from year to year, a nations overall reputation rank is quite stable. The
last four NBI studies with 200 measurements have produced only two year-on-year NBI
rank changes greater than five, both brought on by historic moments. The election of the first
African American President in the United States moved the country up six positions in 2009.
The post-revolution uncertainty of the largest Arab country in a volatile region brought Egypt
down six positions in 2011.
Digging beneath the surface, this report has discussed meaningful changes for individual
nations in the 2011 study. And taking a long term view, we have observed that the NBI world
order is gradually shifting, evident, among other things, in the large gains by a number of
developing countries around the world. Further, we believe it is important not only for nations
to benchmark where they are today, but where they stand in the eyes of the next generation,
if for no other reason than there is always a new generation of students, consumers, investors,
and tourists some with differing attitudes and behaviours than their elders preparing to
take charge.
New for 2011, Table 8.1 shows the 50 nations overall NBI score plotted by key age groups.
The slope of the line shows a nations generational momentum. These three age cohorts are
defined by the world view of their generation where impressions of nations were formed
and reinforced. The first generation (45+) came of age during the Cold War and post-colonial
independence; the second generation (30-44) grew up as the bi-polar global order crumbled,
democracy spread and globalization marched; the youngest generation (18-29) is the furthest
away from the East and West division and the most familiar with borderless digital networks
and non-state terrorism.
The most noticeable trend from Table 8.1 is that nations in the top half of the NBI league
mainly Western advanced economies and mutual democracies almost all have downward
generational momentum, as evidenced by the line sloping from left to right, that is, their
scores are the highest for the Cold War Generation and lowest for the Digital Generation.
Counter-intuitively, the flatter lines appear to be for countries currently mired in financial and
economic problems, particularly in southern Europe: Spain, Italy, France, Ireland, as well as
Belgium. Japan, also troubled by stagnation, shows a similar flat pattern. It is possible that it is
not that these nations have strong good will with the young, but the older generation has
more critical views. For Western countries with steeper declining slopes, such as Canada
and Sweden, the overwhelmingly positive views from the older generation have not been
passed on to the young, suggesting a lack of appreciation of these strong nation brands by the
Digital Generation.

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As we go through the table to lower ranked nations, the clear demarcation sits with Brazil,
where downward and flat slopes of nations before Brazil start to reverse. The BRICs stand out
for having positive momentum, with the Digital Generation giving the highest scores and the
Cold War Generation the lowest. All five Central Eastern European nations have flat
momentum; to the South, Turkey, by contrast, has a clear positive slope. In Asia, Indonesia
and Malaysia have stronger upward momentum, whereas the tiger economies are flatter. In
Latin America, the lowest ranked countries, Colombia and Cuba, have least positive receptions
from the worlds older generation, whereas the youngest generation is not as critical as their
elders.
African and Middle Eastern nations mostly have steep positive slopes, as the worlds Digital
Generation is much more optimistic than the previous two generations about these regions.
Looking at Austria, we see that although the country enjoys an overall NBI rank in the top 15,
younger generations are somewhat less positive in their praise. However, this trend is not
unique to Austria; nearby countries France, Germany, and Italy show a negative trajectory, as
do other affluent smaller countries, such as Belgium and Scotland.

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Table 8.1: Overall NBI Plotted by Oldest to Youngest Cohorts: 45+, 30-44, 18-29
U.S. 68.88

Germany 67.85

UK 67.39

France 66.96

Japan 66.72

Canada 66.44

Italy 65.58

Australia 64.89

Switzerland 64.86

Sweden 63.87

Spain 63.21

Holland 62

Austria 60.81

N. Zealand 60.43

Scotland 60.3

Denmark 59.89

Finland 59.37

Ireland 58.64

Belgium 58.23

Brazil 57.91

Russia 57

Luxembourg 56.18

China 55.79

Argentina 55.28

Singapore 54.79

Poland 54.04

South Korea 54.02

India 53.95

Hungary 53.44

Mexico 53.24

Czech Rep. 53.13

Turkey 52.97

Egypt 52.36

Thailand 52.16

Taiwan 51.86

S. Africa 51.36

Malaysia 51.09

Slovakia 50.82

Chile 50.76

Peru 50.55

Indonesia 49.54

UAE 49.17

Latvia 48.7

Cuba 48.07

Saudi Arabia 46.95

Colombia 46.78

Kenya 45.77

Nigeria 43.09

Angola 42.89

Iran 39.59

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simon anholt
Future Influence on Trade and Economics
New for 2011, Table 8.2 shows the 50 nations scores on two questions assessing national
momentum on world trade and economics over the next 10 years. The left column shows
nations rank-ordered by strongest to weakest future influence. The right column shows
nations rank-ordered by perceived positive or negative influence on the respondents
country. With a line connecting the same nation on the left and the right columns, the slope of
the line indicates whether the magnitude of the influence ranks more or less on the same level
as the receptivity to that influence. The blue lines indicate a positive disparity, that is, that
nations positive influence ranks higher among the 50 nations than the magnitude of its
influence. Conversely, the red lines indicate that the nations global influence growth outranks
its positive impact on the respondents countries.
Major developing economies are largely seen as growing influences on the global economy,
but the worlds citizens are less positive about some of these influences on their own
countries. For example, Chinas influence will have the strongest growth by far; however, it
has a strong good will deficit, a steep red line indicating a drop of 11 places when it comes to
the rank of perceived positive influence on the respondents country. India, ranked 7th for
strong influence growth, has a good will deficit of 12 positions as well. Russia ranks 10th for
strong growth of influence but, unlike export-driven and energy-hungry China and India,
positive receptivity of Russias influence ranks only six places behind. Saudi Arabia has by far
the largest good will deficit, its steep red slope indicating global citizens concerns about
energy security. Among top ranked non-Western economies, Brazil bucks the trend: its
growing influence ranks 13th, lowest among BRIC, but it ranks 11th for positive influence, just
edging out China for the leading position among BRIC. Lower on the influence growth list,
some other developing economies such as Argentina, Turkey, South Africa and Mexico also
have an upward slope towards positive impact on respondents countries.
The top 20 growing influences are split almost evenly between old money Western market
economies on the one hand, and on the other, high-tech Asian economies of South Korea,
Singapore, and Taiwan and oil rich states of UAE and Saudi Arabia, together with BRIC. Not
surprisingly, eight Western European countries fail to make the cut, with Ireland ranking as low
as 36th. Interestingly, almost all Western market economies beleaguered as they are seem
to manage an upward tilt towards their positive influence on respondents countries, an
important attitudinal equity to safeguard. Austria is no exception.
Interestingly, while respondents in each panel country rank their nations influence as a net
positive, many are unsure of their own nations contribution to the worlds economy in the
coming years. For example, Italians rank Italy a low 26th; Poles and Egyptians rank their
respective countries 23rd and 17th. Shockingly, Japanese rank Japan 50th, in stark contrast to
global citizens ranking of 2nd for the home of Toyota, Sony and Nintendo a gloomy national
mood reflecting years of domestic economic malaise, made worse by the enormous loss and
hardship this year resulting from natural and man-made disasters.

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Table 8.2: Future Influence on Trade and Economics
Q54: Countrys influence in next 10 years on
world trade and economics...
Stronger (7) ... Weaker (1)

Q55: Countrys influence in next 10 years on


world trade and economics FOR MY COUNTRY...
Positive (7) ... Negative (1)

China 5.53
Japan 5.02
Germany 4.95
United States 4.81
Canada 4.73
United Kingdom 4.69
India 4.68
Aus tralia 4.67
Switzerland 4.65
Russia 4.61
France 4.59
South Korea 4.58
Brazil 4.57
Sweden 4.55
UAE 4.52
Singapore 4.48
Taiwan 4.41
Saudi Arabia 4.4
Holland 4.39
New Zealand 4.39
Italy 4.38
Denmark 4.33
Finland 4.32
Aus tria 4.31
Spain 4.31
Belgium 4.25
Scotland 4.21
Thailand 4.21
Luxembourg 4.19
Malaysia 4.19
Argentina 4.18
Turkey 4.17
South Africa 4.16
Indonesia 4.12
Mexico 4.11
Ireland 4.1
Poland 4.1
Czech Republic 4.05
Hungary 4.05
Chile 4.01
Egypt 3.97
Slovakia 3.96
Latvia 3.87
Peru 3.85
Colombia 3.83
Cuba 3.77
Iran 3.7
Kenya 3.7
Nigeria 3.59
Angola 3.56

4.71
4.70
4.65
4.64
4.62
4.54
4.54
4.51
4.48
4.46
4.43
4.41
4.40
4.37
4.36
4.36
4.33
4.33
4.33
4.33
4.31
4.30
4.28
4.28
4.27
4.26
4.24
4.21
4.20
4.20
4.20
4.18
4.17
4.17
4.16
4.15
4.15
4.13
4.13
4.13
4.10
4.06
4.06
4.02
3.99
3.96
3.93
3.85
3.83
3.67

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9. Overall Reputational Assessment

How the World Sees Austria


Austria is highly-rated by the connected citizens of the world. It is at the front of the 2nd tier,
ranking 13th out of 50 nations. Moreover, its image is well balanced, with all six indices ranking
in the second tier. The 2011 Nation Brand Hexagon diagram below shows the elements that
comprise Austrias well-balanced image. Austria is seen as a top destination for talent and
investment, providing support for them to succeed and grow, from social equality, high quality
of education, fairness for all citizens, a well-trained workforce, as well as a competent
government. In general, perceptions of Austrias rich heritage slightly outrank its image of
contemporary cultural achievement and innovation, leaving room for improvement in Exports,
Culture, and Tourism.
Figure 9.1: Global NBI Hexagon

The Nation Brand Hexagon


2000 Simon Anholt

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Strengths and Weaknesses by Survey Country
The mini-hexagons for each of the survey countries illustrate the level of image consistency
across the survey countries. The well-balanced image of Austria at the global level is also seen
in most individual survey countries. The almost solid hexagon for Germany indicates that
Austria has cemented a strong relationship with its close neighbour and power-player; the
same is true with emerging power-house Russia. Overall, most of the countries hexagons are
evenly filled, the most notable exception being Argentina, and Turkey to a lesser extent: while
the north section of the hexagon is largely white, the northeast section is mostly filled,
indicating Argentineans approve the Austrian government but have not learned to appreciate
the countrys exports and innovation. In contrast, the fill in the northern section of the
hexagon is extended upward in the U.S., indicating Americans praises for Austrian Exports.
While Indias hexagon is evenly distributed, the fill is evenly shrunken, indicating the countrys
consistently low opinion of Austria.
Figure 9.2: Country Hexagons

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Global Reputation Consistency of Austria


The box and whisker graph shows a nations image consistency across each of the indices,
using the ranks for the 20 core NBI panel countries. Image consistency is judged by the height
of the overall bar for each index, that is, the variability of the 20 ranks from panel countries, as
well as the heights of each of the quartiles, that is, the length of the whiskers of the top five
and the bottom five panel countries, and the length of the box including the rankings from
the middle 10 countries.
Notably, Austrias strong Immigration and Investment rank is driven by a few favourable panel
countries, with a large spread among its top-five ranking countries and fairly little among the
remaining 15. Austria shows the longest whiskers on the People Index, indicating diverse
opinion at either end, though the middle 10 ranks are fairly compressed. The opposite is true
for Culture: while the top- and bottom-five ranks are clustered tightly, the middle ranks show a
large degree of variability.
Figure 9.3: Distribution of NBI and Hexagon Rankings of Austria

Overall

Exports

Governance

Culture

People

Tourism

Immigration/
Investment

10

Rankings

20

30

40

50

Note: Column lines show the spread in rankings provided by the 20 core survey countries. In
general, the first five highest ranking countries (the first quartile) are represented by the line
above the box; ten countries (the second and third quartiles) are represented in the box; and
the last five lowest ranking countries (the fourth quartile) are represented by the line below
the box.

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Outcome Driver Analysis
The outcome driver analysis identifies which NBISM attributes have the most impact on the
global favourable impression of Austria in terms of feeling good about buying Austrian
products. The independent variables are the 22 attributes that make up the Nation Brands
Index; these are coloured by dimension in the driver analysis charts below12.
The most important driver of Austrian product appeal, by a good margin, is a creative place
with cutting edge ideas, which accounts for almost a quarter of the variance. That the
country is considered a major contributor to science and technology is second most
important. Together, at 40% of the variance, innovation driven by creativity and solid science
and technology leads to consumers positive view of Austrian products. The second tier of
most important drivers shows that good governance and general quality of life of the country
also affect the good will towards Austrian products: respondents who perceive Austria as a
country with a competent, fair government that respects its citizens, treats them well, and
offers a high quality of life are more likely to say they feel good buying products from Austria.
Contributing marginally to this appeal are concerns for environmental protection and quality
of workmanship which appears in the form of willingness to hire a well-qualified Austrian
and Austria as a good place to study, attributes arguably related to the top two drivers
creativity and innovation. Attributes related to Culture, Tourism, and perceptions of the
Austrian people (other than quality workmanship-related) are less important to how
consumers feel about buying Austrian.

12

Shapley Analysis is used to measure which attributes are important, i.e. directly contribute to designated outcome variable. A
feature of Shapley Analysis is that it controls for multicollinearity. The importance percentages of all attributes add to 100% of
the total impact on the designated outcome variable explained by the 22 attributes. Note that this does not mean that the
country scores well on the highest attributes, only that they are important in driving outcomes on the designated outcome
variable.

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Figure 9.4: Global Driver Analysis on Feel good about buying products
A creative place with cutting edge ideas and new ways of thinking

24.3%

Major contribution to innovation in science and technology

16.6%

Competently and honestly governed

6.8%

Respects rights of its citizens and treats them with fairness

5.1%

Is a place with high quality of life

4.8%

Live and work for substantial period

4.1%

Behaves responsibly in international peace and security

4.0%

Willingness to hire well-qualified person from country

3.8%

Good place to study for educational qualifications

3.8%

Behaves responsibly to protect the environment

3.7%

Good place to invest money

2.9%

Has rich cultural heritage

2.3%

Would like to visit if money is no object

2.3%

Cares about equality in society

2.3%

Would like to have person from country as close friend

2.2%

Culture
Immigration/
Investment
Governance

Behaves responsibly to reduce world poverty

1.9%

Interesting/exciting contemporary culture

1.9%

Would make me feel welcome

1.8%

Tourism

People

Exports

Rich in historic buildings and monuments

1.6%

Has vibrant city life and urban attractions

1.4%

Excels at sports

1.3%

Rich in natural beauty

1.1%

0.0%

5.0%

10.0%

15.0%

20.0%

25.0%

Favourability
Overall favourability is based on the question of overall opinion of each country on a 7-point
scale from extremely favourable to extremely unfavourable. This question is asked at the
beginning of the survey in order to capture an unvarnished reaction, before the other
questions and issues raised throughout the survey can shape respondents thinking.
Table 9.5 shows the mean favourability score for Austria by each of the 20 panel countries.
The right-hand column shows the difference between that countrys mean favourability of
Austria and that countrys mean favourability of all of the countries.
Table 9.5: Overall Favourability of Austria
Panel countries
Russia
Germany
Italy
Poland
Sweden
Brazil

Mean favourability of Austria


5.45
5.34
5.17
4.89
4.86
4.86

+/- points from all nation average


+0.60
+0.98
+0.64
+0.45
+0.61
+0.28

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30.0%

simon anholt
Mexico
South Africa
China
Canada
France
Egypt
Japan
Argentina
United Kingdom
South Korea
United States
Australia
Turkey
India

4.86
4.84
4.84
4.83
4.81
4.80
4.74
4.74
4.71
4.68
4.64
4.61
4.58
4.52

+0.25
+0.35
+0.17
+0.41
+0.40
+0.05
+0.40
+0.26
+0.34
+0.26
+0.39
+0.29
+0.32
+0.01

The 2011 results show that the global citizen is relatively favourable towards Austria. Despite
varying ranks from panel countries on the indices, each panel countrys favourability towards
Austria is above its all-nation-average, although India and Egypt are practically on par with
their respective all-nation-average. Other large developing countries far away China, Brazil,
Argentina show above average favourability but smaller margins (.17 to .28). Reflecting its
complimentary rankings of Austria, Germany is the most favourable at nearly one point above
average. Following Germany are Italy, Sweden, and Russia (between .6 and .64 points above
their all-nation averages) as most favourable towards Austria.
Familiarity
Table 9.6 displays the percent of panellists from each country who have either familiarity with
or some knowledge about Austria. The right-hand column shows how that percentage differs
from the all nation average within the same panel country. This information can be useful in
understanding whether raising familiarity can help improve a countrys total NBISM and each of
the hexagon points discussed above. For example, receiving a low ranking from a panel
country that is very familiar with a nation and receiving a low ranking from a panel country
that is not familiar with it could mean very different things. For the low familiarity country, a
country might be able to improve its reputation by working to get more exposure in that
country youve got to be known to be liked. The high familiarity country, however,
presents a greater challenge in overcoming already entrenched perceptions.
Not surprisingly, familiarity seems to be heavily linked with geographical proximity; countries
most familiar with Austria include bordering Germany, with nearly 90% having at least some
knowledge of Austria, 25 percentage-points above Germanys all-nation average, and, to a
lesser extent, nearby Poland, Italy, and regional neighbour Sweden. Indicative of LatAm
countries low rankings of Austria, familiarity is between seven and 11 percentage points
below average in the region. Save for Japan, Asian-Pacific nations are not particularly familiar
with Austria, with Australia most notable at five percentage points below average. While
nearly 70% of Chinese respondents have at least some knowledge of Austria, this is still lower
than their all-nation average.

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While considering the level of familiarity that the citizens of various countries have about
Austria, it is important to remember that self-reported knowledge may not be well informed,
which can be frustrating. Nonetheless, growing familiarity is the fundamental foundation for
building a positive reputation creating opportunities to make sure the worlds understanding
of a nation is accurate.
Table 9.6: Familiarity with Austria
Panel countries
Germany
Poland
Russia
Sweden
China
Italy
Turkey
Canada
Egypt
South Korea
United Kingdom
India
Mexico
United States
Australia
Argentina
South Africa
Japan
Brazil
France

% with at least some knowledge


+/- points from all nation average
of Austria
88.64
+24.64
81.28
+12.28
79.32
+0.32
74.24
+6.24
69.56
-3.44
69.14
+9.14
67.07
+2.07
63.87
-0.13
63.16
-6.84
63.08
+0.08
60.90
+0.90
57.25
-3.75
57.03
-7.97
55.15
-0.85
54.83
-5.17
54.63
-11.37
53.03
-4.97
50.70
+6.70
48.74
-9.26
42.78
+1.78

Experience
As with familiarity, personal visits to Austria for either business or pleasure are highly
correlated with geographic proximity. Germany has by and large the most experience with
visiting Austria, at 71%, followed by Italy and Poland (38% and 35%). Close to half of Swedes
have visited Austria, as well. While Russia and Turkey are generally warmer towards Austria,
less than 10% report visiting the country. Visits for business are below 10% across the board,
and at 5% or lower in 17 panel countries.
The percent of global citizens who have purchased products or services from Austria is below
the 50-measured nation average (19% vs. 23%). Of note, over half of Germans report
purchasing Austrian products or services. Though to a lesser extent, Russia and Sweden also
show high rates of purchasing Austrian products. In contrast, less than 10% of Australians,
Brazilians, and nearby French have purchased Austrian products. Regarding visits to Austrian
websites, India leads at 31%, well above the 20-panel country average of 17% and developing
countries generally show high levels of Austrias digital penetration, similar to findings about
other nations. On the low side, Japanese, South Koreans, Brits, Americans, Canadians all show
below 10% levels of digital exposure to Austria.

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Table 9.7: Experience with Austria
% have visited for % have % have visited for
% have visited
vacation/
visited for
business
% have purchased website or social
business
vacation
products/services networking site
from country
from country
Panel countries
Argentina
4
3
1
10
24
Australia
15
14
1
9
6
Brazil
7
5
3
6
20
Canada
11
10
1
18
8
China
10
5
6
16
19
Egypt
4
3
1
21
21
France
22
20
3
9
10
Germany
71
67
9
52
18
India
9
5
4
16
31
Italy
38
35
4
20
14
Japan
9
8
2
11
5
Mexico
6
5
1
13
29
Poland
35
29
8
35
25
Russia
8
6
2
41
21
South Africa
7
7
1
17
24
South Korea
6
5
1
17
9
Sweden
47
44
5
38
12
Turkey
8
4
5
13
26
United Kingdom
19
17
2
14
7
United States
9
7
2
14
7
20 Panel Country
Average for
18
15
3
19
17
Austria
50 Measured
12
10
4
23
18
Nation Average

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10. Perception and Reality Gap Analysis

Exports Index Ranking vs. Export Volume


As noted in this and previous reports, global perceptions of a nations reputation on important
dimensions do not necessarily mirror actual performance measured by external indicators.
This can be the case for nations when it comes to, for example, perceptions of job
opportunities versus unemployment rates, or environmental stewardship and per capita
carbon emissions, and so forth. The question for nations is whether, and to what degree, their
reputation in specific areas tracks with reality: is the reputation under-achieving or is it
punching above its weight?
New for 2011, and planned for each year going forward, we will chart one area of NBI rankings
against the rankings of relevant performance based on reality. Table 10.1 looks at how a
nations reputation of Exports strength correlates to the outcome of exports volume. It
compares the 50 nations rank on the Exports Index (the left column) to its volume rank based
on 2010 exports (the right column, in billions USD). The coloured line connects each nation
between its Index ranking and its export volume ranking, with slopes indicating levels of
disparity in this pair of rankings.
As we can see from the table, the two rankings are moderately correlated, but the size of the
national economy decidedly plays a role also. The top three nations enjoying the best Exports
reputation are three of the worlds largest economies: Japan, the U.S., and Germany, and they
rank in the top four on export volumes as well. Nations known for producing world class
quality and value-add goods with many strong consumer-facing brands (autos, precision
machinery, watches, jewellery, etc.), including many in Western Europe such as Switzerland
and Sweden, have excellent reputations, but the reputation significantly outpaces the export
volume of these mid-sized or small rich economies. Known for producing some of the worlds
finest agricultural products and sporting goods, New Zealands profile is dramatically lopsided
with a reputation enviably in the top half, but, not surprisingly, the nation of 4.4 million sit
towards the bottom of the rankings on export volume. Similar steep red lines for countries
such as Finland, Denmark, and Luxembourg also suggest the power of these nations
reputation despite their relative small size and export volume. In contrast, Holland, South
Korea, Belgium, Singapore, and Taiwan, among the top 15 exporting nations on our list and all
with high-tech and value-add export products, have under-performing reputation that is
behind the stature of their actual export performance.
The worlds largest exporter, China, has a strong reputation deficit. Although it has made
progress over the last four years on the Exports Index, its product quality continues to be an
issue and will present a hurdle as this world power transitions from only assembling Western
products to selling Chinese branded autos and electronics to the world. Mexico and Saudi
Arabia, and to a lesser extent, UAE, Malaysia, Thailand and Indonesia, have a similarly underperforming reputation, not matching their export size ranks largely resulting from natural

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resources and primary products, at least for now. Global citizens may purchase Chinese toys
and Saudi oil, but they do not feel good about it, as evidenced by bottom tier ranks for both
countries on the feel good about buying products question which acts as a drag on the
Exports reputation.
Most nations from Central Eastern Europe and Latin America have reputations that mirror
export volume rank, although Argentinas reputation greatly exceeds its current Export
performance.
Punching above its weight, Austrias reputation far exceeds its actual export volume; its 17th
place rank on the Exports Index is fully 10 positions ahead of its actual export volume rank.

