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Corporate Governance

Community
Environment
Infrastructure

Holroyd:
The Gateway to
Western Sydney

Annual Report 2006-2007

Incorporating:
Audited Financial Reports to 30 June 2007
State of Environment Report 2006 / 2007

Contents
Introduction to Holroyd City Council.....................................................................................2
Holroyd City Council and Corporate Governance ................................................................5
Principal Activities & Achievements .....................................................................................8
Condition of Public Works..................................................................................................74
Summary of Legal Proceedings.........................................................................................77
Policy & Provisions for Elected Members ..........................................................................82
Major Contracts .................................................................................................................99
Environmental Issues ...................................................................................................... 101
Services to People of Diverse Cultural & Linguistic Backgrounds ...................................104
Childrens Needs ............................................................................................................. 109
Promotion of & Access to Community Services............................................................... 113
Human Resources Activities ............................................................................................ 117
External Bodies................................................................................................................122
Freedom of Information.................................................................................................... 125
Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act ................................................................ 138
National Competition Policy ............................................................................................. 140
Miscellaneous ..................................................................................................................142

Rates and Charges Written Off


Summary of Works on Private Land
Grants and Contributions made under Section 356

Audited Financial Reports to 30 June 2007


State of the Environment Report 2006/2007

Annual Report 2006-2007

Introduction to Holroyd City Council


The City of Holroyd
The City of Holroyd is the Gateway to Western Sydney. Its area is 40.3 square kilometres. The
estimated population exceeds 95,000. Historically, it was an area rich in native vegetation, fish,
bird and other animal life. For 40,000 years indigenous people, mainly from the Darug tribe,
thrived in the region until the arrival of the Europeans in the eighteenth century. From the available
records it is noted that the first meeting between the indigenous people and the Europeans took
place around 1790. With the expansion of Parramatta to the regions of Prospect and Toongabbie
the seeds were sown for the development of the Holroyd District. From small scale farming and
grazing of stock the European settlers began to transform the area. Between the two World Wars
a mini industrial revolution took place in the area. However the real expansion of Holroyd began
with the housing boom of the fifties and sixties. The civic leaders accepted the challenges that
accompany rapid development and ensured that Holroyd continued to be a better place to live.
Despite pressures of population increases and increased demand for housing and infrastructure
the open areas, which were an integral part of the lifestyle of the pioneers, have been maintained.
Holroyd can be proud of its diverse and living community.

The City Strategic Plan


The City Strategic Plan for Holroyd embodies the Councils Charter under which it institutes its
management and coordination of activities of the City. While it looks closely at the next four years
it will be cognisant of long-term goals.
The City Strategic Plan is the major platform through which elected representatives and the
Council staff will provide leadership in serving the City and the wider community.
While the Councils Strategic Plan will identify the major issues that affect the activities of the area,
the focus will be on goals to be achieved in four important groups, ie, Corporate Governance,
Community, Environment and Infrastructure.
For further information visit our website: www.holroyd.nsw.gov.au.

Holroyd City Council Contact Details


Council Chambers and Administration Building
16 Memorial Avenue
PO Box 42
Merrylands NSW 2160
Merrylands NSW 2160
Phone: (02) 9840 9840 (24 hour service including after hours emergency)
Facsimile: (02) 9840 9734
Business Hours: 8:00 am to 4:30 pm Monday to Friday
Email: hcc@holroyd.nsw.gov.au
Website: www.holroyd.nsw.gov.au

Annual Report 2006-2007

HOW COUNCIL WORKS

MAYOR AND COUNCILLORS


MANAGER CORPORATE REVIEW

GENERAL MANAGER

FACILITIES MANAGER

MANAGER MEDIA RELATIONS

DIRECTOR CORPORATE
& FINANCIAL SERVICES

DIRECTOR ENGINEERING
SERVICES

DIRECTOR
ENVIRONMENTAL &
PLANNING SERVICES

DIRECTOR LIBRARY AND


COMMUNITY SERVICES

CUSTOMER SERVICES TEAM


LEADER

MANAGER ASSETS AND


ENGINEERING SERVICES

MANAGER DEVELOPMENT

MANAGER CHILDREN
SERVICES

MANAGER ADMINISTRATIVE
SERVICES

MANAGER PARKS AND


BUILDINGS

MANAGER ENVIRONMENTAL
HEALTH

MANAGER COMMUNITY
SERVICES

MANAGER FINANCIAL
SERVICES

MANAGER TRAFFIC
DEVELOPMENT

MANAGER STRATEGIC
PLANNING

MANAGER LIBRARY
SERVICES

MANAGER HUMAN
RESOURCES

MANAGER WORKS

MANAGER INFORMATION
TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS

RISK MANAGER
3

Council and Corporate Governance

Annual Report 2006-2007

Council and Corporate Governance


Corporate governance refers to the way in which Council is directed, controlled and held to
account. It is concerned with structures and processes for decision-making and with the controls
and behaviour that support effective accountability for performance outcomes/results.
It
encompasses authority, accountability, stewardship, leadership, direction and control exercised by
the organisation.
The following key operating principles underpin the corporate governance framework within
Council:
Openness - providing residents with confidence regarding the decision-making processes and
actions of the Council in the management of their activities and enhances Councils communication
with the residents.
Integrity displaying honesty and objectivity as well as high standards of propriety and probity in
the stewardship of public funds and the management of Council affairs.
Accountability - Councillors and staff taking responsibility for their decisions and actions and
submitting themselves to appropriate external scrutiny. This is achieved through the Audit and
Governance Committee and other reporting mechanisms.
Risk Management - identifying, analysing and mitigating risks which could prevent Council from
achieving its objectives. Business continuity is closely related to risk management. Councils
business continuity plan ensures that the organisation is prepared for any foreseeable or
unforeseeable event and will continue operation.

Council and Stakeholders


Council strives to engage its citizens in policy making. It considers such action as a sound
investment for its future in line with the corporate governance principals. Council obtains
information, perspectives and solutions from a wider section of the community. The input is
derived from many and varied sources:

Councils elected representatives;


Councils Advisory Committees;
Section 355 Park Committees;
Community consultation with specific interest groups;
Council sponsored community BBQs at local parks;
City festivals;
Citizenship and other award ceremonies.

Overall, Council provides many opportunities for stakeholders to be partners in the democratic
process.

Audit and Governance Committee


The Audit and Governance Committee meets on a quarterly basis. The Committee consists of the
Mayor and two Councillors, the General Manager and one independent member. The Director of
Corporate & Financial Services, Manager of Financial Services, Manager of Corporate Review and
the External Auditor attend as Observers.

Annual Report 2006-2007

The role of the Committee is to:

Provide assurance as to the integrity of the Councils financial position;


Review the effectiveness of the internal controls through short term and long term audit
plans;
Consider reports arising from internal audit work;
Consider the External Audit Reports and management letters;
Review the risk management analysis.

Ethical Standards
Councils Code of Conduct provides a framework for ethical decision making by Councillors, staff
and community representatives. All new staff are provided with Code of Conduct training during
induction. Existing staff are given refresher training during staff meetings.
Councils Statement of Business Ethics sets out its expectations on how it envisages its
contractors, consultants, developers will maintain standards of professional behaviour when
dealing with Council. These statements are issued to all suppliers, development applicants,
contractors, consultants and others.

Risk Management
Council acknowledges that it faces a range of risks that could impact on the achievement of its
objectives.
To minimise the risks, Council has implemented the following early warning systems:

Financial risks are examined through Monthly Budget Reviews and Quarterly Financial
Health Checks;
Environmental risks are monitored through regular inspections, prompt response to reports of
possible environmental damage and through vigilance;
Health and safety risks are reviewed through Councils Holsafe program and Safety
Committees.
Corruption risks are assessed through the Governance Health Checks;
Operational risks reviewing and assessing business continuity plans; and
Compliance risks reviewing compliance with regulatory requirements on a bi-annual basis.

Currently, a GAP Analysis of the Disaster Recovery and Business Continuity Plan is being
undertaken.

Principal Activities and Achievements

Annual Report 2006-2007

General Managers Department


Core Business
The core business of this Department is to develop and manage Holroyds civic and related
functions on behalf of Council and the Community.

Initiatives and Achievements


Corporate Review
Corporate Review is a function that incorporates the Executive Development Control Unit, Internal
Audit, Complaints Handling, Management and Review process for tendering and purchasing.
The major tasks undertaken by Corporate Review included:

Administration of Executive Development Control Unit;


Financial audits including expenditure reviews;
Constant scrutiny of complaints management;
Probity auditing of major projects;
Performance audits;
Participation in the Tender Review Panel; and
Corporate Governance issues such as risk management, fraud and competition
corruption prevention strategies and unauthorised use of resources.

Media Relations and Promotions


Throughout the 2006 / 2007 financial year the Media Relations and Promotions Unit fulfilled its
objective of promoting awareness of Councils services within and beyond Holroyd City by
organising special and public events and media management.
The range and complexity of civic functions and publicity work for Council continued to grow,
including:

Australia Day Events (January 2007);


Annual Holroyd CityFest (April 2007); and
Local Government Week (July - August 2006);

The unit also helped support:

The Mayoral Charity Golf Day (April 2007); and


PetFest (September 2006).

The unit kept the community informed about Council, its activities, achievements and services by
producing:

Four editions of The Holroyd City Herald (Council newsletter delivered to households
across Holroyd City);
Annual Report to residents (summary produced as a 'community report' and distributed
within The Holroyd City Herald in December 2006 January 2007);
Weekly Corporate Page in local newspapers - 51 editions produced and published in
the local newspapers;
More than 100 media releases written and distributed to the media;

Annual Report 2006-2007

More than 110 information requests from journalists answered;


51 speeches written for Mayor/key Council staff;
Banners, postcards, posters, fliers produced in-house;
Advertisements for newspapers and internet media developed in-house.

Function Centres
An increase in patronage is a measure of the high esteem in which the Centre is held amongst
both the corporate and private communities of the area.
The kitchen still produces an average of 500 meals per week for the Meals-on-Wheels Service.
The Centre has now expanded into the wedding function market. It is anticipated that Councils
return on investment will be at its highest level for over five years.
The Centre is pleased to receive praise from its satisfied customers for providing a very good
service.
The Redgum Centre is the largest community hall throughout the City. The venue has a
permanent tennant and is booked on Fridays and Saturdays for community events. Its large stage
makes it a favourite for drama and theatre groups.
Patronage has been exceptional this past year with not one free Saturday or Sunday all year.

Annual Report 2006-2007

General Managers Department - Report to 30 June 2007


Strategic Objective -

To effectively and efficiently develop and manage Holroyds civic and related functions on behalf of Council and the
Community

PROGRAMS
CORPORATE REVIEW

MEDIA RELATIONS &


PROMOTIONS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)

Coordinate the Executive Development Control Unit

Reduction in median times in determining DAs.

Operational and Performance Audits

Review of Internal Audit Program adopting new


tasks on a priority basis.

Management Plan

Effectively review and change the Management


Plan reporting format.

Tender and Purchasing Reviews

Annual savings in excess of $150,000.

Probity Reviews

Ongoing monitoring of compliance with ICAC,


Ombudsman and other statutory requirements.

Media liaison and publications

Prompt and accurate responses provided to all


media inquiries.

Annual events coordination and Special Civic Managed major events for Australia Day within
Events
budget and without major incident. Substantially
increased attendance to a record of 10,000
people.
Managed major events for CityFest celebrations
under budget and without major incident. Good
participation levels were achieved.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS
FUNCTION CENTRES

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)

Business seminars and conferences at the Holroyd Annual Income Level - $796,000
Centre

Oversee functions
Function Centre

Function and Wedding Reception Centre City Available Time Used 76%
Return on Investment 7%
Hall for community and civic meetings

Oversee bookings of Council Committee Rooms

Achieved and ongoing

Provide Catering Services to Meals on Wheels

To specification and MOW satisfaction Achieved.

and

bookings

11

at

Redgum Annual Income Level - $86,000

Annual Report 2006-2007

Corporate & Financial Services


Core Business
The core business of this Department is to implement the requirements of Councils Governance
Policy and manage the finance, human resources, customer service, administrative, information
technology and risk management services for the efficient and effective operation of Council.

Initiatives and Achievements


Finance
Council has continued to maintain its sound financial position throughout 2006/2007.
Councils audited Annual Financial Reports for the year ending 30 June 2007 show key
performance indicators have remained better than industry benchmarks excepting the Asset
Renewal ratio which Council is addressing through a new Special Infrastructure Rate and
Stormwater Levy.
All statutory requirements have been met by the Finance Section in accordance with set
timeframes including:

Statutory Returns;
Fringe Benefits Tax Reporting;
Goods and Services Tax Reporting; and
Legislative compliance.

Council has continued to upgrade and streamline its financial and business management systems
to industry standards to provide sound, timely and effective financial management information
suitable for operational and strategic decision making. This process includes monthly budget
reporting in addition to the quarterly statutory requirements.
Under Councils Investment Strategy and Policy, the investment portfolio continues to provide
returns which were at or above industry benchmarks. The services of Fund Managers are used to
assist Council in carrying out this function. The Investment Strategy is formally reviewed twice
each year.
The Finance Section continued its program of best value investigations across corporate support
functions as part of the Holroyd Model 2001, designed to achieve cost savings, including motor
vehicles, electricity supply, telecommunication services, advertising, printing and stationery, legal
services, etc.
Councils new Corporate Information System commenced implementation in early 2007 to go live
in July 2007. Significant enhancements to the financial systems are included in the new systems
which will provide for a streamlining of processes and improved reporting.

Administration
Council has met the requirements of the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act and the
Freedom of Information Act.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

There were no other requests for Council to review its policies or practices relating to privacy and
personal information protection, nor were there any requests to source or alter personal
information during 2006/2007.
The number of FOI applications reduced from 81 during 2005/2006 to 66 this year. Applications
were completed within the statutory timeframes. The statutory requirements of the FOI Act were
met.
Council is proactive in its management of records and is well advanced in meeting all requirements
of the State Records Act for documentation to ensure the preservation of Councils corporate
memory through sound record keeping practices and the accurate capture of information to meet
legal, evidential and accountability requirements.
Guidelines for Electronic Records Management have been updated to meet the State
Governments objectives for using information management and technology to deliver government
services to the people of NSW. Council is currently proceeding to upgrade its corporate
information system to function as the core repository of Councils evidential business records. The
Electronic Business Paper continues to be enhanced and provides Councillors with a detailed
history of agendas and minutes, as well as the community through Councils website.
Corporate Information introduced TRIM Context in April 2007. This system enables Council to
view all documents electronically making paper files unwarranted. As of 1 January 2000 physical
documents once scanned are no longer considered the original document making the electronic
version the master document. Staff are now able to view documents electronically not having to
wait for files to be delivered to them. Also, multiple staff are able to work on the same file at the
same time reducing response times.
The State Records Act 1998 still requires that electronic documents have the same retention
period as paper documents and electronic documents will be disposed of in accordance with
GDA10.

Information Technology
Council's Information Technology infrastructure continues to be enhanced under a continuous
improvement program. Additional software, hardware and mature technologies have been
incorporated to enhance Council's business activities and services as set out in the Management
Plan.
Council has implemented a mix of open source and proprietary software, consistent with the
Information Technology strategy of state and federal government departments. Council has used
open source solutions for general systems and infrastructure, with proprietary software for specific
applications.
Council has upgraded its core operational mission critical systems to offer enhanced functionality
and reporting facilities for Council staff, statutory authorities and the local community. Council has
utilised best-of-breed systems to offer robust, functional and customisable solutions for staff and
the local community, including an e-Service portal. This portal offers the public enhanced
functionality including the convenience of on-line rate payments and the viewing of published and
determined development applications. The e-services portal will be expanded to provide an
increasingly wider variety of services.
Council has also embarked on a comprehensive re-build of its website utilising a whole-of-council
content management system. The aims of this task group are to streamline information flow and to
create a more intuitive and functional web presence for the local community.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

For internal customers, this unit continues to provide hardware and software support through its
rapid response team, as well as maintaining continuous operations and securing Council's
information from loss.
For Councillors, the Information Technology unit continues to provide support in the administration
of the Electronic Business Paper and other software as well as providing on-site Information
Technology support for business related technologies.

Risk Management
The Risk Management Plan was reviewed in accordance with the Councils mission, applicable
laws and current legislation. Statutory obligations were continually monitored throughout the
period.
The Unit has been the focal point for monitoring the recent legislative changes and the potential
impact that it has on Council and the community.
Options for placement of Councils insurances were again reviewed to ensure best value.
Initiatives this year included the development of Councils Risk Register, a review of Councils
Disaster Recovery Plan and an introduction to Enterprise Risk Management.
The Unit continues to support MetroPool, an insurance pool with other Councils through which
Council purchases its Public Liability and Professional Indemnity insurances, particularly in regard
to claims management and best practices. Metropool performed strongly throughout 2006/2007
meeting its insurance obligations for member Councils whilst increasing the Pools equity from
$3.70 million to $4.04 million.
A review of Councils rehabilitation processes was undertaken to minimise time lost and
consequent impact on Councils delivery of services.
The Risk Management Section continues to provide a forum for discussion of current risk issues
and provide another vehicle for feedback to staff generally.

Human Resources
The ongoing review of all policies and procedures was continued throughout 2006/2007 to ensure
they all remain relevant and up to date. A number of new policies were developed and approved by
Senior Management Team. The annual staff performance evaluation system has been updated
with a policy checklist to ensure all staff have read and understood the policies and procedures
that are relevant for their job in the current year.
Appointments and salary progression remain based on qualifications, experience and competence.
Annual staff performance evaluations enable feedback on performance between managers and
staff, and facilitate staff progression, collection of training data and succession planning.
The Corporate Training Plan continues in accordance with NAPSA requirements and the Staff
Induction Program conducted monthly to highlight the statutory obligations for Council and staff.
Competency based training was further developed in the reporting year.
Councils HOLSAFE OH&S Management System has been further enhanced with ongoing
promotion, monitoring and reviewing of the system to ensure the organisations OH&S obligations
are being met. HOLSAFE Teams have been formed to work on particular projects.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

Councils Equal Employment Opportunity Plan was reviewed with emphasis again this year on
Human Resources policies and procedures and the identification of staff training needs. As
identified in the Plan, the activity areas are: communication and awareness, recruitment, selection
committee, appointment and transfer, training, higher duties, grievance procedures, conditions of
service, access to Council premises, allocation of responsibilities and resources and evaluation of
the Management Plan.
Council has also endorsed the National Framework of Women in Local Government The Way
Forward and a Womens Development Team has been formed to develop strategies to support the
recommendations of the Framework.
A Workforce Planning Framework has been developed to attract and retain staff in Council. A key
aspect for 2006/2007 was phased retirement to assist the capturing of corporate knowledge and
assist the aging workforce of Council.

Customer Service
The review and upgrading of all procedures within the section was an ongoing operation of the
section throughout 2006/2007 to facilitate the delivery of new and improved services to meet the
changes in customer needs. Procedures are continually reviewed and updated as a matter of
course when it is considered that either a minor or major refinement is required and warranted.
Customer Service staff continue to assist customers gain access to and understand the operations
of Councils website. Where necessary, a Customer Service Officer will walk a customer through
aspects of the site to ensure that the customer gains the most benefit and understands the
information available on the site.
Regular meetings of the team are held after hours each four-week cycle to review operations,
discuss current issues and procedures and improve the operations of the centre. Each member of
the team is conscious of the needs of its customers and endeavours to be responsive to those
needs.
Tasks undertaken by Customer Service are continually reviewed, altered, added to and deleted
with a view to improving the service available to and provided to the public.
New in 2006/2007 was the implementation of EFTPOS and credit card payment facilities which
were made available to customers from 1 July 2007.

Corporate Development
The format of the Management Plan formulated in 2005 was utilised in 2005/2006 and in
2006/2007. With the proposed Integrated Planning and Reporting project underway it was decided
to continue with the 2005 format for 2007/2008.
Under this Management Plan there are two essential elements:
The City Strategic Plan
The City Operational Plan.
The City Strategic Plan for Holroyd embodies the Councils Charter under which it institutes its
management and coordination of activities of the City. The Plan identifies where the Council
wishes to be in 10 years time and how it proposes to achieve this outcome.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

The Councils Strategic Plan identifies the major issues effecting all the activities of Holroyd City. It
focuses on goals to be achieved in four important groups.
The City and Corporate Governance
Corporate Governance is the way the Council is directed, controlled and held to account. It
provides guidelines about how Councillors and Council staff will act in good faith and in the best
interests of the stakeholders.
The City and the Community
This section contains an assessment of the needs of the community at the present time, identifies
future requirements in the next four years and contains an analysis of community needs projected
towards the year 2020.
The City and the Environment
Focuses on methods by which the Council can manage and conserve Holroyds natural heritage,
and facilitate the hand over of a safe and healthy environment to the future generations.
The City and the Infrastructure
Addresses the aspects of preserving, maintaining and delivery of Council assets in the form of
roads, buildings, parks and other facilities.
The City Operational Plan covers activities that will:

Communicate the strategic importance of projects;


How such projects will provide a better city;
The cost of such projects to the community.

The City Operational Plan most importantly indicates the desired outcome of projects, the action
plans, target dates and budget allocation for the projects.
Work is underway for the implementation of the new Integrated Planning and Reporting System as
proposed by the Department of Local Government in consultation with local government Councils
in New South Wales.
The new Integrated Plan will be based on the 10 year Community Strategic Plan which will go
hand in hand with the new Local Environment Plan (LEP).
The new Integrated Plan format is a logical evolution of Councils existing Management Plan
format.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

Special Projects
Second Sydney Airport
Council has maintained its vigorous opposition to the construction of a second airport at Badgerys
Creek or anywhere else in the Sydney basin.
Council provides a secretarial service to the Western Sydney Alliance of Councils and Community
Groups in mounting this campaign, which has involved major submissions, delegations to decisionmakers, media initiatives and general lobbying activities.

Property Issues
Councils charter as stated in Section 8 of the Local Government Act, is to act as the custodian and
trustee of public assets and to effectively account for and manage the assets for which it is
responsible.
To this end, Council continued to review the major properties under its control to ensure that best
value and use is being obtained.

New Corporate Information System


After an extensive selection process based on the calling of expressions of interest followed by the
tender process, a successful supplier, namely Civica Pty Limited, was chosen to provide the
Councils New Corporate Information System as prime contractor for the component systems that
make up the total solution.
The New Corporate Information System provides, for the first time, full integration across the
various key corporate systems which include:
-

financial management;
human resources;
development, planning and compliance;
asset management;
document/records management;
mapping/geographical services;
community/childrens services.

The process of implementing the new corporate information solution commenced in late 2006 and
progressed throughout the first half of 2007, resulting in the new systems going live on Monday, 2
July 2007.
The new systems provide Council a much enhanced capability to deliver services in electronic
format, known as e-Services.
e-Services allows Councils customers to access an increasing number of services over the
internet. To date the following services are available:
-

rate and debtor payments;


viewing development applications lodged.

Currently being developed for internet access are the following services:

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Annual Report 2006-2007

certificate applications (149 and 603 certificates);


development application tracking;
booking of facilities and services;
access to Council maps.

The new systems also greatly enhance Councils ability to capture and store data. In this regard
the document management system now captures documents in electronic format making
document storage, retrieval and archiving much more efficient.
A new mapping system is expanding the layers of data that can be stored and displayed
graphically which improves the usability of the data Council has available.
A new asset information management system provides greatly enhanced ability to both store data
on Councils assets and to report on the costs of managing those assets. These assets include:
-

Holroyd Gardens development;


Clunies Ross site;
Former Sydney Childrens Museum;
Guildford Leagues Club leased site.