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Figure 10.1: Exports Index Ranking vs. Export Volume Ranking

NBI Exports Index Rank


(1-50)

2010 Exports
(in Billions USD)

Japan 76.48
United States 76.22
Germany 72.23
United Kingdom 67.38
France 66.08
Canada 64.87
Switzerland 64.76
Sweden 62.56
Italy 62.14
Aus tralia 61.64
China 58.51
Ho lland 58.30
Rus s ia 57.60
So uth Ko rea 57.43
Spain 57.41
Finland 56.74
Aus tria 56.68
Denmark 56.46
Belgium 55.00
New Zealand 54.98
Singapore 54.29
Taiwan 53.47
Ireland 52.86
India 52.50
Brazil 52.11
Luxembo urg 51.67
Po land 49.38
Argentina 48.80
Turkey 48.34
Czech Republic 48.25
Hungary 48.21
UAE 48.03
Malaysia 47.84
Thailand 47.39
Mexico 46.97
So uth Africa 46.56
Slo vakia 45.68
Egypt 45.68
Indo nesia 45.27
Saudi Arabia 45.12
Chile 45.01
Latvia 43.36
Peru 42.80
Cuba 42.57
Co lombia 41.48
Kenya 38.57
Iran 38.17
Nigeria 37.44
Ango la 37.37

$1,506
$1,337
$1,270
$765
$509
$466
$458
$451
$407
$406
$377
$351
$303
$279
$275
$268
$235
$233
$211
$210
$201
$200
$196
$191
$163
$161
$157
$146
$117
$117
$116
$99
$94
$79
$77
$76
$74
$69
$64
$64
$52
$40
$36
$33
$25
$18
$8
$5
$3

Source: CIA World Factbook, 2010.


*Note: Scotland (22nd on "Exports") does not have reported exports data, and
has been removed from this analysis.

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Appendix II Full List of Projects Reviewed

Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

Business Location Austria as a bridge between


East and West

ABA Invest in Austria / Investment

Description of the Project


Headquarters Initiative:
Being the bridge between Eastern and Western Europe is the single most important USP of the
business location Austria.
Austrian business people have special CEE know how due to the historic ties (dating back to the
Habsburg empire)
Austria especially the Vienna Region boasts more than 300 regional headquarters of international
companies.
The program is closely monitoring the needs of headquarters already located in Austria and providing
services to them while intensively striving to attract new headquarters with tailor-made business
proposals.
ABA established a team for servicing CEE companies as early as 1999. Since then, Austria experiences a
constant growth of CEE companies among successful investment projects. In2011 the group of CEE/SEE
countries was strongly represented again, accounting for 41 investments or 22.5 percent of all ABA
projects in 2011.

Implementation Period

Aim/Success

HQ Initiative:
01/09/2009 -31/12/2012

AIMS:
Identification of potential new HQs
Cooperation with already existing headquarters
to identify expansion projects
Upgrading of Austrian subsidiary within the
company (responsibility for more countries, R&D
facilities etc.)
Preventing relocation from Austria
SUCCESS: Increasing the number of HQs in Austria
SUCCESS: Share of successful ABA projects
increased form virtually zero to almost a quarter

Settling CEE/SEE companies in Austria:


ongoing

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Title of Project
AMADEUS Music Academy

Project Leader/Hexagon
ABA Invest in Austria / Investment
Description of the Project

AMADEUS International School Vienna and the Music Academy were set up by investors from
Singapore and other Asian countries in 2012.
The Music Academy specializes in music education and professional training at the highest
international level for young performers between 12 and 18 years old accompanied by an academic
school program.

Implementation Period
School started in September 2012

Aim/Success
AIMS:
Viennas reputation in the field of classical music is
used to attract students from mostly Asian decent
and thus builds a bridge of music between Austria
and Asia.
SUCCESS:

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

Sustainable and Emerging Cities in Latin America


and the Caribbean

Federal Ministry of Finance / Inter-American


Development Bank

Description of the Project


The rapid rate of urbanization has created economic opportunities for millions of people in Latin
America, but it also brings about great challenges for city governments to provide basic services,
guarantee suitable levels of quality of life, promote employment, and protect the environment. Austria
is the first donor and partner of the Inter-American Development Banks Sustainable and Emerging
Cities Initiative that aims to support city governments in the region to improve their urban management
and urban planning processes.
Employing a holistic and integrated approach, the IDB addresses issues of environmental sustainability,
comprehensive urban development, fiscal sustainability and good governance. It draws on international
expertise and best practice and finds in Austria a partner willing to extend not only financial support but
also technical expertise and access to top of the line urban technology.
Austria, and in particular the City of Vienna, has been pioneering solutions in ecology and quality of life.
By creating an urban networking platform, the Federal Ministry of Finance enables Austrian experts to
pool resources and share knowledge. Through the partnership with the Inter-American Development
Bank, the Ministry of Finance supports Austrian experts gain access to a new market and provides the
basis on which to develop closer cooperation between Austria and Latin America in the development of
smarter, more sustainable and liveable cities.

Implementation Period
2010-ongoing

Aim/Success
- Support Latin American Governments in
identifying, designing and implementing adequate
solutions towards greater sustainability in their
city development
- create networks and partnerships between
Austrian and Latin American urban experts to
share knowledge and expertise and export urban
technologies

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

Austrian Soft Loan Financing for upgrading the Federal Ministry of Finance/ Oesterreichische
Adomi Bridge in Ghana a crucial traffic way Kontrollbank AG (OeKB)
crossing the Volta River
Description of the Project
Rehabilitation of an essential bridge in Ghana severely damaged due to long lasting usage by
private and public transport
Adomi-bridge, built in the 1950ies, is also a symbol for national unity as it connects Ghanas
capital Accra with the more remote Volta region, at the same time interlinking Ghana to its
neighbouring countries
Support from Austrian Project Preparatory Program to renew the necessary architectural plans
and blueprint planning
Austrian support for financing of rehabilitation work to be undertaken by an Austrian company

Implementation Period

Project

Finalization planned for 2015

implementation

Aim/Success

is

ongoing

Aim to support a sustainable project in a


developing country using Austrian know-how

Aim to support Austrian companies in doing


business in African countries in transition

Aim to intensify economical and financial cooperation between Austria and African
countries

Aim to support capacity building in doing long


term planning

Success: Project becoming positive showcase


in
financial
co-operation

Success: Intensified economic and financial


co-operation with various African countries in
transition

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

IFC Cleaner Production Program in


Eastern Europe, Caucasus, Central Asia

IFC/Federal Ministry for Finance


Description of the Project

Eastern Europe, Caucasus and Central Asia (ECA) are a region with high economic potential as well as
numerous challenges. Growth and development of this region is of strategic importance for Austria.
The ECA region is one of the most carbon-intensive regions in the world and has nearly four-fold the
energy intensity of the EU.
Cleaner Production improves economic and environmental performance by reducing and preventing
pollution and waste at the source, while simultaneously improving competitiveness and industrial
efficiency by reducing costs. An increasing number of industrial companies now incorporate CP
techniques into their quality management schemes, particularly lean production, environmental
management, production efficiency and resource optimization. Austrian firms are recognized for their
excellent knowledge, advice and technology in this field and have a competitive advantage in doing
business in ECA.
The Ministry of Finance supports the IFC Technical Assistance program to scale up cleaner production
investments and help identify and prepare cleaner production projects in the ECA region. The Austrian
funded CP Program will undertake diagnostic visits to potential clients and advise them as well as
disseminate information on the benefits of CP to the industry throughout the ECA region. It will also
carry out case studies and hold awareness workshops. In order to demonstrate the benefits from
investing in CP and learn from practical experience, the program will organise a study tour for investors
and policy makers to Austria to visit Austrian companies and institutes with best practice in this field. To
follow up investments two business opportunities workshops in Austria and in the region will be
organised to bring together Austrian business and experts with potential companies/investors from the
region.
Implementation Period
2011 to 2015

Aim/Success
Aim: stimulate uptake of CP improvements and
investment at the company level.
Aim: raise awareness of CP among firms, policy
makers and financial institutions.
Aim: Diagnostic visits to at least 30 clients, with
at least 20 in-depth CP advisory engagements.
Success: 10 case studies and least 8 awareness
events to inform industry
Success: facilitate at least US $90 million of
investment in CP projects
Success: annual energy savings of 30,000 MWh,
reduction of over 100 tons of waste, savings of 180
million litres of water, and over 120,000 tons per
year of avoided GHG emissions (CO2 equivalent)
through the supported projects
Success: More business/exports with
this target region and sector

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Project Title
Project Leader/Hexagon
Communication focus 2013/2014 / culture:
Austrian National Tourist Office/ Tourism
Austria Cultural Bridge between East and West
Description
Austrias role as a European cultural hub represents an essential element in the positioning of the
Holiday in Austria brand. The Austrian National Tourist Office highlights cultural themes in its global
communications campaigns to differentiate Austria from competing vacation destinations.
Hardly any other European country is marked by as many distinctive cultural characteristics as Austria.
As the centre of the multinational Danube monarchy, meeting place and melting pot of the cultures of
central, eastern and south-eastern Europe, Austria has inherited and preserved much of the Habsburg
empires ethnic, linguistic and cultural diversity, and combined these elements in a unique form. The
diverse cultural influences created the fertile soil out of which outstanding achievements in the visual
arts, architecture, literature and music developed. It was this setting which gave birth to the Viennese
Classic (Haydn, Mozart), the waltzes and operettas of a Johann Strauss or Franz Lehr, as well as the
Viennese Modern (Jugendstil, psychoanalysis, twelve-tone music).
The division of Europe into two blocs, East and West, during the Cold War signalled a brutal rupture of
this tradition and indeed led to its partial demise. In spite of the Iron Curtain however, this tradition
continued to show signs of life with an underground avant-garde and tentative cultural ties between
Austria and the eastern half of the continent.
Austrias contemporary artistic and cultural scene builds firmly upon the countrys historic role as
cultural hub of central Europe and, in this tradition, acts as intermediary. Cultural exchange is nurtured
through cultural promotion programmes (e.g. Kulturkontakt Austria) and international fairs (e.g.
Viennafair).
Owing to its eventful history and deeply rooted cultural traditions, Austria as a bridge between East and
West has a singular place in central Europes contemporary cultural life.
In 2014 Europe celebrates the twenty-fifth anniversary of the fall of the Iron Curtain. In the context of its
cultural positioning of vacationland Austria, the Austrian National Tourist Office will focus on Austria
Cultural Bridge between East and West.
The theme will be developed both in terms of content and editorially (text/stories, videos,
images).
In 2013 impulses for touristic product innovation will be implemented in the branch, and
partners in the tourism industry for this theme identified.
In 2014 the theme and content generated will be integrated concertedly in communication and
marketing activities. All communications channels from classical advertising to PR will be
exploited.

Projects Goals
Enhancing Austrias profile as cultural bridge between East and West and communicating this
around the world through a focus on culture.
Knowledge of Austrias culture, history and especially its contemporary role at the heart of
central Europe will be promoted internationally.
Promotion of cultural exchange.
Highlighting common characteristics and particularities of cultural life in central Europe and,
within this context, sharpening the perception of Austrias role as cultural intermediary.
Gaining the attention of potential guests by means of a brand positioning with a pronounced
emphasis on culture.

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Title of Project
Vienna/Moscow - 72hrs visa free
Description of the Project
Visa waiver for Russian/Austrian citizens staying in Vienna/Moscow for a period of max. 72 hours.
In 2003 Russia implemented visa free entry for European citizens arriving in St. Petersburg by boat for a
stay not exceeding 72 hours. Ever since this opportunity was extended to 5 additional Russian ports.
Moreover a complete visa waiver was introduced for the Russia/Norway and Russia/Poland border
areas.
This facility shall be extended to travel between Vienna and Moscow airports under the following
conditions:

Limited to arrivals by aircraft only


Based on return tickets paid by credit card
Under the condition that immigration card has to be filled in online prior departure (required
data to be coordinated between the respective authorities and to be forwarded by airlines to
the border police).

Air carriers are equipped already with the necessary infrastructure. A re-evaluation of the feasibility of
this project after 6 months could be determined.

Implementation Period
As soon as possible, subject acceptance by the
involved Authorities

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

Expansion of infrastructure
rd
Vienna 3 runways

Austrian Airlines /Investment


Description of the Project

The project started in 2005 with a planned implementation in 2012/13. Due to various reasons the
environmental sustainability proceeding is still not completed.
In view of the increasing mobility demand, one can assume that growth rates in aviation will boost also
in future, especially to/from emerging markets. In order to participate in this development, it is of
utmost importance for Austria to provide an equivalent infrastructure. Due to its geographical location,
VIE offers ideal bridging prerequisites for traffic between East and West.
With proper infrastructure at VIE airport, it would be possible to re-establish the position of VIE as the
centre point of the Central European Region, benefitting from the historical, economic and cultural
relationship.
The active involvement of the concerned communities surrounding the airport and its population and
interest groups in the dialogue and mediation forum, constitutes a best practice example for developing
such infrastructure project.

Implementation Period

Aim/Success

Status: The approval was issued in Aug2012 and is


currently open for appeal. Final conclusion is
expected for end 2013 and possible opening of the
runway approx. 2020

Aim: Establish VIE as growth-potential


gateway within the LH Group multi-hub
system.

Aim: Expansion of the OS network and its


position as the national hub carrier

Success: Re-establishment of Viennas centre


point function for CEE.

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

Austrian Service

Austrian Airlines/Culture-Heritage
Description of the Project

Operating all over the world Austrian Airlines is often the first contact for foreigners with Austrian
culture, hospitality and charm. Already our brand represents and promotes Austria. In order to meet the
role of ambassador of Austria we consequently enhance this USP by training our staff accordingly.
For the sake of consistency, we offer Austrian products onboard our flights, e.g. national specialties,
Austrian wine and renowned coffeehouse service on long-haul flights,, overnight kits are showing typical
Austrian photo motives. Austrian onboard magazines and movies are promoting Austrian culture, events
and companies, as well as Austrian regions.
Evaluation of expansion of the services in cooperation with City Vienna, Austrian Tourist board and
BMWfJ in order to make to most out of this unique marketing platform, e.g. focus on Austrias
innovative strengths

Implementation Period

Aim/Success

This project started already in 1958 when Austrian


Airlines started its first schedule flight. Continuous
improvement.

Aim: to establish Austrian as a unique


platform and to convey Austrian hospitality
and culture already onboard Austrian Airlines
flights

Aim: to introduce Austria to destinations


abroad and attract additional travellers

Success: Underlining Austrians


role as ambassador of Austrian culture &
hospitality

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Title of Project
Edict File

Project Leader/Hexagon
Federal Ministry of Justice/
Governance
Description of the Project

The Edict File (http://www.edikte.justiz.gv.at), initially restricted to publications in the field of insolvency
cases, was continuously extended to other business sectors. As from the year 2000 insolvencies
(bankruptcies, compositions with creditors, settlement of debts) have been published exclusively on the
Internet with legally binding effect. The costs of publications could be reduced by 95%. Every Internet
user has access free of charge to the latest data on the Internet (http://www.edikte.justiz.gv.at). Data is
copied automatically from the Insolvency Register of the Automation of Court Procedures (ACP) into the
Insolvency File at the "push of a button". Petitions in bankruptcy have legal effect the following day.
Since 2002 real property auction edicts and publication of entries in the Commercial Register as well as
the service of edicts can be retrieved in the Commercial Register from the Edict File. In 2003 the Edict
File was extended to publication of auctions in execution proceedings against personal property and to
search for owners in criminal proceedings. Since 2005 all announcements provided for in court
proceedings have been published exclusively in the Edict File. Public announcements in probate
proceedings, declaration of nullity and official declaration of death as well as appointment of guardians
are exemplary. In Austria the Edict File won the komanager Award 2000 of the Austrian Business
Association (WKO) and the Justitia 2000 award and, on the European level the e-Government Label
for Good Practice 2005 as well as the Crystal Scales of Justice 2006 award.

Implementation Period
2000 to date

Aim/Success
Aim:
-Better dissemination of information
-Cost reduction
Success:
-all court announcements published
exclusively on the Internet
-cost reduction up to 95 percent
-e.g. more than 850.000 inquiries of
court auctions
-national and international recognized
best practice

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Title of Project
Land Register

Project Leader/Hexagon
Federal Ministry of Justice/
Governance
Description of the Project

At the beginning of the eighties the Federal Ministry for Economy and Employment (at that
time: for Construction) and the Federal Ministry of Justice created in close co-operation a
real property database at the Federal Computing Centre, enabling the courts to maintain an
automation supported Land Register and enabling the Land Surveying Offices to maintain an
automation supported Cadastre (surveying and mapping). Since 1986 so-called "External
Inquiries" have been possible: at that time already the general public was able to inspect the
Land Register at the office or from home.
Since 1999 it has been possible to make external inquiries via the Internet. For these inquiries
charging agencies have been set up.
(For further details see http://www.justiz.gv.at/grundbuch/index.php?nav=93).
In view of the technical developments in this application and in order to best fulfil the
increasing demand of business and public administration as well as the administration of
justice itself, a fundamental technological modernization of the real property database with
all its applications has been launched.
After first results like supporting Electronic Legal Communication, management of court
fees and automated creation of court decisions since May 7th 2012 the land register is
available in a technically revised version with improved functionality.
Since 2006 all documents necessary for land register entries are stored in the newly
established electronic document archive of justice. Thus not only the land register entries
themselves, but also the appropriate documents can be inspected online via charging
agencies.
Implementation Period
1980 to date

Aim/Success
Aim:
-Secure, publicly accessible register of
real property with legal effect
-IT-support for land register
proceedings
Success:
-Full support of Electronic Legal
Communication (ELC)
-Integration of document archives
-Optimized support for application based
land register entries and
decisions
-6.6 m external inquiries 2011

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Title of Project
Electronic Legal Communication
(ELC)

Project Leader/Hexagon
Federal Ministry of Justice/
Governance
Description of the Project

Electronic legal communication with the courts as an instrument of communication with the
parties of proceedings, on the same level as paper, was introduced in 1990. As far as it is
known the Austrian administration of justice is the first country that has introduced electronic
communication.
Electronic communication in legal relations allows electronic transmission of applications or
submissions and the automatic transfer of procedural data to the Automation of Court
Procedures. The resulting personnel savings in the administration of justice, which could be
achieved in the final development, are estimated at 133 manpower units.
In 1999 the "oncoming lane" on the "data highway of the administration of justice" has been
opened: electronic service of court documents is also possible now by the so-called "return
traffic stream". For the year 2011 savings on postage (with increasing tendency) of about
4,4 m were achieved.
In the year 2007 the electronic legal communication was transferred to a web based
technology, where open standards such as XML, Web services and SOAP are used. The
electronic legal communication, which is secured by SSL and certificates, is accessible via
clearing houses and opens amongst other things the possibility of appending attachments to
submissions transmitted electronically.
As one of the outstanding e-Government-Applications in Europe, electronic legal
communication has been awarded the EU e-Government-Label in 2001.
In 2013 ELC will be made available in an even more accessible version for every citizen,
making use of digital signatures for authentication.
Implementation Period
1990 to date

Aim/Success
Aim:
-More efficient communication with
courts
-Cost reduction
Success:
-all key players (e.g. lawyers, notaries,
banks, insurance companies) using
ELC
-11,2 m transmissions in 2011
-significant personnel savings for the
administration of justice
-awarded the EU e-GovernmentLabel

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

FMA University Programme in Financial Market


Supervision

Austrian Financial Market Authority (FMA) and


Oesterreichische Nationalbank (OeNB)/Investment

Description of the Project


The University Programme in Financial Market Supervision represents the upgrading to university status
of the existing in-house Financial Market Supervisor course, offered by the Academy of Supervision run
jointly by the FMA and the OeNB. Back in 2010, when the first courses were being launched, the FMA
and the OeNB were already setting the goal of having this in-house course recognized as a postgraduate
programme of university studies, to be completed with certification as an Academic Financial Market
Supervisor. Through joint efforts with the WU Executive Academy of the Vienna University of
Economics and Business, the existing course has been further developed into an academic programme
that includes a research component. The next goal in the area of postgraduate professional
advancement has already been reached: recognition of this two-year University Programme in Financial
Market Supervision as a specialisation within an MBA programme.
Objectives:
The aim of the University Programme in Financial Market Supervision is to impart the basics relevant to
all areas of financial market supervision. The programme, which provides students with a range of basic
academically oriented training and continuing professional development courses, appeals particularly to
staff members working in the corresponding specialised divisions of the institutions responsible for
supervision of the Austrian financial market. This certification is also making a major contribution
towards establishing financial market supervision as a profession in its own right. The profession of
financial market supervisor has taken on an entirely new significance as a result of the global financial
crisis, both in Austria and at an international level.
The courses offered as part of the university programme are grouped under one of the following general
subjects:
Supervisory law and financial transactions
Financial economics and accounting
Risk management and controlling
Communication and social skills
In addition to completing the required coursework and passing the block exams, students are required
to demonstrate practical application of the knowledge acquired in courses (through a work placement)
as well as to prepare a final paper. On successful completion of the university programme, the WU
Executive Academy awards the academically recognised certificate Academic Financial Market
Supervisor.

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Title of Project
FMA Supervision Conference

Project Leader/Hexagon
Austrian
Financial
(FMA)/Investment

Market

Authority

Description of the Project


Since three years the FMA has annually been organizing a supervision conference with over 700
participants. The invitation only attendees covered not only executive managers from the majority of
supervised institutions, but also political representatives and financial market interest groups. The
objective of this annual event is to encourage the supervisory authority and the market players to
engage in an open dialogue on current supervisory issues and on latest developments that affect them.
The topics are discussed in a single, open forum both from a national and international perspective. In
order to assure an exciting and in-depth discussion, the FMA invites each year speakers from other
European supervisory authorities, national market participants and politicians.
Conference program: In the morning session the agenda usually foresees two speeches in conjunction
with the general topic of the conference, followed by two panel discussions. In the afternoon three
parallel workshops focus on current topics from the field of banking, insurance and security in order to
cover all three supervisory areas in separate expert discussion panels.
The next FMA Supervision Conference will take place in September 2013.
Implementation Period: once a year
Objectives:
to advise the market participants whats coming up soon

for a better understanding of the counterpart

to exchange opinions of current supervisory issues

Implementation Period

Aim/Success

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Title of Project
Integration from the beginning

Project Leader/Hexagon
Federal Ministry of the Interior/
Investment and Immigration
Description of the Project

Integration naturally presupposes a strategic course of action right from the


start. People who intend moving to Austria were for decades left to their own
devices initially. The Integration from the beginning convention in February
2012 created awareness of this situation for the first time since Austria
cannot afford to ignore the potential of migrants.
The project Integration from the beginning amongst others extends the
range of integration measures by already including Austrian embassies and
their role as first contact points for new immigrants. At the conference of
ambassadors in September 2012 in Vienna, State Secretary for Integration
Mr Sebastian Kurz emphasized the important role Austrian embassies play in
this process. As a consequence, Austrian embassies recently offer brochures by
the Federal Ministry of the Interior (at present: Welcome in Austria" and
"Austria from the beginning") to potential immigrants.
Further steps involve a check of their German language skills or a specific
provision with information of first contact partners in Austria.
By gradually increasing the service of Austrian embassies for new immigrants,
Austria is more likely to welcome people who are already in their first phase of
a successful integration process.
Implementation Period
Conferences/Bilateral Follow Up

Aim/Success
Aim to enable a qualification related
job market integration
from the very beginning
Aim to expose immigrants to the
values and principles of Austria
Aim to support immigrants in their
quest for a fulfilling life in Austria
Success: An integration process
that starts beyond Austrias
national borders

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Title of Project
Red-White-Red Primer

Project Leader/Hexagon
Federal Ministry of the Interior/
Investment and Immigration, People
Description of the Project

The Red-White-Red Primer is a measure within the framework of the


National Action Plan for Integration.
The Red-White-Red Primer aims at creating a link between rule of law and
values, addressing those social values and individual virtues which are
indispensable to the success of our community.
The intention with this work to date is not so much an empirical survey of the
value systems actually applied in Austria but rather a reflection on those values
and virtues on which success of the Project Austria should in fact be based.
The drafting of the Primer is assisted by the Expert Council for integration, an
independent body which is widely accepted as a scientific adjunct to strategic
integration policy by all players in the field of integration politics.
Addressee of the Red-White-Red Primer is all of Austrias population. In order
to target specific groups such as children, the youth and also the immigrants,
the Primer will appear in adapted versions.

Implementation Period
Conferences/Bilateral Follow Up

Aim/Success
Aim to create a basis for discussion
about the requirements of a well functioning
polity
Aim to provide an orientation aid to
a culture of welcome and
recognition
Aim to demonstrate that Austrias
constitution only comes to life,
when certain values and virtues are
lived by the people
Success: Assurance of rule of law
and higher degree of mutual trust
between people
Success: More frictionless
integration into Austrias society

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Title of Project
Tourism Strategy

Project Leader/Hexagon
Federal Ministry for Economy, Family &
Youth / Tourism and Historical Objects
Description of the Project

In 2010 the Federal Minister for Economy, Family and Youth presented a new Tourism Strategy in close
collaboration with the nine States and all relevant tourism stakeholders. A key element of the new
Tourism Strategy is the focus on Austrias unique selling points: Alps, Danube and lakes, cities and
culture. The Alps and the river Danube represent unique landscapes of Austria, while cities and culture
represent the values, which have been created by humankind.
But tourism in Austria is not only seen as important economic activity. Tourism has also the capacity to
generate social, cultural, environmental and political benefits. Tourism is about millions of conversations
and interactions that take place as visitors - more than 23 millions international guests in 2011 - and
Austrians come together. Tourism is an effective tool to promote mutual understanding, tolerance and
peace.

Implementation Period
Ongoing process since 2010

Aim/Success

Aim to increase the numbers of guests in


Austria
Every international guest is potentially an
ambassador of Austria, a land rich in history,
rich in science and technology, the arts, music,
literature and culture.
Aim to ameliorate the international
Understanding
Success: More international guests

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

Preserving and sustaining the unique historic state


owned architectural heritage

Federal Ministry for Economy, Family &


Youth / Tourism and Historic Objects

Description of the Project


At its best, preservation engages the past in a conversation with the present over a mutual concern for
the future.
Historic preservation is about saving and sustaining the cultural historic heritage preserving them for
future use and protecting them for the next generations. It helps us Austrians to understand who we
are and shapes relationships with our neighbours and all the nations around the world. Austria has a
long and intense, sometimes painful, historical record, the respect for these historic buildings is vital to
ensure that Austria's history lives on. Schloss Schnbrunn, Hofburg Wien and Hofburg Innsbruck, just to
name a few, serve both as vessels for irreplaceable collective memory and an important basis for
development, both now and into the future. International tourism continues to be among the drivers for
cultural exchange, providing a personal experience, of what survived from the past as well as of the
contemporary life and societies of others.
Managing state-owned architectural heritage is split into state-owned societies and ministerial
organizations, in some cases depending on state budget. Required long-term strategy also depends on
long-term financial set-up, impossible within state budget law.
Consolidation process at time being working through close cooperation is inefficient and stagnant formalized consolidation requires political and financial commitment for a starting period of 10 years.
Austria's image as land of culture and history needs a friendly face for visitors - historic buildings create
first impressions.
Implementation Period

Aim/Success

Ongoing process in small scale;


Starting in new set-up requires political decision;
implementation process: 10 years

Preserve and use historic architectural heritage as


face for Austria;
Set up as bridge between history and future

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

st

21 Austria

Austria Metal AG, Central Bank of Austria, Conwert


Immobilien Invest SE, Do&Co AG, EVN AG, Immofinanz AG,
Lenzing AG, Mondi AG, OMV AG, Post AG, Raiffeisen Bank
International AG, Raiffeisen Landesbank Obersterreich,
Rosenbauer International AG, STARTeurope, Strabag SE,
Telekom Austria AG, Uniqa Versicherungen AG, Verbund AG,
Vienna Stock Exchange, Voest Alpine AG, Wienerberger AG /
Investment and Immigration

www.21st-austria.at

Description of the Project


st

In February 2012, the members of 21 Austria have started an in-depth dialogue with opinion leaders
in the U.S. and the United Kingdom about Austria, the Central European region and its opportunities and
challenges. Austrias status as a superior business location is often overlooked; additionally, the Euro
crisis has caused investors to focus almost exclusively on the risk factors in the CEE countries, despite
evidence of strong economic indicators in many parts of the region. After more than 70 conversations
with investors, commentators, academics and opinion leaders to date, the initiatives collective effort to
reach out to stakeholders has resonated well and was positively received.
st
Besides the ongoing one-on-one meetings between CEOs of 21 Austria members and opinion leaders
in the U.S. and the United Kingdom, the initiative organizes a number of group events:
st
Meet 21 Austria: From October 29 to October 30, about 8-10 stakeholders from the U.S. and
the United Kingdom are invited to Austria to meet with members of the initiative, conduct
company visits, have roundtable meetings with representatives of the Austrian government
and participate in Europes largest start-up festival at the Vienna Hofburg.
st
st
21 Austria Roadshow in New York: in the first half of 2013, the members of 21 Austria
will participate in a roadshow in New York to meet with investors and stakeholders.
CEE Roundtable in London: Experts from Austria and the CEE region will share their expertise
and market perspectives at a roundtable discussion in the fall of 2013.
st
The initiative 21 Austria is privately funded by its members and acts in close cooperation with all
relevant Austrian business institutions, such as the Ministry for Economy, Family and Youth, the Austrian
Business Location, the Austrian Chamber of Commerce, the Austrian Industries Association etc. Mr.
Claus J. Raidl, president of the Central Bank of Austria, acts as spokesperson of the group.
Implementation Period
Start in February 2012; ongoing

Aim/Success
Strengthen and enhance the perception of
Austria as a modern and innovative business
location
Establish an ongoing dialogue/build bridges
with/to key opinion leaders in the U.S. and the
United Kingdom
Put Austria as a business location on the radar
screen of investors
Success: attracting more investors in Austria and
for Austrian companies, business coverage in
Anglo-American media, increase knowledge about
Austria as a business location and therefore
mitigate perception risks

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

sterreichische Lotterien - Innovative strategy for


developing market and responsible gaming

sterreichische Lotterien/Export

Description of the Project


1989 the Austrian Lotteries started the first international pooled lottery project worldwide - the first
cross-border lottery in Hungary, only a few months after the fall of the iron curtain.
Even then, the company took a pioneering role and assumed a bridge-building function with its lottery
concept that allows an innovative development of the market while safeguarding principles of a
sustainable gaming policy, namely subsidiarity, integrity, solidarity, and security, as well as socio-political
responsibility in terms of player protection and the protection of minors (Responsible Gaming).
Following the principle of subsidiarity we provide gambling services only in markets with the prior
authorization by the competent authorities. Social and public order concerns are placed over purely
economic interests and our lottery model is designed to use profits from gambling for the benefit of
society. Our high ethical standards ensure the canalization of the gambling demand without overstimulating it, avoiding to harm people and paying special attention to the most vulnerable in society.
Player protection and protection of minors are of special concern and therefore various measures like
limits, exclusion, monitoring or responsible advertising are implemented.
Today the Austrian Lotteries operate in two foreign markets: Bashkortostan (autonomous republic
within Russia) and Albania, where it can integrate the knowledge gained in its successful 25 years of
lottery experience.
Of particular importance is the fact that the state and the population benefit from an optimum of tax
revenues generated from the lottery model of the Austrian Lotteries.
Implementation Period

Aim/Success
Aim to develop the lottery market
Aim to use profits from gambling for the benefit
of society
Aim to offer exciting and entertaining games,
which at the same time are secure and reliable
Aim to prevent fraud and crime in the gaming
sector
Aim to maintain the social order
Aim to prevent gambling from being a source of
private profit
Aim to canalize consumer gaming urge
Success: Develop the lottery market in a foreign
country and minimize illegal gambling in those
markets.

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

INTPA international Net for Dance and


Performance Austria

Federal Ministry for Education, Arts and


Performance Austria Culture
Federal Ministry for European and
International Affairs
Tanzquartier Wien
/Culture

Description of the Project


The INTPA is a guest-performance support through which event organisers abroad can receive
proportional funding to support the presentation of Austrian artists. The idea behind this
internationalisation offensive and the support concept serves to raise the international presence of
Austrian artistic work in dance and performance. Foreign event organisers will be provided with a
support incentive to put them in the position to invite artists from Austria and to pay them adequate
fees. The proportional funding of the artists costs represents a major incentive for the event
organisers to assume the risk for the presentation of artists and productions which are still little
known or unknown in these countries.
In addition to the support for individual guest performances, two festivals or serial performance
projects per year will be supported as priority events with Austrian artists one in a western
European country and the other in the Danube/ Black Sea area. Accompanying these priority
programmes, framework programmes will be offered that highlight the artistic scene in Austria or
there are (educational) workshops with the respective companies or artists on site. The
programming and design of the framework programme will be assumed by local events organisers in
discussion with the Tanzquartier Wien.
Implementation Period Aim/Success
Internationalisation offensive
Pilot Project 2012 increase of international presence of
Austrian artistic work in dance Continuation and 2013
performance
Funding incentive for foreign event
organisers
2012 guest performances e.g. in Dublin,
Mannheim, Bagnolet, Lubin, Bratislava
and Hamburg
Austria participated in the 29th Zagreb
Dance Week together with INTPA
partner country

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

Increase in number of travel scholarships for


Federal Ministry for Education, Alls and Culture
Federal Ministry for Education, Alls and Culture
Austrian creative artist/Culture
Austrian creative artist
Description of the Project
Funding of travel scholarships for young Austrian creative artist
In addition to the 10 existing studios abroad two new locations were rented. Apart from PARIS,
ROME, KRUMLOV, CHENGDU, SHANGHAI, PEKING, CHICAGO, NEW YORK, MEXICO CITY, TOKYO and
LONDON there are now residencies in Istanbul and Yogyakarta in Indonesia.
A foreign residency programme with the Banff Centre in Canada has been started, an expansion of
the residencies in Yogyakarta to include video- an media art is intended.
Implementation Period Aim/Success
Expansion ongoing since 2010 Internationalisation offensive
Increase of international presence of
Austrian artistic work
Networking

Implementation Period

Aim/Success

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

Claiming rights, promoting peace: Empowerment


CARE Austria
of women in conflict affected areas in Uganda,
(NGO framework program, co-financed by
Burundi, Nepal
ADA/NGO-Cooperation International)
Description of the Project
The overall objective of the program is to contribute to increased effectiveness of Women
Empowerment programs in conflict and post conflict situations through a holistic approach to
empowerment and evidence based research, learning and best practice.
The specific and context related objective is that by 2012 35.000 women affected by conflict in Burundi
(5000), Uganda (15.000) and Nepal (15.000) are able to exercise womens human rights by addressing
agency/individual, institutional/structural and relational aspects of their empowerment. The holistic
approach for womens empowerment in post-conflict settings developed by CARE Austria foresees
interventions on individual level in the spheres of economic empowerment and psychosocial wellbeing
of the women; womens rights education as well as networking and advocacy with national womens
movements; in order to lead to sustainable womens empowerment through structural changes. The
effort to create a favourable environment for women to speak out for themselves is complemented by
strengthening psychosocial wellbeing as an internal precondition for womens ability to participate in
processes.
In order to seek evidence on the program hypothesis and to learn more about effective ways to
implement UN SC Resolution 1325 (and 1820) a special focus is given to documentation of results,
synthesis of findings and to the pursual of an intensive learning agenda.

Implementation Period
st

st

Aim/Success

January 1 , 2010 December 31 , 2012

1) Solidarity
group
approach:
Womens mobility, self-esteem, resilience,
solidarity and social cohesion is
strengthened through the Solidarity
Group Approach. At the end of the
program, 35 000 women are participating
in Solidarity Groups.
2) Psychological wellbeing of women
affected: Womens self esteem and sense
of social connectedness is strengthened
by tailored psychosocial interventions.
35.000 women and 10.000 men benefit
from psychosocial interventions.
3)

Advocacy and networking: Networks are


promoting the implementation of UNSCR
1325 and 1820 at local, national and
international level and grassroots
womens voices and perspectives are
integrated
into
peace-building,
reconciliation, reconstruction efforts and

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womens
rights
campaigns,
thus
successfully contributing to the creation
of an enabling environment for womens
rights attainment.
4) Research
and
Learning
Agenda:
Continuous
research,
participatory
learning and questioning of the used
methodologies and interventions lead to a
continuous enhancement of the quality of
programming and to the deduction of best
practices, clarity of do-no-harm and a set
of model interventions which can be used
for piloting womens empowerment also
in other post-conflict settings. The
knowledge is continuously fed back into
the Programming Cycles and shared with
other stakeholders.

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Title of Project
Bau-Fachkrfte fr Sdosteuropa

Project Leader/Hexagon
Porr et al (Arbeitsgemeinschaft)
Description of the Project

Innovative Bauakademie in Serbien und Kroatien


gefrdert von der Austrian Development Agency in
Kooperation mit der sterreichischen Entwicklungsbank
Erfolgreiche Bauprojekte sind nur mit gut geschulten Fachkrften mglich. Diese
fehlen Baukonzernen jedoch hufig bei Auftrgen in Sdosteuropa. Eine praxisnahe Berufsausbildung in
Serbien und Kroatien soll diesen Mangel knftig beheben. Porr startete in Belgrad gemeinsam mit
Partnern wie Alpine Bau, Limi Bau, der Bauakademie belbach, dem Wifi Kroatien und Serbien, Bfi
Burgenland und Institut L&R Sozialforschung eine Bauakademie mit Lehrbauhfen fr 300 FacharbeiterInnen sowie 25 TrainerInnen. Im Rahmen einer Wirtschaftspartnerschaft wird das mit einer
Million Euro dotierte Projekt zur Hlfte von der Austrian Development Agency in Kooperation mit der
sterreichischen Entwicklungsbank finanziert.
Qualitt sichern, Arbeit schaffen. Aus mehr als 1.000 Interessenten vor allem MaurerInnen und
SchalungsbauerInnen haben wir die geeignetsten ausgewhlt und die Ausbildungen begonnen,
betont Jrgen Grandits vom Bfi Burgenland.
Damit wollen wir die Qualitt unserer Bauvorhaben sichern sowie fr Fachkrfte
neue Chancen am Arbeitsmarkt erffnen. Denn die Arbeitslosigkeit in der Baubranche ist in
Sdosteuropa sehr hoch, ist Porr-Geschftsfhrer Josef Pein von den positiven Impulsen der
Wirtschaftspartnerschaft berzeugt.
Implementation Period
Aim/Success
04/2011 03/2013

Grndung
einer
Bauakademie
mit
entsprechenden Lehrplnen und effizientem
Management
Ausbildung und Zertifizierung von 25 Trainern
Pilotschulungen fr rund 250 Bauarbeiter und
Fachkrfte in den Bereichen Gebudetechnik und
Energieeffizienz

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Title of Project
Mode aus dem Reich der Inkas

Project Leader/Hexagon
anzglich Fashion Design, Wien
Description of the Project

Wiener Modelabel produziert mit sozialer Verantwortung in Peru


untersttzt von der Austrian Development Agency (ADA) in
Kooperation mit der sterreichischen Entwicklungsbank (OeEB).
Sie sind feminin, sexy und fhlen sich gut an die Modelle aus Biobaumwolle vom Wiener Label
anzglich Fashion Design. Als Unternehmerin bernimmt Barbara Koszednar soziale Verantwortung.
Gute Mode soll kologischen Standards entsprechen und fair hergestellt sein. Darum haben wir unsere
Produktion vor zwei Jahren nach Cusco (Peru) der einstigen Inka-Hauptstadt und ehemaligen
Hochburg der lokalen Textilindustrie verlegt und eine Schneiderwerkstatt mit sechs gehrlosen
Schneiderinnen aufgebaut, erklrt sie. Untersttzt wird die Geschftsidee durch eine
Wirtschaftspartnerschaft der sterreichischen Entwicklungszusammenarbeit, in Zusammenarbeit mit
einer lokalen Nichtregierungsorganisation.
Rundum beste Qualitt. Um fr die Mitarbeiterinnen gengend Auftrge zu garantieren, werden auch
Kollektionen fr andere sterreichische DesignerInnen sowie Merchandising-Produkte gefertigt. Fair
bezahlt, erhalten die Nherinnen ein solides Einkommen und neue Perspektiven. Von der
Wirtschaftspartnerschaft profitieren letztlich auch lokale Zulieferbetriebe und VertriebspartnerInnen.
Unsere Zukunftsvision: Mitarbeiterinnen umfassend weiterbilden, damit sie selbststndig einkaufen
und produzieren knnen, so die engagierte Mode-Pionierin, die 2012 eine Fairtrade-Zertifizierung
anstrebt.
Implementation Period
Aim/Success
06/2010 05/2013

Anspruchsvolle Arbeit und solides Einkommen


fr sechs gehrlose Schneiderinnen
Hherer Umsatz bei lokalen Zulieferbetrieben
und Vertriebspartnern
Fairtrade-Zertifizierung bis 2012

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Title of Project
Export Credit Insurance Co-operation

Project Leader/Hexagon
Oesterreichische Kontrollank AG OeKB/Export

Description of the Project


OeKB started close co-operation with Export Credit Agencies (ECAs) of the CEE-region in the 1990s as they
started their activities in field of export insurance. Together with the Austrian Ministry of Finance OeKB
supported the newly established agencies in creating their own products and the implementation of these
products. This co-operation has been in the form of extensive on-the-job training of their respective staff at
OeKBs offices in Vienna as well as continuous information exchange and workshops.
This early training has led to good co-operation in ongoing businesses with these ECAs and to business
cooperation in the form of reinsurance between OeKB and these ECAs, specifically with KUKE of Poland,
EGAP of Czech Republic or HBOR of Croatia.
Most recently OeKB arranged training for Russian employees of Sberbank to support their efforts in
establishing a Russian export credit agency called EXIAR (Export Insurance Agency of Russia).

Implementation Period
Ongoing

Aim/Success
- Aim to support ECAs in the CEE region in their
implementation of their export insurance schemes
- Aim to build strong economic relationships
between the countries
Success: More projects being done in cooperation
between Austria and CEE-countries

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

9th Vienna Economic Forum

Vienna Economic Forum


Description of the Project

Vienna Economic Forum was founded in April 2004, with the aim to promote the economic cooperation
between the countries from the Adriatic to the Black Sea - Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria,
Croatia, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Slovenia, Turkey and Ukraine from the Headquarters in
Vienna.
Vienna Economic Forum has been growing and last year has received the status INTERNATIONAL NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION by the Austrian Ministry for European and International Affairs, as a
recognition for our years of activities in the region above all of South-Eastern Europe.
The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) of the United Nations at its Substantive Session of July 2012
adopted the recommendation of the Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) to grant
Special consultative status at the UN to Vienna Economic Forum.
Vienna Economic Forum will continue the good cooperation with the countries of the region, and we are
proud that our Austrian Mini-Davos for Southeast European Countries, the region of Vienna Economic
Forum, is the place where we experience the importance of cooperation in the region and achieve
positive and concrete results during our meetings.