In addition, the new software has for the first time provided for credit card payment fees to be oncharged to the customer (where permissible) resulting in the introduction of EFTPOS, credit and
debit card payment options.
During 2007/2008 a new business paper system and additional community/children service
modules will be developed.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

Corporate & Financial Services - Report to 30 June 2007


Strategic Objective -

To provide efficient, effective management of Councils corporate and financial functions including best practice, continuous
improvement and customer service principles.

PROGRAMS
FINANCIAL SERVICES

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)

Financial Management

Unrestricted Current Ratio 4.9:1

Management Accounting

Debt Service Ratio 4.11%

Revenue Collection

Rates and Annual Charges Outstanding Ratio


3.95%

Purchasing/Inventory Control

Investments

Statutory Requirements

Inventory Ratio Satisfactory.


Average rate of return on investment 6.54%
Compliance with Regulatory Deadlines - Achieved.

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES

Audit Committee Support

Compliance with decisions - Achieved.

Electricity Pricing

Monitoring of industry developments - deregulated


market tested.

Secretariat

Meeting agreed deadlines for Agenda/Minutes Achieved.

Records Management

Number of transactions (Correspondence) 19,529


Level of Customer Satisfaction - High.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS
ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES (Contd)

CUSTOMER SERVICE CENTRE

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)

Property Management

Implementation of lease obligations Achieved. Vacancy Rates Nil.


Maximum Returns - Acceptable Level
Achieved.

Printing Services

Number of jobs 1,304


Level of satisfaction High

FOI Management

Number of Applications 66
Meeting statutory deadlines - Achieved.

Privacy & Personal Information Protection Number of Applications Nil


Meeting statutory deadlines - Achieved.
Act

Counter Service

Number of complaints received as % of total


transactions - 2%

Call Centre

Number of customers dealt with at source


80%
Time taken to answer telephone enquires 43
seconds (average)
Maximum Wait: 19 minutes 17 seconds
No of Calls Handled: 98,454
No of Calls Abandoned: 10,304 or 10.46%
Level of Service Satisfactory.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS
RISK MANAGEMENT

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

Risk Management

Identify Risks

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)
Risk audit performance measurement in
conjunction with Metro Pool 86%
compliance.
Number and cost of claims by public 22
claims - $38,650 (est.)

Manage Risks
Number and cost of workers compensation
claims - 60 claims $395,407 (est.)

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

HUMAN RESOURCES

Continuous operation, maintenance and


review

Up-time - 99%

Data Security and Recovery

Response Time - Immediate.

Integration and Enhancement

System Capacity - Satisfactory.

Training and Support

IT staff ratio - 1 to 65 workstations

Policy Development

Number of policies and procedures reviewed


and updated 35.

Industrial Relations

Number/type of grievances/disputes 20.

Equal Employment Opportunity

Number of EEO incidents 1.

Recruitment and Selection

Timely Placement - 8-10 weeks.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS
HUMAN RESOURCES (Contd)

CORPORATE DEVELOPMENT

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)

Remuneration Management

- Number of Reviews 95%.

Training

- Training Hours 7,543.50.

Occupational Health and Safety

- Number of Programs 18.

Support Services
counselling)

Management/Corporate Planning

Workplans for new


framework developed.

Quality Improvement

Ongoing review with Driving Organisational


Excellence program.

National Competition Policy

Compliance with guidelines Achieved.

Performance Indicators & Benchmarking

Implementation
Achieved.

(on

22

and

off

site -

Number of requests for assistance 459.

of

integrated

agreed

planning

programs

Annual Report 2006-2007

Engineering Services
Core Business
The core business of the Engineering Services Department is to develop and manage Holroyd
Citys roads, traffic, drainage and recreational infrastructure on behalf of Council and the
community.

Initiatives & Achievements


Works

Implementation of Councils Road Reseals and Reconstruction Programs leading to 60% of


the road network being in fair to good condition.

All assets maintained to a standard consistent with funds provided.

Levels of Service for Works activities completed.

Redesign of depot operations including road and park maintenance and street cleaning in
progress.

Continued shopping centre hazard inspections has seen a reduced number of hazards being
observed within the shopping centres.

Electronic Street Sweeping System and Road Hazard and Maintenance Inspection System in
place and progressing.

Continued the implementation of an electronic Maintenance Management System.

Graffiti Abatement Program being reviewed.

Renovations of playing fields undertaken in line with funding available.

Renewed the soft-fall material under play equipment within parks.

Occupational Health and Safety documents for the majority of the Works Operations have
been reviewed through participation and consultation with staff.

Street and public amenity cleaning carried out daily. Work includes cleaning major shopping
centres, cleaning public toilets daily, cleaning of Merrylands Station Bus Interchange, road
sweeping, sweeping paths, emptying bins and general rubbish removal.

Procurement of new plant and equipment in line with funds available.

Central Gardens and Holroyd Gardens Operations Manuals reviewed.

Traineeship in Horticulture Certificate III undertaken by interested staff.

Contributed to the evaluation and implementation of the New Corporate Information System.

23

Annual Report 2006-2007

Continued bushcare including three volunteer groups at Pendle Hill Creek, Alpha Park
Bushland and Lower Prospect Canal Reserve.

Restoration and preservation of Shale Plains and Woodland Corridor Link at Hyland Road,
utilising grant funds from the Environmental Trust.

Traineeship in Road Construction & Maintenance Certificate III completed by interested staff.

Depot staff undertook Driving Organisation Excellence programs.

Depot Continuous Improvement Team continued providing opportunities to introduce


innovation into the Depot operations.

Trialled the parental supervision program at Merrylands Swim Centre.

Traffic and Development


Implementation of Traffic Management measures across the city including:

Installation of load limits in the Toongabbie and Parramatta area roads. Specifically, the
strategy aims to encourage heavy vehicles to use main roads.

Facilitate new Rapid Bus Transport System (T-Way) through Holroyd City.

Traffic impact assessment of major development applications including Pemulway,


Toongabbie Portico Arcade development and Stockland Merrylands Mall.

Technical support for Holroyd Traffic Committee including compilation and analysis of traffic
data and issue of maintenance instructions.

Implementation of Holroyd Integrated Transport Study, which sets strategic parameters for
heavy vehicle movements, public transport and pedestrian access.

Continued installation of new bus shelters in Holroyd City.

Establishment of a Westmead Permit Parking Scheme.

Securing funds from the Federal Government for the Auslink Blackspot Program.

Facilitate the construction of Wentworthville Commuter Car Park.

Implement Accident Blackspot Treatments and Pedestrian Facilities.

Prepare Holroyd Bike Plan.

Road Safety Activities

Speed assessments in school zones.

Commenced negotiations for School Zone Alert Signs.

Driver Fatigue program.

24

Annual Report 2006-2007

Survive the Ride program with particular emphasis on commuter riders returning to
motorcycling.

Holroyd Liquor Accord.

Pedestrian Safety for Seniors.

Choose Right Buckle Right Seat Belts Save Lives project for parents/caregivers.

Graduated Licensing Scheme Parents Workshops.

Back to School Publication and distribution of parking and road safety rules brochures.

Support Operation Westsafe.

Implementation of Road Safety Strategic Plan 2005-2009.

Bicycle Safety Promotion, On Your Bike program.

Kinda Orientation for parents/carers of children entering kindergarten.

Development

Implementation and review of the vehicular crossing policy.

Auditing of On-Site Detention (OSD) system, including inspection and compiling of nonconforming systems.

Design, inspection and supervision of vehicular crossing, kerb and gutter, and footpath
constructions related to DAs or existing residences.

Assessing engineering conditions of DAs.

Supervision of vehicular crossings, K & G, footpaths related to DAs or existing residence,


including design and inspection.

Provision of technical input into a large number of development applications including SEPP
59 (Boral), Holroyd Gardens (Delfin), Portico Parade (Toongabbie) and Stocklands
Merrylands Mall.

Implementation of new procedures required by changes to the Environment Planning and


Assessment Act, and State Government Planning requirements.

Review of current checklist and OSD requirements.

Fast tracking DAs of minor impact.

Providing input on Executive Development Control Unit meetings.

25

Annual Report 2006-2007

Landscape and Community Buildings


Landscape

Completion of artworks and seating on Prospect Creek as part of the Warali Wali project.

Playgrounds installed at Barcom Street Park, Shannon Avenue Park, Benaud Street Park,
Charles Mance Reserve, and Pye Street Park.

Preparation of Plans of Management for Holroyd Gardens, Guildford West Sportsground,


Ringrose Park and Bathurst Street Park.

Tree planting projects on National Tree Day at Central Gardens.

Bush regeneration works in Central Gardens, Lytton Street Park, Civic Park and Carolyn
Street Park.

Friends of Prospect Creek supported in their efforts to regenerate remnant vegetation and to
remove debris from this significant natural corridor.

Annual General Park Committee Forum gives an opportunity for Committee members and
Council staff to discuss issues concerning the administration, maintenance and future
development of park facilities.

Coordination of Access Works Programs to ensure ongoing support for equal access in
Holroyd.

Implementation of City Bushland Master Plan.

Implementation of Plan of Management for Crosby Street Park, CV Kelly Park and Guildford
West.

MJ Bennett Reserve Installation of new play equipment and improvements in sporting


facilities.

Preparation of Plans of Management for sportsground and parks within Holroyd.

Nelsons Ridge Plan of Management Finalising Plan of Management for implementation.

Hylands Road Open Space/Gipps Road Park Preparation of Masterplan for the sporting
complex.

Community Gardens Improvements to landscaping.

Holroyd Gardens Improvements to the disabled playgrounds.

Central Gardens Preparation of the Masterplan.

Section 94 Contribution projects Implementation of landscaping and open space projects


approved under the S94 contribution scheme.

26

Annual Report 2006-2007

Community Buildings

Upgrade of floodlighting at the infield of the Guildford West Sportsground Baseball field.

Reconstruction of the Depot Carpenters Workshop.

Provision of family and accessible (disabled) toilet facilities at Pendle Hill Park.

Provision of air conditioning to the kitchen at Greystanes Community Centre.

Renewal of the entry verandah of the Greystanes Library.

Upgrade of the floodlighting at Ted Burge Sportsground.

Upgrade of the canteen facilities at Harold Read Park.

Assets and Engineering Support

Established the Floodplain Management Committee.

Continued involvement in managing the development of the Goodlet & Smith Brickworks site,
off Walpole Street, Holroyd (Holroyd Gardens Estate). Liaison with development manager
Delfin Lend Lease on project management, financing and budgeting, land sales and
conservation of the Heritage Precinct.

Progressed actions within the three Stormwater Management Plans.

Provided on-going technical support and liaison for Councils membership of the Upper
Parramatta River Catchment Trust. Participated in the management or review of various
flood studies being undertaken by the Trust and developers of major development precincts.
Worked with the Trust on a project to identify means of raising flood awareness within
councils and the community.

Overland Flood Study for Upper Back Creek, Upper Clay Cliff Creek and Upper Domain
Creek are in progress.

Continued development of the GIS Flood Layer to comply with NSW Government policy to
include overland flooding areas and inundation up to the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF)
event.

Progressed Councils Asset Management Systems by improving the asset registers including
TAMS and increasing awareness of the asset portfolios critical role in underpinning provision
of services.

Provided on-going management of the Local Emergency Management Committee and


liaison with the District Emergency Management Officer and Holroyd SES on planning and
operational issues, including review of Holroyd Displan, and desktop emergency response
exercises.

Progressed the design of a new headquarters building for the Holroyd State Emergency
Services.

27

Annual Report 2006-2007

Provided technical services to internal and external customers on engineering and


management issues including: land ownership searches, catchment plans, easement
information, road grants, design of civil works, GIS mapping, capital works budgetary
management, and development control on flood prone land.

Place Management Shopping Centres

Place Managers responsibility for North and South areas of Council area.

Ongoing support provided to the Merrylands CBD Committee, Guildford Chamber of


Commerce and Wentworthville Promotions Committee.

Annual Shopping Centre meetings held at all main centres.

Festive Banner program in Shopping Centres continuing with upgrade of banners.

28

Annual Report 2006-2007

Engineering Services Department - Report to 30 June 2007


Strategic Objective -

To effectively and efficiently develop and manage Holroyds road, traffic, drainage and recreational infrastructure on behalf
of Council and the community.

PROGRAMS
WORKS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

Road
&
Drainage
Maintenance

Construction

Parks Maintenance

Street & Public Toilet Cleaning

Depot Operations

Swimming Centres

* TBD = To be determined

29

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES (OPERATIONAL)


No. of requests road repair
& (From March 2004 included all roads
requests. Targets to be reviewed in
2004/05)
Roads cost per metre or kilometre
Drainage cost per metre or kilometre
No. of requests park maintenance
(From March 2004 included all parks and
gardens requests. Target to be reviewed
in 2004/05)
Parks cost per park maintained
Works Maintenance Programs
actual cost vs budget
Works Improvements Programs
- actual cost v budget
- works completed
Swimming Centres cost per
attendance
Swimming Centres attendance per
Centre:
- Guildford
- Merrylands
- Wentworthville

Actual
162

Target
<500

$10,000
$1,200

TBD
TBD

454

<500

$12,596
99%

TBD
95%

95%
81%
$6.86*

100%
>85%
TBD

99,892
58,588
68,186

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS
TRAFFIC & DEVELOPMENT

LANDSCAPE & COMMUNITY


BUILDINGS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

Traffic Management

Road Safety
Engineering Development

Landscape & Park Improvement

OPERATIONS

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES (OPERATIONAL)

Parks Improvement Program


- actual cost v budget
- works completed
Building Improvement Program
- actual cost v budget
- works completed
Asset value v replacement value
(Refer to Special Schedule 7)
Total Dept. Improvement &
Maintenance Programs
- actual cost v budget
- works completed
Maintain Asset Management Plans
Asset management systems
maintained
Prepare Flood Risk Management
Strategy
Grant applications submitted and
grants managed.
Development Applications
assessed.
Provide technical advice.
Implement and Maintain Council
GIS Based Flood Liable land
mapping.

Community Buildings

Access Program

Department Budget

Asset Management

Drainage & Flood Mitigation

Traffic Improvement Programs


- actual cost v budget
- works completed
All projects completed
DA applications turnaround

30

Actual

Target

TBD
68%*
100%
10.9
days

100%
>85%

82%
58%*

100%
>85%

TBD
78%*

100%
>85%

72%*
C
C

>85%

C
C
C
C
C

<10
days

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES (OPERATIONAL)


-

New park purchases


Emergency Services

ENGINEERING SERVICES

Corporate Computer Mapping


Stormwater Management Plans

Holroyd Gardens Estate

MainStreet Program

Engineering Office Administration

*Revenue has been deducted


C Completed
TBD To be defined
* - includes all Capital Works projects.

31

No land purchased during year.


Local Emergency Management
plans in place
Local Emergency Management
Committee operating.
New headquarters for SES
concept design
Implemented and maintained
Plans implemented and reviewed in
accordance with timetables set out
in the Plans
Stages completed to a high
standard, maximising Councils
share of the profit
MainStreet Program
- plans completed
- works completed

Actual
N/A
C
Ongoing
In
progress
C
C

C
C

Target

Annual Report 2006-2007

Environmental & Planning Services


Core Business
The core business of the Environment & Planning Services Department is to develop, manage and
enhance Holroyd Citys built and natural environments, and to sustain public health on behalf of
Council and the community.

Initiatives & Achievements


Environmental Health
State of Environment Report
Under the Local Government Act 1993, Council is required to prepare a State of the Environment
Report each year addressing eight key environmental themes. The first State of Environment
Report of a Council for the first year ending after an election of Councillors must be a
comprehensive report. The other State of Environment Reports may be either a comprehensive of
supplementary report.
For 2006/2007 Council has prepared a supplementary report in accordance with the requirements
of the Local Government Act 1993 addressing not only the eight key environmental themes, but
broader sustainability issues.

Living Holroyd: A Sustainable Future


Holroyd City Council continued to demonstrate its commitment to working with the community at
the local level to progress towards achieving a sustainable community through implementation of
actions identified in Living Holroyd: A Sustainable Future (Living Holroyd).
Living Holroyd was adopted by Council in December 2003, and contains strategies for Council and
the community, that are about changing behaviour at a corporate, community, household and
personal level encouraging local action on global issues. All the strategies work towards
achieving the shared Council and community vision which was formulated by the Local Agenda 21
Steering Committee to reflect the values expressed from the community and stakeholder input into
the process. Living Holroyd is currently under review to ensure that it remains relevant.

Environmental Protection
Council is responsible for non-scheduled premises (as defined under the Protection of the
Environmental Operations Act 1997) to determine, regulate and respond to activities that may have
a negative impact on the environment.

Immunisation
Holroyd Council continues to provide a free childhood immunisation service for its residents.
Immunisation clinics are held each month at Merrylands, Wentworthville and Greystanes.
Residents find these clinics convenient with reminder letters being sent advising of the child's next
appointment. NSW Health accredited nurses administer the vaccines. The service is operated
cost-neutral to Council with NSW Health paying the cost of employing the nurses and the
Commonwealth Government paying a subsidy for each immunisation procedure.

32

Annual Report 2006-2007

Food Premises
NSW Food Regulation Partnership
In June 2006 the State Government allocated $1.6 million for the 2006/2007 financial year to
support implementation of the NSW Food Regulation Partnership which is a model for food
regulation between the NSW State Government and Local Government.
Local Government will now have a mandated role in food regulation and are required to nominate
what level (category) of food regulatory work they will undertake:
-

Category A: Minimal base role only


food premises approvals;
emergency response; and
urgent food recalls
Category B: Category A plus for food service and retail businesses:
premises inspections;
investigating complaints (including single-cases of foodborne illness); and
enforcement action.
Category C: Categories A & B plus any other role negotiated directly between Council and
the NSW Food Authority.

The partnership will:


clearly define the respective roles of Councils and the NSW Food Authority;
provide a dedicated program to support and assist Council roles in food regulation;
establish arrangements for coordination of the NSW food regulatory system; and
provide a secure funding base for Councils food regulatory work.
Councils Food Safety Surveillance Program
Councils food safety surveillance program is designed to educate the food handler and encourage
the provision of safe food to the consumer. The introduction of good food safety practices not only
minimises the risks associated with food poisoning, but also instils customer confidence, which can
have a flow on effect by increasing business trade.
The current program is undertaken based on the national Food Safety Standards. The food
surveillance inspections incorporate:
-

all premises where food is stored, prepared and/or sold within Holroyd City;
all temporary food stalls and food vending vans operating at festivals and carnivals where
Council has an involvement; and
all food vending vehicles operating in the streets of Holroyd City.

Council demonstrates its commitment to food safety through its routine inspection program and the
continued education of local food handlers to minimise the risk of food poisoning in its community.
It is Councils goal to have all food handlers in Holroyd City attend Councils free food handler
seminars held annually at various town centres within our Local Government area.

33

Annual Report 2006-2007

Waste and Recycling


In February 2007 Council commenced a new recycling collection contract with JJ Richards, who
held the previous contract. The new contract saw the introduction of several improvements,
including the removal of the bin divider.
Council is also considering the options available for the disposal of domestic waste. In line with its
commitment toward achieving sustainability in all its operations, Council's aim is to encourage
measures that reduce waste production, deliver collected waste to a facility that offers the most
sustainable solution and to provide a recycling service that will optimise the diversion of recyclable
material from landfill.

Strategic Planning
Merrylands Town Centre Precinct LEP and DCP
The draft LEP for the Merrylands Town Centre Precinct, which included the introduction of new
planning and design principles and the specific objectives for the town centre, was re-exhibited in
August 2006 and finally gazetted in March 2007. The previously adopted DCP No. 45
consequently came into effect in April 2007.

Merrylands Town Centre Precinct and Neil Street Precinct section 94 Contributions Plans
The draft Neil Street s94 Contributions Plan for the provision of road and drainage infrastructure
which would be required as a result of any redevelopment of the area was placed on public
exhibition in February 2007 and came into effect in April 2007 after being adopted by Council. The
Merrylands Town Centre Precinct Section 94 Plan which was exhibited in July 2006, came into
effect in October 2006 after being adopted by Council.

3 Dawn Street, Greystanes


A zoning anomaly was rectified after being brought to the attention of Council. The land was
erroneously zoned 6(a) Public Open Space and consequently a draft LEP was prepared and
exhibited which amended the zoning to 2(a) Residential. The LEP was gazetted in July 2007.

SEPP 59 Residential Lands Precinct Plan 'Western Precinct' - former CSIRO Site,
Pemulwuy
Preparation of a Precinct Plan for the former CSIRO site is required under State Environmental
Planning Policy No 59 Central Western Sydney Economic & Employment Area. Council
conducted a preliminary assessment of the draft Precinct Plan for the western area of the former
CSIRO site which was submitted for consideration in October 2004. Consultation with government
agencies, other local governments and interest groups was subsequently undertaken, and the draft
Precinct Plan was publicly exhibited for a twenty-eight (28) day period from 23 February 2005 to 23
March 2005. A list of outstanding concerns of Council still requiring attention was advertised
concurrently with the exhibition of the draft Precinct Plan, indicating that these matters would need
to be resolved prior to the approval of the Precinct Plan by Council.
The draft Residential Lands Precinct Plan for the Western Precinct of the former CSIRO site at
Pemulwuy has been amended following the above and on-going consultation, with the latest
version submitted to Council in December 2006 for approval.

34

Annual Report 2006-2007

Council adopted the Precinct Plan subject to further minor amendments, and the plan came into
effect in August 2007.

Heritage
Each year Council allocates monies under the Holroyd Local Heritage Grants Program to be
distributed as dollar for dollar grants for small works to heritage items. Six applications were
received for financial assistance under the 2007 Local Heritage Grants Program have been
received and all but one application was considered worthy of support by the Heritage Committee.
The total funds allocated were $3,750.
In addition to the Grants Program Council also runs an Annual Heritage Awards Program. Three
Heritage awards were awarded in the categories of Best Maintained Heritage Property, Best
Restoration Project and Best New Development Involving Heritage.
Council continues to offer a free Heritage Advisory service for all property owners.

Draft Holroyd Local Environmental Plan 2009


In accordance with the requirements of the State Government, Council resolved at its meeting of
19 December 2006 to commence preparation of Draft Holroyd Local Environmental Plan 2009
("Draft LEP"). The Draft LEP will be prepared in accordance with the State Government's Standard
LEP Template. In the first half of 2007 Council notified the NSW Department of Planning of its
intention to prepare the Draft LEP, carried out an initial round of consultation with public authorities
and commenced drafting the Draft LEP. The initial phase of the drafting process involves a
translation of the current Holroyd LEP 1991 into the new Template format. An LEP is the main
legal document that a Council uses to control development and guide planning decisions.

Residential Development Strategy


Council is currently preparing a new Residential Development Strategy (RDS) based on funding
received from the NSW Government. The RDS will be a comprehensive study of residential
development throughout Holroyd and will establish a strategic framework for residential
development over the next 15 - 20 years. An analysis of constraints and opportunities has been
completed and Council officers have commenced targeted precinct analysis of centres and
calculation of preliminary estimates of dwelling targets. Council has also completed its Urban
Character Study and has commenced preparation of a Transitway Study, both of which will feed
into the RDS. Council has also commenced the community consultation project "Holroyd's Future"
(see "Community Visioning" below) which will also feed into the RDS.

Community Visioning
Council has appointed community consultation experts Elton Consulting to carry out a major
community visioning project for Holroyd, to be known as "Holroyd's Future". The purpose of this
consultation project is to tap into various parts of the Holroyd community "voice" to develop a
shared vision for Holroyd. The project has been developed so that it will consist of two (2) stages.
The first stage will consist of a number of workshops, briefings and focus groups with Councillors,
the community, youth, developers, businesses and CALD groups. The second stage will be a
major community forum, where the issues raised in the first stage will be discussed. The forum will
focus on exploring the tradeoffs and implications of different land use and development strategies,
the outcome of which will be a clear strategic direction for Council to consider in shaping its new
plans and strategies.