Implementation Period

Aim/Success

2 Days Conference/Bilateral Follow Up

Aim to exchange experience for


Investment opportunities
Aim to build an economic bridge
Aim to popularise and promote investment
opportunities in the region
Aim to provide impulses and point out joint
projects
Aim to be a place of definition, encounter, and
of realising the public and private interests
Success: High level participants and delegations
from the region
Success: Defining the role of Austria as
international meeting place for the countries of
the region of South-East Europe

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

Sustainable Tourism Training Program in


the Republic of Macedonia

Macedonian-Austrian Cooperation/ Tourism

Description of the Project


Sustainable Tourism Training Program in Macedonia aims at providing trainings conducted by exerts
coming from Austria- country with remarkable success figures in tourism; trainings related to
marketing and imaging of Macedonia as tourist destination, train-the-trainer workshops and
programs, presentation opportunities for tourism-related small and medium enterprises, soft skills
training for tourism employees and supporting services, enabling them to maximize their social and
economic benefits from everything Macedonia has to offer to the potential tourist.
Why Austrian experts-trainers?
Austrias tourism and leisure industry plays a vital role in the Austrian economy and hosts 20.8
million tourists per year. In 2007, the total foreign currency earnings from tourism amounted to
approximately 15.6 billion. Foreign visitors represented approximately 73.3 % of the total overnight
stays in 2008. 1
Why Macedonia?
Gaps in the tourism sector in Macedonia, lack of qualified tourism management, lack of
environmental awareness of the people, need of national tourism strategy make this a right time for
experts know-how contribution to a developing (EU membership candidate) country, a possible
solution to the problem, supporting also the efforts of the national government in promoting
Macedonia as tourist destination.
The training is organized with the joint forces and partnership of Non-Governmental Organizations
from Austria (Macedonian-Austrian Cooperation) and Macedonia (Makedonya Ege), conducted by
professionals experts in various fields (e.g. tourism, regional development, legislation, nature and
historical monuments conservation, etc.) from Austria- leader country in Central Europe in tourism
industry.
The aspect of sustainability within the fields of tourism represents a great chance for developing
country such as Macedonia.
Implementation Period What will the result be of the training
activity?
The workshops/seminars will be implemented in Macedonia, in six months period- once per
month for three days in small groups a relaxed atmosphere.
- Discussing, debating and exhibiting required skills in problem solving and decision making.
-Expanding knowledge in other kinds of tourism as educational tourism, health/wellness/spa,
summer and winter tourism in the mountains, natural and cultural heritage, rural, cultural, adventure
tourism, camping and ecotourism etc.
- Tourism income improves the economic situation of a developing country
-Fostering environmental protection and raising the awareness of the local population
concerning environmental problems.
- It may result in a transfer of money from richer to poorer regions and thus create jobs.
- Improvement of the quality of life.
- Slow down the rate of rural exodus

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Title of Project

Project Leader / Hexagon

Erwin Schrdinger Programme

Austrian Science Fund / People (Culture)


Description of the Programme

The Erwin Schrdinger Programme designed and operated by the Austrian Science Fund is a high
quality funding instrument providing young outstanding post-doc researchers from all scientific
disciplines and the humanities an opportunity to work at leading research facilities (of their choice)
around the world and to acquire international experience in their early post-doc phase. Each application
is exposed to a thorough international peer review process managed by the Austrian Science Fund. The
Erwin Schrdinger Programme, established already in 1985, is Austrias biggest post-doc outgoing
programme, enabling on average 130 Fellowship holders to spend up to two years at a research
institution abroad, thereby turning them into bridge builders in the sciences, humanities and beyond. A
significant number of former Erwin Schrdinger Fellows having decided to stay abroad often become
hosts of current Erwin Schrdinger Fellows who want to profit from new ideas, new methods, and
approaches at top-research institutions.
The success of the Erwin Schrdinger Programme has been recognized by the European Commission
which since 2009 provides co-funding to the programme through its Marie Curie Actions. The additional
funds (amounting to Euro 12.6 million until the year 2018) helped a lot to make the Erwin Schrdinger
Programme even more appealing to young scientists and scholars by providing the option to make use
of a so-called return phase of up to 12 months at their Austrian home institution after they have
returned from their stay abroad.
The FWF now offers an attractive, flexible post-doc programme which allows researchers to gain
experience in the best research institutions abroad. With the implementation of the return phase the
FWF encounters the brain drain from Austria and in consequence from the ERA. In the meantime nearly
80% of the applications for a Schrdinger fellowship include a return phase to Austria, so in
consequence, the fellows bring newly gained knowledge, new methods and techniques back to the
Austrian institutions and in this way back to the ERA.
Implementation Period

Aim / Success

The Programme was launched in 1985. There are


no submission deadlines and the reviewing
process is carried out on a rolling basis.

Young post-docs acquire new knowledge,


get access to new ideas, methods and
approaches

Young post-docs develop into future


bridge builders, be it as future hosts of
Erwin Schrdinger Fellows or through
manifold professional and personal ties

The research stay abroad is a catalyst for


individual careers and international
contacts

The potential of young researchers


coming from Austria is recognized by the
scientific community in other countries

Austria becomes a stronger player in the


international competition of excellent
research locations.

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Title of Project

Project Leader / Hexagon

Lise Meitner Programme

Austrian Science Fund / People (Culture)


Description of the Programme

The Lise Meitner Programme designed and operated by the Austrian Science Fund is a high quality
funding instrument offering outstanding scientists and scholars from around the globe to come to
Austria in order to contribute to the advancement of science at an Austrian research institution for a
maximum duration of two years. The Lise Meitner Programme aims at enhancing quality and scientific
know-how in the Austrian scientific community and at establishing international contacts.
Each application is exposed to a thorough international peer review process managed by the Austrian
Science Fund. The Lise Meitner Programme, established in 1992, is Austrias biggest post-doc incoming
programme. On average, 75 Lise Meitner fellows spend up to two years in Austria, thereby acting as
bridge builders between Austria, their home countries and beyond.
There are no submission deadlines for Lise Meitner applications and the peer review process is carried
out on a rolling basis. Candidates must hold a PhD, have a strong record of international scientific
publications and need to be invited by an Austrian host research institution. There is no age limit in
place.
As a recent development it can be observed that the share of applications coming from Eastern and
Central Europe countries, which have been traditionally strong, has dropped significantly leaving space
open for inflow from other countries, particularly from Western European countries.
Implementation Period

Aim / Success

The Programme was launched in 1992. There are


no submission deadlines and the reviewing
process is carried out on a rolling basis.

To attract post-doc researchers from


abroad that enhance the quality and
scientific know-how in the Austrian
scientific community; they contribute to
the advancement in science and the
humanities in Austria

To attract researchers as future bridge


builders for instance as future hosts if
they stay in Austria

The research stay is a catalyst for the


researchers careers

The potential of Austria as a country with


a strong science base is recognized by the
scientific community in other countries

Austria becomes a stronger player in the


international competition of excellent
research locations.

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Title of Project

Project Leader / Hexagon

The D-A-CH Lead Agency Agreement

Austrian Science Fund / People (Culture)


Description of the Programme

From a researchers perspective, contemporary research is an activity with no national borders or


limitation of ideas tied to the fact that national borderlines still exist. Science policy is required to
provide frameworks and conditions which endorse the researchers mind-set reducing or even better
withdrawing any restrictions nurtured by technocratic requirements. Funding agencies play a critical
role in this context. Being funded nationally, they have to deal with researchers striving for cooperations with colleagues doing research abroad.
In this context, the so called Lead Agency Agreement was established under the traditionally close ties
between the big research funding organisations in Switzerland (SNF, Schweizerischer Nationalfonds),
Germany (DFG, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft), and Austria (FWF, Austrian Science Fund). This
procedure aims at simplifying applications for research groups contributing to a joint research effort
situated in at least two of these three countries. The core idea behind this agreement is that the group
with the biggest share of the proposed research submits an application to its national funding agency
including all involved groups from abroad. This lead agency carries out the whole reviewing procedure
according to the national rules and arrives at a funding decision. The other funding agencies accept this
decision of the Lead Agency and in case of approval fund the project parts at home. The
international consortium of researchers has to deal with only one funding agency, the lead agency.
This idea, originally created by SNF, DFG, and FWF, raised attention among other national research
funding organisations leading to a growing momentum to join this arrangement. The FWF, being at the
service for a small but open(-minded) scientific community, has been a strong supporter and can be
described as a driving force of this lead agency procedure right from the start.
Generally speaking, the FWF perceives itself as a gateway and interface between the national and the
international scientific community by relaying entirely on international peer-reviewing for all submitted
proposals. The FWF receives almost 5,000 written peer appraisals per year from around the world as a
footing for its decision making process. Special juries and scientific boards as additional modes of
decision preparation are all staffed internationally. So, the FWF in general may be seen as a bridge
builder sending out thousands of quality signals to the Austrian scientific community per year.
Implementation Period

Aim / Success

The D-A-CH Lead Agency Agreement was initiated


in 2008 and furthered developed year by year
since then. Especially since 2010, a growing
number of other national funding institutions have
been interested in joining this approach of
encouraging cross-national research endeavours
funded by national sources.

To encourage cross-national research


efforts by reducing administrative
complexity
To see an increasing number of
international co-operation triggered by
bottom-up research ideas and efforts
To actively endorse an instrument
capable to deliver an approach to
effectively establish an European Grant
Union (EGU)
To actively foster the idea of a European
Research Area (ERA), where co-operation
is based on quality, driven by scientists
and scholars who generate their ideas
and considerations in a bottom-up
fashion.

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Projektnummer
RO/2003/IB-JH-06

RO/06/IB/OT/03

RO2003/IB/OT-03

RO2005/IB/JH/03

RO2002/IB/JH12TL
RO 2004/IB/JH14TL

RO2004/IB/AG/01
RO04/IB/AG-03

RO 06 IB JH 08

RO/06/IB/EN/02

RO/06/IB/EN/01

RO/06/IB/EN/09
RO/06/IB/EN/05

TWINNING Projekte mit sterr.Beteiligung RUMNIEN


Implementierende Implem
Organisation
entierun
Projekttitel
(LP/JP)
gsdauer
BMI/AEI (JP) NL
22
Setting up the Europol unit
(LP)
Monate
Institutional building, secondary
legislation drafting and training
concerning the Movable Cultural
15
Heritage and Cultural Goods
BMI/AEI
Monate
Multi-annual Programme of the
Cadastre and Real property Rights
Registration System in Romania CLC/BMJ (LP), IT
17
Phase 1
(JP)
Monate
Strengthening the Institutional and
Legislative Framework in the Field of
22
International Judicial Cooperation
CLC/BMJ
Monate
Creating and strengthening conflict
analysis and resolution capacities by
introducing alternative means to the
judiciary in solving civil and
5
commercial cases
CLC/BMJ
Monate
Promoting mediation as an
alternative dispute resolution mean
CLC/BMJ/NeuSTAR 8
to the judiciary
T
Monate
Strengthening the policy making
capacity of the Ministry of
Agriculture, Forests and Rural
24
Development
AMA (LP), D (JP)
Monate
Implementing a functional milk quota
24
system
AMA (JP), NL (LP)
Monate
Improving the institutional capacity of
the agencies involved in the
prevention of trafficking in human
beings in line with the current
European standards and best
BIM (LP), D (JP), GR 15
practices
(JP)
Monate
18
Implementation and enforcement of
Monate
the environmental acquis focused on Umweltbundesamt + 3
nature protection Phase II, Sibiu
(LP) NL (JP), CZ (JP) Wochen
Implementation and enforcement of
the environmental acquis focused on Umweltbundesamt 18
air quality Phase II, Cluj
(JP), D (LP)
Monate
Implementation and Enforcement of
the Environmental Acquis at National
Level and Coordination of the other 8
Regional Twinning Projects Phase II,
Umweltbundesamt 18
NEPA
(JP), D (LP)
Monate
Implementation and enforcement of Umweltbundesamt 18

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Budget
544.000

850.000

1.199.000

1.199.990

150.000

215.000

1.000.000
996.000

642.983

800.000

800.000

800.000
800.000

simon anholt
the environmental acquis focused on
IPPC and risk management Phase II,
Pitesti
Support for adopting and
RO/04/IB/AG/10/ implementing the acquis in the
TL
forestry sector
Implementation and enforcement of
the environmental acquis focused on
RO/04/IB/EN/02 nature protection
Implementation and enforcement of
the environmental Acquis focussed
RO/04/IB/EN/01 on air quality at the REPA Cluj-Napoca
Implementation and Enforcement of
the Environmental Acquis at National
Level and Coordination of the other 8
RO/04/IB/EN/09 Regional Twinning Projects, Phase I
Twinning in the field of chemicals to
improve the legal framework and to
RO/02/IB/EN/01 improve the enforcement
Implementation of the harmonised
legislation on occupational safety and
health in the small and medium sized
RO/04/IB/SO/01 enterprises
Strengthening of the School of public
RO2005/IB/FI/02 finance
Support for the development if
community mental health services
and the deinstitutionalisation of
RO/06/IB/OT/02 persons with mental disorders
Strengthening the administrative
capacity of UCVPP regarding the
public procurement verification
RO2006/IB/FI-05 procedures
Strengthening the internal audit
capacity by developing the
association process for the small
public entities and the attestation
RO/2007-IB/FI/04 system for the internal auditors
Implementation of the integrated
tariff of the European Union-TARIC
RO 2001/IB-FI-02 (TARIR)
Strengthening the inter-operability of
Romanian customs administration
through the implementation of the
strategy of inter-operability with EU
RO 2002/IB/FI-01 systems

RO03/IB/JH 07 TL
RO /2007IB/AG/04

Resources Centre on countering


trafficking in human beings
Support for Common Agricultural
Policy Adaptation

(JP), F (LP)

Monate

8
Umweltbundesamt Monate
Umweltbundesamt
(LP), CZ (JP), NL
24
(JP)
Monate

1.250.000

Umweltbundesamt 24
(JP), D (LP)
Monate

1.250.000

Umweltbundesamt
(JP), D (LP), NL
24
(JP), CZ (JP)
Monate

2.000.000

24
Umweltbundesamt Monate

1.000.000

250.000

AEI/BMWFJ
AEI/BMF (LP), IT
(JP)

22
Monate
21
Monate

AEI (LP), NL (JP)

24
Monate

1.000.000

AEI/Bundesvergab
eamt

5
Monate

220.000

AEI/BMF (JP), F
(LP)

18
Monate

1.000.000

AEI/BMF

20
Monate

698.000

AEI/BMF

20
Monate

600.000

AEI/BMI/BKA
AMA (LP), D (JP)

8
Monate
15
Monate

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1.500.000
599.752

120.000
700.000

simon anholt

RO2002/IB/OT/06 Enhancement of the Romanian SME


-TL
Agency Capacity
RO/06/IB/AG/01

Further Support to ANCA Services


Improving the Management of
RO /2007Human Resources of the Romanian
IB/JH/04
Police
Strengthening the capacity of the
Romanian institutions for the
RO/1999/IB/JH/0 prevention and control of money
2
laundering
Continuation of the assistance in the
RO 2007 / IB / JH - field of judicial cooperation in civil,
09 TL;
commercial and criminal matters.
Support for improving the General
Inspectorate for Emergency Situations
RO 2007 / IB / OT- capacity in assessment of the risks /
04 TL
major accidents effects
RO 2007 / IB / JH - Increasing the efficiency of the
11 TL
judicial expertise system in Romania

7
AWS
Monate
Landwirtschaftska 15
mmer (JP), F (LP) Monate

150.000
500.000

AEI/BMI

15
Monate

648.718

NB

12
Monate

375.000

CLC

6
Monate

250.000

TV

6
Monate

229.607

CLC

6
Monate

243.000

34 Projekte

TOTAL

24.581.050

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Competitive Identity Austria


A few examples of Austrias recent efforts to serve as a bridge-builder or mediator in international fora:
1.

In August 2009 Austria hosted informal talks regarding the Western Sahara in Drnstein.
In December 2010 informal talks on Sudan between the North and South were held in Baden.
Austria further supported the mediation process between the Steering Group for Kosovo and the
Balkans.

2.

As member of the United Nations Security Council for the period 2009-2010, Austria committed
itself to acting as honest broker on many issues on the agenda of the Security Council. During
Austrias presidency in November 2011 per our initiative the UNSC unanimously adopted SC
resolution 1894 (2009) on the protection of civilians in armed conflict (by many viewed as a
landmark resolution of the Security Council). It is one of the main goals of this resolution to ensure
that the United Nations can make an effective contribution to the protection of civilians in the
framework of its own peacekeeping missions. Resolution 1894, therefore, obliges all such missions
to develop comprehensive protection strategies as part of their overall implementation plans.
(Protection issues remained a priority for Austria after her Council presidency: They were of
particular relevance in the Councils deliberations on the UN missions in the Democratic Republic of
the Congo (DRC), in Chad, in the Sudan and in Cte dIvoire.)

Per initiative of Austria together with France and UK - the plight of hundreds of thousands of
civilians trapped between the army of Sri Lanka and the LTTE terror organisation was discussed by
the members of the Security Council (even though not on the agenda of the SC).
3. Within the EU, Austria is increasingly putting an emphasis on regional cooperation as a tool for
strengthening the ties with our neighbours. The EU Strategy for the Danube Region that Austria has
initiated together with Romania provides a basis for intensive cooperation among the countries of
the Danube Basin, mostly in the areas of transport, energy and environment.
4.

Austria cultural foreign policy is a pillar of Austrian foreign policy. With its global network of cultural
service points, Austrian foreign cultural activities increasingly cease to be mere presentations of
Austrian art and culture, but tend to focus on contributions to the international cultural dialogue. In
this context, Austria also supports EUNIC, the European Union National Institutes for Culture, of
which Austria is a founding member. EUNIC serves as a partner in the cultural dialogue between EU
member states and between the EU and third countries.

5.

The intercultural and interreligious dialogue is a clear priority of the Austrian foreign policy. By
launching and supporting dialogue initiatives the Republic of Austria strives to offer sustainable
contributions to building worldwide trust and peace. Furthermore, Austria aims at combating the
spread of stereotypes. Our dialogue initiatives are designed to promote democracy and the
universal respect for human rights and basic human freedoms, including the freedom of religion or
belief. In the next months, we will focus on the preparation of the 5th Annual Forum of the UN
Alliance of Civilizations in Vienna, the setting up of a new interreligious and intercultural centre in
Vienna as well as on, the 100th anniversary of the Austrian law on Islam.

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Dual Apprenticeship training in Austria


About 40% of young people learn a profession in the dual system (~ 130.000 apprentices)

Apprenticeship takes place in training enterprise (80% of time) and part-time vocational school
(20% of time); apprenticeship contract between enterprise and apprentice

training is based on two regulations (ordinances): training company and school

~ 200 apprenticeships (professions) in practically all branches of the economy with a 2-4 years
training period depending on the profession

Certificate with the Final apprenticeship examination = key qualification for commercial and
industrial economic sectors

Combination with high school education/university-entrance diploma (Berufsreifeprfung) is


possible

Access to regulated professions and basis for Higher Vocational Education and Training:
Meister and other professional qualifications

Key benefits of the dual system:


It is practical-oriented and a flexible demand led system

Covers the needs for skilled persons in companies

Good position for young people at labour market

Minor costs for the public funding

Financing of Apprenticeship training


Training companies provide and pay for company based part of training (training infrastructure,
trainer salary, apprentice remuneration, etc.)

Federal and regional governments provide and finance the school based-part of training

Financial support to training companies, also with specific quality related incentives; moreover
coaching and consulting of apprentices and companies (mainly financed by employers through a
fund scheme )

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STRABAG verbindet Schweiz und sterreich


Mit dem Neubau der Eisenbahnbrcke St. Margrethen-Lustenau wird nicht nur der Rhein berwunden,
sondern zugleich auch die Landesgrenze zwischen der Schweiz und sterreich. Die Brcke liegt auf der
wichtigen Strecke Zrich-Mnchen und wird die Fahrzeit verkrzen.
Die neue Brcke ist eine Stahlbetonverbundkonstruktion mit einer anspruchsvollen Geometrie. Sie
erfordert eine uerst przise Schalungstechnik mit mageschneiderten Sonderschalungen. Die sechs
Brckenpfeiler gestalten sich elliptisch und werden nach unten schmaler. Dank einer Trgerschalung
entstehen hohle Pfeiler, deren Wnde bis zu 90 cm dick sind. Das Tragwerk bilden die Vorlandbrcken
an beiden Ufern. Ihre trogartige Form erhalten sie durch eine Rahmenschalung mit Formholzkasten. Mit
vormontierten Schalungselementen wird die Fahrbahnplatte von einem Haupttrger zum anderen ber
dem Fluss betoniert. Oberhalb der Fahrbahn erstreckt sich der Brckenbogen mit seinen 102 m
Spannweite, der am hchsten Punkt 20 m hoch ist. Durch die beiden Bogenteile, die oben aufeinander
treffen, erscheint der Brckenbogen als gekrmmtes X. Mglich war dies mit einem Lehrgerst und
einer magenauen, stabilen Groflchenschalung aus gehobelten Brettern. Ohne einen einzigen Anker
und in einem Zug konnte der Brckenbogen so betoniert werden. Wenn Ende September 2012 das
Lehrgerst abgesenkt wird, trgt sich die Konstruktion selbst.
Der Anforderung, dass alle Oberflchen Sichtbetonqualitt aufweisen sollten, wird STRABAG mit dieser
Ausfhrung gerecht. Eine weitere Herausforderung, die es im Vorfeld zu meistern galt, stellt das
Sicherheitshandbuch dar: Die Landesgrenze verluft in der Mitte des Rheins. Da die Brcke diesen
berquert, gilt auf der einen Seite der Baustelle schweizerisches Recht und auf der anderen
sterreichisches.
Die Eckdaten zum Projekt
Ausfhrungszeitraum: November 2010 bis Mai 2013 (30 Monate)
Auftragssumme: EUR 10,66 Mio.
Lnge der Brcke: 275 m
Breite der Brcke: 8 m
3
Verbaute Betonmenge: 9.000 m
Bauherr: BB-Infrastruktur AG, Wien
Photos werden auf Anfrage gerne zugesendet.

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Title of Project
FIW - Research Centre International Economics
(FIW Forschungsschwerpunkt Internationale
Wirtschaft)

Project leader / Hexagon


Austrian Institute of Economic Research (WIFO),
The Vienna Institute for International Economic
Studies (wiiw), Computing Centre for Economics
and Social Sciences (WSR)
Hexagon: Exports, Investment & Immigration,
Governance, Tourism
Project description
The Research Centre International Economics - FIW provides a platform for topics and relevant
information related to International Economics and free access to international foreign trade databases.
The project aims
to connect researchers and decision makers in Austria and to enhance the development of knowhow with regard to foreign economic affairs;
to sharpen awareness of the public for topics such as foreign trade, FDI and globalisation by
providing easy access to relevant information in a user friendly manner;
to connect Austrian policy makers and researchers to the international community in the field of
International Economics, thereby raising awareness of the expertise and improving effectiveness of
Austrian policy makers in international negotiations.
FIW maintains a systematic research programme and supports decision makers in ongoing questions on
foreign trade in the scope of the European Union and other international organisations. It embeds
Austrias research efforts in the international scientific debate and provides various networking activities
(FIW Research Conference, FIW-Working Paper series, FIW-Experts database).
FIW advises the Austrian government and social partners directly and provides various regularly
published publications like the FIW-Policy Briefs that address current and policy-relevant issues in
International Economics or the FIW-Notes that provide a brief overview of global and Austrian
developments in foreign trade.
Therefore, FIW is an important source of information with regard to foreign economic affairs for the
research community, the Austrian government, social partners and the general public.
Implementation Period
Aim / Success
FIW I: 2007-2008
Specific aim towards international awareness:
FIW II: 2008-2009
increasing visibility and effectiveness of Austrian
FIW III: 2009-2011
policy makers and researcher
FIW IV: 2011-2012
Success: Providing access to a platform for
FIW V: 2012-2013
international trade topics, international foreign
Planed FIW VI: 2013-2016
trade databases and other relevant information
related to International Economics
Success: strong network of experts in various
research areas in International Economics listed in
a database
Success:
international
cooperation
with
universities and research institutes in Hungary,
Slovenia, Germany
Success: close cooperation with the European
Trade Economist Network (TEN)
Success: periodic lectures, seminars, workshops,
conferences with well-known international
economists

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

Transnational Education through Educational IMC FH Krems / Export


Export
Description of the Project
On the basis of bilateral agreements, IMC Krems implements accredited study programmes with partner
institutions in well chosen regions, such as Azerbaijan, in order to enhance educational standards in the
fields of International Tourism Management. Thus students and staff of the local institution
Azerbaijani Tourism Institute (ATI) in Baku - can benefit from the expertise of an Austrian University of
Applied Sciences, a well- developed curriculum adapted to the local needs, and guidance supplied
through Austrian academic and non-academic staff. The education provided both on Bachelor and
Master level fosters the development of the key competencies sought for in the tourism industry and
thus enhances employability of the young generation and thus the future of the country.. Furthermore,
regular visits equally enhance follow-up options for cooperation in other fields, such as health opening
up windows for further cooperation and engagement of Austrian companies in Azerbaijan.
IMC FH Krems can already look back on three cohorts of successful Bachelor graduates all employed in
the Azerbaijani Tourism industry, and started a Master program only recently, also in cooperation with
ATI thus strengthening the bridges to Azerbaijan through education and educational export.