35

Annual Report 2006-2007

Transitway Study
Council has appointed HASSELL Consulting to undertake an Urban Planning and design Study for
the Liverpool to Parramatta Transitway. The study will investigate;
Improving links between housing and transport
Providing a range of housing to meet our communitys changing needs (e.g. ageing
population, multicultural needs)
The availability of a range of services and facilities such as schools and parks, and
Encouraging sustainable development.
Community consultation is an integral component of the study and the study will be completed in
late 2007.

Urban Character Study


Council appointed the Consultants HB+O in 2006 to undertake an Urban Character Study of
Holroyd. The aim of the study was to identify the essential elements of the existing urban character
and from this determine urban character precincts. This document will form part of the necessary
background and policy direction for a new residential development strategy and was completed in
April 2006.

Retail Study
Council appointed the Consultants HillPDA to prepare a city-wide Retail Study for Holroyd. The
purpose of the Retail Study is to allow Council to ensure its planning policies have regard to
current trends and patterns and enable Council to target where growth is necessary, both
geographically and sectorially. The study was completed in 2007 and will be presented to Council
late 2007.

DCP 2007
Holroyd City Council currently has over thirty-six (36) Development Control Plans (DCPs), which
range in nature from small site specific development controls. There is a need to integrate the
planning controls across the entire Local Government Area so that consistent planning controls will
exist in a single plan and also to meet the requirement of the recent NSW Government's reforms to
planning legislation which introduced a new Division 6 into Part 3 of the EP&A Act to provide for
the preparation of DCPs) which specify that only one Local Environmental Plan (LEP) can apply to
the whole LGA and one Development Control Plan (DCP) can apply to a site and/or the whole
LGA. The objective of this is to minimise duplication and complexity inherent in the current system
and overcome any uncertainty regarding the status of Councils planning controls.
Holroyd Council has commenced preparation of the new principal Holroyd LEP 2009, including
substantial background studies. The comprehensive review of the DCP controls will occur at the
same time in order to be consistent with, and be informed by, the LEP process.
Given the tight time-constraints for Council to prepare the comprehensive review of the DCP as
outlined in the strategy planning work program report topic [DCS 223-06, 19 December 2006] the
DCP consolidation is being prepared in two stages, with the subject of this report relating to Stage
1 of the process:
Stage 1 administrative process combining all current DCPs into one document; and
Stage 2 review, analysis and updating the DCP controls to reflect best practice and support the
new Holroyd LEP 2009.

36

Annual Report 2006-2007

Stage 1 is due to be completed in September 2007.

Development
Council is experiencing sustained high levels of growth and development activity underpinned by
medium density residential infill development, residential flat buildings, mixed used
retail/commercial/residential development and the subdivision construction of development across
Holroyd Gardens, the Nelson Ridge Estate and former CSIRO land at Pemulwuy (Lakewood) that
will realise 2500 dwellings.
Whilst there has been a correction in the demand for speculative dual occupancies, this has been
replaced by the volume of single and multi dwellings under construction within Nelsons Ridge.

Councils Fast Track Team (FTT) for Development Assessment


Given the volume and complexity of Development Applications resulting in extended time frames
for assessment and determination, it was evident that a number of routine-type applications were
taking longer to determine which was less than ideal.
In response, a Development Application Fast Track Team (FFT) was established and commenced
operations on 1 December 2003. The key function of the FTT is to expedite assessment and
determination of DAs deemed to be routine which can be determined in seven to 28 calendar days.
For the year ending 30 June 2007, the Fast Track Team has assessed and determined 214
applications out of a total of 1,234 equating to 17%.

Competition for Construction Certificates


Up until 1 July 1998, Local Government was the traditional watchdog or consent authority for any
building work under construction.
However, new legislation was introduced which enabled
applicants, developers, etc., to either appoint Council as the Principal Certifying Authority (PCA) or
engage an accredited Private Certifier. Approvals for construction work previously known as
Building Permits are now referred to as Construction Certificates.
Initially the Development Sector heavily utilised the services of Private Certifiers. However, in
response to a range of issues including certainty, ethics and observing conditions of Development
Consent and Council generally providing a competitive and cost efficient service, the market share
of Councils issuing Construction Certificates and being appointed Principal Certifying Authority has
increased. Indeed, one of the key goals for Councils Building Services Unit (BSU) has increased
Councils market share to 54% and has expertise in carry out construction certificate inspections
across all classes of buildings. During the 2006/07 Council exceeded the target set and actually
increased market share by a further 2%.

Tree Management Order (TMO)


Council recognises the importance of trees and for many years has had guidelines which aim to
prevent the unnecessary loss of existing trees and/or encourage the provision of new trees.
Under the Tree Management Order (TMO), approval is required from Council for any tree works
that are not exempt under the Order. In this regard, applications for General Tree Works are
received by the Landscape and Tree Management Section (L&TM Section). These are assessed
against Councils assessment criteria following an inspection of the tree and based on the merits of
the application.

37

Annual Report 2006-2007

This process often involves officers from the L&TM Section liaising with applicants to determine the
exact problem, discuss options and provide advice which, in most cases, results in a satisfactory
outcome to all parties. In situations where Council does not agree to pruning or removal of a tree,
there is a review process available.
Applications can also be made under the TMO for Pre-Development Application advice. In this
regard, proponents (i.e., DA applicants) can obtain advice in relation to which trees on a site
should be retained and the setbacks required to any works prior to the preparation of a DA.
Overall Council determined 546 applications during 2006/2007.

Executive Development Control Unit


In October 2002, Council introduced an additional Development Application pre-lodgement
meeting service for certain categories of development. The new service, known as the Executive
Development Control Unit (EDCU), has been established to focus on more complex applications
such as the following:
-

Medium density residential development (eg. villa, townhouse and integrated housing);
Residential flat buildings;
Mixed commercial and residential development;
Major commercial and industrial development; and
Other major and community significant developments.

The EDCU is a multi-disciplined panel of senior council officers offering pre-lodgement advice to
ensure that applications, when formally lodged, are processed effectively and efficiently. The
EDCU consists of officers from the planning, building, tree/landscape, engineering and
environmental disciplines. The key features of the EDCU is that the chairperson is independent of
the rest of the panel and reports directly to the General Manager, and detailed minutes of the
meeting are provided. Such minutes help applicants submit acceptable development applications.
During the 2006/2007 financial year, 44 EDCU meetings were conducted.

Establishment of Development Application Review Team (DART)


As part of councils commitment to continuous process improvement DART was introduced in
March 2007 to review all Development Applications accepted for lodgement.
The role of the DART is to identify applications which require additional information up front and
expedite referrals and assessment of those applications that are complete. The introduction of
DART serves to reduce Councils overall periods for assessing/determining applications.

38

Annual Report 2006-2007

Environment and Planning Services Department - Report to 30 June 2007


Strategic Objective -

To exercise effective environmental and planning management to ensure a prosperous and healthy City, in tune with the
communitys needs and the changing needs of the 1990s.

PROGRAMS
ENVIRONMENT AND HEALTH

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)

Garbage Service

Collection costs/service
Kilograms per capita
Average charge/residential
property

Static but
consistent
with industry
practice

Recycling

Collection costs/service
Kilograms per capita
Reduction in waste to landfill

Steady
Increasing
Improving

Environment Reporting

2006/2007 State of Environment


Report completed
Satisfactory

Living Holroyd: A Sustainable Future

Implementation of:
Environment assessments
of industries continuing
Ongoing

Environmental Management & Protection

Immunisation

An attendance rate of at least 60% of


those called to a clinic
Satisfactory

Animal Control

Effective response to pollution


incidents
Achieved

Reduction in stray animal reports Implementation of


a Low Kill Policy Incorporating the return or
re-homing of seized dogs
Improving

39

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS
ENVIRONMENT AND HEALTH (Contd)

STRATEGIC PLANNING

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

City Health Plan

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)
Implementation of City Health
Plan 2006-2010

On target

Health and Safety Education

Programs undertaken

On target

Food Surveillance

Percentage of all food shops


Inspected

On target

Legionella Control

Percentage of cooling towers


inspected

Land Research and Policy

Accurate policy and research


advice to Council on time and
within budget

Achieved
seasonally

Satisfactory

Land Planning Operations

Development Control plans completed


within agreed Timetables
Satisfactory

Land Planning Publications

Documents available at all times


- 48-hour turn around to
issue Section 149 Certificates Achieved

Land Planning Support

Documents processed within


48 hours

40

Satisfactory

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS
DEVELOPMENT SERVICES

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)

Development of Best Practice

Built environment to Councils


satisfaction

Development and Building Application


Processing

Ratio of staff to applications/report Satisfactory


Number of counter enquiries/staff/report
Number of telephone enquiries/staff/quarter

41

Satisfactory
and ongoing.

Annual Report 2006-2007

Library & Community Services Department


Core Business
The core business of the Library & Community Services Department is to manage and develop
libraries, community facilities and specific services for children, young people, the aged and people
with a disability, and to support the development of a vibrant and harmonious community.

Initiatives & Achievements


Administration
The Departments administration staff play a key role in promotion of the Departments services
and facilities to local residents. The Department brochure has been widely distributed in seven
community languages to encourage full participation in services from across the community. A
staff working party is preparing a 2008 Departmental calendar, to be launched in September,
providing information and contact details for all services.
Councils Community Grants Program continued in 2006/2007. The program has two components,
the Minor Assistance Program providing donations of up to $250, and the Community Assistance
Program providing donations of $251 to $5,000. In 2006/2007 six groups received funding to a
total of $1,500 under the Minor Assistance Program and seven groups received a total of $25,000
under the Community Assistance Program.
In 2007 Council offered the fourth annual Scholarship for a local young person commencing
undergraduate studies at the University of Western Sydney. Each Scholarship is valued at $2,110
p.a. (indexed annually) and is tenable for the duration of the course. Applications are considered
on the basis of academic merit, community benefit of the proposed studies, and any academic or
financial disadvantage.

Community Facilities
Council has a range of community facilities which are available for hire. This includes six halls and
meeting rooms, and two buses which are available for hire by community groups, commercial
organisations and individuals. All facilities can be used for a range of activities including
recreational activities, meetings and private functions.
Throughout the 2006/07 financial year audits of all facilities were carried out and a number of
outstanding requirements were found. The following improvements have been carried out:

Hand dryers, toilet roll holders, paper towel holders, soap dispensers and a new microwave
have been installed at Toongabbie Community Centre.
A new microwave has been installed at Wentworthville Community Centre.
Hooks have been installed on the back of the toilet doors at Jones Park Hall and
Wentworthville Community Centre.
Mirrors have been replaced/installed at Jones Park Hall and Wentworthville Community
Centre.
Ventilation in the foyer of the Wentworthville toilets has been improved.
Air fresheners have been installed in the downstairs toilet at the Merrylands Community
Centre.
Carpets at Merrylands Community Centre, Wentworthville Community Centre and
Toongabbie Community Centre have been cleaned.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

Curtains at Wentworthville Community Centre cleaned and repaired, and windows cleaned.
Jones Park Hall painted internally and screen doors fitted to kitchen. Replaced missing
chairs at Toongabbie Community Centre. Third meeting room fitted out at Toongabbie
Community Centre.
New refrigerator at Merrylands Community Centre and new whiteboard at Toongabbie
Community Centre.

These improvements have increased the standard of facilities run by Council, and ensure that
quality venues are available for use by local groups. All maintenance issues that have been
identified through the ongoing audits of the facilities have been resolved. The audits have been
very successful in helping to maintain and upgrade the facilities, and will continue to be carried out
on a regular basis.

Library Services
Holroyd City Council Library Service aims to provide equitable access to quality informational,
cultural and recreational materials for all. This is achieved by skilled staff offering excellent
customer service, via relevant technologies, resources and collections, to enhance and enrich the
community and promote the joy of discovery, reading and lifelong learning.
The Library Service was successful in securing grant funding from the Library Council of NSW in
2006/2007. The amount of $199,388 was received to assist with the purchase and installation of a
new Library Management System. Council also approved a budget of $350,000 for the new
Library Management System. The tender process for the new system is nearing completion with a
final report, making a number of recommendations, being submitted to Council in October 2007.
In addition, the Local Priority Grant of $59,230 funded the replacement of the ageing timber
shelving at Wentworthville Branch Library, with modern metal fittings. Other items purchased with
this funding included new study carrels and Hindi language resources.
The new Hindi collection was launched in May 2007. The collection is available at Wentworthville
Branch Library and comprises books and DVDs for both adults and children.
The Library Service replaced its ageing security gate system in December 2006. All three service
points were installed with new security gates, which are fully compatible with the Librarys current
security tag system.
A wireless Internet service was introduced at Merrylands Central Library in June 2007. This
system enables Library members with their own equipment, such as notebook computers, to
access the Library's Internet network from selected 'hot spots' around the Library. It has proved to
be extremely popular, and will be available at Wentworthville Branch Library in 2008.
A stocktake of all service points was conducted in May 2007. The Library Service conducts a
stocktake every three years in order to keep track of resources and identify missing items. During
the process, the Library Management System is updated to accurately reflect this information. It
also enables staff to assess security measures and replace missing stock if deemed necessary.
The 2007 stocktake process was particularly significant, as Library staff were able to clean-up the
existing data base, in preparation for migration to the new system.
The annual pre-loved book sale was held at Merrylands Central Library in March 2007. A selection
of resources including books for children, young adults and adults, toys, videos, cassettes and
magazines was available for sale to eager members of the community. This is an extremely
popular venture for the Library, with the majority of items on sale sold within a four-week period.

43

Annual Report 2006-2007

Proceeds from the book sale are used to purchase new resources for the Librarys collection. Any
leftover stock is donated to Lifeline for their booksale.
The Early Words project for Holroyd was launched in September 2006, in conjunction with
Merrylands Central Librarys Bubba Time (a lapsit session for children aged 0-24 months and their
parents/carers). Early Words is a Families First initiative, funded by the NSW Government. It
aims to provide free resources on early literacy to parents. Holroyd City Council's Mayor at that
time, Councillor Allan Ezzy APM was there to officially launch the free resources. These included
tip sheets translated into fifteen different languages, a DVD on reading to your child, fridge magnet
and a book bag complete with a book.
The Childrens and Young Adults Library team has worked tirelessly over the past year, creating
and presenting programs and activities for Holroyds children and young adults. In 2006-2007,
over 15,000 children and young adults either attended activities within the Libraries, or were visited
by Library staff at their school, pre-school or centre.
The Library Service continues to provide free activities, workshops and classes for the community.
These include computer workshops both in English and bi-lingual versions, English conversation
classes for new migrants, craft workshops for young adults and activities specifically aimed at
seniors. Other activities include genealogy workshops, author visits and historic bus tours of the
local area. These are all extremely well attended and are held on a regular basis.
The Holroyd Movie Club and the Holroyd Book Club continue to thrive. Both groups meet monthly
and attendees continue to increase.
The Library Service also has a very proactive Library Committee that meets quarterly. The aim of
the Committee is to provide advice on issues relating to the Library Service, monitor progress in
the achievements of Library objectives and report upon matters referred to the Committee by
Council. The Committee includes representatives from the local community, Councillors and
Council officers (including Library staff). This collaborative approach between the community and
Council has been most effective in producing positive results for the Library Service.
A user survey was conducted at all three service points during Library and Information Week in
May 2007. The aim of the survey was to gauge what type of users visit the Library, their reasons
for using the Library and suggestions to improve the Service. Over 500 customers were surveyed,
with the results reported to the August 2007 Library Committee meeting. Overall, the survey
provided valuable feedback and positive responses, which reflect that the Library Service is
performing efficiently in catering to the diverse needs of its users.

Community Services
Aged Services
Councils Annual Seniors Bus Trip was held in August 2006. The theme for this years bus trip was
Yulefest, which included a meal and visit to Manor House in the Blue Mountains. Due to popular
demand, a second trip was held to accommodate the extra numbers.
Seniors Week 2007 was celebrated with a variety of events, the main one being a Bowl-Off held at
the Redgum Centre. The event was well attended, and featured stimulating games and activities,
and healthy refreshments. Students from local schools assisted with the activities and the
interaction was outstanding.
The two-year term (2006-2008) for the Aged Services Advisory Committee continued, with working
parties established for Seniors Week and the Healthy Ageing Forum. Staff have continued to

44

Annual Report 2006-2007

resource and support the Auburn/Holroyd/Parramatta Community Care Forum and provide
comments on a range of policies and planning documents.
Holroyd Seniors Newsletter continued to be produced four times this year and more than 1,500
copies of each edition disseminated to the local community and various networks.
The Healthy Ageing Forum Healthy Ageing = Healthy Living was held in April 2007, in
conjunction with Carnivale. Seniors were informed of personal safety measures by the Local Area
Command and given a free personal alarm; yoga demonstrations were also given and a wealth of
information from various groups was available for seniors.
Timehelp continued to grow this year with the launch of a new DVD featuring volunteers from
Holroyd. Following the launch, Council received 12 Expressions of Interest to attend a training
session for Timehelp.
The Guildford Community Centre provides a daily respite program for the frail aged and people
with a disability and their carers. This includes transport, meals and activities. Special activities
held at Guildford Community Centre included a Christmas In July, a Spring Dance, a Carers
Luncheon Cruise, Melbourne Cup Day, Holroyd Games Challenge and Multicultural Anzac Day.
Two Respite Care Away Programs (RESCAP) were held to Shellharbour and Mudgee.
Holroyd Community Food Services provided 14,189 hot meals and 8,117 frozen meals during the
year to a total of 235 clients. In April, with the introduction of a new winter menu, the service
began providing hot desserts when appropriate and completed the phasing in of 100% in-house
production of frozen meals. The service continued to work with other food services toward the
provision of culturally appropriate meals and successfully negotiated funding through the
Department of Ageing Disability and Home Care for a new Centre-Based Meals program for clients
from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse backgrounds.
Wentworthville Centre Based Meals program (The Happy Club) continued to provide quality meals
and social activities for up to 45 clients each week. The program operates at Wentworthville
Community Centre each Friday.
Disability Services
Councils Speaking UP project for adults with an Intellectual Disability is developing. It aims to
develop a manual which will develop and enhance the skills of adults with an intellectual disability
in meetings, public speaking etc. The project is due for completion at the end of 2007.
Two-year terms (2006-2008) continued for Holroyd Access Committee, Disability Services
Advisory Committee and Peer Support Users Committee. The Peer Support Users Committee
successfully planned their annual walkathon in Central Gardens in August 2006 raising $1,638
which was all donated to charity.
The Peer Support Program continued to offer a range of out-of-hours recreation and social options
for service users. Activity calendars were prepared for four month periods, based on suggestions
received from members of the group at planning nights. Regular Aqua fitness and bowling
programs were also offered. Consultation and Annual Survey results indicated service users were
very happy or mostly happy with support received, quality of staff/volunteers, transport and
information received and participation levels in the Peer Support program.
The Annual Planning Night was held in August 2006. Staff have continued to resource the
Cumberland Prospect Disability Forum and regional networks for relevant service providers.
Throughout the reporting period staff have continued to operate a regional disability information

45

Annual Report 2006-2007

service, offer advocacy support and provide comments on a range of policies, development
applications and planning documents in relation to the rights and needs of people with disabilities.
International Day of People with a Disability (IDPWD 3 December) was celebrated again with
Council hosting 2 events to celebrate the abilities of individuals with a disability. A celebratory
disco was held at the Holroyd Centre for adults with a disability in Holroyd and surrounding areas.
A second event was held also at the Holroyd Centre with the SportsAbility kit giving people with a
disability an opportunity to try a range of different sports, and educating staff on the range of sports
available. A total of 130 people attended the events.
In 2006 the Aged / Disability Services Team established a list of Holroyd Carers. Most are known
through a connection to our services. Support to Carers has been provided through special
events, information sessions and support group meetings. Carers Week 2006 (October 15- 21)
events for carers included a Tulip Festival bus trip, a relaxation session with Peer Support, and a
cruise with Guildford Community Centre.
Youth Services
Council manages three youth projects and provides premises for two other non-government youth
services in the Holroyd local government area. Councils Youth Services Team provides structured
and unstructured programs and are involved in the provision of outreach and developmental
projects for young people aged 12 to 25 years of age. Some of the programs provided include
drop in, holiday activities, educational workshops, court support, sporting activities, employment,
homework assistance, events and activities.
Wentworthville Youth Services staff deliver bi-weekly drop in sessions, school holiday programs
and outreach visits to high schools. Staff are also involved in the court support program. The
service provides information, support and referral services to young people.
Guildford Youth Project staff provide services including a weekly drop in held at the local scout hall,
Chill Out (which works in partnership with Centrelink assisting local unemployed young people),
the Homework Assistance Centre program specifically targeting school students in Years 7-9 with
English and Mathematics, young womens programs, cultural art projects and hip hop dancing
sessions. Information, support and referral services are also provided to young people.
Councils Youth Services Team has played a significant role in local festivals and activities
including Youth Week 2007, which was held in partnership with Parramatta City Council. There
were 12 programs held during Youth Week that included sporting, cultural and music activities,
which were attended by and involved approximately 2,000 young people. Other festivals include
Australia Day and Holroyd CityFest.
Councils Peer Education Project is a four year WSAAS funded project which commenced in 2004.
The Holroyd Youth Peer Education Project aims to provide an avenue for young people aged 1519 years to contribute to the wellbeing of their communities by providing leadership and mentoring
training based on a peer education model. This project provides information and training
workshops to young people in order to develop leadership skills and positive self esteem, train
young people as trainers to peers based on a peer education model, and to involve young people
in the development and implementation of youth specific activities with support from youth service
providers and networks. To date, 45 young people have been trained through the Project. Other
achievements of the Project include the establishment of the Peer Education mentor network and
funding through the Foundation of Young Australians in order to develop and implement a Talk
Depression Project.

46

Annual Report 2006-2007

Council has a Youth Advisory Committee that meets on a monthly basis at Council.
Committee has had input into many activities and issues that impact on young people.

The

Community Development
Councils annual Volunteers Luncheon incorporating the Gift of Time ceremony was held on 9
November 2006. More than 90 guests attended the function enjoying the sit-down meal. This
function is held each year to acknowledge the valuable contribution volunteers make to the
community. The Gift of Time Christmas Tree was showcased in Councils foyer.
Council continued to support the Western Sydney Academy of Sport through a financial
contribution of $10,000 and representation on the Advisory Forum and the Board of the Academy.
Councils Community Safety Awards are aimed at acknowledging and encouraging the initiatives
undertaken by local not-for-profit groups and organizations to promote safe neighbourhoods and
crime prevention. The Awards opened on 23 April 2007 and closed on 1 June 2007. The major
award was jointly awarded to: Holroyd Peer Education Project for the Speakout Young People
Against Bullying Project and Merrylands High School for the Positive Behaviour Interventions and
Support Program. A highly commended plaque was awarded to the Merrylands CBD Committee
for the Merrylands Shop Numbering System.
Council administered the Western Sydney Area Assistance Scheme (WSAAS) for Holroyd, a
funding program of the NSW Department of Community Services. Through this scheme, Holroyd
Parramatta Migrant Services received funding for the Friends of Refugees Program.
Seven local community groups shared $25,000 in funding through Councils Community
Assistance Program. These funds will support the organisations to develop and provide
appropriate and accessible services to the residents of Holroyd.
Council continued its ongoing commitment to implementing the National Framework for Women in
Local Government. An action plan was developed to progress identified priorities.
Council supported the Young Womens Leadership Project, a joint initiative between WSROC and
its member Councils to provide training and mentoring opportunities to local young women.
Council was a key member of the Holroyd Womens Working Party (HWWP). Through the HWWP,
Council collaborated with a number of organizations to hold several successful initiatives. A
luncheon was held for International Womens Day. A Negotiating Consent Workshop was held
with local high school students to assist them to learn practical skills and develop strategies to
protect themselves in unsafe or abusive situations. Council also auspiced a grant from the Area
Assistance Scheme on behalf of HWWP to develop a resource kit which is aimed at providing
service providers with information on how to respond to Domestic Violence as well as referral
options. A 2-day workshop was also held to assist service providers in identifying and responding
to Domestic Violence.
Council entered into a partnership with Maddocks Law Firm to provide training on Industrial
Relations Changes and their impact on Not-for-Profit organizations. Over 35 participants attended
the training.
Council continued to convene, resource and support local forums and interagencies. These include
Holroyd Interagency, Holroyd Parramatta Domestic Violence Committee and the Wednesday
Forum.