Implementation Period

Aim/Success

Start in 2007 with prep year as first step in the


common development of ATI, followed by three
years of education and first graduation in 2010;

Aim: joint development of a HEI for


Tourism studies / Success: Foundation of
ATI
Aim: To foster competence development
recognized and supported by Azeri
authorities /Success: Programmes are
supported by Azeri Minister of Tourism
and Culture
Aim: Enhance employability through
quality education / Success: graduates
employed by national and international
companies
Aim: Enhance internationalization of IMC
Krems / Success: New partners for
Transnational programs
Aim: Open up windows for further
cooperation between Austria and
Azerbaijan / Success: Project in field of
health completed and project for
secondary education(College) as well as
Hotel Project (in Sheki) as regional
development project in cooperation with
Austrian companies in progress.

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

VICISU Vienna International Christian-Islamic


Project Leader: University of Vienna
Summer University
Hexagon: People
Description of the Project
The project VICISU started in 2008 and has since then been organized on a biannual basis. Professors
and students came from countries including Australia, Austria, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Cameroon,
Germany, Indonesia, Iran, Israel, Kazakhstan, Kosovo, Malaysia, Morocco, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Turkey,
United Kingdom, and the United States of America.
VICISU is a three week summer programme hosted by Stift Altenburg, a Benedictine monastery in Lower
Austria, that aims at bringing together students and professors from universities in Christian and Muslim
countries all over the world to discuss the most import questions concerning our todays world from a
Christian and from a Muslim perspective. The students are confronted with theological, legal, social and
political approaches on the topics.

Implementation Period
Running, organized biannually, supported by
BMWF and public and private sponsors

Aim/Success
AIM: VICISU brings together students and
professors from all over the world in order to
discuss important questions from a Christian and
from a Muslim perspective.
Success: VICISU success is to unite students and
professors in their efforts to the mutual
understanding between religions. VICISU lets
lifelong friendships of future decision makers
across confessional boundaries grow and supports
the image of Austria as a place of intercultural
dialogue and tolerance.

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Title of Project
Higher Education Marketing

Project Leader/Hexagon
Austrian Federal Ministry of Science and Research
(BMWF) / People
Description of the Project

International presentation of Austria as an attractive location for higher education and research.
In 2002 a WG for the presentation of the higher education location Austria was established. Members
are the Austrian Agency for International Cooperation in Education and Research (OeAD-GmbH),
Universities Austria, the Association of Universities of Applied Sciences, Federal Ministry of Science and
Research, Federal Ministry for European and International Affairs, Steering Committee of the University
Colleges of Teacher Education and the Austrian Private Universities Conference.
The OeAD-GmbH is commissioned to implement all activities regarding higher education marketing,
participates at international education fairs for multipliers and/or students in Asia, America and Europe
(e.g. APAIE, NAFSA, EAIE, EHEF,). There, the agency supports higher education institutions in their
international activities and represents all Austrian higher education institutions at one booth.
Further measures are e.g.: publication of information brochures, which are updated every year (e.g.
Study Guide, Higher Education Institutions Guide), organization of booths at conferences,
receptions, the Austrian database for scholarships and research grants www.grants.at and EURAXESS
Austria www.euraxess.at. Text source, more information and logos:
http://www.oead.at/oead_infos_services/communication/higher_education_marketing/EN/

Implementation Period
Since 2002 - ongoing

Aim/Success
emphasize and increase the attractiveness and
international presence of Austria as a higher
education and research location
to make Austria known as an attractive area for
studying and research and to be present on an
international level
to ease and enhance the exchange of students
to ease the recruitment of excellent,
international students
Internationalization of
Higher Education
Institutions in Austria

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Title of Project
Transnational
Export

Education

through

Project Leader/Hexagon
Educational

IMC FH Krems / Export

Description of the Project


On the basis of bilateral agreements, IMC Krems implements accredited study programmes with partner
institutions in well-chosen regions, such as Azerbaijan, in order to enhance educational standards in the
fields of International Tourism Management. Thus students and staff of the local institution
Azerbaijani Tourism Institute (ATI) in Baku - can benefit from the expertise of an Austrian University of
Applied Sciences, a well- developed curriculum adapted to the local needs, and guidance supplied
through Austrian academic and non-academic staff. The education provided both on Bachelor and
Master level fosters the development of the key competencies sought for in the tourism industry and
thus enhances employability of the young generation and thus the future of the country. Furthermore,
regular visits equally enhance follow-up options for cooperation in other fields, such as health opening
up windows for further cooperation and engagement of Austrian companies in Azerbaijan.
IMC FH Krems can already look back on three cohorts of successful Bachelor graduates all employed in
the Azerbaijani Tourism industry, and started a Master program only recently, also in cooperation with
ATI thus strengthening the bridges to Azerbaijan through education and educational export.

Implementation Period

Aim/Success

Start in 2007 with prep year as first step in the


common development of ATI, followed by three
years of education and first graduation in 2010;

Aim: joint development of a HEI for Tourism


studies / Success: Foundation of ATI
Aim: To foster competence development
recognized and supported by Azeri authorities
/Success: Programmes are supported by Azeri
Minister of Tourism and Culture
Aim: Enhance employability through quality
education / Success: graduates employed by
national and international companies
Aim: Enhance internationalization of IMC
Krems / Success: New partners for
Transnational programs
Aim: Open up windows for further
cooperation between Austria and Azerbaijan /
Success: Project in field of health completed
and project for secondary education (College)
as well as Hotel Project (in Sheki) as regional
development project in cooperation with
Austrian companies in progress.

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Study 1:

Die volkswirtschaftliche Bedeutung des Bildungsexports: Qualitative Evidenz und


wirtschaftspolitische Bedeutung
(The Economic Importance of Education Exports: Qualitative Evidence and political
Importance

Abstract (German)
Die wachsende volkswirtschaftliche Bedeutung von Qualifikation und die beginnende Europisierung
des Bildungsmarktes belegen die groe Bedeutung, die der Bildungsexport knftig haben wird. Whrend
die Datenlage es nicht zulsst, das Volumen des Bildungsexports zu schtzen, zeigen Zahlen ber
auslndische Studierende in sterreich, dass Bildungsexport fr die sterreichische Volkswirtschaft
relevant ist. Die Studie schliet mit der Diskussion ber ausgewhlte wirtschaftspolitische Aspekte des
Bildungsexports.

Abstract (English)
The growing economic importance of qualifications and the beginning Europeanization of the market for
education are evidence for the growing economic importance of education exports. While data
constraints prevent a full quantification of education exports for Austria, figures on foreign students
show the importance and potential of exports of the education industry for Austria. The study closes
with a discussion of some selected policy issues with respect to education export.

Study2:

Zentralasien und Sdkaukasus Wirtschaftsentwicklung und Bedeutung fr


sterreichs Auenwirtschaft

Abstract (German)
Die zunehmende und trotz der Wirtschaftskrise anhaltende Globalisierung verstrkt die Bedeutung
wirtschaftlicher Auenbeziehungen der Europischen Union. Das Engagement in den Regionen
Zentralasien und Sdkaukasus lsst sich, neben entwicklungspolitischen Argumenten, vor allem durch
die Energieabhngigkeit, die Suche nach neuen Absatzmrkten und das Interesse an der Stabilitt in der
geopolitisch wichtigen Region argumentieren. Die vorliegende Studie gibt einen berblick ber die
Volkswirtschaften beider Regionen und ber sterreichs auenwirtschaftliche Beziehungen zu den
Regionen. Diese heterogenen Wirtschaftsrume unterscheiden sich deutlich hinsichtlich
Produktivittsniveau und Struktur. Sie verzeichneten in den letzten Jahren hohe Wachstumsraten und
weisen weiterhin ein groes Aufholpotential auf. Vor diesem Hintergrund schtzt die Studie das
Exportpotential fr sterreichische Unternehmen. Dafr werden qualitative Einschtzungen zur
Nachfrageentwicklung vorgenommen, ein Indikator zur bereinstimmung der Importstruktur der Lnder
Zentralasiens und des Sdkaukasus mit der sterreichischen Exportstruktur errechnet sowie die
sterreichische Wettbewerbsposition in diesen Lndern analysiert. Das Exportpotential ist demnach im
europaorientierten Sdkaukasus und im wohlhabenderen Kasachstan am grten. Zum Abschluss
werden wirtschaftspolitische Schlussfolgerungen entworfen, um die Integration mit diesen Lndern zu
strken.
Abstract (English)
The increase and despite economic crisis increasing globalization underlines the increasing
importance of external economic relations for the European Union. An increased interest in the Central
Asian and South Caucasus regions can be justified by aspects of development policy, the energy
dependence of Europe and an interest in political stability in these geopolitically important regions. The
current study provides an overview of the economies of these regions and the Austrian economic

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relations to this region. The heterogeneous economies of these regions differ with respect to
productivity and structure. They have registered high growth in the last years and show a substantial
potential for catching up. Against this background the study estimates the export potential for Austrian
enterprises. To this end quantitative scenarios for the development of demand are developed and an
indicator on the concordance of the export structure of Austria with the import structure of these
regions as well as the competitive position of Austrian enterprises in this region are analyzed. According
to the study the export potential is largest in the Southern Caucasus regions and in wealthy Kasachstan.
The study concludes with policy conclusions to support the economic integration of these countries.
Study 3:

CENTROPE Regional Development Report Project Summary and Policy Conclusions

Abstract (German)
Diese Studie fasst die Ergebnisse des Projektes CENTROPE Regional Development Report und die
verwandte Literatur zu dieser grenzberschreitenden Region zusammen. Wir schlagen vor, dass sich
grenzberschreitende Initiativen in dieser Region auf folgende Funktionen konzentrieren sollten: a) die
Erstellung und Zurverfgungstellung von Informationen ber Aktivitten in den Teilregionen und
anderen Grenzregionen b) die Koordination von Politiken mit rumlichen Bezug an den Grenzen
bestehender Gebietskrperschaften c) Bndelung von Ressourcen und Entwicklung eigener Projekte mit
dem Ziel der Erhhung der Wettbewerbsfhigkeit in verschiedenen Feldern der Wirtschaftspolitik d)
Vertretung gemeinsamer Interessen der teilnehmenden Regionen. Darber hinaus schlgt der Bericht
auch vor die Politik entlang vier verschiedenen thematischen Feldern zu entwickeln: Aufbau und
Verbesserung der institutionellen Rahmenbedingungen fr grenzberschreitende Politik und
Raumplanung, Entwicklung der CENTROPE in eine tief integrierte Wissensregion, grenzberschreitende
Arbeitsmarktintegration und Sicherung der Wettbewerbsfhigkeit der Region.
Abstract (English)
This report summarizes the results of the CENTROPE regional development report project as well as the
related literature on regional development in this cross-border region. In particular we propose that
cross-border policy initiatives in CENTROPE should focus on fulfilling the following functions a) securing
and providing information on the activities of and development in other regions, b) co-ordinating spatial
policies at the borders of administrative units, c) pooling resources and developing own projects in
various strands of economic policy to improve competitiveness and d) lobbying for common interests of
the participating regions. Furthermore, the report also suggests that the focal areas of cross-border cooperation should be structured around 4 priorities: Establishing and improving the institutional
preconditions for cross-border policy making and cross-border spatial planning, developing CENTROPE
into a deeply integrated knowledge region, integrating cross border labour markets, securing
international competitiveness of the CENTROPE region.

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Title of Project
Austrian Music Export

Project Leader/Hexagon
st. Musikfonds, Culture, Export, Tourism
Description of the Project

Austrian Music Export is a common initiative of the Austrian Music Fund and the Austrian Music
Information Centre mica music Austria in close cooperation with the organizers of the Austrian
booths at international music trade fairs. The initiative is in place since late 2011 and modelled
on the example of European music export offices. Its goal is to collectively help Austrian music
professionals to develop the presence of Austrian artists and productions abroad and aid the
international exploitation of Austrian repertoire. Austrian Music Exports aim is to be a service
and resource centre for exporters of contemporary Austrian music in all genres and aspects
(recordings, live, synch, etc.). This includes
- providing access to information on Austrian artists and companies,
- building a substantial network of industry professionals and media,
- providing travel/tour support for export projects of the Austrian industry,
- representing Austrian music at international events and
- gathering of international market know-how.
Specialised events for the European and international live music industry as well as stand-alone
Austrian events in key territories are used to
- develop export cooperations and international exchange
- develop promotional campaigns for the artists involved and the variety of the current
Austrian music scene in general and
- to encourage networking of music industry delegates (labels, promoters,
management/booking agencies, media partners) from Austria and abroad.
The exchange and joint projects with partners such as the major trade fairs, local and
international festivals, Cultural and Commercial Sections of the Austrian Embassies, Austrian
collecting societies, the Austrian federal economic chamber, go international as well as with
other national and international partners are both a starting point and an essential component
for future extensions.
Implementation Period
Aim/Success
2011ff

Aim: strengthen international exploitation of Austrian


repertoire by acting as a catalyst for export-oriented
Austrian companies & artists
Aim: provide adequate funding of international
showcases/tours of local artists
Aim: provide adequate funding of international
exploitation of Austrian repertoire, promotion and
marketing
Success: providing access to information on Austrian
artists and companies and building a substantial
international network of industry professionals and
media
Success: realisation of networking and showcase
events at international trade fairs and showcase
festivals as well as promoting a series of Austrian
events in key territories

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Title of Project
Waves Vienna Festival

Project Leader/Hexagon
Comrades GmbH, Culture, Export, Tourism
Description of the Project

Waves Vienna is a new club- and showcase festival taking place in Viennas 2nd district. In
autumn Viennas most significant clubs (Flex, Fluc, Pratersauna), unique off-locations, and the
public space merge into the festival site and host numerous international and Austrian
alternative, electronic, rock, and club acts. Waves Viennas motto is East meets West; the focus
of the festival is on exchange in artistic and economic terms with the CEE countries and western
states alike. The Waves Vienna Music Conference constitutes a part of the festival and offers the
possibility to attend networking events, lectures and panels and participate in workshops. The
programme serves as the basis and inspiration for many years of pan-European cooperation.
True to this motto Waves Vienna welcomes two countries as special guests - in 2012 Poland and
France, in 2013 Belgium and Slovenia. In 2012 10,800 visitors and 517 delegates from 30 different
countries visited the festival. Music from Austria was represented prominently with over 50 acts;
the festival also featured numerous acts from Eastern Europe (23, including 9 from Poland, one
of the host countries 2012).
In addition to the festival in Vienna a series of spin-off events was developed and implemented in
cooperation with Austrian Music Export and Cultural and Commercial Sections of the respective
Austrian Embassies. In 2012 these showcase and industry networking events took place in Paris
and Warsaw. The aim is to initiate sustained international cooperation and exchange programs as
well as additional support for export-oriented Austrian management and booking agencies, labels
and promoters.
Implementation Period
3 Day Festival & Conference

Aim/Success
Aim to position and publicise Vienna as a city of a
young and flourishing music culture as well as a
contact point with Eastern Europe
Aim to strengthen, educate, connect
and fund the local music scene
Aim to exchange ideas and implement projects
for international circulation of Austrian and
European repertoire
Aim to build a artistic and economic hub for
exchange between Eastern and Western European
countries
Success: More than 500 international Delegates
visited the festival in 2012
Success: Partnerships with European
music export offices and music festivals in place
Success: More imports/exports for music
companies from Austria and abroad

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

Austrias Welfare State as European Role Model

Federal Ministry for Labour, Social Affairs and


Consumer Protection / People
Description of the Project

The well-established Austrian welfare state ensures social peace and security, a well-educated work
force and economic progress. As an activating welfare state, it avoids and alleviates poverty and
guarantees a smooth transition from education and training into work and profession by various
measures and benefits. At the same time, economic change and modernisation are safeguarded by
labour market measures for flexicurity and work-family-reconciliation and by a great economic
autonomy.
In times of the financial crisis, the Austrian welfare system could be secured and modernised. This is
only possible because of the Austrian Social Partnership, an established system of intensive cooperation
and consensus finding between different government and non-government actors, the economic
interest groups. State bodies and Social Partner organisations form a unit with transparent structures of
dialogue and decision making: The social partners are included in both the development and the
implementation of social and labour market policies, ensuring a broad acceptance and thereby e.g. one
of Europes lowest strike quotas and one of the least unfair income distributions worldwide.

Implementation Period

Aim/Success
Aims of the Austrian Welfare State
full employment
equal opportunities in social inclusion
price stability and economic growth
humane labour conditions
Successes
low poverty and social exclusion rate
low unemployment and low
unemployment

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youth

simon anholt

Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

Ensuring Quality of Life and Participation

Federal Ministry for Labour, Social Affairs and


Consumer Protection
Description of the Project

The Federal Act on the Promotion of the Interests of the Older Generation (Federal Senior Citizens Act,
Federal Law Gazette No. 84/1998 of 21.6.1998) brought about the establishment of the Federal Senior
Citizens Advisory Council to represent the interests of the older generation vis--vis political decisionmakers at a national level. The General Promotion of Senior Citizens' (the government provides 1 euro
for every Austrian and EEA citizen in Austria over 55 (women) or 60 (men) secures the financing of
advice, information and support for senior citizens via the senior citizens' organisations. The Austrian
Federal Plan for Senior Citizens Ageing and future aims to develop, guarantee and raise the quality of
life of senior citizens.
The National Quality Certificate for Old Age and Nursing Homes in Austria (NQC) is an Austrian-wide
uniform and sector-specific external evaluation procedure to objectively gauge the quality of services in
old age and nursing homes. The quality of life of residents is at the centre of the National Quality
Certificate.
UNECE Ministerial Conference on Ageing: The second review of the implementation of the 2002
rd
MIPAA/RIS framework culminated in the 3 UNECE Ministerial Conference on Ageing under the motto
Ensuring a society for all ages, promoting quality of life and active ageing in Vienna and set out in its
Ministerial Declaration four priorities for action for the next five-year cycle (2013-2017).
Implementation Period

Aim/Success
Aims of the Austrian Welfare State
ensuring participation of older people in policy
making
safeguard and/or to improve the quality of life of
older people
improving of quality of life in residential care
minimize inequalities
fostering social integration
Successes
Austrian Federal Plan for Senior Citizens
NQZ: Participation of all provinces
rd
3 UNECE Ministerial Conference on Ageing

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Title of the Project


EU Strategy for the Danube Region, Priority Area 9
Investing in People and Skills

Project Leader
Federal Ministry of Labour, Social Affairs
and Consumer Protection of Austria
(Lead) / other Project Partner: Federal
Ministry for Education, the Arts and
Culture of Austria / Republic of Moldova

Description of the Project


Long term prospects emphasize the importance of skills in Europe. Skills and skills development
through adequate education and labour market policies, are at the core of improving
individuals employment outcomes, increasing countries productivity and growth and equally of
promoting equitable and inclusive societies. They are also essential components of efforts of
improving the well-being and personal fulfilment of citizens.
In order to be prepared for the changes and challenges ahead, capacity-building and new
approaches in initial and continuing education and training are needed to empower and equip
citizens with more and better skills and competences which the European economy and
European society need in order to remain competitive and innovative. Improving the
attractiveness and relevance of VET, increasing the participation in adult learning and providing
innovative training opportunities for disadvantaged groups, especially the Roma population and
youth, are of particular importance in this regard.
The project promotes equal access to education, training and retraining to overcome the
economic and social gap between the highly developed states near to the origin of the Danube
and the minor developed states in the South East. Lead Partner Austria therefore has an
eminent role from the strategic development to the day-to-day business of making it possible
for Moldova, the Ukraine, Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Serbia and Croatia to
participate in and profit from the Strategy at all.
Implementation Period
endorsed by Heads of States 24 June 2011

Aims
Aim to overcome the economic gap
between the highly developed states
near to the origin of the Danube, Austria
and Germany and the non-EU member
states in the South East (for example
Moldova, Ukraine).
Aim to make participation of non-EU
member states possible on an everyday
basis
Aim to empower capacity-building and
new approaches in initial and continuing
education and training

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simon anholt

Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

The Platform Digital Austria innovator and Federal Chancellery/ Governance


international leader by example
Description of the Project
Austria is one of the eGovernment leaders in Europe. International comparisons confirm that
Austrian eGovernment services are not only comprehensive but also user-friendly and of the
highest quality, thereby delivering a series of international recognized best practice examples.
The Platform Digital Austria is the strategic platform ensuring the active participation of all levels
of Government and coordinates the Austrian eGovernment programmes. Its main tasks are
strategic decision-making, priority setting regarding the implementation of joint eGovernment
projects, their coordination and monitoring of their performance.
The E-Government Strategy of Digital Austria is based on a holistic view taking into account all
parts and steps of electronic procedures. This starts with the very first contact and information
gathering and includes the application, the back-office workflow and the delivery of the result to
the citizen or company. For the generic parts, the Platform Digital Austria provides open source
modules which can also be used for eCommerce and eBusiness.
Basic tools for eSignature and eIdentification are provided with the Citizen Card Concept. Most
recently, Austria introduced supported by the European Commission the so called mobile
phone signature. This is a major step forward as secure and reliable signatures can be produced
without any hard- or software requirements. The technical complexity is being done behind the
curtain. This is the way forward: convenient use, understandable for users and at the same time
highest security and legal certainty. Further well-known best practice examples in the Austrian EGovernment landscape are: The Austrian E-Government Portals www.HELP.gv.at and
www.usp.gv.at, the electronic file system ELAK including the AT solution for digital long-term
archiving, the Legal Information System www.ris.bka.gv.at including the eLAW-workflow of the
Parliament, the eDelivery solutions, the Austrian Cadastre and Land Register, the Central Register
of Residence and a series of other successful services.
Eminent international interest in the Austrian solutions is demonstrated by plenty of electronic
contacts as well as visits of international delegations from all over the world (almost biweekly).
Austria is also intensively cooperating in international projects such as the so-called Large Scale
Pilots of the European Commission (e-CODEX (e-Justice Communication via Online Data
Exchange), EPSOS (Smart open Services for European Patients), PEPPOL (Pan-European Public
Procurement Online), SPOCS (Simple Procedures Online for Crossborder Services) and STORK
(Secure idenTity acrOss boRders linked)).