47

Annual Report 2006-2007

Work on the Holroyd Community Garden continued and most allocated Council funds have been
expended. Council is currently establishing a Memorandum of Understanding with Cassia to
formalize this arrangement.
Council received State recognition for its Cultural Plan 2006-2011 Cultural Vitality in Holroyd City
winning the LGSA NSW award in the category Developing Culture - Cultural Policy and
Planning. The Plan is shaping the direction of Community Services cultural projects and will
create further opportunities for local communities to participate in cultural expression, and
encourage the celebration of diverse interests, creativity and collective values.
Councils program of enlivening the communitys public spaces included channeling youthful
artistic expression into a street wall mural. Holroyd City Council partnered with Railcorp and
Parramatta City Council to coordinate the decorative, artistic painting and sealing of the walls of
the Merrylands Station Underpass. Young people attending Holroyd High School and the Dundas,
Granville and Karabi Youth Centres worked to create designs that reflected the concept
Federation Continuing and to then paint these onto the underpass walls. This project will be
finalised by December 2007.
Council continues its Culture in the Chambers performing arts program. The March 2007 event
sought to promote Healthy Ageing and to provide cultural experiences for senior citizens with a
Live Life Concert.
The Foyer Gallery provides a space for local and regional artists to publicly showcase their work.
The group exhibitions calendar included HSC Artworks of 2006, works from the Holroyd Oil
Painting Group and a NAIDOC Week related exhibition including works from Western Sydney
based Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.
The Sewing Stories Project Workshops were completed and a final collaborative project Tree of
Hopes and Wishes was created that demonstrated both the techniques learnt and the personal
stories, varied cultures and friendships that were shared within the group. A local photographer
was commissioned to take portraits of the women and their works and these images will be
included in a printed catalogue documenting the project and its outcomes. The photographs and
works created through this project will form the content of an upcoming Council Foyer Exhibition.
Council participates in the development of regional Western Sydney arts and cultural initiatives that
support the development of cultural industries, the arts sector, and community cultural
development. Council continued to resource, support, employ and skill, artists and community
groups on a local level to undertake cultural and arts initiatives. Council continues to advocate for
the progression of cultural policy development on a local, regional and state level.
Councils Access and Equity Policy Statement and Action Plan was updated in 2004 and adopted
by Council on 7 September 2004. This Action Plan continued to be implemented in 2006-2007,
and lists 199 strategies of which 169 have been implemented.
Council funded and held Carnivale, a festival promoting community harmony and integration, on 22
April 2007. Approximately 5,000 people attended. The festival was planned, implemented and
evaluated by a Working Party drawn from Councils Culturally and Linguistically Diverse
Consultative Committee members.
Council has updated its Induction program to include cross-cultural training. All new staff must
attend induction and are provided with a copy of Councils Hints to Better Cross Cultural
Communication booklet for reference. A list of bilingual workers is posted on Councils Intranet
and the list is updated bi annually. The booklet is updated annually.

48

Annual Report 2006-2007

Other activities aimed at the culturally and linguistically diverse community include:

South Asian Conference held on 17 July 2006


Orientation to Australian Work Culture sessions
Egyptian Forum held on 17 May 2007 - 136 people attended
Multicultural Anzac Day held 27 April 2007 - 110 people attended
Presentations at seminars and conferences e.g. the LGCSA Conference in October 2006
Involvement in the Open Day at Baulkham Hills Holroyd Parramatta Migrant Resource
Centre
Community Education Programs for the Tamil community and for students from the
Australian Centre for Languages
Harmony Day celebrations to close the Warali Wali Indigenous Project
Work experience opportunities for overseas trained and qualified people
Planning for a Refugee Week held in June 2007
Planning for a series of How to Vote workshops held in September, October, November
2006 & February 2007 - 11 workshops held

Additional details of these activities can be found in the section titled Services to People of
Diverse Cultural and Linguistic Backgrounds.
Council employs a Community Development Officer - Indigenous on a part-time basis to work on
indigenous programs and issues, including convening and resourcing the Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander Consultative Committee. This Committee meets quarterly to advise Council on
matters of importance to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander residents.
The 2006 NAIDOC Festival was held at Central Gardens in July with approximately 500 people in
attendance. This celebration of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples coincides with
national NAIDOC celebrations and is an opportunity for the wider community to help celebrate
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander culture. The festival included traditional and contemporary
indigenous singers and dancers, as well as information stalls.
The 2004-2008 Indigenous Employment Strategy continues to be implemented by Council and
includes funding for the employment of three (3) Indigenous employees which was initiated with
assistance from the Elsa Dixon Program. These positions are currently within the Community
Services Section, Customer Services and the Depot.
Council supports and resources the Holroyd Community Development Support Expenditure
Scheme Local Committee, Clubs for Holroyd. The group is made up of representatives from local
Licensed Clubs, NSW Council of Social Services, NSW Department of Community Services,
Holroyd Interagency and Council. 21 projects received a combined total of $144,822 in funding in
the 2006/2007 funding round.
Council continued to implement strategies from the 2005-9 Social Plan. The plan includes 61
recommendations which respond to local community priorities.
Council continued to convene and resource the Syringes Working Party. Members of the working
party include Merrylands Community Health Centre and NSW Police.
Council continues to be an active member of the Parramatta/Holroyd Community Drugs Action
Team by attending monthly meetings and providing support where needed to address local drug
issues.
Council received $20,000 to implement recommendations for the City Health Plan in May 2006.
Significant progress has been made to date and several projects are underway. These include a

49

Annual Report 2006-2007

Falls Prevention Project targeting seniors, Mental Health Awareness training for staff and service
providers and a Childhood Obesity Program. A steering committee consisting of representatives
from Council and Sydney West Area Health Service oversee implementation of the Plan.
Council continued to undertake a range of community consultations to ensure that programs and
activities reflected community priorities. A review of the community consultation strategy is being
undertaken to further enhance this process, in preparation for the 2007 Community Consultation.
Council continued to convene the Gaming and Liquor Consultative Committee which is made up of
Councillors, local community members, religious groups, community agencies, members of the
club/hotel industry, local police, Sydney West Area Health Service and the NSW Department of
Community Services. During 2006/7, the Committee continued to comment on proposals or
applications relating to liquor and gaming, where relevant.
Many of Councils community services programs and activities are carried out with guidance from
Advisory and Consultative Committees and related Working Parties. This ensures input and
support from community members, service providers and other stakeholders, so that programs
meet the needs of the community. Some examples include:

Arts Advisory Committee


Community Safety Committee
Disability Services Advisory Committee
Holroyd Access Committee
Social Plan Steering Committee

Childrens Services
The Childrens Services section provides a range of services that care for and educate children
aged 0-13 years. The services include Pre-school/Long Day Care, Occasional Care, Family Day
Care, Emergency Care, Out of School Hours Care, supported playgroups and an Inclusion
program for children with additional needs. In addition, family and childrens community
development issues are addressed via a range of consultations, networks, representation at
meetings of peak bodies and Parents and Carers in Partnership groups.
Childrens Week 2006 celebrations focused on Childhood obesity. A Childrens Healthy Lifestyle
Expo was held, called Back to the Backyard. The day was well attended by parents and children
and helped to raise awareness about the importance of healthy eating and exercise. The day was
so successful it will be held again on 28 October 2007 at Central Gardens.
A variety of other activities were held by each of Councils individual services during the week to
raise awareness of the rights and needs of children and families. Childrens Week 2007 will again
focus on Healthy Lifestyles for Families.
To promote networking and currency of knowledge, staff development conferences and training
sessions are held each year. During these conferences, all staff participate in a range of child care
specific workshops, local government workshops and generic lectures.
The Childrens Services section was successful in obtaining funding for the Early Integration
Program (EIP). A grant of $31,101 was received from the Department of Education and Training.
Other grants were also received from:

Inclusion Support Program (ISP) - Dept of Family & Community Services


ACCESS (SCAN)
Australian Sports Commission - Active After School Care

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Annual Report 2006-2007

Playgroup Association - MyTime Playgroup

The Inclusion Networking Group (ING) provides services for children with additional needs, which
allows them to be included within mainstream childrens services.
Childrens Services prepares an annual Transition to School booklet for all parents, providing
detailed information on many local schools and tips for parents to help them determine whether
their child is ready to start school or not. This booklet is presented at the School Expo and
information sessions held by each childrens service and is also available from Councils Childrens
Services section.
Holroyd Council hosts the Cumberland Childrens Services Forum. All childrens services
providers (community, commercial & Local Government) from Auburn, Parramatta and Holroyd are
invited to attend. The meeting discusses current issues that impact on the provision of services to
children.
Childrens Services continue to be promoted through local ethnic networks. Flyers were distributed
to local ethnic groups and discussions were held with ethnic representatives through Councils
Community Education Program.
The Pursuit of Excellence Awards program started in 2001 and provides primary and high schools
in Holroyd the opportunity to nominate a student who has excelled in community spirit. A Council
Representative attends the school presentation day to present the award.
Over the last 12 months Out of School Hours care services have experienced a drop in
enrolments, therefore vacancies exist in many services. Staff have developed a range of
strategies designed to increase OOSH enrolments.
Holroyd City Councils Children Services hosted the Corporate Partners for Change Program 2007
(CPC). The CPC program is an initiative of the Office of the Minister for Western Sydney and
provides opportunities for the unemployed or people facing barriers to employment to develop
skills and knowledge in childcare. There is a training component, which consists of 7 of 13
modules of the Childrens Services Certificate III. The participant is then exempt from these
components if they wish to complete a Traineeship or complete the Childrens Services Certificate
III at a later date. After the training component of the program, which ran for 5 weeks, there was a
6 week block of work experience in a Council Child Care centre and commercial centres that chose
to get involved in the program. The benefits to Council are reflected in lower unemployment for the
area and a recruitment program that offers a selection of partially trained and experienced staff.

51

Annual Report 2006-2007

Library & Community Services Department - Report to 30 June 2007


Strategic Objective

To effectively and efficiently provide quality human services to the local community, which are appropriate to their identified
needs and in accordance with the principle of access and equity.

PROGRAMS
ADMINISTRATION

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

Community Facilities

Halls

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)
-

52

No. of regular groups using facilities:


- Wentworthville Community Centre 23
- Toongabbie Community Centre 12
- Merrylands Community Centre 21
- Westmead Progress Hall 13
- Jones Park Hall 9
- Domain Meeting Room 13
- Pemulwuy N/A
Occupancy Rate:
Wentworthville Community Centre
- Grevillea Room 34%
- Banksia Room 31%
Toongabbie Community Centre
- George Mepham Hall 31%
- Andrew Cooke Meeting Room 18%
- Neil Pigram Meeting Room 13%
- Billiard Room 4%
Merrylands Community Centre
- Miller Street Room 37%
- Prospect Room 27%
- Arts & Crafts Room 21%
Westmead Progress Hall 27%
Jones Park Hall 30%

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)
-

LIBRARY SERVICES

Community Buses
Street Stalls

Minor Assistance Program.

y Client Services

y Australian Library Week activities.


y Basic English.

53

Domain Community Rooms:


- Mackey Room 12%
- Oakes Room 10%
Pemulwuy:
- Hall N/A
- MR1 N/A
- MR2 N/A
Hours used per quarter: 1,849
Days used per quarter:
- Merrylands Kiosk 240
No. of applications received: 6
No. of grants approved: 6
No. of issues per capita. 1.8
Total No. of issues 632,465
Total No. of borrowers: 33,566
No. of resident borrowers: 25,956
% resident borrowers of total population:
30%
Total attendance: 1,557
No. of issues: 5,575

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED
y NEL Collection.
y Home Library Service.

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)
-

y Information Services
y Community Information Directory.
y Inter Library Loans.

y Local Studies.

y Childrens and Young Adults Service


y Storytime program.

y Outreach programs.
y Class visits (to service points).
y Holiday program.
Youth Week activities.

54

No. of issues: 54,935


No. of Home Library borrowers (not
including nursing homes): 115
No. of issues per borrower (not including
nursing homes): 70
No. of volunteers: 23
No. of reference enquiries: 32,595
Turnaround time per enquiry: 3 minutes
No. of enquiries: 5,576
Requests from other libraries:
- Received: 1,623
- Satisfied: 1,626
Requests to other libraries:
- Requests sent: 997
- Satisfied: 1,425
No. of enquiries: 403

- No. of sessions held: 248


- Total attendance: 8,292
- Annual survey of parents: 51 responses
received.
- No. of services visited: 57
- Total attendance: 1,289
-

No. of visiting schools: 12


Total attendance: 342
No. of activities held: 38
Total attendance: 876
No. of activities: 3
Total attendance: 29

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED
y Toy Library.

y Childrens Book Week Celebration.


y Technical Services
y Information Technology

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)
- No. of issues per capita: 0.915
- No. of borrowers: 885
- % of borrowers of 0-11 age population:
11.9%
- No. of toys in collection: 1,271
- Annual survey of users: N/A
- No. of activities held: 13
- Total attendance: 813
- No. of items processed: 15,629
- No. enquiries: 4,813
- No. of bookings: 82,401
- No. of hours booked: 49,321
- No. of computer workshops held: 19
- Total attendance: 149

COMMUNITY SERVICES

Administration
Review policies as required.
Facilitate the implementation of S94
projects.
Review S94 levies annually and adjust
as required.
Hold an annual planning day.
Holroyd City Council Scholarship

Provide staff training and development


opportunities.
Staff involved in Driving Organisational
Excellence program.

55

Date reviewed: N/A


No. of projects implemented: 35

Date reviewed: December 2007

Date held: 5/10/06


Working Party meetings: 2
No. of applicants: 2
Scholarship presented: 20/3/07
No. of staff involved: 67

No. of staff who have participated: 5

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

Involvement in activities, festivals,


events to promote Councils Community
Services provision.

Community Development
Service/Program Delivery
Administer the Western Sydney Area
Assistance Scheme

Facilitate the operation of the Holroyd


Community Development Support
Expenditure Local Committee

Administer the Community Assistance


Program

Community management training


seminars
Community education program

Public art projects

56

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)
-

No. of activities/events: 48

No. of groups resourced: 85


No. of applications received: 12
No. of successful applications: 1
Total funds granted: $39,832
Program completed according to timetable:
Yes
Projects monitored as required: 5
No. of applications received: 73
No. of successful applications: 16
Total funds granted: $121,040
Program completed according to timetable:
Yes
Program advertised: Yes
No. of applications received: 25
Applications assessed: 25
No. of successful applications: 7
Presentation night held: Yes
Seminars conducted: N/A
No. in attendance: N/A
2 programs held each year: 4
Total attendance for each program: 74
Level of community participation: 104
Artist/s employed: 9
Projects implemented: 9

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)

Coordinate art and craft displays in


Council foyer.
Reporting / Planning / Policies
Coordinate the implementation of the
Access & Equity Plan recommendations

Displays held: 12
Artists promoted: 168

Coordinate the implementation of the


Social Plan recommendations

Coordinate the implementation of the


City Health Plan recommendations

Coordinate the implementation of the


Cultural Plan

Convene and resource Councils


Culturally and Linguistically Diverse
Consultative Committee
Convene and resource Councils
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Consultative Committee
Convene and resource Councils Social
Plan Steering Committee
Convene and resource Councils City
Health Plan Steering Committee
Convene and resource Councils
Syringes Working Party
Convene and resource Councils Arts
Advisory Committee

No. of recommendations acted on:


No. of new recommendations
implemented: 1
No. of recommendations acted on:
No. of new recommendations
implemented: 3
No. of recommendations acted on:
No. of new recommendations
implemented: 4
No. of recommendations acted on:
No. of new recommendations
implemented: N/A
Quarterly meetings held: 4
Issues addressed: 66

Quarterly meetings held: 4


Issues addressed: 18

Steering Committee meetings held: 1


Issues addressed: 2
Steering Committee meetings held: 2
Issues addressed: 6
Working Party meetings held: N/A
Issues addressed: N/A
Advisory Committee meetings held
quarterly: 1
Issues addressed: 4

57

168

32

14

N/A

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

Hold an annual planning day for the


community development team
Community Activities & Events
Coordinate Councils celebration of
NAIDOC Week

Coordinate Councils celebration of


Carnivale

Coordinate Harmony Day activities

Coordinate Cultural Events at Council


Chambers

Coordinate the HSC Art Exhibition at


Council Chambers

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)
-

Planning Day held: Yes

Planning Committee meetings held: 10


Celebration held in July: Yes
Total attendance at celebration: 1,000
Planning Committee meetings held: 10
Celebration held: Yes
Total attendance at celebration: 3,000
Planning Committee meetings held: 8
Activities held in March: Yes
Total attendance at celebration: 60
Hold 3 Culture in the Chambers events: 2
Artists booked: 56
Promotion conducted: Yes
Total attendance at each event: 300
Hold exhibition as part of CityFest
activities: Yes
No. of high schools participating: 7
No. of exhibits: 70

Community Development / Resourcing /


Consultations

58

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

Community consultation

Community resourcing

Hold an annual Community


Consultation for the Holroyd LGA
Update the Holroyd Community Profile

Update the Aboriginal Services


Directory

Maintain awareness/contact with


community housing issues
Resource and support Holroyd
Interagency
Resource and support the National
Framework for Women in Local
Government Working Party

59

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)
-

Total persons consulted per quarter:


CPO: 65
CDW: 19
CO: 13
ECDO: 194
No. of occasions per quarter:
CPO: 1,250
CDW: 11
CO: 63
ECDO: 194
Consultation held: N/A
No. in attendance: N/A
Profile updated (March): N/A
Placed on Website: N/A
Hard copies printed: N/A
Directory updated (March): N/A
Placed on Website: N/A
Hard copies printed and distributed: N/A
Opportunities taken for networking and
information sharing: 12
No. attending meetings (monthly): 14
Issues addressed: 4
No. attending meetings: 10
Strategic Plan items addressed: 8

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED
Youth Services
Service/Program Delivery
Conduct centre-based and outreach
programs, both structured and
unstructured

Run school holiday programs for young


people
Continue regular streetwork program
Recruit young people for the Peer
Education Project
Provide Information/Education
Workshops

Reporting/Planning/Policies
Develop policies and procedures
relating to service delivery
Report to the Steering Committee
Hold an annual Open Day

Hold an annual planning session

Community Activities and Events


Conduct music activities

60

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)

No. of centre-based programs conducted:


113
No. of outreach programs conducted: 37
No. of drop-in programs held: 60
No. of individual cases: 79
Total attendance per quarter: 594
No. of promotional activities: 56
No. of school holiday programs held: 35
Total attendance per quarter: 280
No. of streetwork contacts made: N/A
Issues addressed: N/A
No. of young people: 28

No. of workshops held: 51


Total attendance per quarter: 177
Issues addressed: 46

No. of new policies prepared: 3


No. of existing policies reviewed: 21
Reports prepared and distributed: 5
Date/s of Open Day: 14/11/06 & 22/11/06
No. in attendance: 85
Date of planning session: 13/9/06 &
14/9/06

No. of programs held: 13


No. in attendance: 1,023

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)

Coordinate Youth Week activities and


events

Community Events - including


Australia Day celebrations, CityFest,
Back to Guildford Festival, Carnivale,
NAIDOC, Local Government Week
Community Development / Resourcing /
Consultations
Raise awareness in schools of services
and activities available for young people

Consult with young people and the


wider community regarding activities,
projects and issues

Develop specific programs for young


women
Attend relevant network and
interagency meetings

Coordination of Youth Projects

61

No. of Expressions of Interest distributed:


65
No. of activities undertaken: 12
No. in attendance at all activities: 1,500
Report on outcomes submitted:
Completed.
No. of activities held: 5
Total attendance: 1,335
No. of meetings attended: 22

No. of school visits: 52


No. of young people accessed through
school promotions: 12,450
Schools visited: Greystanes, Merrylands,
Holroyd, Pendle Hill, Cerdon, St Pauls,
Granville Boys, Granville South
No. of consultations with young people:
158
No. of consultations with the community:
31
No. of programs held: 6
No. of participants: 50
No. of HAPYN meetings attended: 9
Other interagency meetings attended: 4
No. of other interagency meetings
attended: 6
No. of youth projects coordinated: 23

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

Community resourcing

Resource and support Holroyd City


Youth Advisory Committee

Disabilities Services
Service/Program Delivery
Information Service

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)
-

No. of organisations resourced: 47


No. of individuals resourced: 651
No. of requests for information: 609
No. of meetings attended: 8
Training supplied: 3
Information supplied: 24
No. of activities and events : 12

No. of telephone referrals/website visits:


114
No. of telephone/email requests for
assistance: 212
No. of face to face requests for assistance:
49
Information dissemination - bulletin
recipients per quarter: 192
No. of cases short term active assistance:
32
No. of cases mid term active assistance:
17
No. of cases long term active assistance:
0
Contacts with Government agencies: 21
Contacts with non-Government agencies:
15
Contacts with political representatives: 10
Contacts with Communities: 9

Individual Advocacy

Systemic Advocacy

62

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

Peer Support Program

Reporting/Planning/Policies
Prepare reports to Council as required
Report to Disabilities Services Advisory
Committee meetings
Convene the Access Policy and Action
Plan Implementation Committee twice
each year
Conduct Peer Support planning
sessions with service users to develop
activity calendars (4 monthly)
Conduct annual survey of newsletter
recipients
Conduct annual survey of Peer Support
service users and carers
Conduct an annual planning session for
disabilities services
Community Activities and Events
Coordinate Councils celebration of
International Day of People with a
DisAbility
Represent Councils disabilities services
at community events as appropriate

63

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)
-

No. of activities held: 112


Programmed respite hours: 504
Total attendance per quarter: 249
Total client respite hours: 4,864
No. of clients in program: 156
Requested respite hours on waiting list:
2,428

No. of reports: 10
Reports prepared and distributed: 8

Meetings held and progress documented:


N/A

Planning done and calendars distributed:


Yes

Survey completed and outcomes


documented: Yes
Response rate of survey: 23 responses
Satisfaction level with service: 87%
Date of planning session: 29/8/06
No. in attendance: 20

Celebration carried out: 2


No. in attendance: 115

No. of events: 12

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED
Community Development / Resourcing /
Consultations
Resource and support the
Cumberland/Prospect Area Disability
Forum
Convene and resource Councils
Access Committee
Community consultation
Community resourcing
Support and resource the Peer Support
Users Committee
Aged Services
Service/Program Delivery
Provide meals, programs and activities
through the Guildford Community
Centre day respite program.

Develop 6 monthly program for


Guildford Community Centre
Promote external hire of Guildford
Community Centre

64

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)

Tasks undertaken: As required.