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simon anholt

Implementation Period

Aim/Success

After the successful implementation of the


eGovernment Initiative which was launched in
2003 by the Federal Government, the
coordination structure for eGovernment was
consolidated in autumn 2005 with the
establishment of the Platform Digital Austria.

The aim of the Platform Digital Austria is


to build a strategic umbrella for electronic
communication and interaction with the
Government and beyond.
The goal is to provide for comprehensive,
user-friendly electronic services.
eServices are defined and implemented
using modular architecture and including
interoperability by design allowing for
cross-border usage.
Intensive international cooperation

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simon anholt

Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

EU Strategy for the Danube Region


Several Federal Ministries + City of Vienna
Austrian Contribution
Description of the Project
"sterreich und der Donauraum: Ein berblick"
Die Donau verbindet das ist die Kernbotschaft der EU Strategie fr den Donauraum, die die
Zusammenarbeit verbessern und Gemeinsamkeiten zwischen EU und Nicht-EU-Lndern
hervorstreichen soll. 14 Lnder, 115 Millionen Einwohnern und ein Fnftel der EU-Flche sind starke
Argumente fr die Relevanz der Makroregion Donauraum fr Europa.
Die EU-Mitgliedsstaaten Deutschland, sterreich, Ungarn, Tschechien, Slowakei, Slowenien,
Bulgarien und Rumnien bilden den Kern der Strategie. Dazu kommen die beiden Beitrittskandidaten
Kroatien und Montenegro sowie mit Serbien, Bosnien-Herzegowina, Ukraine und der Republik
Moldau vier Drittstaaten, die sich zusammengeschlossen und 11 gemeinsame Priorittsfelder
definiert haben. Diese Felder sind in einem Aktionsplan und einem Strategiepapier 2011 von der
Europischen Kommission verabschiedet worden und umfassen neben Mobilitt, Kultur und
Tourismus, unterschiedliche Themen des Umweltschutzes, des Wohlstands und der Sicherheit.
http://ec.europa.eu/regional_policy/cooperate/danube/index_en.cfm#6
"sterreich spielt eine zentrale Rolle"
sterreich ist wirtschaftlich und sozial eines der strker entwickelten Donauraum-Lnder. Deshalb
nimmt man nicht nur in der Gesamtkoordination der Strategie eine zentrale Fhrungsrolle ein,
sondern trgt als Koordinator von drei Priorittsfeldern mageblich Verantwortung. Gemeinsam mit
dem Verkehrsministerium koordiniert die sterreichische Wasserstraen-Gesellschaft via Donau (in
Kooperation mit Rumnien) den Schwerpunktbereich Schifffahrt, das Bundesministerium fr
Unterricht, Kunst und Kultur und das Bundesministerium fr Arbeit, Soziales und Konsumentenschutz
den Bereich Menschen und Qualifikationen (gemeinsam mit der Republik Moldau) und die Stadt
Wien (in Zusammenarbeit mit Slowenien) das Priorittsfeld Institutionelle Kapazitt und Kooperation.
Das Auenministerium und das Bundeskanzleramt sind der nationale Kontaktpunkt der Strategie.
"sterreichs Beitrag zur Strategieumsetzung"
Am Beginn der Umsetzung einer Strategie braucht es eine Organisationsstruktur. Die AkteurInnen
des Donauraums verstndigten sich auf einen transnationalen Lenkungsausschuss, in dem sich
Arbeitsgruppen auf die Prozesse und Vorgehensweise innerhalb der Strategie austauschen.
Gemeinsam mit den Partnern in der Makroregion ist es die zentrale Aufgabe der sterreichischen
AkteurInnen die Strategie und insbesondere die drei Priorittsfelder zu kommunizieren sowie
institutionelle Bewusstseinsbildung zu betreiben. Im Donauraum sollen langfristig transnationale,
grenzberschreitende und regionale Projekte identifiziert und umgesetzt werden. Dazu braucht es
neben den Schwerpunktkoordinatoren auch das politische Commitment der involvierten
Institutionen. Nur wenn diese bereit sind im Planungsstadium neuer Vorhaben den Donauraum
mitzudenken und zu integrieren, kann eine solche Strategie nachhaltig erfolgreich sein.
Implementation Period
Aim/Success
Ongoing (since 2007)

Gemeinsam mit den Partnern in der


Makroregion ist es die zentrale Aufgabe der
sterreichischen AkteurInnen die Strategie
und insbesondere die drei Priorittsfelder zu
kommunizieren
sowie
institutionelle
Bewusstseinsbildung zu betreiben.

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simon anholt
Title of Project: Desiring the Real. Austria Contemporary
Hexagon: Culture and Heritage
Description of the Project:
Upon the initiative of Federal Minister Dr. Claudia Schmied the exhibition Desiring the Real
was commissioned by the Directorate General for International and Religious Affairs within
the Austrian Federal Ministry of Education, Arts and Culture. The exhibition presents the
works of 22 artists which have been acquired in recent years by the Ministry, complemented
by art loans.
Since spring 2012 Desiring the Real. Austria Contemporary is on a worldwide tour. It was
presented in the MOCAB Museum of Contemporary Art Belgrade, Serbia, the MUAC
Contemporary Art University Museum Mexico City and is actually shown at the Cervantino
International Festival, University of Guanajuato, Mexico. Current plans foresee further
presentations in the following countries: Cuba, Croatia, Italy, Macedonia, Turkey and France.
This project is aimed to be a contribution towards enhancing the mutual understanding
between contemporary artists in different countries and a contribution to intercultural
dialogue. A dialogue, that leads to a better understanding of different cultures with all their
diversity and many-faceted nuances.
Communication and dialogue are essential in the interplay of culture and politics and in the
exchanges between different countries. Artists are multitasking specialists, they permeate
the boundaries between high and low art, between elite and popular culture, between art and
everyday life. Artists are global players, they move around the world with ease and take their
inspiration from global culture. Through this exhibition they can establish worldwide contacts
and relationships this is how Austria suddenly gets to be somewhere else, too.
Art is a tool and a medium of encounter. Presenting young Austrian artists at the international
level is one of the major priorities and objectives of our cultural policy. It is of prime
importance to secure global visibility for young Austrian artists and ensure they are part of a
far-reaching network. The presentation of Desiring the Real is one step towards achieving
this mission: it will be open to change, it will communicate, and it will serve as an opening
and a gateway into today's reality.

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simon anholt
Title of Project: Austrian Schools Abroad
Hexagon: People, Culture and Heritage
Description of the Project:
The Federal Ministry for Education, the Arts and Culture maintains 8 schools abroad, with
locations in Albania, Guatemala, Liechtenstein, Mexico, Hungary (2), the Czech Republic
and Turkey.
These schools are involved in a wide range of projects, thus building local contacts across a
broad spectrum. From a pedagogical standpoint they act as educational models; they
present Austrian culture and the German language as spoken in Austria to the host country
in question and encourage cross-cultural interaction. Pupils at Austrian schools abroad are
encouraged to take an interest in intercultural issues and approaches, familiarised with
Austrian institutions and presented with a positive image of Austria. Graduates from these
schools have in-depth knowledge of Austrian political and economic structures and can
therefore interact successfully at a variety of levels. Furthermore, Austrian schools abroad
offer teachers the chance to combine the new and the familiar and to enhance their
understanding of foreign cultures. After they return to Austria, their teaching is enriched and
they help promote an international outlook in various different ways at their respective
schools.

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simon anholt
Title of Project: Vocational Education
Hexagon: People
Description of the Project:
International comparative statistics show that Austria has a very successful system of
vocational education and training at upper secondary level. Austria has with approximately
80 percent the highest percentage of young people in initial VET among all EU and OECD
countries. At the same time the youth unemployment has been one of the lowest if not the
lowest in the European Union during the last decade. There is a wide offer of different VET
programs and pathways available in Austria covering technology, business administration,
tourism, health care and agriculture and forestry. Fifty percent of the VET students are
enrolled in school based programs, the other half follows the apprenticeship or dual training
program. Many VET programs lead directly to tertiary education. The graduates from the
other programs either directly enter the labour market or take bridge exams and continue with
university studies.
Several factors contribute to the success of the Austrian VET system: the involvement of the
social partners, the close link to the business world, updated curricula with a focus on
employability, teachers and trainers with working experience, a wide and well balanced mix
of different programs offering attractive options for the different expectations and learning
preferences and backgrounds of the young people as well as safety nets for young people at
risk.
With ever growing youth unemployment rates in many EU countries but also outside the
Union, VET is very high again on the agenda of many countries and international
organizations. Austria has worldwide co-operations in the field and receives increasing
numbers of foreign delegations from all over the world eager to learn more about the
Austrian VET-system. Based on longstanding experience in educational co-operation in VET
well developed networks of educational partnerships, especially in the fields of tourism
education and training firms/entrepreneurship education, have been established in Europe by
Austrian institutions. Via a network of Austrian educational coordinators projects are
developed and implemented in close co-operation with local and Austrian partners. For
example in the field of entrepreneurship education around 1 300 training firms at roughly 330
schools cooperate with each other and with schools world-wide in the framework of EcoNet.
Therefore there is a great potential for the further development of the international cooperation
in this field, also on a commercial basis.

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simon anholt

Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

COMET Competence Centres for Excellent Federal Ministry of Economy, Family and Youth
Technologies
and Federal Ministry for Transport, Innovation and
Anm.: ev. Einschrnkung auf K2-Zentren, d.h.:
Technology/
COMET Competence Centres for Excellent Exports?
Technologies/K2-Centres
Description of the Project
The COMET Programme is a funding scheme which aims to strengthen cooperation between science
and industry by establishing long term research cooperation at highest level, open to international
participation.
The COMET Programme has three lines which are scaled according to their target, ratio of public
financing and duration: K-Projects, K1-Centers and K2-Centers.
K-Projects are multi-firm projects carried out jointly by science and industry.
K1- and K2-Centers are have to be implemented as separate legal entities.
K2-Centres are characterised by outstanding research programmes corresponding to high risks in
development and implementation. High international visibility and international networks mark K2
centres.

Implementation Period
since 2008

Aim/Success

Strengthen co-operation between science and


industry
Long term research co-operation at the
highest level
Excellence in Research and Technology
Open to international participation
Reach international visibility by setting up
bigger centres (K2 centres)
Strengthening of human capital
Strengthening the research location Austria
Success: Leading international companies are
cooperating with Austrian companies,
universities and research institutes, e.g.
automotive industry and pharmaceutical
industry

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simon anholt

Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

Initiative Programme
Laura Bassi Centres of Expertise
http://www.w-fforte.at/laura-bassicentres/innovative-forschung.html

Federal Ministry of Economy, Family and Youth/


People?

Description of the Project


Innovation through diversity: the Laura Bassi Centres of Expertise are close to industry and practice a
new research culture. Headed by highly qualified female experts, it is their task to do innovative
research in the natural sciences and technology. In answer to current requirements in science, they
operate on the basis of transdisciplinary and interdisciplinary research, team orientation, targeted
personnel development and an efficient management culture.
The initiative programme Laura Bassi Centres of Expertise defines itself as a learning initiative. The
results of the ongoing evaluation at programme level are published. The information gained provides
other research programmes with impetus for a new research culture, more gender-equal design and
increases the gender competence of the Austrian scientific community. The selection process for
Laura Bassi Centres of Expertise does not judge scientific quality only. The idea was to define
scientific excellence in a new way - based on modern assessment criteria. The programme also takes
into account other skills and competences, which are necessary in applied oriented research. The
following criteria also play a role in project selection:
-The creation of new links between inter-disciplinary and trans-disciplinary approaches to research as
the prerequisite for research and innovation
- Career development that is commensurate with womens qualifications and potential more women
in top positions
- Team-oriented and inter-cultural research, because rigid hierarchies hinder creative science diversity leads to success
- Transparent, project-oriented research management that recognises development potential,
consciously structures the transfer of knowledge, allows every member of the team to contribute to
development and creates identification.
Implementation Period
Aim/Success
The Laura Bassi Centres of Expertise are
designed as a one-off initiative. The centres
started in 2009. In 2013 there will be a mid-term
evaluation with a stop-or-go decision. In total
they should have a lifespan of seven years.

- Visualization of successful female research work


- Visualization of scientific leadership competence
- Research work as team work: Development of
the teams potential
- Targeted, broad-ranging career development of
both individuals and the team
- Development of transparent and traceable
procedures (selection and evaluation procedures)
to ensure equal opportunities for women and men
- Development of gender competence for funding
management (learning based on the Laura Bassi
Centres of Expertise and providing the outcome
to other research programmes in the funding
portfolio)
- Reflection of the existing research culture
- We note a growing interest in the programme
design in Austria and at international level (e.g.
COMET in Austria, Members of the Laura Bassi
Jury, EU-Gender Summit, FiF, etc.)

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simon anholt

Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

Christian Doppler Laboratories

Federal Ministry of Economy, Family and Youth /


Governance
Description of the Project

The Christian Doppler Research Association (CDG) is promoting high-quality in application-oriented


basic research in line with the demands of technology based companies which also have to be funding
members of the CDG. As one of the first initiatives within Austria the CDG has explicitly addressed the
improvement of science-industry linkages as its core ambition. The CDG is organised as a public-private
partnership in the legal form of a non-profit association and thereby co-funded by the Federal Ministry
of Economy, Family and Youth and the National Research Foundation. Research is performed within
the CD-Laboratories which are all embedded within different hosting institutions (universities; nonuniversity organisations). Based on the preconditions of scientific excellence and new knowledge for
the company partners a CD- Lab can be established in every scientific discipline for a maximum term of
7 years, characterized by small groups of researchers (5-15) cooperating with 1-6 industry partners.
Every CD-Laboratory also represents a scientific node of research within a specific area and its
community, requiring a continuous exchange of scientific knowledge on an international basis.

Implementation Period

Aim/Success

Since the implementation of the CDG as a Public


Private Partnership in research in 1995 the basic
principals have not been changed.

2012: 63 CD-Labs in operation (historical track


shows a steady increase of active CDLaboratories i.e. R&D-cooperations between
science and industry)
round 650 employees
round 140 national and international CDGpartner companies
6 international CD-Labs: 5 in Germany; 1 in
UK

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simon anholt

Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

(Offices of Science and Technology in


Federal Ministry of Economy, Family and Youth
Washington and Beijing)
Federal Ministry of Science and Research
[Anm.: Aufgrund der angesprochenen Thematik
Federal Ministry for Transport, Innovation and
der Neufindung der CI ersuchen wir hier um ein
Technology
Anfhren der OST in Klammer]
The Austrian Foreign Ministry
Description of the Project
Research and technology orientation has been a clear and strong priority for Austria throughout the
last decade. The growth rate on R&D expenditure exceeded all other European countries. With such
strong focus on R&D, one important element is to interlink Austrian research with the most dynamic
regions in the world, and to spread awareness of Austrian research efforts and research-based
products. Therefore, ("Offices of Science and Technology") have been established at the Austrian
Embassies in Washington and Beijing as official, government-driven hubs for Austrian research.
The establishment of these offices is a joint effort of four Austrian ministries; during the current pilot
phase of the office in Beijing the consortium is completed by the Federal Economic Chamber.
Important notice: Both offices are currently undergoing a restructuring of their corporate design
(name, logo, etc.). Therefore the description of the project, especially the name of the offices, may
change in the near future.

Implementation Period

Aim/Success

Current status ("OST Washington"): project


phase
Current status ("OST Beijing"): pilot phase

Transfer of technology between Austria and


the most dynamic regions worldwide
Hub for Austrian research
Contact to foreign local authorities, academia,
research facilities and companies in the matter
of technology and science
Promotion/awareness of the Austrian R&Dlandscape
Encouragement of cooperation (research
projects, technology transfer) and exchange of
research staff

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

Young Scientists Forum on Central and


South East Europe
3rd Edition: (In-)Equality Political,
Economic, Social, Spatial and Gender
Aspects

Institute for the Danube Region and Central


Europe (IDM),
Hexagon: Governance, Immigration, Culture
and Heritage, People, Tourism, Exports.

Description of the Project


The Young Scientists Forum (YSF) on Central and South East Europe was initiated by the
Institute for the Danube Region and Central Europe (IDM) in the year 2007 to promote and
encourage young scientists to engage in the regions of Central and South East Europe.
Further the project wants to enforce mobility and bring young scientists from countries of the
Danube Region and Central Europe together to establish a regional scientific network within
the European Research Area and give them the chance to present their work to a wider
public.
The target group of the project are young scientists dealing with Central and South East
Europe in the fields of cultural studies, history, European ethnology, media studies, political
sciences, geography and sociology.
The first YSF with the main topic System Changes of South East European Societies:
Social, Political and Demographic Consequences" took place in December 2008 in Vienna.
Two years later the Young Scientists Forum was successfully continued with the
second edition in October 2010. The main topic was: Cultural Changes in Central and
South East Europe after 1989
In December 2012, the 3rd Edition will take place. For the topic (In-)Equality Political,
Economic, Social, Spatial and Gender Aspects the experts had to choose 30 participants
from among more than 160 applications.
Implementation Period

Aim/Success

Three day International Symposium in


English, out of around 160 applications 5
experts invite 30 young scientists to present
their paper during the conference
Follow up: Conference proceedings in the
frame of the IDM Journal Der Donauraum
3-4/2012

Aim: Promoting and encouraging young


scientists to engage in the regions of Central
and South East Europe
Aim: Presentation of young research to a
wider public
Aim: Exchange between young and more
advanced researchers on topics, methods,
sources and results
Success: Networking and fostering mobility
within the Danube Region
Success: Publication of contributions and
results
Success: Large international attendance,
participants from nearly 20 countries

__

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

The EU Strategy for the Danube Region


Focussing on Human Needs
Institute for the Danube Region and Central
Europe (IDM),

Danube University Krems (DUK)


Under the patronage of
Working Community of the Danube Regions
/ ARGE Donaulnder
Kindly supported by
Province of Lower Austria
Hexagon: All Nation Brand categories

Description of the Project


The EU Strategy for the Danube Region (EUSDR) was initiated by the Austrian and
Romanian governments in 2008, proposed by the European Commission in 2010 and
endorsed by the EU Member States at the General Affairs Council in 2011. As the second
EU macro-regional strategy (after the EU Strategy for the Baltic Sea Region) the EUSDR
serves as a united response of 14 herein participating countries to various challenges such
as environmental and energy problems, shipping potentials and road and rail transport
connections, uneven socio-economic developments, uncoordinated education, research and
innovation systems.
One year after the implementation of the EUSDR, high ranking politicians, decision-makers,
stakeholders and internationally well respected experts came together at the conference to
discuss good practices, achievements, obstacles and prospects regarding regional cooperation
as well as education, science and research, and Culture in the Danube Region.
The main question was whether that macro-regional strategy meets human needs (the
micro level). The conference included the following three panels: The Danube Region and
Its Importance for European Macro Regions, Regional Cooperations as Key Factors for the
EUSDRs Success, and Focussing on Human Needs Potentials and Opportunities of the
Danube Region in Education, Science, Research and Culture.

Implementation Period

Aim/Success

One international Day Conference (English


and German with simultaneous
interpretation)
Media coverage before, during and after that
high ranking conference
Follow up Conference proceedings in the
frame of the IDM Journal Der Donauraum
(2/2012) and
Further IDM activities concerning the
EUSDR (next conference in Vienna 2013)

Aim to generate and exchange ideas for


further improving of the EUSDR, sustainable
growth and future initiatives
Aim to foster regional co-operations and
networking
Aim to initiate more awareness raising
initiatives regarding possibilities and
importance of the EUSDR
Success: 150 people (stakeholders and
shareholders) participated in the conference
and discussed challenges and prospects of
the EUSDR
Success: networking among diverse
participants and future cooperation partners
was enabled

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

Flow Festival of Conversation for Culture


and Science

Initiated and sponsored by


Austrian Ministry for European and
International Affairs (BmeiA)
organised by
Institute for the Danube Region and Central
Europe (IDM)
Hexagon: People, Culture and Heritage,
Governance, Tourism, Investment and
Immigration

Description of the Project


The idea of flow is to branch out and open new channels of communication, forming a
network among artists and scientists that brings the countries of the Danube Region closer
together: Austria, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Hungary, Republic of Moldova,
Romania, Serbia, Slovakia, and Ukraine.
This initiative of the Austrian Ministry for European and International Affairs is designed to
produce direct and long-term connections between individuals in different domains
concerned with the arts and sciences. The core of the festival is sustainable conversation
and networking with concrete outcomes: its aim is to initiate multinational,
interdisciplinary projects in diverse fields.
Since 2009 the Institute for the Danube Region and Central Europe (IDM) in Vienna is
responsible for the organization and coordination of flow. For flow 2012 the IDM
collaborates with the International Elias Canetti Society in Ruse.
The first edition of the flow festival successfully took part in Novi Sad, Serbia in May 2008,
the second in Chisinau, republic of Moldova in September 2010. The goal is to bring flow
every two years to a different city in the Danube Region, creating a local impact and at the
same time to present the local arts and science community.
The actual flow festival is taking place from October 18th to October 21st in Ruse,
Bulgaria. The general topic for flow 2012 is Activating Spaces, Activating People by MicroImagination.
Implementation Period

Aim/Success

1st flow Festival in Novi Sad, Serbia, in May


2008
2nd flow Festival in Chisinau, Republic of
Moldova, in September 2010
3rd flow Festival in Ruse, Bulgaria, in
October 2012

Aim to form a network, platform and long-term


connections among artists and
scientists within the Danube Region
Aim to initiate multinational, interdisciplinary
projects in diverse fields
Success: International follow-up projects
emerged from the festival in 2010 (partly
financed by the European Commission)
Success: 2010, in Chisinau the
communication among local authorities and
the civil society was improved by flow
Success: 2010, all the festival events were
characterized by a large attendance and
broad media coverage

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

European Forum Alpbach

European Forum Alpbach / People


Description of the Project

Founded August 1945 by WW2 resistance activists Otto Molden and Simon Moser with the aim of
promoting the economic and above all intellectual reconstruction of post-war Europe, the European
Forum Alpbach (EFA) has been an important hub of transdisciplinary exchange for more than sixty
years. With a strong commitment to the values of European integration, democracy, and sustainable
development, the EFA gathers high-ranking speakers from the fields of science, the economy, politics
and the arts during 3 weeks for open and critical discussions in the mountain village Alpbach. While
the most recent 2012 Forum welcomed European Commission President Jos-Manuel Barroso and
American economist Jeremy Rifkin, personalities such as Erwin Schrdinger and Sir Karl Popper were
regular visitors in Alpbach. Yet others, such as former Indian Prime Minister Indira Ghandi, physicist
Lise Meitner or human rights activist Shirin Ebady, have been amongst Alpbachs renowned
speakers.
Today, more than 4000 people from over 60 countries come together every year in order to
experience the special Spirit of Alpbach. Among them are 700 young scholarship holders, who are
connected in the Alpbach network: many so-called Initiative Groups (IGs), local ambassadors of the
Spirit of Alpbach, can be found all around the EU and outside, in countries such as Armenia or
Egypt. Inspired by the open debates connecting people from different backgrounds in the Tyrol, the
IGs are increasingly active organizing events such as the Summer School for European Integration in
Belgrade, the Sarajevo World Cafs, or the Small Talks organized by the Club Alpbach Croatia.
Implementation Period
Aim/Success
European Forum Alpbach 2013, main topic:
Experiences and Values, 12 to 30 August 2013

Aim to establish a platform of exchange


of ideas on European integration,
democracy, and sustainable growth
Aim to build an interdisciplinary,
transgenerational and cross-cultural
bridge between academia, politics, the
economy, and the young generation
Success: for over 60 years, the EFA has
functioned as a platform of discussion; it
has built cultural and political bridges
transgressing national and ideological
boundaries
Success: a concrete example: the IGs
from Belgrade and Pristina have cooperated on different projects, such as the
Euroxibition currently on display in the
European Parliament, in order to promote
a constructive dialogue between Serbs
and Kosovars

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

9th Vienna Economic Forum

Vienna Economic Forum


Description of the Project

Vienna Economic Forum was founded in April 2004, with the aim to promote the economic cooperation
between the countries from the Adriatic to the Black Sea - Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria,
Croatia, Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Slovenia, Turkey and Ukraine from the Headquarters in
Vienna.
Vienna Economic Forum has been growing and last year has received the status INTERNATIONAL NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATION by the Austrian Ministry for European and International Affairs, as a
recognition for our years of activities in the region above all of South-Eastern Europe.
The Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) of the United Nations at its Substantive Session of July 2012
adopted the recommendation of the Committee on Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) to grant
Special consultative status at the UN to Vienna Economic Forum.
Vienna Economic Forum will continue the good cooperation with the countries of the region, and we are
proud that our Austrian Mini-Davos for Southeast European Countries, the region of Vienna Economic
Forum, is the place where we experience the importance of cooperation in the region and achieve
positive and concrete results during our meetings.

Implementation Period

Aim/Success

2 Days Conference/Bilateral Follow Up

Aim to exchange experience for


Investment opportunities
Aim to build an economic bridge
Aim to popularise and promote investment
opportunities in the region
Aim to provide impulses and point out joint
projects
Aim to be a place of definition, encounter, and
of realising the public and private interests
Success: High level participants and delegations
from the region
Success: Defining the role of Austria as
international meeting place for the countries of
the region of South-East Europe

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

BRAWISIMO:
Federal Ministry for Transport, Innovation &
Region
BRAtislava
WIen:
StudIe
zum Technology
MObilittsverhalten,
/ Gouvernance
Regin BRAtislava WIen: tdIe MObilitnho
sprvania
Description of the Project
In the Vienna - Bratislava region the ongoing integration of both metropolitan areas causes dynamic
transport growth and an increased need for transport infrastructure. Coordinated transport planning is
essential to fulfil the needs. As a basic for such a coordinated planning a common understanding of
mobility and transport demand is crucial.
The Austrian Federal Ministry of Transport, Innovation and Technology has launched a project for a
common mobility survey in the Vienna Bratislava region, aiming to generate a harmonized picture of
peoples mobility on both sides of the boarder. In the survey information on daily trips as well as border
crossing trips carried out by the resident population will be collected. The data collected includes
information such as trip purpose, origin and destination of trips and the mode of transport used. The
project is embedded into the Austrian national mobility survey. As a preparation for this survey the
research study KOMOD had been carried out by Austria which developed an up to date method for
mobility data collection.
The bridging function of the project is twofold: On one hand there will be a profound common
knowledge and understanding of mobility in the region, ensuring a better quality for planning for both
countries. On the other hand, based on the research carried out by Austria a new standard for mobility
surveys will be implemented. That new standard could also be used for a future, extended survey that
covers all of Slovakia and might serve as a positive example for other countries that do not have a
tradition in mobility surveys.

Implementation Period

Aim/Success

Data collection 2013, finalization 2014

Aim to create a common data base on mobility


in Vienna-Bratislava region.
Aim to build a bridge in the cooperation
between Ministries and Universities of both
countries.
Aim to improve the bilateral understanding
Success: to run the survey as planned
Success: common presentation of results
Success: common understanding in the field of
transport planning

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Title of the Project


Project Leader / Hexagon
Smart Cities - Collaboration within Europe and
Federal Ministry of Transport, Innovation and
with Asia
Technology / People, Exports & Governance
Description of the Project
The future of Europe will be decided in its cities. Even today, a majority of Europes population lives in
urban regions which generate a large portion of our welfare. They are motors of growth for our
economies, engaged in a worldwide competition for creating the best framework conditions in terms of
quality of life, productivity and communication; they vie for investments and the best brains. At the
same time they confront us with environmental damage, urban sprawl, problems of urban traffic and
transport, the segregation of migratory groups, security problems and their climate impact.
Presently, Austria can look back on more than a decade of successful RD&I in energy technologies and
energy efficiency, as well as in sustainable mobility, which are already being exported worldwide. Based
on this strength, the Federal Ministry of Transport, Innovation and Technology has taken an initiative
which aims at making the country a worldwide competence centre and provider of urban related
solutions, ranging from integrated planning, to the holistic implementation of methods and instruments,
and finally the interactive deployment of urban technologies.
Together with the Austrian Climate and Energy Fund a national RD&I programme (Smart Energy Demo
fit4SET) has been launched, which is currently enabling 18 Austrian cities to develop and implement
their visions of a Smart City with the help of research and technology organisations (RTOs) and industry;
In addition, a national technology platform (TPSC-AT) brings together Austrian cities and industry
players.
Based on the national actors and consortia Austria has taken the lead in coordinating European
initiatives, which aim at finding answers to global urban challenges by providing joint European solutions
and available technologies: The Joint Programming Initiative Urban Europe (www.jpi-urbaneurope.eu),
chaired by Austria, and with active participation of 13 other European countries, is currently liaising with
China in order to create joint activities; the European Smart Cities Member States Initiative, initiated and
coordinated by Austria, is connecting 21 European countries in making joint contributions to the
European Innovation Partnership on Smart Cities and Communities; again, collaborations are under way
with China and India.
Implementation Period

2012 2016

Aim / Success
Aim:
To make Austria a centre of competence and
solutions in addressing the challenge of
urbanisation;
To address global urban challenges and provide
joint European solutions;
To assess urban challenges on a European level,
but also in close collaboration with Asian
countries, like China and India;
Success:
First transnational joint call for RD&I proposals
completed in 2012, funded together with 5
European countries;
Active collaboration of other European
countries;
Strong interest in Asian countries;

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Title of the Project


Project Leader / Hexagon
Smart Energy Systems living lab and
Federal Ministry of Transport, Innovation and
showcase for the integration of renewable
Technology / People, Exports & Governance
energy
Description of the Project
Future energy systems will be characterised by a dramatic improvement of energy efficiency and
a rising share of renewable energy, with a remarkable fraction coming from decentralised
sources. Driving factors against this development are global challenges like climate change and
resource bottlenecks, side by side with societal trends towards individualisation and
environmental consciousness on the one hand side and new technological options due to
miniaturisation and fast and widespread networks on the other hand side. The most challenging
task is the efficient and smart system integration of new technologies. The competition on at the
worldwide technology markets has already started. Smart Energy Systems will be a key factor as
well for the improvement of the energy infrastructure in highly industrialised regions as for the
development of infrastructures in emerging economies. They will be the backbone for smart and
sustainable urban regions as well as for the efficient supply of rural areas. They are the key
enabler for new technologies like electro mobility and new markets.
The Austrian energy (particularly power-) sector, is historically highly experienced in the
integration of renewable and decentralised energy. Based on this strength, the Federal Ministry
of Transport, Innovation and Technology has taken an initiative which aims at making the country
a worldwide living lab and showcase for the integration on renewable energy, ranging from
modelling and engineering tools and the validation of new system solutions in test beds to the
implementation in the real environment. Together with innovative stakeholders from industry
and research, supported by the Austrian Climate and Energy Fund a national Pioneer Initiative on
Smart Energy Systems has been launched. Three Austrian Pioneer Regions have started to build
up showcases and model systems. A national technology platform brings together Austrian
industry players.
Based on the national initiative Austria has taken a leading role in the European Strategic Energy
Technology Plan (SET-Plan) initiative on electricity grids (EEGI), a collaboration of all European
member states aiming at joint European implementation of Smart Grids. In the framework of the
International Smart Grids Action Network (ISGAN) Austria has started worldwide cooperation
with 22 nations including US, Korea, Japan, China, Australia, Mexico as well as Russia and others
and is thereby contributing to the global development as well as to the deduction of policy
messages to the Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM), a high-level global forum on ministers level to
encourage the transition to a global clean energy economy. The Austrian Pioneer Regions are
partnering with Model- Regions and R&D initiatives in Germany and Switzerland in the
framework of the Technology Cooperation Smart Grids D-A-CH.

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Implementation Period

2010 2016

Aim / Success
Aim:
To make Austria a living lab and showcase for
smart and sustainable Energy Systems
To address global challenges in the energy
sector by providing joint European solutions
and contribution to a global cooperation
network
Success:
Three establishing Pioneer Regions on Smart
Grids, (Salzburg, Upper Austria, Vorarlberg)
Leading Role within the European Set-Plan
Initiative on Electricity Grids (EEGI)
Global visibility and active collaboration within
the International Smart Grids Action Network
(ISGAN) in the framework of the IEA (OECD)

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Title of the Project

Project Leader / Hexagon


Federal Ministry for Transport, Innovation and
Nanchang
Technology (AustriaTech) / BMVIT City of
Low carbon city planning & development
Nanchang Austrian industry and research
institutions
Description of the Project
Background
In April 2010 a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) was signed between the National Development
and Reform Commission (NDRC) of the Peoples Republic of China and the Federal Ministry for
Transport, Innovation and Technology (BMVIT) of the Republic of Austria, on bilateral cooperation in the
field of technology-related infrastructure development.
Based on this MOU an agreement between Austria Tech, on behalf of BMVIT, and the Municipal
Government of the City of Nanchang on Low Carbon City- Development was signed in October 2010.
Potential
Nanchang was defined as a pilot area to become the first Low Carbon City in the Peoples Republic of
China. In order to reach this objective Nanchang is supported by the Austrian Institute of Technology
(AIT) and numerous Austrian technology companies. The total investment volume of this pilot-cityproject amounts to 2.8 bn. to be used for energy efficient construction of urban infrastructure (e.g.
green buildings, Intelligent Transportation Systems, waste management, water treatment, waste to
energy- technologies etc.).
Implementation
In this context a comprehensive bilateral project list has been defined between Austria and China. A
Master-Plan for the implementation of the citys low carbon goals has already been designed and
training courses for Nanchang urban development planning experts, led by AIT, are taking place in
November this year.
Implementation Period

October 2010 on-going

Aim / Success
Aim:
To support Nanchang in reducing the citys
carbon emission in accordance with predefined
objectives by using Austrian expertise and
technology ;
To increase the share of technology in Austrian
exports;
To support added value in Austria by raising
production and enhancing employment through
the implementation of technology-exportprojects;
To exchange know-how and expertise and gain
new insights with regards to environmentally
friendly city planning
Success:
Confirmed bilateral project list;
Comprehensive Low-Carbon-CityDevelopment-Master-Plan designed by AIT;
Design and execution of training programs for
Nanchang representatives;
Continuous cooperation and further exchange

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Title of Project
Austrian Building Bridges Orchestra

Project Leader/Hexagon
The five Austrian Music Universities, the Vienna
Philharmonic and the Vienna Symphonic
Orchestras coordinated by University of Music and
Performing Arts Graz
Culture and Heritage
Description of the Project

Austrian music (as in the New Years concert or in Mozarts music) is understood by many as a
common, universal language. Various exemplary projects by other nations, for example, the WestEastern Divan Orchestra, have demonstrated how bridge building can be achieved for political purposes.
This aspect is still not given due attention by Austrias top orchestras, such as the Gustav Mahler Youth
Orchestra, or by such joint ventures at various Music Universities as the EUphony Youth Orchestra
(Music Universities in Budapest, Ljubljana, Graz, Vienna and Zagreb). These are regarded as good
orchestras, but the political dimension is not a top priority. A first attempt to carry the message of how
music can build bridges was made by the film shown in the intermission of the 2012 New Years Concert,
which integrated musicians with obvious immigration backgrounds as well as their traditional music.
The fact that musicians are able to work together with colleagues from other cultures, without
prejudice, thus serving as important role models, is demonstrated by every orchestra at Austrias
Music Universities. These orchestras provide an enormous potential for integration.
Thus, I propose to found an Austrian Building Bridges Orchestra a cooperative effort between the
five Austrian Music Universities and the Vienna Philharmonic and the Vienna Symphonic Orchestras. The
purpose of individual projects would be to consciously integrate musicians from those regions where
bridges have been broken. For example, the University of Music and Performing Arts in Graz has contact
with both Vietnam and the USA, as well as with many other countries that were former and/or are
current enemies. One troubled hotspot would be highlighted each year by means of widespread
broadcasting through the ORF as well as through other effective forms of communication. This would
enable the role of Austrian music to be presented in an emotionally vivid language as a way to break
ice and build bridges.
Implementation Period

Aim/Success

Preparation 2013, First concert tour would be


possible around Christmas 2013, annual
realization

to show the Bridge-Building Function of Classical


Music, which Austria is famous for
to show the enormous potential of integration
through music
to represent the function of Austria as a bridgebuilder in an emotional touching way

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

Annual Meetings of Important University


Universities Austria or Science Space Styria
Organizations in Austria to Stage and Present the
(Steirische Hochschulkonferenz)
Topic of Bridges
People
Description of the Project
Many Austrian universities are members of the EUA (European University Association) and the IAU
(International Association of Universities). In 2003 the annual meeting of the EUA took place in Graz, but
the role of Austria at that time was hardly evident. And yet, Austria for example, in its networking with
ASEA-Uninet or Eurasia Pacific Uninet can play a definite bridge-building role. Thus, it would be
desirable in the future to have Austria host such annual meetings or stage a conference on an
appropriate topic. And, the cross-sectoral cooperation between fields of higher education, as was
demonstrated in a model way by the Science Space Styria, can also be addressed here. By the way, this
idea is already in effect now: the next annual meeting of the Danube Rectors Conference in November
2012 is taking place under the motto: Building bridges across turbulent waters. This conference,
however, will hardly be noticed beyond the Danube Region. The situation would be clearly different for
meetings of the EUA and IUA.

Implementation Period

Aim/Success

annual meetings (EUA Spring 2015 or 2016, IAU


autumn 2014 or 2016) or stage a conference on an
appropriate topic (2014 or 2015)

to show Austrian Universities and other tertiary


organizations for education as having a bridgebuilding function because of their open setting
to foster Bridge Building as a matter of
research in different scientific and artistic fields
to represent the Austrian (Styrian) model of
interaction between different sectors of tertiary
education as a best practice in collaboration

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Title of Project

Project Leader/Hexagon

Styrian Integration Partnership as a Vision for the


Future of the Model Austrian Society

Integrationspartnerschaft Steiermark
Investments and Immigration

Description of the Project


For the past year in Styria, an Integration Partnership has been enacted in which institutions from all
areas of society have addressed the topic of integration. What is special here is the networking not only
between the important social partners in Austrian society, but also between religious communities,
educational institutions, clubs, the military, and other groups belonging to a Charter of Peaceful
Coexistence in Cultural Diversity in Styria. Thus, by using existing knowledge and valuable resources,
strategies and methods will be developed to provide an essential and sustainable ideal for integration
purposes. The spirit of this initiative should be considered in defining the model Austrian society, since it
forms a politically significant and socially necessary countercurrent to the policies of exclusion promoted
by right-wing populist forces.

Implementation Period

Aim/Success

This project cannot be implemented in the


context of Austrias competitive identity alone,
but it should be a part of the Austrian model.

to show a politically significant and socially


necessary countercurrent to the policies of
exclusion promoted by right-wing populist forces in
the field of integration
to show the power of special forms of
cooperation, that are not used normally

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simon anholt

Title
Danube Basin Business Conference

Project Leader /Hexagon


AdvantageAustria, Austrian Federal Economic
Chamber (AFEC)
Description of the Project

Austria is a preferred partner in the CEEC-Region and often a spring-board to Eastern Europe, in
particular the countries in the Danube region. After providing technical assistance to businesses and
business organizations in the 90s (e.g. management trainings etc.) and helping to jumpstart vital
Austrian investments in the region, the Austrian Federal Economic Chamber has been and continuous to
be an active promoter of EU membership of Eastern und South Eastern European Nations. Since 2011
AdvantageAustria, the Austrian Foreign Trade Service organized by AFEC, has been organizing a
comprehensive business-to-business platform for SMEs from various industry sectors and for specialized
research organizations. The initiative has been integrated by the European Union in its Danube Basin
Initiative and receives high ranking EC-Commission support. More than 500 participants from all over
the region met for the first time in 2011 to discuss renewable energy issues and engage in bilateral
business talks. The second conference in November 2012 will focus on environmental issues, ranging
from solid waste, to water and emission related topics.

Implementation Format/Period/Venue
Format: 1 1/2 day conference with off-venue site
visits

Aim/Success

discuss challenges common to the countries


of the region

Period: annually

engage SMEs and academia in a solution


oriented business dialogue

Venue: Vienna

support institutional cooperation in the


Danube Basin

facilitate business-to-business contacts

foster Danube Basin Common Market

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Title
WIFI International Know-how-Transfer

Project Leader /Hexagon


WIFI Austria (Economic Promotion Institute of
the Austrian Federal Economic Chamber)
Description of the Project
Qualification and high-quality continuing and further vocational training play a key role in
determining an economic region and influence international companies to settle. Education and
knowledge create competitive advantages. With initiatives like international educational projects
we support the goal of positioning Austria as a knowhow-location and at the same time
generate additional benefits for the Austrian economy. Our projects are mostly co-financed by
Austrian Federal Ministries (BMWFJ, ADA) and EU educational programs.
Since 1990 the WIFI - together with local partners in the Russian Federation, CIS countries and
the Balkan region (South-eastern Europe) - runs management training courses in various topics
such as management, energy efficiency, tourism, human resources etc. combined with study
visits and B-2-B meetings in Austria. Approx. 55 Vocational Education and Training Seminars
(VET-seminars) annually with more than 700 participants. Our partners abroad: Chambers of
Commerce, trade associations, GOs. The target audience of the courses is entrepreneurs and
executives from companies and GOs.
A research WIFO study in 2011 estimated that the WIFI International Know-How-Transfer
program enhanced induced an export volume of approx. 16 - 36 million EUR in the 2008-2010
period for the Balkans region, Russia and CIS countries.
Implementation Format/Period/Venue
Aim/Success
Format: training courses, seminars, study visits, training of local SMEs employees /
B-2-B meeting
managers / entrepreneurs.
economic development through B2B
contacts (in Austria) following the training
Period: 1990 today - ongoing
programs (host country).

creating a positive environment for


Venue: various in the Russian Federation, CIS
Austrian investors (in coordination with
countries and the Balkans
the international trade promotion
organization of the Austrian Federal
Economic Chamber).
international networking via quality
cooperation & and training projects.
preparing new export markets for
companies by providing training and
networking.
strengthening a positive image of Austria
in the energy efficiency, environmental
technology, process, organization, tourism
and vocational training area.

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Title
innovmat

Project Leader /Hexagon


WIFI (Economic Promotion Institute of the
Austrian Federal Economic Chamber)
Description of the Project

Material sciences and technologies play an important role in the Bratislava-Vienna region. A large
number of technology oriented enterprises with very particular R&D needs are located here.
However, the transfer of knowhow from scientific institutions to SMEs is limited and remains a
cause for significant competitive disadvantages. The project boosts the regions competitiveness
by using transnational-intersectoral instruments in the field of materials sciences and
technologies tailored to suit the market needs. It provides access to the knowhow and expertise
of material science actors and establishes a network to link scientists and enterprises enabling
them to improve the quality and quantity of technology and knowhow transfer. Financed with
support from the European Union Regional Development Fund.
Implementation Format/Period/Venue
Format: training, seminars, study visits, B-2-B
meeting
Period: ongoing

Venue: various in Western Bratislava and the


Vienna Region.

Aim/Success
Initiate new routes of collaboration
between Austrian and Slovakian R&D
institutions to develop new materials for
industrial applications.
establish a bilateral technology transfer
platform for innovative materials in the
Bratislava-Vienna region.
establish a cross-border platform for
technology transfer of innovative
materials and technologies to strengthen
the local supply chains.
enhance the innovative potential and
competitiveness of high-tech oriented
enterprises in the Vienna-Bratislava
region.

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Title of Project
Research Location Austria

Project Leader/Hexagon
ABA Invest in Austria / Investment
Description of the Project

Austria- excellence in innovation and R&D: The image and marketing campaign for the research
location Austria has set itself the goal of more strongly positioning Austria abroad as an attractive
business location for innovative companies and researchers, as well as luring international R&D-driven
companies to Austria. The campaign relies on a mix of print advertising, PR measures, direct marketing,
trade fair presentations and investor events.
Austrias image abroad as an innovative location can be further improved. The image of Austria is very
strongly shaped by cultural and tourism-related values, which do not correspond to a modern
industrial country and partly diametrically contradict it. Simple facts such as the existence of a 10%
research premium are not sufficiently known by foreign companies.