Attendance at Forum: 134

Meetings held: 3
Decisions actioned: As required.
No. of persons consulted: 137
No. of occasions: 43
Meetings held: 1
Service User attendance: 5

Total meals provided: 11,087


Total attendance per quarter: 1,175
No. of frail aged clients: 286
No. of clients with disability: 61
No. of CALD clients: 77
Total no. of clients: 351
No. of activities held: 196
No. of people consulted: 24
No. of new activities: 38
No. of community hirings: 142
No. of private hirings: 29

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)

Provide appropriate meals for clients of


Holroyd Community Food Services

Conduct multicultural activities as part


of the Guildford Community Centre
program
Conduct activities for Centre-Based
Meals clients
Conduct activities for the well aged

Prepare and distribute Holroyd Seniors


News publication
Recruit and support volunteers

65

Total meals delivered: 22,639


Hot meals: 14,189
Frozen meals: 8,117
No. of clients (MOW): 503
CALD background: 90
Younger with a disability: 48
New clients: 134
Exited clients: 103
Total attendance at centre-based meals:
1,597
Activities held: 8
No. in attendance: 276
No. of activities held: 17
No. in attendance: 460
No. of activities held: 3
No. in attendance: 566
Newsletter produced: 4
No. on mailing list: 1,300
No. of current volunteers
- GCC: 23
- MOW: 44
- CBM: 6
No. of new volunteers
- GCC: 3
- MOW: 4
- CBM: 0
No. of support occasions
- GCC: 6
- MOW: N/A
- CBM: N/A

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED
Reporting / Planning / Policies
Report to Aged Services Advisory
Committee meetings
Submit quarterly MDS reports to
funding body

Conduct an annual planning day

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)
-

Develop/revise policies as required

Community Activities and Events


Conduct Seniors Week activities

Participate in local events and festivals


as appropriate
Community Development / Resourcing /
Consultations
Resource and support the Holroyd
Carers Group
Community consultation
Community resourcing
Resource and support Home and
Community Care forums

66

Date of meeting: 16/8/06, 15/11/06,


21/2/07 & 16/5/07.
Reports submitted on time
- GCC: 4
- MOW: 4
Date held
- GCC: 30/8/06
- MOW: N/A
- Aged Services: 29/8/06
No. in attendance
- GCC: 24
- MOW: N/A
- Aged Services: 20
No. of policies developed/revised
- GCC: N/A
- MOW: N/A

Activities held: 2
No. in attendance: 485
No. of events: 4

No. of meetings held: 6


No. in attendance: 50
Total persons consulted per quarter: 16
No. of occasions per quarter: 11
No. of forums held: 7
No. in attendance: 110

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS
CHILDRENS SERVICES

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED
Management of Councils Childrens
Services Section
Representation on peak bodies
Childrens Week
Deliver activities that promote the rights
and needs of children
Child Protection
Maintain the ongoing operation of the
Child Protection Committee

Provide training
Deliver activities that promote Child
Protection
Community Development
Resource & support all other childrens
services in Holroyd
Provide for new service providers
Sustainable Workforce
Provide a service of recruitment,
training, induction & support for all new
staff, both permanent and casual.
Provide a casual list for use by all
services

67

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)
-

Overall operation as listed

No. of meetings: 16

No of meetings attended: 15
No of activities held: 1

No of meetings held: 10

No. of training sessions held: 6


No. of activities held: 3

No. of services: 37
No. of children in care: N/A
No. of enquiries: 27

No. of staff recruited: 17

No. of casuals on list: 32

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)

Long Day Care


To provide Accredited and licensed
care for children on a daily basis
Resource and convene meetings of the
parent advisory committee and provide
opportunities for parent involvement

Centres licensed: 3
Centres accredited: 3
No of meetings held: 7
No of events hosted: 17

No of community visits: 43

No. of children waiting placement.


- (0-2) : 87
- (2-6) : 61
Average utilisation (No. children per day):
75
No. of children waiting placement.
(0-2) : 30
(2-6) : 16
Average utilisation (No. Children per day):
44
No. of children waiting placement.
(0-2) : 43
(2-6) : 23
Average utilisation (No. Children per day):
47

Develop the childrens knowledge and


understanding of the wider community
Services Provided
Holroyd Childrens Centre (75 place).
Two locations:
Banksia Babes
Gumnut Grove

Wenty Childrens Centre (45 place)

Guildford West Childrens Centre (45


place).

Pemulwuy (65 place)


Occasional Care

N/A

68

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

To provide licensed care for children on


a daily basis
Resource and convene meetings of the
parent advisory committee and provide
opportunities for parent involvement
Develop the childrens knowledge and
understanding of the wider community
Services Provided
Friend Park (16 place - 450)

Merrylands (30 place 800hrs)

Family Day Care/Home Based


Through home based carers provide
Accredited and licensed care for
children on a daily basis
Provide a service of recruitment,
training, support and regulation for
home based carers
Resource and convene meetings of the
Carer/Parent advisory committee and
provide opportunities for parent
involvement
Develop the childrens knowledge and
understanding of the wider community

69

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)
-

Centres licensed: 2

No of meetings held: N/A


No of events hosted: 21

No of community visits: 40

Average utilisation (hrs of care per week).


(0-2) : 104
(2-6) : 268
No. of families using service: 46
Average utilisation (hrs of care per week).
734
No. of families using service: 94

Service Licensed: 1
Service Accredited: 1

Inservices held: 9
Inductions held: 11
No. of Carers: 46
No of meetings held: 4
No of events hosted: 6

No of community visits: 9

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

Merrylands/Holroyd Family Day Care


(220 place)

Out of School Hours Service


To provide recreational care for children
on a daily basis
Resource and convene meetings of the
parent advisory committee and provide
opportunities for parent involvement
Develop the childrens knowledge and
understanding of the wider community
Services provided
Sherwood Grange
(pm 60)
(am 30)
(vac 40)

Parramatta West (pm 45)


(am 45)
(vac 40)

Guildford West

(pm 75)
(am 45)
(vac 40)

70

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)

No. of children waiting placement.


(0-2) : 47
(2-6) : 34
(6-12) : 13
Average utilisation (No. children per day) :
163
No. of carers: 46

Centres meet Australian standards: 6

No of meetings held: N/A


No of events hosted: N/A

No of community visits: 205

No. of children waiting placement: 3


Average utilisation
am (No. of children): 24
pm (No. of children): 52
Vacation care (No. of children): 39
No. of children waiting placement: 6
Average utilisation:
am (No. of children): 26
pm (No. of children): 44
Vacation care (No. of children): 42
No. of children waiting placement: 12
Average utilisation
am (No. of children): 35
pm (No. of children): 72
Vacation care (No. of children): 39

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED

Double Digits

(vac 30)

Ringrose

(pm 60)
(am 45)
(vac 60)

Merrylands East (pm 29)


(am 15)

Pemulwuy

(pm 60)
(am 60)
(vac 60)

Pendle Hill

(pm 30)
(am 30)

71

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)
-

No. of children waiting placement: 21


Average utilisation
Vacation care (No. of children): 27
No. of children waiting placement: 28
Average utilisation
am (No. of children): 42
pm (No. of children): 55
Vacation care (No. of children): 54

No. of children waiting placement: 25


Average utilisation
am (No. of children): 15
pm (No. of children): 30
Vacation care (No. of children): N/A
No. of children waiting placement: N/A
Average utilisation
am (No. of children): N/A
pm (No. of children): N/A
Vacation care (No. of children): N/A
No. of children waiting placement: 1
Average utilisation
am (No. of children): 11
pm (No. of children): 18
Vacation care (No. of children): N/A

Annual Report 2006-2007

PROGRAMS

SERVICES TO BE PROVIDED
y Early Integration Program

KEY PERFORMANCE MEASURES


(OPERATIONAL)
No. of children enrolled
Occasional Care
- Friend Park: 1
- Merrylands: 9
Long Day Care:
- Guildford West Childrens Centre: 2
- Wenty Childrens Centre: 2
- Holroyd Gumnut Grove: 1
- Holroyd Banksia Babes: 0
- Pemulwuy: N/A
Family Day Care: 0
Out of School Hours Care:
- Sherwood Grange: 2
- Parramatta West: 1
- Guildford West: 4
- Double Digits: 2
- Ringrose: 2
- Merrylands East: 0
- Pendle Hill: 1
- Pemulwuy: N/A

72

Condition of Public Works

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


Annual Report 2006-2007

Special Schedule No 7
Condition of Public Works
As at 30 June 2007

Asset
Class

Asset Category

References
PUBLIC BUILDINGS
All Buildings

Depreciation
Rate (%)

Note 9

Carrying
Value

'000

'000

'000

Note 3

Estimated
Annual
Maintenance
Expense

Program
Maintenance
Works for
current year

'000

'000

'000

Local Govt. Act 1993, Section 428 (2d)

Note 9

1,183
1,183

56,868
56,868

(28,489)
(28,489)

28,379
28,379

2
3
6
7

1,567
4,944
6,511

746
451
399
139
1,735

440
266
235
81
1,022

1,762
103
430
585
18
2,898

163,001
8,213
26,300
41,390
599
239,503

(43,407)
(4,262)
(8,809)
(16,478)
(168)
(73,124)

119,594
3,951
17,491
24,912
431
166,379

1
2
3
6
7
3
2
3
6
7
2
3
6
7
1
3
7

10,600
371
100
568
469
422
100
12,630

5,767
100
598
319
150
6,934

2,375
174
119
136
2,804

Bridges
Footpaths

1.25
2

Kerb and Gutter

1.4

Street Furniture

10

TOTAL PUBLIC ROADS

'000

Cost

Accumulated
Depreciation

Estimated
Cost to
bring to a
Satisfactory
Standard

TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDINGS

PUBLIC ROADS
Sealed Roads

Depreciation
Expense

Asset
Condition
(see
Notes
attached)

74

Annual Report 2006-2007

Asset
Class

Asset Category

References
DRAINAGE WORKS
All Works
TOTAL DRAINAGE WORKS

TOTAL CLASSES - ALL ASSETS

Depreciation
Rate (%)

Depreciation
Expense

Cost

'000

'000

Note 9

Note 3

Accumulated
Depreciation

Carrying
Value

'000

'000

Estimated
Cost to
bring to a
Satisfactory
Standard

Estimated
Annual
Maintenance
Expense

Program
Maintenance
Works for
current year

'000

'000

'000

Local Govt. Act 1993, Section 428 (2d)

Note 9

1,225
1,225

123,515
123,515

(44,303)
(44,303)

79,212
79,212

5,306

419,886

(145,916)

273,970

75

Asset
Condition
(see
Notes
attached)

319
319

472
472

293
293

19,460

9,141

4,119

Summary of Legal Proceedings

Annual Report 2006-2007

Summary of Legal Proceedings


The Council uses several legal firms in relation to legal proceedings.
A summary of the legal costs incurred in 2006/2007 is as follows:Health
Environmental/Food Compliance Issues
Development
Development Appeals
Building
Building/Development Control Costs
Tree Management/Compliance
& Enforcement
Compliance & Enforcement Issues

$ 47,891.93
$697,119.51
$ 91,547.90
$ 32,099.33
$868,658.67

Cases Finalised Financial Year 2006-2007


APPELLANT

ADDRESS OF PROPERTY

NATURE OF
APPEAL

Ablas Patisserie

6 Sherwood Road
Merrylands

Tradelink
Constructions Pty
Ltd

79-81 & 88 Dunmore Street


Wentworthville

Stockland
Developments Pty
Ltd

191-201 Pitt Street; 233259 Merrylands Road & 5254 McFarlane Street,
Merrylands

Andrew Marcel Fryc

9 Grand Avenue Westmead

Telstra Corporation
Ltd

Cnr Coleman Street &


Great Western Highway,
Mays Hill

Class 4 action for


non-compliance with
conditions of consent
in relation to fire
safety upgrade of
premises.
Deemed refusal of DA
for alterations and
additions to existing
premises and use as
a function centre and
restaurant with
parking on No. 88.
Deemed refusal of
application for
redevelopment of
Merrylands Stockland
Mall and Merrylands
Court sites
Appeal against
Councils Order of 27
October 2005
seeking:
cessation of use
demolition of
pavement
demolition of
stormwater
detention system
Appeal against refusal
of DA for erection of
telecommunications
facility

77

DATE APPEAL
FINALISED OR
ACTION
CEASED
31 October 2006

24 October 2006

14 November
2006

31 August 2006

14 August 2006

Annual Report 2006-2007

APPELLANT

ADDRESS OF PROPERTY

NATURE OF
APPEAL

Rosemarie Guerin

13 Denmark Street
Merrylands

Bazouni & Snezana


Kuruc

3 Mason Street, Merrylands

J W Carter

69 Toongabbie Road
Toongabbie

J Sellauthari

8 Dunmore Street
Wentworthville

Hong Hang

178 & 179 Military Road


Guildford

Virgil Vidaicu &


Carmen Oncescu

2 Talara Street Pemulwuy

V J Samanty

49 Edward Drive Pemulwuy

B & S Kuruc

3 Mason Street Merrylands

G Salman

41 Carinya Road Girraween

Deemed refusal of DA
for demolition of
existing structures,
erection of a mixed
townhouse/villa
development and
Strata subdivision into
5 lots
Deemed refusal of DA
2007/38 for erection
of a child care centre
Unauthorised use of
premises as a printing
business
Unauthorised use of
premises as an
abortion clinic
1. Appeal against
refusal of S95AA
application for
modification to
approved L&E
Court Consent for
brothel.
2. Class 4 action for
use of building
without operative
consent.
HCC Order under
S121B to remove fill,
retaining wall, fencing,
repaint house, restore
overland flow path
and complete
landscape works
HCC Order under
S121B to remove fill,
retaining wall and
complete landscape
works
Deemed refusal of DA
2007/38 for erection
of a child care centre
Deemed refusal of DA
2004/909 for
demolition of existing
structures and
Torrens subdivision
into 2 lots

78

DATE APPEAL
FINALISED OR
ACTION
CEASED
21 August 2006

5 October 2006

31 October 2006

31 October 2006

13 December
2006

30 October 2006

28 February 2007

5 October 2006

1 November 2006

Annual Report 2006-2007

APPELLANT

ADDRESS OF PROPERTY

NATURE OF
APPEAL

G Salman

41 Carinya Road Girraween


(Proposed Lot 1)

G Salman

41 Carinya Road Girraween


(Proposed Lot 2)

G Salman

208 Targo Road Girraween


(Proposed Lot 1)

G Salman

208 Targo Road Girraween


(Proposed Lot 2)

Wendy Wei C/Storey & Gough

1/181 McCredie Road


Guildford

E L Mariani

Farah & Hook

Lot 201 DP 1030744 & Lot


301 DP 1035614 Cnr
Reconciliation/Reservoir
Roads &U Picrite Close
Pemulwuy
3 OConnor Street Guildford

Puflett & Associates


Architects Pty Ltd

Lot 1083 Biana Way


Pemulwuy

Deemed refusal of DA
2004/1033 for
erection of attached 2
storey dual occupancy
and Torrens
subdivision into 2 lots
Deemed refusal of DA
2004/1034 for
erection of attached
single storey dual
occupancy and
Torrens subdivision
into 2 lots
Deemed refusal of DA
2004/1035 for
erection of attached 2
storey dual occupancy
and Torrens
subdivision into 2 lots
Deemed refusal of DA
2004/1036 for
erection of attached
single storey dual
occupancy and
Torrens subdivision
into 2 lots
Deemed refusal of DA
2007/105 for
alterations and use of
premises as a brothel
Deemed refusal of DA
2007/346 for erection
of warehouses, hitech units and child
care center
Class 4 action under
S125(1) EP&A Act for
illegal pruning of trees
Deemed refusal of
application for 5 new
dwellings and Torrens
subdivision

79

DATE APPEAL
FINALISED OR
ACTION
CEASED
1 November 2006

1 November 2006

1 November 2006

1 November 2006

28 March 2007

28 June 2007

24 March 2007

23 May 2007

Annual Report 2006-2007

Cases Outstanding 1 July 2007


APPLICANT/
OWNER
Alcoa Australia
Rolled Products Pty
Ltd
G & A Ghannoum
M & M Elkhouri

STREET ADDRESS

SUBJECT MATTER

Lot 220, DP 703309 & Lot


3, DP 940279 Kiora
Crescent Yennora
23 Clyde Street Guildford
7 Grant Crescent
Wentworthville

Deemed refusal of DA 2005/674 for use of


rotary furnace 3

A B & M Kavich

607 Great Western


Highway Girraween
6 Birriwa Street Greystanes

Linda Khoury

Owen Tregarthen
P J Kubacki

10 Guernsey Road
Guildford
154 Magowar Road
Girraween

Mohammad Bashir
Aria

Unit 6/79-91 Betts Road


Smithfield
56 Hampden Road South
Wentworthville

John James Starr

75 Brickworks Drive
Holroyd

Meehan Properties
Pty Ltd

306-308 Church Street &


10-12 Meehan Street
Granville

Bathla
Constructions Pty
Ltd

220-226 Great Western


Highway & 1-7 Hawkesbury
Road Wentworthville

Bathla
Constructions Pty
Ltd

17 Beresford Road
Greystanes

80

Illegal construction works


Non compliance with conditions of
Development Consent and failure to stop
work as instructed.
Unauthorised building work in relation to
existing use rights
Non compliance with conditions of DC
2003/1148 in regard to additional bedroom
and various internal and external changes.
Unauthorised building works to premises
for use as a brothel.
DA refused following up on unauthorized
use of premises for warehousing and of
food.
Appeal against refusal of DA 2006/381 for
use of Unit 6 for
Deemed refusal of application for
alterations and additions to existing child
care centre
Deemed refusal of DA 2007/277 for
erection of 3 storey residential flat building
containing 9 units above basement
parking and associated Strata subdivision
into 9 lots
Deemed refusal of DA 2007/583 for
construction of new motor showroom with
ancillary offices, vehicle service and spare
part sales, associated car park and
signage
Deemed refusal of DA 2004/1167 for
demolition of existing structures, erection
2x3 storey and 1x4 storey residential flat
buildings
Appeal against refusal of S96(2)
application to modify DC 2003/685 issued
for mixed 3 storey residential/ commercial
building

Policy & Provisions for Elected Members

Annual Report 2006-2007

Mayoral and Councillor Expenses


The total amount expended by Council during 2006/2007 on Mayoral and Councillor fees was
$198,280.
Councillors received a fee of $13,980 for the year, with the Mayor receiving an additional
allowance of $25,942 and the Deputy Mayor receiving an allowance of $4,578.
The allowance to the Deputy Mayor is based on 15% of the Mayors annual allowance of $33,520
and is deducted from the Mayoral allowance.
In addition to the abovementioned Mayoral and Councillor fees, the following facilities and
equipment were also provided:

Cost of providing office equipment, ie laptop computers, mobile phones,


telephones, facsimile machines and internet installed in the Councillor
homes
Cost of phone calls, including mobile phones, landlines, facsimile
and internet services
Expenses in relation to spouses/partners accompanying Councillors
Conference and seminar expenses
Training and skill development expenses
Interstate travel expenses (including subsistence and out of pocket
Expenses
Overseas travel expenses
Carer and other related expenses

$11,108
$49,873
$964
$27,771
$1,094
$28,849
$Nil
$Nil

Policy for Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to the Mayor


and Councillors
A full copy of Councils Policy on the Payment of Expenses and Provision of Facilities to the Mayor
and Councillors follows.
PART 1

Purpose of the Policy


The purpose of the policy is to ensure that there is accountability and transparency in the
reimbursement of expenses incurred or to be incurred by Councillors. The policy also ensures
that the facilities provided to assist Councillors to carry out their civic duties are reasonable.

Background
NSW Department of Local Government has conducted a review of a number of Council expenses
policies and has circulated guidelines pursuant to Sections 23A and 252(5) of the Local
Government Act 1993 following extensive consultation with the Local Government and Shires
Association of NSW.
The purpose of a Council expenses and facilities policy is to ensure that there is accountability and
transparency in the payment of expenses incurred, or to be incurred, by Councillors.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

It is noted that a Council may disburse money only if the disbursement is authorised by the Local
Government Act 1993, either expressly or because it is supplemental, incidental to or
consequential upon the exercise of its functions.

Principles
Conduct
As required by Section 439 of the Local Government Act 1993 and reinforced in the Model Code
of Conduct provisions, Councillors must act lawfully, honestly and exercise a reasonable degree of
care and diligence in carrying out their functions under the Act or any other Act. Councillors should
in particular, be mindful of the provisions of the Anti-Discrimination Act 1977.
Participation, equity and access
The expenses policy provisions must be non-discriminatory and used in an equitable manner to
enable the full participation by Councillors from different walks of life. The policy should allow
Councillors to represent the community in different ways and take account of, as much as
possible, individual differences.
The provisions made in the policy should be at an appropriate level to encourage members of the
community, particularly under-represented groups such as those in primary caregiver roles, to
seek election to Council by ensuring that they would not be financially or otherwise disadvantaged
in undertaking the civic duties of a Councillor. Such encouragement promotes a diversity of
representation that can bring the benefit of new and different approaches and solutions to issues.
The Council expenses policy also takes into account of and makes reasonable provision for the
special needs of Councillors to allow access to the appropriate parts of Council premises, and
facilities, and maximise participation in the civic duties and business of Council. Provision is also
made for sight or hearing impaired Councillors and those with other disabilities, including
reasonable transportation provisions for those unable or unwilling to drive a vehicle to provide
access.

Objectives of the Policy


Accountability and transparency
The Council expenses policy must ensure that there is accountability and transparency in the
reimbursement of expenses incurred or to be incurred by Councillors. They should cover the
specific expenses for which Councillors are entitled to receive reimbursement. Councillors can
only receive reimbursement for expenses when the expense is identified in the policy.
The overriding principle to be addressed in the development of the Holroyd City Council expenses
policy is that the details and range of benefits provided to Councillors by the Council must be
clearly stated and be fully transparent and acceptable to the local community.
Reasonable expenses
The expenses and facilities policy ensures that Councillors are reimbursed for expenses
reasonably incurred in their performance of their role as a Councillor.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

Limits
The payment of expenses and the provision of equipment and facilities to Councillors should not
be open-ended. Councils must agree and set monetary limits to all expense provisions in their
policy where practicable and where appropriate, as well as standards for the provision of
equipment and facilities provided to Councillors.
Statutory requirements
A policy for the payment of expenses and the provision of facilities for Councillors is made under
Section 252 of the Local Government Act 1993 and in accordance with clause 403 of the Local
Government (General) Regulation 2005.
Other policy provisions, which should be considered, include these guidelines, Department of
Local Government circulars to Councils, the Model Code of conduct for Local Councils in NSW
and the Independent Commission against Corruption publication No Excuse for Misuse.

Development, promotion and review of an expenses and facilities policy


Development and adoption of the policy
Pursuant to Section 253 of the Local Government Act 1993 and according to the guidelines for the
payment of expenses and the provision of facilities for Mayor and Councillors for Local Councils in
NSW issued by the Department of Local Government, Holroyd City Council has reviewed its
policy.
As part of any future review process, Council will give public notice of its intention and allow at
least 28 days for public submissions. Council will consider any submissions received and make
any appropriate changes to the policy. Councils do not need to give public notice of a proposed
amendment to the policy, if the amendment is not substantial. Within 28 days of adopting or
amending the policy, the policy and details of submissions will be forwarded to the DirectorGeneral of the Department of Local Government.
Promotion and availability of the policy
The Council will promote its policy on the payment of expenses and the provision of facilities to
Councillors to the community by placing it on the Councils website and making it readily
accessible.
Review
Holroyd City Council will, on an annual basis, review and submit its policy to the Director-General
of the Department of Local Government within 28 days of adoption by Council, even if it is
proposed to adopt an unchanged policy.
Holroyd City Council will report separately on:

the total cost of expenses and the provision of facilities for the Mayor and all Councillors, as
well as:

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Annual Report 2006-2007

Provision of facilities

the total cost of the provision of dedicated office equipment allocated to Councillors on a
personal basis, such as laptop computers, mobile phones, telephones and facsimile
machines and internet installed in the Councillors homes (including line rental and Internet
access). This item does not include the costs of using this equipment, such as calls.

Expenses

the cost of phone calls including mobiles, home located landlines, facsimile and Internet
services
spouse/ partner/ accompanying person expenses (limited to circumstances outlined on page
14 of the Guidelines)
conference and seminar expenses
training and skill development expenses
interstate travel expenses (including subsistence and out-of-pocket expenses)
overseas travel expenses (including subsistence and out-of-pocket expenses)
care and other related expenses (of dependants to enable a Councillor to undertake his/her
civic functions).

PART 2 PAYMENT OF EXPENSES

General provisions
A time limit of 30 days is provided for Councillors to seek reimbursement for their expenses

Allowance for Deputy Mayor


Council will only pay the Deputy Mayor part of the Mayors annual fee where the Deputy Mayor
demonstrably acts in the role of the Mayor. Such payment must only be done at the direction of
the Council and any amount paid to the Deputy Mayor must be deducted from the Mayors annual
fee (Section 249 of the Local Government Act 1993).

Payment of expenses generally


Specific expenses for Mayor and Councillors
Payment of expenses to Councillors shall be limited to:

payment of accommodation, travelling and reasonable out-of-pocket expenses whilst


attending conferences and seminars
reimbursement of costs paid by Councillors for which Council is liable under this policy.

Accommodation
Payment of accommodation costs will be made on the following basis:

accommodation will be selected by the Council on the basis of cost and convenience
of location to the conference venue. A Councillor may choose accommodation at a
different location, but which is at the same cost or less;

the number of accommodation days provided under this policy will be limited to:

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Annual Report 2006-2007

a
b

registration day; and


each day on which official sessions of the conference/seminar area held.

any additional accommodation costs incurred as a result of the attendance of partners


and/or children, shall be borne by the Councillor.

No changes from previous Payment of Expenses & Provision of Facilities Policy


Meals
Council will meet the cost of breakfast, lunch and dinner under Incidental Expenses for delegates
where any of these meals are not provided as part of the conference/seminar/training course.
Reimbursement and reconciliation of expenses

Council will, where possible, pay expenses directly to the place of accommodation by
account.
Councillors should be aware that it may be necessary for them to pay expenses. In order to
obtain reimbursement for such expenses a claim for reimbursement together with receipts
must be submitted to the General Manager on the appropriate form (Appendix A).

Payment in advance
Councillors may request payment in advance in anticipation of expenses to be incurred in
attending conferences, seminars and training away from home. Advance Payment Request Form
(Appendix B) to be completed. All expense payments may be claimed for reimbursement on the
appropriate form (Appendix A) together with receiptst or reconciled if an advance payment is
made.

Establishment of monetary limits


Payment of expenses for spouses, partners and accompanying persons
There may be limited instances when certain costs incurred by the Councillor on behalf of their
spouse, partner or accompanying person are properly those of the Councillor in the performance
of his or her functions (hence they are properly incurred by, and reimbursable to the Councillor).
An accompanying person is a person who has a close personal relationship with the Councillor
and/or provides carer support to the Councillor.
As a consequence, meeting the reasonable costs of spouses and partners or an accompanying
person for attendance at official Council functions that are of a formal and ceremonial nature, is
considered appropriate when accompanying Holroyd City Council Councillors. Such functions will
be those that a Councillors spouse, partner or accompanying person could be reasonably
expected to attend. Examples include but not be limited to, Australia Day award ceremonies,
Citizenship ceremonies, civic receptions and charitable functions for charities formally supported
by the Council.
Limited expenses of spouses, partners or accompanying persons associated with attendance at
the Local Government and Shires Associations annual conferences will be met by Council. These
expenses will be limited to the cost of registration and the official conference dinners. Travel
expenses, any additional accommodation expenses, and the cost of partner/accompanying person
tours etc will be the personal responsibility of individual Councillors.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

The Council will pay the expenses for the spouse, partner or accompanying person of a Mayor, or
a Councillor when they are representing the Mayor, when they are called on to attend an official
function of Council or carry out an official ceremonial duty while accompanying the Mayor outside
the Councils area, but within the State. Examples include charitable functions to which the Mayor
has been invited and award ceremonies and other functions to which the Mayor is invited to
represent the Council.
The above circumstances will be distinguished from spouses, partners or accompanying persons
who accompany a Councillor at any event or function outside the Council area, including interstate
and overseas, where the costs and expenses of the spouse or partner or accompanying person
would not be paid by Council (with the exception of attendance at the Local Government and
Shires Associations annual conference, as noted above).
The above examples will also be distinguished from circumstances, where spouses, partners or
accompanying persons accompany Councillors at seminars and conferences and the like. In
these situations all costs, including any additional accommodation costs, must be met by the
Councillor or the spouse/partner/accompanying person and not reimbursed.
The payment of expenses for spouses, partners or accompanying persons for attending
appropriate functions as permitted above will be confined specifically to the ticket, meal and/or the
direct cost of attending the function. Peripheral expenses incurred by spouses, partners or
accompanying persons such as grooming, special clothing and transport are not reimbursable
expenses.
Monetary limit: As per Schedule A
Incidental expenses of the Mayor and Councillors
Incidental expenses will reasonably include telephone or facsimile calls, refreshments, internet
charges, laundry and dry cleaning, newspapers, taxi fares and parking fees. In addition, the cost
of meals not included in the registration fees for conferences or similar functions.
Monetary limit: As per Schedule A

Specific expenses of the Mayor and Councillors


Attendance at seminars and conferences
Council will provide the following facilities to Councillors attending conferences or seminars which
have been authorised by Council resolution or by the Mayor under delegated authority:

(i)

Registration Fees the payment of registration fees for attendance at conference/seminar


sessions.

(ii)

Accommodation including breakfast on each day of a conference/seminar as provided in


Expenses, above.

(iii)

Transportation as provided below.

Local travel arrangements and expenses


Council will provide transport to and from conferences, seminars on other Council business on the
following basis:

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Annual Report 2006-2007

(i)
(ii)
(iii)

Aircraft all aircraft travel to be economy class. However, business class airfare will be
applicable for overseas travel and for journeys involving four hours or more of flying time;
Train first class where available;
Private motor vehicle where appropriate

In the event that private motor vehicle is the selected mode of transport, an allowance will be
made to the Councillor for use of their own vehicle in accordance with the maximum calculated
under the Holroyd City Council National Agreement Preserving the Local Government
(State)Award 2004.
Note: In any case the total shall not exceed the cost applicable to that of economy class aircraft
for a return ticket.
Training and educational expenses
Council will consider making separate provision for the payment of relevant training and education
expenses incurred by Councillors in the budget. These expenses would support and encourage
an active learning process and skills development in addition to attending seminars and
conferences related to Council functions. The training or educational course will be directly related
to the Councillors civic functions and responsibilities.
Attendance at dinners and other non-Council functions
Council will provide meeting expenses associated with attendance at dinners and other
non-Council functions which provide briefings to Councillors from key members of the community,
parliamentary representatives and business, and when the function is relevant to the Councils
interest.
Such expenses are to relate to the cost of the function only including an additional payment to a
registered charity where appropriate.
Travel outside the LGA including interstate travel
General travel arrangements
All travel by Councillors will be undertaken by utilising the most direct route and the most
practicable and economical mode of transport subject to any personal medical considerations.
Prior approval of travel should generally be required for interstate travel. The application for
approval should include full details of the travel, including itinerary, costs and reasons for the
travel.
Local travel arrangements and expenses
The policy provides for the payment of reasonable travel expenses for local travel relating to
defined Council business.
The policy includes arrangements for the use of a private vehicle and provisions for the use of
public transport, travel using a Council vehicle and associated other costs such as parking and
road tolls. The driver is personally responsible for all traffic or parking fines incurred while
travelling in private or Council vehicles on Council business.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

Provision will also be made for sight or hearing impaired Councillors and those with other
disabilities, including reasonable transportation provisions for those unable or unwilling to drive a
vehicle to provide access.
Overseas travel
Detailed proposals for overseas travel will be developed, including nomination of the Councillor(s)
undertaking the trip, purpose of the trip and expected benefits. The duration, itinerary and
approximate total costs of each proposed visit, will also be provided.
Overseas travel must be approved by a Council resolution prior to a Councillor undertaking the
trip. Travel must be approved on an individual trip basis. No retrospective reimbursement of
overseas travel expenses will be made unless prior authorisation of the travel has been obtained.
After returning from overseas, Councillor(s), or an accompanying member of Council staff, will
provide a detailed written report to Council on the aspects of the trip relevant to Council business
and/or the local community. Councillor(s) will report back on their overseas travel to a Council
meeting within 30 days of date of return to Australia.
Details of overseas travel will be included in Councils annual report.
Mobile Phone costs and expenses
Council will provide an appropriate mobile telephone and suitable in-car kit to Councillors if
requested.
Such mobile telephones are for use by the Councillor on matters relating to official duties.
A copy of each individual mobile telephone account will be distributed to each Councillor for
payment of private or personal telephone calls.
Council will be responsible for the payment of costs associated with monthly access charges, and
Council related telephone calls.
Councillors will be required to pay the call charges for all calls which fall within the definition of
private or personal calls.
Monetary limit: As per schedule A
Computer Equipment
Such computer equipment is for use by the Councillor on matters relating to duties of office and
private use as approved and is to remain in the possession of the Councillor during their term of
office.
Councillors will be provided with computer equipment, service, manuals and training required to
support Councils electronic applications:
1.

Communications:

Email

Broadband

Dialup internet

Firewall

AntiVirus

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Annual Report 2006-2007

Anti Spyware
Fax Software

2.

Office functions and utilities:

Operating system

Electronic Business Paper

Word processing

Spreadsheets

Presentation

Database

Printing

Fax machine

External backup

DVD/CD reader/writer

Templates including:

Letterhead

Notice of Motion

Notice of Rescission

Questions Without Notice

Research

Electronic Business Paper History (back to September 1997)

3.

General

Councils external website

General internet browsing

Training and support

Manuals and notes

Remote support software

Telephone support

Site visits

Monthly health check

Other applications and services as requested and agreed by the General Manager

Provision will be provided in three locations: at each Councillors residence, in the Councillors
Room, in Council Chambers.
The installation, servicing and upgrading of computer equipment will be coordinated through
Councils information technology personnel.
The computer equipment, levels of service, types of manuals and training will be reviewed
annually. Due to the changing nature of information technology, the current equipment is outlined
later in this Section.
Responsibilities for Council:

Supply and maintain equipment, services and consumables;


Rectify faults as soon as practical;
Provide training as required;
Respond to changing information needs of Councillors.

Responsibilities for Councillors:

Identify faults and training needs;


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Annual Report 2006-2007

Request consumables;
Manage private usage and private data;
Ensure all usage complies with Australian Law;
Ensure the security of privileged information.

Electronic Business Paper

The Electronic Business Paper is published Friday prior to each Council Business Meeting.
Minutes are published Friday after Council Business Meeting.

Support
All support for Councils Electronic Applications will be coordinated through Councils information
technology personnel. Telephone support will be provided during office hours weekdays
between 8:00 am and 4:30 pm.
Extended Support
Extended support and site visits to Councillor residences will be coordinated through Councils
information technology personnel. The extended hours require joint negotiation, depending both
on staff and Councillor available.
Monthly Information Technology Health Check
Councillors will be contacted monthly to ensure their information technology equipment supplied
by Council is functioning effectively. This is a formal opportunity for Councillors to request
additional support, equipment or training.
Training
All training for Councils Electronic Applications will be coordinated by Councils information
technology personnel.
Security and Confidentiality
Councillors are responsible for their passwords. Particularly each Councillor should maintain a
unique undisclosed password particularly for email access.
Information Technology Personnel can reset passwords. This will only be done with the
Councillors direct permission.
Assistance and instructions on setting and changing passwords will be supplied on request by
Information Technology Personnel.
The Electronic Business Paper Application contains information that is confidential to Councillors
(eg Committee of the Whole reports). It is the responsibility of Councilors to care and protect this
information.
Private Usage
In addition to Councils electronic applications, Council has agreed that a degree of private use
may be made of the computer equipment. For this purpose the following guidelines will apply:

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Annual Report 2006-2007

It is acknowledged that all computer equipment is provided to Councillors primarily to


support Councils electronic applications outlined above.

Any secondary or private use is not to impact on the correct functioning of Councils
electronic applications.

Private use is confidential.

Council will not access any Councillors private or personal information without their
knowledge and agreement.

In particular, Council will not retain any copies of private information outside of the Councillors
residence without a Councillors expressed knowledge and approval.
Where private information must be held by Information Technology Staff, this will be negotiated
with the Councillor concerned to their agreement and endorsement.
Councillors may request Information Technology Staff to return or destroy any private information
held by Council. The destruction will be confirmed with the Councillor.

Councillors take responsibility for any private software licences ensuring copyright laws are
not infringed.

In particular Councillors should provide the General Manager with a signed photocopy of any
licences for privately installed software on Council equipment and negotiate the installation with
the Manager of Information Technology Services.

Councillors take responsibility for any information accessed on the Internet ensuring
Australian laws are not infringed.

Installation and removal of private software and hardware will be coordinated with Councils
Information Technology personnel.

This will ensure any private software functions correctly and does not interfere with Councils
Electronic Applications.

Support is not guaranteed for private applications, data and equipment through Councils
Information Technology personnel.

Councillors acknowledge that the private equipment may be removed, disconnected or


upgraded by Councils Information Technology personnel where it interferes with Councils
Electronic Applications.

Councils information technology can take no responsibility for private applications or data.
Private data loss may occur.

Councillors take responsibility to back up or restore any private or personal information.

Councillors bear the cost of private software or services.

Councillors take responsibility for granting permission to any others using the computer
equipment.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

Information Technology Staff may provide advice on how a Councillor should manage private
usage to ensure it does not conflict with Councils Electronic Applications, however each
Councillor remains responsible for private use.
For each Councillor in Council Chambers:

Laptop docking station and power supply

External mouse

For the Mayor in the Mayors Office:

Laptop docking station and power supply

External monitor

External keyboard and mouse

Monochrome laser printer

Care and other Related Expenses


Council will make provision for the reimbursement of the reasonable cost of carer arrangements,
including childcare expenses and the primary care of elderly, disabled and/or sick immediate
family members of Councillors own households, to allow Councillors to undertake their Council
business obligations. This is in accordance with the principles of participation, access and equity
outlined in the Guidelines by the Department of Local Government.
Consideration will be given to the payment of other related expenses associated with the special
requirements of Councillors such as disability and access needs, to allow them to perform their
normal civic duties and responsibilities.
Monetary limit: As per Schedule A
Insurance
Council will effect an appropriate level of insurance for Councillors in the following area.

(i)

Personal Accident coverage of Councillor and spouse/partner while on Council business.

(ii)

Councillors and officers insurance-covering Legal Liability, Public Liability and Professional
Indemnity.

(iii)

Travel.

Legal Expenses
1.

Council may pay for the reasonable cost of legal advice and suitable legal representation for
Councillors in respect of:
a
b

any liability or potential liability of Councillors; or


any requirement of Councillors to give evidence

incurred by a Councillor on his or her capacity as a Councillor of Holroyd City Council.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

2.

The provisions in (a) apply to:


a
b
c
d
e

court proceedings, both criminal and civil;


enquiries by the Independent Commission Against Corruption;
enquiries before any Legal Commission or Parliamentary Enquiry;
proceedings before the Pecuniary Interest Tribunal; and
other proceedings before other administrative or statutory tribunals.

3.

A reference to the payment of legal expenses includes Council reimbursing a Councillor for
such expenses incurred by the Councillor.

4.

Council may in any case resolve that payment or reimbursement by limited to a certain
amount or proportion of the legal expenses or in some other way be limited.

Facilities, Equipment and Other Services


Council will provide facilities, equipment and services for Councillors, including but not limited to:

Office equipment (phones, fax, photocopier);


Mobile phone;
Internet;
Dedicated computer equipment including a desktop and/or laptop, printer, scanner and
software, including consumables for each Councillor residence, as well as office furniture
and computer cabinet;
Furnished Councillors Room;
Secretarial and administrative support;
Non-dedicated Council vehicle;
Car parking set aside for the sole use of Councillors;
Meals and refreshments;
Meals on evenings of Council Meetings and official dinners, light refreshments at Committee
and working party meetings;
Corporate clothing and protective clothing and equipment;
Access to flu vaccination as part of the Councils Wellbeing program;
Stationery and equipment each Councillor will be provided with an adequate supply of the
following stationery and equipment:
o
A4 letterhead;
o
Notepaper;
o
Business Cards;
o
One briefcase during the term of office (optional style);
o
Christmas cards;
o
Name badge.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

PART 3 ADDITIONAL MAYORAL EXPENSES

General Provisions
The following facilities, additional to those outlined elsewhere in this policy will be provided to the
Mayor:
Motor Vehicle
Council will provide at its cost to the Mayor a full registered, insured, maintained, fuelled vehicle
with provision for an E-tag for use by the Mayor on official duties and for private use. Council will
be responsible for the payment of fringe benefits tax payable as a result of the supply of this
facility.
The type of vehicle at the time of changeover, shall be the choice of the Mayor, being either a
Holden Statesman or Ford Fairlane:
(a)
(b)

Changeover of vehicle to occur as per Councils Motor Vehicle policy.


Vehicle chosen being available for purchase in accordance with the specifications of
the State Contracts Control Board (Amended Min 578, C/M 5/11/96).

The vehicle provided for the Mayor is for use on official duties and functions of the Office of Mayor
and for private use.
Telephone
Council will provide at its cost a separate telephone to the residence of the Mayor for use in
relation to official duties and functions of the Office of Mayor.
Facsimile Machine
Council will provide at its cost an appropriate facsimile machine at the residence of the Mayor for
use in relation to official duties and functions of the Office of Mayor.
Office Facilities
Council will provide the following office facilities at the Council Chambers:
(i)
(ii)
(iii)
(iv)
(v)
(vi)

Office space sufficient quantity of quality office space necessary to fulfil the duties of
office.
Telephone a high quality digital telephone connected to Councils PABX System with
direct in dial and direct line facilities.
Facsimile machine connected to a dedicated telephone line.
Furniture an appropriate quantity of quality office furniture.
Secretarial Support Secretarial support facilities are available to the Mayor during
normal office hours.
Council will meet the cost of postage of mail forwarded by the Mayor in the conduct of
official duties.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

PART 4 OTHER MATTERS

Acquisition and return of equipment and facilities by Councillors

Telephones, facsimile equipment, mobile phones, computer and any other electronic equipment or
furniture supplied to Councillors for their official use will remain the property of Holroyd City
Council. All such items are returnable to the Council once the Councillors term of office comes to
an end. There is provision for the Councillors to purchase Council equipment previously allocated
to them at the cessation of their duties, or at the time of replacement of the equipment, at an
agreed fair market price or written down value.
This Policy was adopted by Council at its Meeting held on 19 June 2007.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

SCHEDULE A
ESTABLISHMENT OF MONETARY LIMITS
The monetary limits applicable to this policy are as follows:

Payment of expenses for spouses, partners and accompanying persons:


The maximum entitlement of $200 per function per person.

Incidental Expenses:
The maximum entitlement of $150 per day.

Mobile Phone Calls:


Mayor = $300 maximum per month;
Councillor = $250 maximum per month.

Care and other related expenses:


The maximum entitlement of $1,000 per year subject to production of appropriate
documentation / receipts.

97

Major Contracts

Annual Report 2006-2007

Major Contracts Awarded (Over $100,000)


(including GST)
FRH Astec Pty Limited
PO Box 682, Campbelltown 2560
Resurfacing of roads with asphaltic concrete

$1,123,409

Nepean Concrete Industries Pty Limited


19 Amax Avenue, Girraween 2145
Concrete kerb and gutter, paving

$259,525

Stabilised Pavement of Australia Pty Limited


234 Wisemans Ferry Road, Somersby 2250
Stabilisation of road pavements

$243,856

Ally Property Services


53-57 Cosgrove Road, Strathfield 2136
Concrete kerb and gutter, paving

$350,847

Works Infrastructure
1 Unwin Street, Rosehill 2142
Pavement milling, heavy patching

$585,587

99

Environmental Issues

Annual Report 2006-2007

State of the Environment Report/Local Agenda 21 Program


Holroyd City Council has prepared a supplementary State of Environment Report for the 1 July
2005 to 30 June 2006 reporting period. This is the 13th annual State of Environment Report
produced by Holroyd City Council and it provides discussion on major environmental and
sustainability issues pertinent to the Holroyd City Council area, including key items of
environmental data, which are presented as indicators. Also discussed are the actions taken by the
Council, other government agencies and the community in response to the issues identified in the
report.
The final 2005/2006 Supplementary State of Environment Report will be available on Councils
website (www.holroyd.nsw.gov.au) in early 2007. Placing the report on our website makes it
available for residents to read at all of Holroyds branch libraries or on their home computer.
During the reporting period, Council continued to demonstrate its commitment to working with the
community at the local level to progress towards achieving a sustainable community through
implementation of actions identified in Living Holroyd: A Sustainable Future.
Below is a snapshot of initiatives and responses to environmental/sustainability issues from the
past 12 months.

Water Consumption
With the below average rain falls Sydney has experienced over the last five years and low levels of
water held in Warragamba Dam, water has come to the forefront of environmental concerns for
people throughout south eastern Australia.
The residents of Holroyd City have again displayed a positive response to this water shortage, with
Sydney Water data showing that people living in houses in Holroyd have further reduced their
water usage by 5,000L/dwelling whilst people living in flats and units in Holroyd have decreased
their water usage by 2,000L/dwelling.
During the reporting period, Holroyd City Council as an organisation used on average 373,321
litres of water per day, this is a 3% decrease on the previous reporting year.
Council was notified by the Minister for the Department of Energy, Utilities and Sustainability
(DEUS) that the Water Savings Action Plan had been approved. Actions that Council implemented
during that reporting period include replacing single flush cisterns with dual flush cisterns, replacing
urinal cisterns with sensor controlled cisterns and retro-fitting water saving showerheads.

Climate Change
Climate change due to atmospheric pollution is another topic that is receiving much attention both
by governmental agencies and in the media. Council is committed to improving urban air quality
and reducing greenhouse gas emissions which is demonstrated through the participation in the
Cities for Climate Protection Program (CCP) and the development of the Energy Savings Action
Plan.
Council continued the preparation of a Draft Energy Savings Action Plan which contains actions to
improve the energy efficiency at Councils highest energy consuming facilities. The Draft Energy
Savings Action Plan was submitted to the Department of Energy, Utilities and Sustainability
(DEUS) on 4 April 2007 for approval by the Minister for DEUS.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

Although the Energy Savings Action Plan is yet to be approved by the Minister for DEUS, Council
has commenced implementation of the cost-effective efficient initiatives identified in the plan,
including installing non-return dampers on vents at Guildford Pool, enabling Energy Smart settings
on computers, upgrading air-conditioners controls at Councils Administration Building and
installing power factor correction devices.

Clean Up Australia Day


Council registered and coordinated 25 sites for Clean Up Australia Day on 4 March 2007 including
the following locations:
-

Merrylands CBD
Civic Park, Pendle Hill
Long Street, Smithfield
Nancy Street, Pendle Hill

Over 100 local volunteers took part in the nations largest community based environmental event,
cleaning up at the 25 sites with 100 bags of rubbish collected. This year 17 local schools in the
Holroyd City Council area took part in the Clean Up Schools Day.
An estimated 1 million people across Australia took part in the day at more than 7,000 sites. Some
of the more unusual finds around the country were a parking meter, half a boat and a maintenance
leg. Feedback from site supervisors around Australia, which was supported by collections in the
Holroyd City Council area, shows beverage containers are one of the most commonly found items.

Biodiversity
The biodiversity within Holroyd City Council is under constant threat from pollutants and the spread
of introduced species. In an effort to protect against further degradation and fragmentation of
Holroyds biodiversity, Councils bush regeneration staff together with volunteer bushcare groups
including Pendle Hill Creek Bushcare Group, Lower Prospect Canal Reserve Bushcare, Friends of
Prospect Creek, Alpha Park Bushcare and Greystanes Management Committee planted 9,738
new trees, shrubs and grasses.