Implementation Period
Research Location Austria
st

1 period: 1.9.2007 31.3.2009


nd
2 period: 1.9.2009 30.4.2011
rd
3 period: 1.10.2011 31.3.2013

Aim/Successes
AIMS:
Attract foreign R&D firms to set up operations
in Austria
Identification of potential new R&D-driven
companies
Image improvement of Austria as a research
location
SUCCESSES (2007 until 31.8.2012):
52 companies have made R&D-relevant
investments in Austria, entailing investments
of EUR 104 million, creating 561 jobs.
55 additional business location projects with
R&D components have been identified
417 reports in international media
48.4 million potential readers reached by
advertising messages
3,932 direct contacts with international firms
and multipliers
8,500 newsletter subscribers
85,500 clicks on the website section

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Appendix III: Executive Summaries of Shortlisted Symbolic Actions

Symbolic Action Name: Preserving and Sustaining the Unique Historic State-Owned
Architectural Heritage (Short name: Twinning Buildings)
Tranche: 1
1. What is it?
Twinning buildings is a new idea which links Austrian cultural heritage more closely to overseas
development, and is consequently a good example of bridge building.
A selection of major historical buildings in Austria are twinned with equally important buildings
in a developing country, and the two governments collaborate closely on preserving and
sustaining their heritage.
The twin buildings could be selected because of some shared history; because they have a
similar public function; a similar architectural style; present particular conservation challenges
as a result of their similar construction style or materials or location; or simply because they
were built in the same year. For example, Schnbrunn Castle could be twinned with Raniji ki
Baori, an important stepwell in Rajasthan, since both were built in 1699; Stefansdom and the
Majusri Hall at Foguang Temple in Shanxi Province were both completed in 1137. One could
even have fun selecting buildings because they happen to start with the same letters: the
Technisches Museum and the Taj Mahal would form an agreeably random couple which
otherwise might never have anything to do with each other, but might be able to assist each
other in innovative and unpredictable ways.
The final selection from a list of candidate twinnings could be made by visitor votes (giving
each visitor a token which they then drop in a slot to make their choice is one simple way of
doing this).
Once the twinning has been created, an audio-video floor could be installed in the entrance of
each building, with a live feed between the two, so that visitors to each building, even though
they might be thousands of kilometres apart, can see each other, wave, and even enjoy a
transcontinental conversation from one building to another.
When the twinning is announced, and later when restoration works are being carried out, a
construction hoarding would be used to protect the faade in the usual way (a mesh building
wrap printed with a full-size photographic image of the building), but instead of the printed
image simply reproducing the real building underneath, half of the wrap should show the real
building, and half should show the faade of the twin building.
2. What is its communicative power for Austria?
This Symbolic Action shows that Austria is not isolated or inward-looking, but that the richness
of its cultural heritage and the wealth of experience which it has earned in caring for this
heritage is part of its obligation to collaborate with and support developing countries. It
shows that Austria is strongly connected with distant countries in practical and useful ways,
and is original, innovative, dynamic and cosmopolitan in its thinking.

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It also serves to promote Austrias cultural heritage in emerging markets, where such
knowledge is badly lacking.
Finally, it can help the process of direct bilateral relationship-building between Austria (and its
cities) and these developing countries (and their cities). Over time, there are many
opportunities to extend the twinning into other areas of trade, tourism, education and
diplomacy.
It is also a good B2B story to tell in three specialist industries: tourism, cultural heritage
management, and technology.
3. How does it fit the Brookenbower concept?
Building bridges of culture, knowledge and understanding between very different countries at
different stages of development.
4. How can we promote it internationally?
Even without any extra expenditure on promotion, the idea promotes itself to tourists in
Austria and the partner country: anyone who visits either of the buildings in the scheme will be
exposed to the partner building (and consequently the partner country), and very likely will
talk to friends and family about the experience since it is very new.
The idea will certainly benefit from additional PR and marketing, and especially if the
technology used is effective and innovative, it should be a story that the media is happy to
cover. Simply as a new story to tell about Austrias cultural destinations, it will easily become
part of existing travel promotion.
5. Operational Considerations
The main cost is the video floor technology, and depending on the choice of partners, it may
be necessary for Austria to pay for both terminals. Ideally, it can provide a showcase for
Austrian technology, and this may help to defray the costs if the company is keen to
demonstrate its products in two important markets simultaneously.
The building wrap is an extra expense but only a marginal one if works are already planned to
the faade.
A bilateral agreement with the Ministry of Culture in the partner country is obviously the first
step and this may stem from an existing agreement or relationship.
6. Who should be in charge of it?
Federal Ministry for Economy, Family and Youth, with support from Ministry of Foreign Affairs
and private sector partners and national/regional/city tourist authorities.

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A researcher in the Ministry (or engaged by the Ministry) should be responsible for identifying
a shortlist of suitable buildings in countries where relationships or mutual interests with
Austria already exist.

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Symbolic Action Name: Austria as a Bridge-Builder or Mediator in International Law Trust Fund
(Short name: Rule of Law Trust Fund)
Tranche: 1
1. What is it?
Austria creates a trust fund that allows it to support other international actors to foster the
rule of law, and to send international legal experts whenever or wherever help is required.
These experts will give their expert, unbiased advice, free of charge. An Austria-based
committee of experts would decide on the missions and the expertise required. A trust fund
would be set up and financed by the Austrian government with a generous endowment for an
initial 5-year period. Each individual request will be decided on its merits with an emphasis
on speed (he who helps fast, helps twice).
Austria could set up its own international Legal Aid Insurance Scheme to assist a large number
of selected developing countries in case they need its legal services in the future: in return for
a small annual premium, guaranteed legal help is immediately available when needed. The
revenue from these premiums will help to ensure that Austrias coverage is truly global, and
that resources wont be overstretched in case of a significant increase in demand.
2. What is its communicative power for Austria?
Austria will strengthen the international legal reputation it already enjoys and build up
additional Austrian expertise, thus positioning the country as a principled, expert, responsible
player in international affairs. These kinds of associations are key for developing Austrias
moral reputation, and helping it to compete more effectively with countries such as
Switzerland, Norway and the Netherlands in being perceived as a net benefactor to humanity.
By adopting innovative projects such as the Legal Aid Insurance Scheme, Austria further
demonstrates its competent, mature, intelligent, practical approach to global issues.
3. How does it fit the Brookenbower concept?
Austria is building bridges between the countries and regions which enjoy the benefits of
systems based on the rule of law, and those which dont.
4. How can we promote it internationally?
By focusing on cases with a strong human interest angle, it should be possible to interest both
domestic and international media in this initiative. Specialist media in law, insurance and
international development are also potential channels of communication.
As with all other Symbolic Actions, regularly submitting projects to the Ideas Factory should
ensure that this project is able to produce a steady supply of stories which will work well in the
media.
5. Operational Considerations

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The creation of this Symbolic Action depends upon the creation of a grant funded by
government, so its scale and impact will be in proportion to the size of this grant. Serious
consideration should be given to ensuring that the project gets sufficient promotional impact,
as the rule of law is not a topic which ordinary people are generally familiar with, and it will
need a good deal of help in bringing home these issues to general populations.
6. Who should be in charge of it?
Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

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Symbolic Action Name: Nanchang Low Carbon City Planning and Development (Short name:
Nanchang)
Tranche: 1
1. What is it?
The MOU between the Chinese NDRC and the Austrian BMVIT to cooperate on turning
Nanchang into a low carbon city should be used as an opportunity to demonstrate Austrias
innovative approach to overseas development and technology transfer.
Two approaches will serve to twist this project and give it a media-friendly angle: one is to
ensure that it is fully bilateral and equal, with Chinese technology helping Austrian cities
become more green as much as Austrian technology helping Nanching. In this way, Austria can
show that collaborative problem-solving is a modern alternative to the increasingly
discredited ideas of capacity building and overseas development.
The second approach is to merge technological and cultural collaboration, so that all the
technological developments and advances produced by the project are visibly accompanied by
cultural transfer at the same time: distinctively Austrian and Chinese styles of design,
architecture and graphics, both traditional and modern, should always be used to brand the
innovations.
2. What is its communicative power for Austria?
Low-carbon innovations using Austrian technology, designed in a distinctively Austrian style,
will appear in Chinese cities just as similar innovations, looking very Chinese, will appear in
Austrian cities. These new arrivals will provide media with unusual and visually appealing
ways of telling the story of Austrias innovative and balanced collaboration with distant
countries for the benefit of the whole planet as much as Austria and its partner countries.
This Symbolic Action simultaneously shows off Austrias green technology, its commitment to
the environment, and its talent for more innovative forms of overseas partnership.
3. How does it fit the Brookenbower concept?
Collaborative problem-solving of this sort is a dramatic way of illustrating how the bridges
which Austria builds to developing countries are not downhill bridges, simply donating money
or expertise to less fortunate countries, but are level bridges, on which benefits can flow in
both directions. Building bridges between culture and technology is an equally valuable
initiative.
4. How can we promote it internationally?
Probably the most valuable aspect of this project in communications terms will be the
technology itself, so care has to be given to ensure that not only the design but also the
function of each technology is sufficiently innovative and striking that both the media and their
readers will want to know more.

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Clearly, there will be many opportunities for promoting this project in specialist media,
including the architectural, technological, environmental, governmental and assistance fields.
However, if the technologies are interesting enough for ordinary consumers, they can become
the lead story for consumer media, with the Austria/China partnership providing the
background story.
5. Operational Considerations
The importance of developing technologies which are media stories in their own right is such
that a Creative Director or Design Director should be appointed to the project, with the specific
brief of ensuring that all the projects outputs look good enough, and interesting enough, to
create their own media buzz.
6. Who should be in charge of it?
Federal Ministry for Transport, Innovation and Technology (AustriaTech) / BMVIT, with private
sector partners.

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Symbolic Action Name: Vienna International Christian-Islamic Summer University (Short name:
VICISU)
Tranche: 2
1. What is it?
VICISU is a three week summer programme hosted by Stift Altenburg, that aims to bring
together students and professors from universities in Christian and Muslim countries all over
the world to discuss the most import questions concerning our todays world from a Christian
and from a Muslim perspective. The students are confronted with theological, legal, social and
political approaches on the topics.
In order to enhance the Symbolic power of this important initiative, the proposal is that the
groups deliberations should end with a public performance of their findings. To create the
script for this event, a number of poets, speechwriters, slam poets, rap artists, composers and
dramatists would join the group towards the end of the discussions and work with the
participants to produce performance versions of their best findings, provocations, ideas and
projects. These outputs would then be performed in a mixed programme of words and music
(played by the Austrian Building Bridges Orchestra from Graz University).
The purpose of the combined event is not, of course, to impose solutions on these difficult
problems, but to introduce fresh and unexpected viewpoints, inputs, insights and provocations
into the debate, so that others can be more effectively stimulated into developing real
solutions over the longer period. A combination of music and words is the best medium for
delivering this kind of input, since it isnt required to have the intellectual rigour and finality of
an academic paper or a policy proposal, but does need to affect people at a deeper, spiritual or
emotional level which can so often provide the inspiration for new solutions to old problems.
2. What is its communicative power for Austria?
This Symbolic Action powerfully demonstrates that Austria has a society-wide commitment to
resolving the key challenges of our age, and the cultural and educational capabilities to do so
in an imaginative, creative and effective way.
3. How does it fit the Brookenbower concept?
Building bridges between religions is one of the fundamental interpretations of the bridgebuilding concept, and this Symbolic Action demonstrates it in action.
Amongst the more obvious benefits of this approach, it would help to prove an important
concept at the heart of Austrias long-term Competitive Identity strategy: that music lies at the
heart of public life, and is functional rather than merely entertaining, serving to build bridges
between the cultural sector and the rest of society.
4. How can we promote it internationally?
Following the Summer programme, the group would then travel with the performance
package to major events around the world. A short version could be produced for performance

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at the General Assembly of the UN in New York, for example. The performance would also of
course be freely available online, on DVD, and so forth. Kits would be made available so that
other groups could repeat the formula and produce their own contrasting results. Both the
discussions and the final public performance would be virtually linked with other centres
worldwide, creating a networked global resonance for the event.
5. Operational Considerations
Some additional marketing and travel costs would need to be added to the existing
programme in order to give it the extra profile it needs. It may be that some of this cost can be
met by sponsorship or other forms of commercial partnership.
6. Who should be in charge of it?
University of Vienna.

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Symbolic Action Name: Insurance as an Alternative to Overseas Disaster Relief (Short name:
AidSurance)
Tranche: 1
1. What is it?
Instead of bailing out developing countries following natural disasters, as is the conventional
approach, Austria will use its contacts in the insurance world, and its significant buying power,
to negotiate an insurance policy for each of the countries it wishes to help, and pay the
premium for them each year.
This will help to ensure that the appropriate level and type of assistance reaches its destination
immediately after a catastrophe (performance guarantees would of course be built into the
policy), since the majority of deaths usually occur while the victims are waiting for Western
donors to make and deliver on their pledges.
It will also enable the Austrian government to maintain predictable levels of disaster relief
funds year on year.
2. What is its communicative power for Austria?
By devising and pioneering an entirely new and completely rational approach to disaster relief,
Austria shows that it can be moral and principled without losing sight of its natural gifts of
intelligence, maturity, experience and sound business sense. It shows an interesting blend of
compassion and creativity, and should help to demonstrate Austrias real leadership qualities
in the international domain.
3. How does it fit the Brookenbower concept?
This is bridge-building in the most modern sense: creating valuable connections between the
developed and developing worlds that save lives and property.
4. How can we promote it internationally?
My instincts tell me that this is a story which will effectively tell itself, as it is entirely original
and entirely self-explanatory. It will be possible to start telling the story of this initiative as
soon as its viability is established and a partner country chosen.
5. Operational Considerations
My belief is that this will reduce the amount of money which Austria spends on overseas
disaster relief, permitting the government to focus on a wider range of vulnerable countries
than ever before without increasing its overall assistance budget. Obviously, the more
premiums of this sort that the Austrian government is able to purchase on behalf of third
countries, the greater its buying power, and the cheaper the programme will become.
The first stage is to do a feasibility study, composed of insurance and disaster relief experts. I
have already had some preliminary conversations with a friend who recently retired as Chief

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Executive of one of the worlds largest reinsurance companies, who has indicated his
willingness to explore this idea on behalf of the Austrian Government.
6. Who should be in charge of it?
Ministry of Foreign Affairs / Ministry of Finance.

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Symbolic Action Name: AustriaCard (Short name: AustriaCard)
Tranche: 1
5. What is it?
This is a large-scale loyalty scheme for Austria, targeted at all users and consumers of the
nation: students, tourists, investors, foreign residents and consumers of Austrian products and
services around the world. In concept, it is basically identical to the classic airline or hotel
loyalty card, except that Austria would be the first country to create such a scheme for the
entire nation.
The ultimate benefit of the card is that it has the potential to make Austria the first country to
migrate from expensive conventional mass marketing towards relationship marketing
where it builds long-term, interactive relationships of trust and mutual esteem with its most
valued visitors, investors, consumers, visiting students and workers.
This database of users of the country would provide a growing resource for understanding,
stimulating and maintaining Austrias international customer base and reputation. It would
also provide a valuable resource for polling on changing attitudes towards Austria by its users,
lapsed users and potential users.
6. What is its communicative power for Austria?
By maintaining constant contact with prospects, past and current customers of Austria, the
AustriaCard enables the country to communicate directly and interactively with its user base.
And by linking together more and more existing operations in the fields of tourism, leisure,
transport, education, investment, exports and trade, huge benefits of scale become possible in
all of Austrias external communications.
7. How does it fit the Brookenbower concept?
It doesnt directly: this is an operating system which will enable Austria to engage more
efficiently and effectively with its consumer base, and thus build its global reputation as a
Bridgebuilder more quickly and efficiently.
8. How can we promote it internationally?
Simply by encouraging existing loyalty schemes and discount cards to collaborate or merge,
this Symbolic Action can initially be marketed by the founding partners to their existing
databases. Beyond this point, the enrolment process for new users would be both quick and
simple. As with most airline loyalty programmes, it should be instant and free of charge at the
base membership level, so that members can start earning points as soon as their holiday is
booked (travel agencies would need to recruited as resellers of the scheme) or on the inbound
flight. The card is swiped by the arriving visitor at immigration, and points automatically added
on every arrival.

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Cards can also be distributed through stores overseas by the simple addition of a hang-tag on
exported Austrian products which informs purchasers that they could have saved e.g. 20% if
they bought the product with their AustriaCard, and directing them to the till where they can
apply for immediate membership.

9. Operational Considerations
This Symbolic Action can be launched with little additional expense other than the creation of
a graphic design and logo, since in the first phase it is merely the result of existing card offerers
merging or co-branding with the new project.
In the longer term, the AustriaCard can take on many additional functions, such as VAT refunds
for departing non-EU visitors, major investment incentives, and even cash or credit related
functions. Until exploratory conversations are held with partners and these should certainly
include banks and other financial institutions as well as travel, culture and leisure operators
it is difficult to know whether the project is ultimately part of the cost of marketing Austria
more effectively, or whether it has the potential to become a revenue earner in its own right.
10. Who should be in charge of it?
To be discussed.

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Symbolic Action Name: Become Lead Country for the Global Footprint (Short name: Footprint)
Tranche: 2
1. What is it?
This Symbolic Action is based on Austria becoming the international champion and home
country of the Global Footprint. The Global Footprint Network, which devised this measure, is
working to establish the Footprint as the standard resource accounting tool for countries, in an
effort to ensure that humanity lives within the available resources of the planet. This tool
compares human demands on nature to the regenerative capacity of nature: thus it can show,
for example, how much humanity takes compared to what the biosphere can renew, or how
much a nations population consumes compared to what the countrys ecosystems can
provide.
2. What is its communicative power for Austria?
For Austria to become the global standard-bearer for a new kind of sustainable accounting,
based on available resources rather than purely on credit and debit, is a prime example of
bridge-building, and a really significant opportunity for Austria to raise its profile worldwide.
3. How does it fit the Brookenbower concept?
By becoming lead nation for the Global Footprint, Austria could gain almost unlimited
opportunities to build bridges of sustainable national development with other countries,
helping them to adopt the same metrics and aspire to the same targets.
4. How can we promote it internationally?
The Global Footprint is rapidly gaining acceptance in many countries, and has been endorsed
by the United Nations, the European Union and many multilateral organisations, NGOs and
governments worldwide. Its momentum is clearly gathering, and my strong sense is that it will
soon be accepted as the standard metric for sustainability. If Austria moves quickly and
becomes associated with this new standard, then the reputational benefits for both parties
could be significant.
5. Operational Considerations
I understand that Austrias performance on the Global Footprint metric is relatively good by
the standards of developed countries, and the chances of it being able to achieve the
recommended targets are good, if the right measures are adopted by government and
industry, of course. For this reason, Austria will obviously have to take care to match deeds
with words, and this is an important consideration. Certain levels of investment and some
policy changes will probably be essential, but a more prominent and credible way of making
people around the world feel glad that Austria exists (my original definition of success for this
project) would be difficult to find.
6. Who should be in charge of it?

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To be discussed.

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Symbolic Action Name: European Forum Alpbach
Tranche: to be confirmed
1. What is it?
The key task facing Europe at this time of crisis is primarily an internal one: to define what its
job must be for the next fifty years, and to generate consensus, passion and ambition around
this. Unless this purpose is relevant, credible and inspiring to people in the areas that they care
about most, then solidarity and commitment, not to mention democratic participation, will
remain a distant dream.
Europe is surely mankinds most ambitious and most successful experiment in global
governance, the master problem facing humanity today. Europes duty and destiny is
therefore to continue the experiment and perfect the techniques of multilateralism.
My deliberately ambitious proposal is that the Alpbach Forum should adopt this as its role: to
do whatever is necessary and possible to help Europe redefine itself according to this mission.
2. What is its communicative power for Austria?
In pursuing this goal, Alpbach will help to redefine Austria as a leader within Europe, and has
the capability to add even more international lustre to Austrias image than Davos does to
Switzerland.
By inviting ever more senior and prominent influencers to Alpbach, and ensuring that people
begin to recognise that this is where Europes future is being forged, the Alpbach Forum will
position Austria in a strong leadership position not only within the EU but globally too. Of
course the global media follow these decision makers, and coverage will increase (along with
valuable imagery of Austrias beautiful alpine scenery) as the quality of the debates and the
solutions improve.
3. How does it fit the Brookenbower concept?
Austria is directly tackling the biggest challenges facing humanity in the current age, building
bridges between sectors, races and religions, between populations and governments, between
rich and poor, between Europe and the world.
4. How can we promote it internationally?
A high-profile international event such as the Alpbach Forum, as long as the speakers are
sufficiently prestigious, and as long as it takes care to produce a certain number of radical,
important and thought-provoking deliberations each year, will generate its own profile. Far
from needing additional marketing costs, the Alpbach Forum will market Austria.
5. Operational Considerations
This is a large task, and it will certainly be necessary for Alpbach to partner, network and
collaborate with other Austrian institutions (such as the Vienna Economic Forum) in order to
achieve the influence it needs.

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simon anholt
In order to rise above the mass of think-tanks and conferences currently operating, however, a
big mission is not sufficient: careful thought needs to be given to developing an entirely
innovative format for the organisation and its meetings. The scope of the Competitive Identity
project unfortunately doesnt permit this degree of detailed product development, but with
the right participants in the discussion, it is possible, necessary, and certainly fun, to develop a
completely new way of running an international forum. Alpbach should seize this challenge as
a matter of urgency.
6. Who should be in charge of it?
European Forum Alpbach, with government and private sector partners.

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simon anholt
Symbolic Action Name: Adomi Bridge (Short name: Chain Aid)
Tranche: 2
1. What is it?
Inspired by the Adomi Bridge project, Austria will help countries like Ghana with its
development projects, but only on condition that whatever skills, techniques and experience
Ghana acquires during the project must one day be passed on to others in the form of further
overseas development. So, through the Adomi Bridge project, our Ghanaian partners acquire a
wealth of knowledge and experience in managing, funding and implementing major civil
engineering projects: we then require them to build on this experience, and in due course to
become donors themselves, offering the benefit of that experience to other countries on
similar projects.
There is no reason why the chain of aid should remain in the developing world: one day the
Ghanaian government could offer its skills and expertise in bridge-building to a Canadian
province or a Japanese prefecture and of course this export of skills can one day become a
valuable source of revenue for Ghana, and perhaps provide a return on the original Austrian
investment.
2. What is its communicative power for Austria?
This Symbolic Action takes a single conventional aid project and develops it into an entirely
new model of foreign assistance. It shows Austria at the forefront of innovation in overseas
development, tackling a widely-acknowledged global problem with courage and imagination.
The message of this project is simple and compelling. Austria is changing the tired mantra of
overseas development, from give a man a fish and you will feed him for a day. Teach him to
fish and you feed him for life to something much more inspirational: Teach him to teach
others and you might end poverty.
3. How does it fit the Brookenbower concept?
This is bridge-building in the literal sense (helping to build bridges) and in the metaphorical
sense: not just building bridges between the developed and the developing world in the
traditional foreign aid sense, but extending those bridges in all directions, worldwide.
4. How can we promote it internationally?
Because the underlying concept of ChainAid has significant and wide-reaching implications, its
very important that it is fully communicated worldwide. I would suggest that once the concept
has been piloted perhaps with the Adomi Bridge project then it would make sense to
communicate the new approach through conferences, academic papers, interviews, magazine
articles and ultimately even a book (once there is sufficient case history material to support
this).

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simon anholt
It would also make sense to share the principle as widely as possible in the EU and other donor
countries so that it gets maximum exposure. Perhaps Austria could create a club or
association of donor states who support the approach in order to put more impetus behind
the initiative.
5. Operational Considerations
There are no additional costs associated with the pilot project, which is already funded. The
first stage is simply to discuss with Ghanaian partners whether they are interested in piloting
this new approach. Private sector partners can make an important contribution to the success
and subsequent roll-out of the initiative.
Some budget will need to be made available for promoting the concept of ChainAid once it is
launched, but this will probably not take place until after the Adomi pilot project is nearly
complete.
6. Who should be in charge of it?
Ministry of Foreign Affairs and, where appropriate, private sector partners in the civil
engineering, architectural and construction industries. Civil society partners from appropriate
NGOs could be very helpful in debating and developing the underlying principles of ChainAid.

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