City Health Plan


Council adopted the Holroyd City Health Plan 2006-2010 on 16 May 2006. This is Councils third
City Health Plan and was developed in collaboration with a broad range of stakeholders including,
the Merrylands Community Health Centre, the Holroyd Local Area Command; Sydney West Area
Health; Cumberland Womens Health Centre and Holroyd-Parramatta Migrant Services.
The aim of the City Health Plan is to provide a mechanism to respond effectively to, and review,
the public and environmental health needs of the community. This will be achieved through three
key areas:
Healthy & Safe Environments;
Disease prevention; and
Healthy Lifestyles.
A copy of the Holroyd City Health Plan 2006-2010 is available on Councils website
(www.holroyd.nsw.gov.au).

102

Services to People of Diverse Cultural &


Linguistic Backgrounds

Annual Report 2006-2007

Services to People of Diverse Cultural and Linguistic


Backgrounds
The population of Holroyd is increasingly diverse in cultural and linguistic character as shown by
the following information obtained from the ABS Census of Population and Housing - 2006
Census.

Table One
Birthplace by Country
Summary Indicators

2001
Census
85,760
48,467
30,991
NC
NC
46,279
33,741
680

Population
Australian born
Overseas born
Birthplace not stated
Visitors from overseas
Speaks English only
Speaks other language
Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander

2006
Census
89,766
47,614
35,353
NC
580
44,402
40,581
737

% Change
01-06
4.67
-1.75
14.07
N/A
N/A
-4.05
20.27
8.38

Females
26,035
1,305
2,908
3,646
2,006
1,808
3,264
581
469
41
3,300
45,363

Total Persons
51,049
2,674
5,691
7,700
3,401
3,346
6,917
1,122
974
95
6,798
89,767

Table Two
Birthplace by Tegion
Region
Australia/Oceanic/Antarctica
Northwest Europe
Southern and Eastern Europe
North Africa/Middle East
South East Asia
North East Asia
Southern and Central Asia
The Americas (Most Sth America)
Sub SaharaAfrica
Other
Not stated
Total

Males
25,014
1,369
2,783
4,054
1,395
1,538
3,653
541
505
54
3,498
44,404

ABS: Quick Stats and Holroyd Community Profile. 2006 Data

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Annual Report 2006-2007

Table Three
Languages other than English Spoken at Home:
Language
Speaks English only
Speaks other language:
Arabic (including Lebanese)
Australian Indigenous Languages
Chinese languages:
Cantonese
Mandarin
Other (c)
Total
Croatian
Dutch
Filipino (excludes Tagalog)
French
German
Greek
Hindi
Hungarian
Indonesian
Iranic Languages
Persian (excluding Dari)
Dari
Other (e)
Total
Italian
Japanese
Khmer
Korean
Macedonian
Maltese
Polish
Portuguese
Russian
Samoan
Serbian
Sinhalese
Spanish
Tagalog (excludes Filipino)(d)
Tamil
Turkish
Vietnamese
Other(f)
Total
Not stated
Total
(a)
(c)
(d)
(e)
(f)

Males
21,376

Females
22,232

Persons
43,608

5,703
30

5,474
16

11,177
46

1,070
902
91
2,063

1,161
1,003
96
2,260

2,231
1,905
187
4,323

499
28
230
119
82
692
932
41
117

491
31
302
121
81
666
902
52
155

990
59
532
240
163
1,358
1,834
93
272

297
550
183
1,030
819
21
26
277
30
801
122
33
77
103
209
146
518
315
1,095
711
338
2,872
20,079
2,947
44,402

290
571
174
1,035
883
22
43
297
29
858
199
39
115
117
222
123
620
497
1,078
730
424
2,619
20,501
2,631
45,364

587
1,121
357
2,065
1,702
43
69
574
59
1,659
321
72
192
220
431
269
1,138
812
2,173
1,441
762
5,491
40,580
5,578
89,766

This list of languages consists of the most common Languages Spoken at Home responses reported
in the 2006 Census.
Comprises Chinese nfd Hakka, Hokkien, Teochew, Wu and Chinese nec.
In 2006 Tagalog and Filipino have been identified individually, in 2001 they were classed as one
language.
Comprises Iranic nfd, Kurdish, Pashto, Balochi and Iranic nec.
Comprises languages not identified individually, Inadequately described and Non-Verbal so described.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

Council adopted an updated Access and Equity Policy Statement for People from Culturally and
Linguistically Diverse Backgrounds in September 2004. The Policy Statement was developed after
extensive consultation with local CALD communities, Councils CALD Consultative Committee,
multicultural service providers and peak bodies.
The Access and Equity Policy Statement includes an overview of the statistics relevant to the
CALD communities and an analysis of the priorities. Strategies to address these priorities were
developed and address issues of access and equity in the corporate culture and detail actions
across all Council departments. A representative of each department attends the CALD
Committee to update them on the implementation. The objective of the Policy is to include issues
of access and equity in standard operational procedures.
The Access and Equity Policy Statement is a standard item on the Consultative Committees
agenda. Where special strategies are needed to address disadvantage, they are developed in
consultation with the particular CALD communities and delivered in collaboration with these
communities.
National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Week was celebrated on 22 July 2007 with a
community festival held in Central Gardens. Approximately 500 community members participated
in the celebrations which were overseen by Councils ATSIC Committee. The Committee advises
and makes recommendations to Council on Indigenous priorities. The Indigenous Employment
Strategy resulted in the employment of three indigenous workers at Council, and won the 2005/6
NSW Aboriginal Employment and Business Award.
The Aboriginal flag is flown at Council on every working day. An Indigenous representative of the
Committee attends the annual Local Government Aboriginal Network Conference and reports back
to other members.
A brief message in seven community languages is printed on the reverse of Councils letterhead,
inviting recipients to contact Council for assistance in understanding the contents. The Department
of Library and Community Services pamphlet has been translated in various community languages
and distributed through local service providers, peak bodies, child care centres, youth centres,
aged care facilities, and libraries. Other information pamphlets are also provided in relevant
community languages where funds are available e.g. library services, family day care.
Where possible, Council uses pictograms and language charts to facilitate access to information,
services and facilities. The use of Language Aides and the Telephone Interpreter Service is
promoted at staff orientation days. Council updates the booklet on Hints for Cross Cultural
Communication and distributes it across Council and externally to various community
organisations and government departments. The booklet is used at Councils staff induction.
Immunisation booklets in a variety of languages are used to promote this important issue and food
handling seminars are held four times per year, using a language free video to demonstrate food
handling and storage practices. Information on rates is also available in various community
languages. Language charts are posted at each customer service point. In June 2006, Council
updated its language charts and reissued them to all customer service points, including childcare
centres.
Council funded and held Carnivale, a festival promoting community harmony and integration, on 22
April 2007. Approximately 4,000 people attended. The festival was planned, implemented and
evaluated by a Working Party drawn from Councils Culturally and Linguistically Diverse
Consultative Committee members.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

Holroyd Community Food Services has been offered funding to provide a CALD Centre Based
Meals Program in the Holroyd and Parramatta Local Government Areas. Operational details are
still being finalised with DADHC.
Disability Services promote access to people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds
through printed information and videos, and encourage networking and linking of ethnic
communities to mainstream community services.
In August 2005 Council, in partnership with the BHHP Migrant Resource Centre and SIVA
International, planned and implemented a South Asia Conference which was held in July 2006.
An Egyptian Forum was held in April. 120 people attended.
Councils Community Education Program was the subject of a small-group session at the LGCSA
Conference in October 2006 with 40 people in attendance.
On 21 March 2007 Council, in partnership with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Consultative Committee and the Warali Wali Working Party, celebrated Harmony Day. 30 persons
attended a function at the Warali Wali site.
In March 2006 Council, in partnership with Merrylands Community Health Centre, Holroyd
Parramatta Migrant Services and the BHHP Migrant Resource Centre, commenced planning for a
Refugee Forum to be held in October 2006. Approximately 60 persons attended the event.
Council, in partnership with the Australian Centre for Languages, delivered a Community
Education Program Getting to Know Your Local Council in April 2007. 70 people, all new
migrants, attended. Feedback on the program was positive and the Australian Centre for
Languages requested a second program for March 2008.
How to Vote workshops were developed and were held in the last three months of 2006. The aim
was to educate and empower CALD residents prior to the 2007 State elections.
Council has updated its Induction program to include cross-cultural training. All new staff must
attend induction and are provided with a copy of Councils Hints to Better Cross Cultural
Communication booklet for reference. A list of bilingual workers is posted on Councils Intranet
and the list is updated bi annually.
Council continues to convene and resource the Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Consultative
Committee and all its Working Parties.
Council continues to provide opportunities for overseas trained and qualified persons to gain work
experience and ensuing references. 19 persons with overseas qualifications participated in this
work experience program.

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Childrens Needs

Annual Report 2006-2007

Childrens Needs
The following programs undertaken by Council develop and promote services which provide for the
needs of children and their families.

Staff Development
Ongoing staff training is essential in ensuring the continued provision of quality care and motivated
staff. Training is developed based on staff and centre needs and covers topics such as First Aid,
Child Development, The Emergent Curriculum, Child Protection (Responding to Risk of Harm),
Programming, Dealing with Difficult People, Critical Incident Training, Budgeting, Health Issues,
English as a Second Language, Gifted and Talented Children and Fire Safety. Relevant training is
also offered to parents such as the Early Integration Program, Super Nanny and many other topics
that parents request.

Excursions/Visitors
An important feature of Childrens Services is excursions and/or special visitors to the centres.
These include farm visits, plays, cultural visitors or educational presentations, as well as
community visitors such as Fire Brigade, Police, Ambulance, library and Storytellers visits to the
Library. Such visitors and excursions increase the childrens cultural and community awareness,
promote tolerance, appreciation of the arts and life skills.

Developmental Records
Each centre maintains comprehensive developmental records on each child. These records
determine individual needs on which the centres base their daily program. This is an integral part
of ensuring that the development of each child is fostered. The records are ongoing and are
available for parents at any time. At the end of the year the parents are given a journal of their
childs progress and are invited to discuss their childs development with their carer.

Parents and Carers in Partnership


Parents and Carers in Partnership groups have been established at each child care service to
promote parent involvement.
The Parents and Carers in Partnership model offers parents and carers the opportunity to get
involved in a more social context and creates networking possibilities for families who are not
interested in more formal groups. Many occasions have been developed through this new initiative
such as multicultural cooking nights, mums & dads games nights, open day sessions and art
displays.

Transition to School
Childrens Services holds a Transition to School Expo each year for parents deciding on a school
for the following year. This session helps parents in making the important decision of whether their
children are ready to go to school. It also gives them an idea of what to expect when their child
goes to school, and what schools have to offer. Various speakers are organised with expertise in
this area. This is especially important for parents of children with May, June or July birthdays and
parents of children with additional needs.
A Transition to School booklet is also distributed to services and families in Holroyd and contains
information on local schools in the Holroyd area so that parents can make an informed choice of
which school to send their child to. The booklet also has other general information such as NSW
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Annual Report 2006-2007

schools handwriting styles and school preparation. This booklet is updated and distributed
annually and is available on the Council website.

The Early Integration Program (Inclusion Networking Group)


This important program continues to grow to meet the increasing need to integrate children with a
variety of additional needs into Early Childhood and Out of School Hours Care services.
The Early Integration Program holds an annual orientation morning tea to explain how the program
works. This gives parents an opportunity to meet teachers and caseworkers from referral
agencies. It also allows the parents to build contacts with each other and share the way they have
coped with their childrens disabilities.
The program employs one additional needs teacher and one outreach worker to meet the needs of
over 30 children in Occasional Care, Long Day Care, Family Day Care and Out of School Hours
Care services. In consultation with centre staff this team develops and implements individual
programs to meet the individual needs of the children, encouraging them in the next step of their
development.
Recently a Support Group called Inclusion Networking was set up to support the program and staff
with resources and funding opportunities.

Child Protection
The Child Protection Committee continues to work to provide training and policy direction. The
Committee is made up of representatives from each of Councils departments.
During the year, the Committee has provided training to staff and local services in relation to
Mandatory Reporting and prepared training sessions to deliver Councils revised Child Protection
Policy to staff.
Child Protection Week falls in September each year and the committee is involved in projects that
raise awareness within the community about child protection and how everyone can make a
difference.

Quality Assurance
All Early Childhood (Long Day Care centres), Middle Childhood (Out of School Hours Care
services) and Family Day Care Schemes (Home based care) in Australia follow Quality Assurance
Systems which ensure services meet stringent quality assessments to maintain Accreditation.
The childrens services Quality Assurance System is a Commonwealth Government initiative linked
to the funding of Child Care Benefit to childrens services. If a service does not reach satisfactory
standards it is not eligible to register for Child Care Benefit.
Services use varied terminology for these systems. Early Childhood (Long Day Care) refers to
Quality Improvement Accreditation System (QIAS), whereas Middle Childhood (Out of School
Hours care) and Family Day Care (Home based care) refer to Quality Assurance (QA).
These systems are built around quality areas and principles, such as

Relationships with Children and Families

Planning and Evaluation,

Safety & Health, and

The General Management of a service.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

All of Holroyd City Councils Childrens Services have recently been reassessed and are proudly
operating at High Quality standards. All of Councils childcare services consistently maintain these
values through a continuous improvement process.

Language and Literacy


Councils Early Childhood services incorporate language and literacy components into their
programs from birth to 12 years of age to develop important developmental skills.
Early Childhood Educators and child care workers are working together to facilitate all children
along the language and literacy journey. The Sometime Centre has a parenting group which
meets monthly to engage parents into this process, teaching them the skills to read stories to their
children and empowering them to enjoy these learning experiences together.

The Active After-School Communities (AASC) program


The Active After-School Communities (AASC) program is a major component of the Australian
Government's Building a Healthy, Active Australia package aimed at tackling the growing problem
of declining physical activity and poor eating habits of Australian children.
AASC is an after school hours structured physical activity and health program that is being
delivered nationally to children enrolled in Australian primary schools and Childcare Benefit
approved Out of School Hours Care Services.
Councils Out of School Hours services run these programs and apply for grants each term for
ongoing assistance in running the program. AASC supports Councils objective of developing and
promoting healthy active lifestyles in children and young people in the Holroyd community.

111

Promotion of and Access to Community


Services

Annual Report 2006-2007

Promotion of and Access to Community Services


Publicity
The annual Local Government Week celebrations incorporate extensive information displays and
written material promoting Council services, as do celebrations such as Childrens Week, Child
Protection Week, CityFest, PetFest, NAIDOC, and Carnivale. Opportunities are also sought out for
the provision of services and information in shopping centres, e.g. Road Safety campaigns,
environmental issues, and library services. In November 2006 Officers delivered a presentation to
the Cumberland/Prospect Disability Forum on the use of the SportsAbility Kit which includes
purpose modified sports activities which are suitable for people with a disability. This kit is
available for loan to community organisations.
Sessions on Getting to know your Local Council promote Council and inform residents and
interested persons on a wide range of services and processes. These programs are usually aimed
at a particular language group and two general programs are planned each year, using accredited
interpreters. Councils Community Development Officer - Multicultural runs mini-programs on
request for local CALD groups.
Policy
In September 2004, Council adopted its updated Access and Equity Policy Statement and Action
Plan for people from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds. The policy has the following
objectives:

To inform local non-English speaking communities of Councils roles, responsibilities,


services, facilities and activities.
To provide all residents including people of non-English speaking background equal
access to all Councils facilities and activities.
To improve the skills of Council staff to meet the specific needs of people of nonEnglish speaking background.
To consult effectively with local ethnic communities on the full range of Council
activities.

The Access and Equity Policy Statement includes strategies which are monitored quarterly and
progress is reported through Councils CALD Consultative Committee. The Plan lists 199
strategies of which 167 have been implemented.
Councils Access Policy and Action Plan promotes equality of access to Council services and
facilities for people with a disability, and aims to satisfy Councils requirements under the Disability
Discrimination Act. Following the successful completion of Councils first Action Plan (endorsed in
1998) a second Access Policy and Action Plan commenced from March 2002. The strategies in
the Action Plan are taken into consideration in the preparation of Councils Management Plan and
in the budget process, with the aim of minimising and eliminating discrimination on the basis of
disability in the provision of Council services and facilities.
In September 2006 Council adopted the revised Cultural Plan Cultural Vitality in Holroyd City
2006-2011. This Plan seeks to expand the creative potential of the community and to enrich and
contribute to personal, family, social and working lives. The document won an award in the LGSA
2007 Cultural Awards.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

Communication
The Peer Support Program provides its information on audio tape for service users who have
difficulty reading. This respite and recreation program for adults with intellectual disabilities
encourages access by service users from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, who
account for 35% of members of the group.
Aged Services produces and distributes over 1,200 copies of a Seniors Newsletter which provides
information on Council and community services and activities. This newsletter is distributed four
times each year.
Councils Customer Service Unit and the Central Library have TTYs to facilitate communication
with the deaf community. An AUSLAN interpreter is arranged on request for Council meetings and
public events.
There are hearing loops installed in the Council Chambers and Merrylands Library. These
systems result in acoustic benefits for people with hearing impairments. Council also has a
portable hearing loop system that can be used for meetings in Councils Committee Rooms, the
Holroyd Centre, and Councils community facilities.
The Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS) is used where required and the use of the TIS is a
standard feature in customer service training, as is cross cultural sensitivity. A number of staff
have been tested to become accredited interpreters, and are listed as Language Aides at Council.
The booklet Hints for Better Cross Cultural Communication, which was originally produced in 1998,
was updated to ensure that service provision and appropriate customer service is current and
continuously improved for clients of diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds.
The Library service has a Basic English collection to assist in basic English language acquisition
and enhancement. The collection is made up of videos, resource materials and kits. The Library
also provides newspapers and magazines in a number of community languages, and has access
to extensive collections in community languages from the State Library of NSW. Local collections
are available in monograph, CD, DVD and video in Arabic, Chinese, Tamil and Vietnamese. The
library service has also commenced a Hindi collection. The library service also coordinates a
program of conversational English classes which are run by volunteers.
Ease of Contact
Installation of a telephone system which incorporates an after hours service and voicemail has
facilitated public access to Councils services and officers. The front counter has a conference
phone to assist with interpreting services, and section managers have a hands free telephone,
which facilitates the use of interpreting services.
Enquiries regarding Councils community facilities (halls, meeting rooms and community buses)
are directed to the Customer Service Centre so that residents can access information and make
bookings with one phone call or visit.
Outreach Services
Councils Childrens and Young Adults Librarian conducts outreach visits to schools and
kindergartens.

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Annual Report 2006-2007

The Outreach Youth Worker utilises outreach visits to make contact with young people and make
them aware of appropriate services.
Councils Housebound Library Service operates with the assistance of a team of volunteers to
ensure that library services are available to housebound residents.
Disability Access Needs
The Holroyd Access Committee meets quarterly to allocate funds toward high priority access works
within the Holroyd Local Government Area. Projects are undertaken based on community
requests and/or potential for usage. The Committee has an annual budget of $50,000 and also
lobbies other bodies regarding access issues.
The public areas of Councils administration building are accessible, with a lift, accessible toilets
and automatic doors. An upgrade of these facilities is currently being reviewed. There is an
accessible walkway through to the Library, which also has lift access and an accessible toilet.
An accessible 23 seater bus is available through Guildford Community Centre and enhances
access to services for people who are frail aged or have disabilities. Council also provides a 20
seater accessible community bus. Both buses are available for use by community groups.

Social and Community Planning


Council adopted the Social Plan for 2005 2009 in November 2004. An extensive process of
community consultation was undertaken, including a community survey carried out by the Hunter
Valley Research Foundation. The plan includes 61 recommendations to respond to local
community priorities, including priorities that relate to specific target groups and the general
community.
The recommendations in the Social Plan are taken into consideration in the preparation of
Councils Management Plan and in the budget process. The Social Plan is monitored every 6
months by Council, through the Social Plan Steering Committee.
In May 2006 Council adopted the 2006-2010 City Health Plan, following a broad consultation
process. A grant of $20,000 has been secured to assist with implementation of Health Plan
strategies, including falls prevention, childhood obesity and mental health awareness.

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Human Resources Activities

Annual Report 2006-2007

Human Resource Activities


Human Resource Policies and Procedures
In the report period the Holroyd City Council a number of new policies were developed, as well as
reviewing current policies. The senior management team approved the following policies and
procedures:

Corporate Fitness
Exit Interview & Questionnaire
Leave Policy
PE Form 2006
New Employee Induction Checklist
Educational Assistance Policy
Home Base Work
Employee Handbook
Salary Sacrifice
Work Experience Placement
Overt Video Surveillance
References for Employees
Workforce Planning Framework
Pre-employment Medical Policy
Guide to Work Rights
Child Protection Policy
Observance of Religious Duties & Cultural Obligations
Career Break
Dress Standards
EEO Management Plan
Higher Grade Duties
Staff Recognition

Human Resources General Activities


A staff newsletter called H-Files is produced bi-monthly which provides both corporate and
personal articles to keep staff updated. Also with the introduction of Work Choices an information
newsletter is issued to the staff as and when there are changes to report.
The Senior Management Team is also provided a quarterly HR report, which provides them with
statistics and other relevant information to assist them manage their departments.
A staff survey was conducted in March 2007 and the survey indicated overall Council an 82.2%
employee satisfaction index. A Lunch n Learn was held to promote the outcomes of the survey and
what strategies would be put into place for areas of improvement.
Council is a project participate in the Working Carers Liaison Project which forms part of the
Employee Assistance Program, and to launch our involvement a Lunch n Learn was put on to
provide more information on how the project can assist staff who are carers.

Recruitment and Selection


Recruitment and selection procedures are continually monitored by the Human Resources team to
reflect changes in NAPSA and industrial relations requirements. All stages of the recruitment

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Annual Report 2006-2007

process are monitored by systematic step by step review of all advertising, interviewing,
appointments and exit stages of employment at Holroyd. Formal training has been conducted for
staff that are part of the interview panels.
The Human Resources Section participated in the Local Government Week Activities with
reference to Gateway to Careers, the UWS Nepean Career Expo under the banner of WSROC
and the SMH Careers & Employment Expo under the banner of LGSA. HR is currently reviewing
the web positions vacant page and the Gateway to Careers brochure to ensure they are current
and relevant.

Induction Training
Employee induction sessions are scheduled on a six-week cycle. The content of these sessions
evolves with changes to policies and practices to ensure continuous improvement and up to date
advice to new staff members. The new employee induction checklist was reviewed to provide
more support to staff and managers to ensure information was provided prior to the corporate
induction. It covers keys aspects of the position and councils key policies and procedures, which
staff need to be aware of immediately they start.

Remuneration Management
Appointments and salary progression remain based on qualifications, experience and competence.
The annual skills review and performance evaluations were undertaken for all staff on their
anniversary dates. The evaluation process involves an annual skill review in line with NAPSA
requirements and the development of individual training plans and Councils Corporate Training
Plan.
In November 2006 an award increase of 3% was applied to Councils Salary System from the first
pay period on or after 1 November 2006 and the AFPC increase was also applied to those grades
of the salary system that were applicable.

Training and Development


The competency based training emphasis was further developed in the report year. The annual
staff performance evaluations were used to collect training needs data and the locally created
training database used to collate and prioritise training delivery, both on and off the job training and
the development of Councils Corporate Training Plan. An e-learning tool for computer packages
has been purchased to give staff the ability to learn on the job and use their new skills immediately.

Occupational Health and Safety


Councils HOLSAFE OHS Management System has been further enhanced with ongoing
promotion, monitoring and reviewing of the system. HOLSAFE Teams have been formed to work
on projects.
The highlight for the year was winning the National Local Government Award in the category of
Leadership in the Injury Prevention and Management. Manager Human Resources also presented
at the National Local Government Occupational Health & Safety Conference 2007 on how Holroyd
won the National Award.
As part of the OHS Committees planning for 2006/2007 the following was achieved:

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Annual Report 2006-2007

Training

Injury Management for Supervisors


Herbicide
Chemical Handling
Manual handling
Confined spaces
Green card
Ergonomics
Defibrillator
Drug & Alcohol
Workplace Bullying & Harassment
Senior First Aid
First Attack Fire Fighting
Vehicle Driving
Design & Audit Traffic Control Plans
Overhead Powerline Awareness
Select & Modify Traffic Control Plans Training
Tag & Testing Risk Assessments

Policies/Programs

Pandemic Plan of Management


Drug and Alcohol Policy (revised)
Occupational Health & Safety Policy (revised)
Council HIV/Hep/Blood Policy (revised)
Tag & Testing Policy
Volunteer Policy
Toolbox talks
Hearing Assessments Program
Managing Contractor Safety
Chemical Handling Policy
Noise Management Policy & Audit
No Smoking
Fit for Work
Height Safety

With effective implementation and continual review, Council can expect a safer workplace for all.
This implementation program is assisted by a quarterly Holsafe Newsletter and a Safety Week. A
number of Lunch n Learns and wellness programs were held during the year Driver Safety,
WorkCover speaker, Walk to Work and a massage day.

EEO Management Plan Implementation


Councils EEO Management Plan was reviewed with emphasis again this year on human
resources policies and procedures and consistently identified staff training needs. As identified in
the plan the activity areas are communication & awareness, recruitment, selection committee,
appointment & transfer, training, higher duties, grievance procedures, conditions of service, access
to Council premises, allocation of responsibilities & resources and evaluation of the Management
Plan. Other activities were:

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Annual Report 2006-2007

Review EEO Management Plan;


EEO training for staff and managers;
Bullying and harassment training
Maternity Leave Morning Tea

The Womens Development Team has developed an Action Plan which was endorsed by Council
in June 2007.
Council received a Highly Commended in the National Local Government Awards in the category
of Increasing Womens Participation.

Senior Staff Numbers and Total Employment Costs Payable


There are five senior officers employed under Contract.
General Manager

$225,000

Director of Engineering Services

$168,265

Director of Corporate & Financial Services

$168,265

Director of Library & Community Services

$152,250

Director of Environment & Planning Services

$152,250

The total remuneration for senior staff including provision of a Council vehicle, superannuation and
fringe benefits tax is $866,030.

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External Bodies

Annual Report 2006-2007

External Bodies Exercising Functions Delegated by Council


Local Committees
Bathurst Street Park Local Committee
Central Gardens Tennis Courts Local Committee
CV Kelly Park Local Committee
Daniel Street Park Local Committee
Darling Street Park Local Committee
Girraween Park Trust Local Committee
Greystanes Community Centre Local Committee
Greystanes Sports Ground Local Committee
Guildford West Sports Ground Local Committee
Gum Tree Reserve Local Committee
Holroyd Sports Ground Local Committee
Hyland Road Park Local Committee
Jones Park Local Committee
King Park Local Committee
Lawson Square Tennis Court Local Committee
Mays Hill Tennis Court Local Committee
McCredie Park Local Committee
Merrylands Park Regional Sports Centre Local Committee
Ringrose Park Local Committee
Roberta Street Park Local Committee
Sydney Smith & M J Bennett Local Committee
Ted Burge Sportsground Local Committee
Tom Uren/Tait Streets Park Local Committee
Westmead Parks Local Committee

Advisory Committees
Council has a number of Advisory and Consultative Committees that make recommendations to
Council:
Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Consultative Committee
Access Committee
Aged Services Advisory Committee (incorporating Meals-on-Wheels and Guildford Community
Centre)
Arts Advisory Committee
Audit and Governance Committee
City Health Plan and Local Air Quality Management Plan Steering Committee
Community Safety Committee
Companion Animals Advisory Committee
Councils Staff Consultative Committee
Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Consultative Committee
Disability Services Advisory Committee
Heritage Committee
Holroyd City Bicycle Steering Committee
Holroyd City Youth Advisory Committee
Holroyd Gaming and Liquor Consultative Committee
Library Committee
Local Agenda 21 Steering Committee
Prospect Hill Conservation Management Plan Steering Committee
Road Safety Steering Committee

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Annual Report 2006-2007

Scholarship Committee
Social Plan Steering Committee
Syringes Working Party
Toongabbie Community Consultative Committee
Traffic Committee
Western Sydney Area Assistance Scheme (WSAAS) Local Ranking Committee
Yennora Distribution Park Community Consultative Committee

Companies in which Council has a Controlling Interest


The Council held a controlling interest in conjunction with other Councils in the following
companies:

Western Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils.

Council Partnerships, Co-Operatives and Joint Ventures


The Council was a party to the following partnerships, cooperatives and joint ventures:

MetroPool (Insurance Joint Venture);


Local Government Association of NSW;
Greater Western Sydney Economic Development Board;
Greater Western Sydney Business Connection;
Smithfield-Wetherill Park Chamber of Commerce & Industry;
Floodplains Management Authorities of NSW;
Western Sydney Alliance of Councils (Anti-Airport Group);
Upper Parramatta River Catchment Trust;
Parramatta Park Regional Trust;
Local Government Community Services Association;
GROW Area Consultative Committee (Central Western Sydney);
Western Sydney Regional Community Forum;
Holroyd/Parramatta/Auburn HACC Forum;
Cumberland-Prospect Districts Disability Forum;
Baulkham Hills/Holroyd/Parramatta Joint Migrant Resource Centre;
Western Sydney Academy of Sports Forum;
Holroyd-Parramatta Youth Network;
Cumberland District Childrens Services Forum;
Out of School Hours Cumberland District Forum;
Local Government Internal Auditors Group;
WSROC Human Resources and Training Group;
Local Government Risk Yahoo Group;
Councils HR Yahoo Group;
LGMA (Including Finance and HR Special Interest Groups);
Corruption Prevention Network NSW Public Sector;
Strategic Alliance Network (Department of Local Government); and
Institute of Public Works Engineering Metro West Group.

123

Freedom of Information

Freedom of Information (FOI)


Statement of Affairs
Under the Freedom of Information Act, Council is required to publish an Annual Statement of
Affairs. The Statement describes the structure and functions of Council and lists categories of
documents held by Council. It also sets out how to obtain documents, which are eligible for public
scrutiny under legislation. The following information satisfies the legislative requirements of the
Act.

Structure & Functions


The following is a diagram of Councils current organisation structure.

COMMUNITY

COUNCIL

MAYOR

GENERAL MANAGER

CORPORATE &
FINANCIAL
SERVICES

ENGINEERING
SERVICES

ENVIRONMENT
& PLANNING
SERVICES

LIBRARY &
COMMUNITY
SERVICES

The functions as stated under the Local Government Act 1993 of Holroyd City Council are as
follows:

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Functions of Holroyd City Council


Under the Local Government Act 1993, Councils functions can be grouped into the following categories:

A COUNCIL EXERCISES FUNCTIONS UNDER


THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACT 1993
SERVICE
FUNCTIONS

REGULATORY
FUNCTIONS

ANCILLARY
FUNCTIONS

Including:

Including:

Including:

Provision of
community health
recreation, education
and information
services

Approvals

Resumption
land

Environmental
protection

Orders
Building
certificate

REVENUE
FUNCTIONS
Including:
of Rates

Powers of entry
and inspection

ADMINISTRATIVE
FUNCTIONS
Including:

Including:

Employment of staff

Proceedings for
breaches of the Act

Charges

Management Plans

Fees

Financial reporting

Borrowings

Annual reports

Investments

Human Resource
support

Waste removal &


disposal

Risk Management
Information
Technology support

Land & property,


industry and tourism
development &
assistance

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ENFORCEMENT
FUNCTIONS

Prosecution of
offences
Recovery of rates and
charges

As well as the Local Government Act, Council has powers and obligations under a number of other
Acts, including:

Bush Fires Act 1949;


Children and Young Persons (Care and Protection) Act 1998;
Coastal Protection Act 1979;
Community Land Development Act 1989;
Companion Animals Act 1998;
Conveyancing Act 1919;
Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979;
Fire Brigades Act 1989;
Fluoridation of Public Water Supplies Act 1957;
Food Act 1989;
Freedom of Information Act 1989;
Fringe Benefits Tax Act 1986;
Goods & Services Tax Act (1999);
Heritage Act 1977;
Impounding Act 1993;
Independent Commission Against Corruption Act 1994;
Library Act 1939;
Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998;
Protected Disclosures Act, 1984;
Protection of the Environment Operations Act 1997;
Public Health Act 1991;
Recreation Vehicles Act 1983;
Roads Act 1993;
State Emergency and Rescue Management Act 1989;
State Emergency Service Act 1989;
State Records Act 1998;
Strata Title Act 1973;
Strata Title (Leasehold) Act 1986;
Unclaimed Money Act 1982; and
Unhealthy Building Land Act 1990.

127

These functions are carried out by five departments. The specific functions of each department are as follows:
GENERAL MANAGER

CORPORATE & FINANCIAL


SERVICES

ENGINEERING
SERVICES

ENVIRONMENT &
PLANNING SERVICES

LIBRARY & COMMUNITY


SERVICES

Communicates with the


public & develops plans for
the future

Responsible for Councils


administration & finances

Builds & maintains the


Citys civil
infrastructure

Controls City
development & cares for
the public health &
environment

Provides services to various


groups in the community

Responsibilities:

Responsibilities:

Responsibilities:

Responsibilities:

Responsibilities

Media Relations &


Promotions

Customer Service

Roads & Bridges

Garbage Collection

Libraries

Commercial & Residential


Property Management

Drains

Recycling

Management Plan

Traffic Management

Health Promotion

Out of School Hours


Services

Purchasing

Food Inspections

Long Day Care

Engineering Design

Corporate Review

Council Elections

Computer Systems

Parks & Gardens

Family Day Care

Development &
Building Approvals

Occasional Care

Parking

Function Centre
Management

Accounts Receivable &


Payable

Tree Planting

Insurance

Personnel & Industrial


Relations

Vehicle &
Equipment
Maintenance

Building Trades

Staff Training

Street Cleaning

Records

Pools

Business Paper

Budget

Community
Buildings

Information Technology

Financial Management
and Reporting

Internal Audit

128

Town Planning

Toy Library

Licences

Aged Services

Pollution Control

Youth Services

Health & Safety

Community Development

Environmental Policy

Ethnic Services

Immunisations

Disabilities Services

Dog Control

Community Facilities

Ordinance Inspectors

Effect of Functions on Members of the Public


Nearly all of the functions of Holroyd City Council have an effect on members of the public. The
following is an outline of how the broad functions of Council affect the public.
Service functions affect the public as Council provides services and facilities to the public.
Services provided include the upkeep of roads and footpaths, stormwater drains, parks and
gardens, the removal of rubbish, food handlers seminars, immunisation and legionella control.
Facilities provided include libraries, swimming pools, parks, halls and community centres.
Regulatory functions place restrictions on developments and buildings to ensure that they meet
certain requirements and will not endanger the lives and safety of any person. Members of the
public must be aware of, and must comply with such regulations.
Ancillary functions affect only some members of the public. These functions include for example
the resumption of land or the power for Council to enter onto a persons land. In these
circumstances, only the owner of the property would be affected.
Revenue functions affect the public directly in that revenue from rates and other charges paid by
the public is used to partly fund services and facilities provided to the community.
Administrative functions do not necessarily affect the public directly but have an indirect impact on
the community. For example, Councils Management Plan outlines and strategies of the Council
over a short-term and long-term period.
Enforcement functions only affect those members of the public who are in breach of certain
legislation. This includes matters such as the non-payment of rates and charges, unregistered
dogs, parking offences, unclean premises and environmental offences.

Public Participation
There are two broad ways in which the public may participate in the policy development and,
indeed, the general activities of Council. These are through representation and personal
participation.
Representation
Local government in Australia is based on the principle of representative democracy. This means
that the people elect representatives to their local Council to make decisions on their behalf. In
New South Wales, local government elections are normally held every four years on the second
Saturday in September. Elections were last held on 27 March 2004.
Holroyd City is divided into four electoral districts called Wards. At each election, voters elect
three Councillors from each Ward (i.e. a total of twelve Councillors) for a four-year term. All
residents of the City who are eligible to vote are required to do so. Property owners who live
outside of the City and desire to vote must register their intention to vote on the non-residential
roll. Voting is compulsory for all eligible residents. Residents are able to raise issues with, and
make representations to the elected Councillors. The Councillors may pursue the matter on the
residents behalf thus allowing members of the public to influence the development of policy.

129

Personal Participation
If a particular item has a direct effect on a resident, (eg, a proposed building next door to which an
objection is made, an application that has been lodged with Council) and the resident wishes to
speak on this item at a Council meeting, they can contact Councillors or Councils Officers who
will make appropriate arrangements. Copies of agendas are available for inspection at the
Administration Centre and Councils libraries or Councils website, usually on the Friday before
the meeting that is generally held on the first and third Tuesday of each month, commencing at
6.30pm.
Alternatively, residents can ring Administrative Services to confirm which items are to be
considered by Council.
Members of the public may also have input into Council decision-making by making written
submissions, writing letters, raising issues in person or by responding to surveys or
questionnaires.
A Public Forum at Ordinary Meetings of Council allows a member of the public to ask a question of
Council. Details of the Public Forum are set out in Councils Code of Meeting Practice.
The majority of Councils parks and halls are managed by Local Committees. In the case of
Parks, these Committees consist of users and Councillors. As well many of Councils community
services operate with Advisory Committees. Members of the public are invited to apply for
membership and provide input to the Committees.
Council may take a poll of electors if it wishes to seek the opinion of electors on any issue.
Council conducts a survey of residents to gauge community expectations and changing service
requirement trends every four years.
Further, residents and ratepayers are able to participate in the formulation of Councils Policies,
as plans are placed on public exhibition inviting comment.
Information relating to the formulation of policies or the public exhibition of plans is published
through Councils Corporate Page in the local newspaper.
Council actively supports local community radio as part of its communication process and in
particular SWRFM and 2CCR, the local FM Community Radio Stations.
Council is also required to conduct a constitutional referendum before doing any of the following
things:
(a)

divide its area into wards or abolish all wards in its area;

(b)

change the basis on which the Mayor attains office (that is, by election by the
Councillors or by election by the electors);

(c)

increase or decrease the number of Councillors; and

(d)

change the method of ordinary election of Councillors for an area divided into wards.

Categories of Documents Held by Council


Holroyd City Council holds documents which relate to a number of different issues concerning the
Holroyd area. These documents are grouped into three categories:
1.
2.
3.

Files
Policy Documents
General Documents

130

Some of these documents may be made available to the public on request in accordance with the
provisions of the Local Government Act, 1993; Privacy & Personal Information Protection Act,
1998; or the State Records Act, 1998.
Documents that are not normally available to the public may require a Freedom of Information
application to be completed before the release of such documents is considered.
Some of these documents are available for inspection as a requirement of certain legislation,
other documents are available for purchase, whilst others are available free of charge.

Files
The main types of files that are held by Council include General Subject files and Property files.
These files are not generally available to the public although copies of some documents contained
on a file may be provided on request.
Members of the public, who wish to peruse files and/or copy documents contained on a file,
should apply to do so under the Freedom of Information Act. Details of how to apply under the
Freedom of Information Act are outlined in the next section.

Policy Documents
Council has a register of policy documents that relate to the functions of Council.
Policy documents are available for information free of charge. Copies can be obtained for a
copying fee.

General Documents
The following list of general documents held by Council has been divided into two sections:
a)
b)

Documents available for inspection as per Legislation; and


Other documents available for inspection, purchase or free of charge.

Documents Available for Inspection as per Legislation


Section 12 of the Local Government Act 1993 requires certain documents held by the Council to
be made publicly available for inspection, free of charge. The public is entitled to inspect such
documents at the office of the Council during ordinary office hours or at any other place as
determined by the Council, for example, at libraries. Any current, and previous years documents
of this type may be inspected by the public free of charge.
These documents are:

Councils Code of Conduct;


Councils Code of Meeting Practice;
Annual Report;
Annual Financial Reports;
Auditors Report;
Management Plan;
EEO Management Plan;
Councils Policy concerning the payment of expenses incurred by, and the Provision of
Facilities to, Councillors;
Councils Lands Register;
Register of Investments;

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Returns of the Interest of Councillors, Designated Person and Delegates;


Returns as to Candidates Campaign Donations;
Business Papers for Council and Committee Meetings (but not including business papers
for matters considered when a meeting is closed to the public);
Minutes of Council and Committee Meetings (but not including minutes of a meeting or any
part of a meeting that is closed to the public other than the recommendations of that
meeting);
Any Codes referred to in the Local Government Act 1993;
Register of Delegations;
Annual Reports of Bodies Exercising Delegated Council Functions;
Applications under Part 1 of Chapter 7, for Approval to Erect a Building, and Associated
documents;
Development Applications (within the meaning of the Environmental Planning and
Assessment Act 1979) and Associated documents;
Local Policies adopted by the Council concerning Approvals and Orders;
Records of Approvals Granted and decisions made on Appeals concerning approvals;
Records of Building Certificates under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act
1979;
Plans of Land proposed to be compulsorily acquired by the Council;
Leases and Licences for use of Public Land classified as community land;
Plans of Management for community land;
Environmental Planning Instruments, Development Control Plans, Precinct Plans and Plans
made under Section 94AB of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act, 1979,
applying to land within the Councils area;
The Statement of Affairs, the Summary of Affairs and the Register of Policy Documents
required under the Freedom of Information Act 1989;
Departmental Representatives Report presented at a meeting of the Council in accordance
with Section 433; and
The Register of Graffiti Removal Work kept in accordance with Section 67C.

Other Documents Available for Inspection, Purchase or Free of Charge

Corporate & Financial Services

Annual Statements of Account;


EEO Policy;
Policy Documents;
Property & Transfer Register Microfiche; and
Rating Records.

Engineering Services

City Maps;
Drainage Plans;
Engineering Design Plans;
Flood Advice Letters;
Flood Mitigation Reports;
Filming Policy;
Footpath Levels;
OSD (On-site Detention) Identification Tags and Confined Spaces Signs;
OSD (On-site Detention) Policy;
Road Opening Permits;
Road Safety Strategy Plan 2004-2009;
Specification for Road Works and Drainage associated with Subdivision or other
Development;
Traffic Management Plan Guidelines and Application;
Traffic Volumes Data;

132

Works Programs;
Sporting Facilities Information;
Vehicular Crossing Policy; and
Plans of Management for Parks and Sportsgrounds.

Environmental & Planning Services

BA Register;
BA & DA Plans/Applications;
DA Register;
Environmental Impact Statements;
Section 94 Annual Statement;
Section 94 Contributions Plans;
Section 94 Contributions Register;
Zoning Information; and
Tree Preservation Orders.

Library & Community Services

Community Information Directory;


Census Data;
Community Services Publications;
Historical Photographs;
Local Area Information;
Local History;
Minutes of Community Advisory and Consultative Committee Meetings;
Social Plan;
Cultural Plan;
City Health Plan;
Access Policy and Action Plan;
Access and Equity Policy Statement for People from Culturally and Linguistically Diverse
Backgrounds;
Community Profile;
Various Information Directories; and
Policies and Associated Plans.

Accessing and Amending Council Documents


As mentioned in the previous section, Council has a vast range of documents, which can be
accessed, in varying ways. Most documents can be inspected at the Council Office between
8.00am and 4.30pm, Monday to Friday (public holidays excepted). Copies of documents may
also be picked up from the Administration Centre in person. Documents which are not available
as a matter of course may still be obtained under the Freedom of Information Act 1989, where the
Public Interest principle is an overriding consideration in deciding whether documents will be
released.
The Public Officer may deal with requests from the public concerning the Councils affairs and has
the responsibility of assisting people to gain access to public documents of the Council.

133

Number of New Applications Received During 2006/2007


FOI Request

Personal

Other

Total

05/06

06/07

05/06

06/07

05/06

06/07

New

79

66

79

66

Brought forward

Total to be processed

79

68

79

68

Completed

79

68

79

68

Withdrawn

Total processed

79

64

79

64

Unfinished

Result of Completed Requests


FOI Request

Personal

Other

Total

05/06

06/07

05/06

06/07

05/06

06/07

Granted in full

61

58

61

58

Granted in part

Refused

Deferred

B5 completed

79

64

79

64

05/06

06/07

05/06

06/07

Number of Requests Requiring Formal Consultation

Consultations undertaken

Ministerial Certificates

Ministerial Certificates issued

Number Of Completed Requests That Required Formal Consultations

Amendment of Personal Records


Result of Amendment Request

Total
05/06

06/07

Result of amendment agreed

Result of amendment refused

Total

134

Notation Of Personal Records


05/06

06/07

Number of requests for notation

Requests Granted In Part Or Refused - Basis Of Disallowing Access


FOI Request

Personal
05/06 06/07

Other
05/06 06/07

Total
05/06 06/07

Section 19 (application incomplete,


wrongly directed)

Section 22 (deposit not paid)

Section 25(1) (a1) (unreasonable


diversion of resources)

Section 25(1) (a) (exempt)

12

12

Section 25(1)(b), (c), (d) (otherwise


available)

Section 28(1) (b) (documents not held)


0

Section 24(2) deemed refused, over 21


days

Section 3(4) (released to Medical


Practitioner)

Totals

18

11

18

11

Costs And Fees Of Requests Processed


Accessed
Costs

All completed requests


Type of Discounts Allowed

FOI Fees
Received

05/06

06/07

05/06

06/07

7770

8401

7770

8401

Personal

Other

Total

05/06

06/07

05/06

06/07

05/06

06/07

Public interest

Financial Hardship Pensioner/Child

Financial Hardship Non profit


organisation

Totals

Significant correction of personal records

135

Days To Process Completed Applications


Days

Personal

Other

Total

05/06

06/07

05/06

06/07

05/06

06/07

0-21 days

73

49

73

49

22-35 days

Over 35 days

Total

79

58

79

58

Hours To Complete Applications


Hours

Personal

Other

Total

05/06

06/07

05/06

06/07

05/06

06/07

0-10 hours

39

40

39

40

11-20 hours

34

34

21-40 hours

Over 40 hours

Totals

79

58

79

58

05/06

06/07

Number of internal reviews finalised

Number of Ombudsman reviews finalised

Number of District Court appeals finalised

Reviews And Appeals

Impact of FOI Requirements on the Organisation


The adherence to the requirements of the FOI Act and the increase in the number of applications
has resulted in the need to divert staffing resources to process this increase as is evidenced in the
abovementioned statistics.
No changes to Councils existing policies or procedures occurred as a result of the FOI Act.

136

Privacy & Personal Information Protection


Act

Annual Report 2006-2007

Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act


In accordance with the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998, Council adopted a
Privacy Management Plan on 6 February 2001.
There were no requests for Council to review its policies or practices relating to privacy and
personal information protection nor were there any requests to source or alter Personal Information
during 2006/2007.
The Council continues to disseminate information about the requirements of the PPIPA to all staff
including the new staff at induction sessons.

138

National Competition Policy

Annual Report 2006-2007

National Competition Policy


The Council has classified the following business activity as Category 1:

Child Care Centres

In addition the following business activities have been classified as Category 2:

Swimming Centres

Function Centres

Commercial Waste Collection

Rented Properties

Details of expenses, revenues and assets for both categories are set out on pages 17 to 20 of the
2006/2007 Annual Financial Reports contained herein.
The principles of competitive neutrality have been identified for the community in the management
planning process. As part of this process a complaints handling mechanism has been established
as a function of the Public Officer. To date there have been no complaints registered.
In regard to competitive neutrality pricing requirements, the Council has identified the level of
subsidisation associated with these business activities.
A comparison of performance is set out in the report on Principal Activities and Achievements
included herein.

140

Miscellaneous

Annual Report 2006-2007

Rates and Charges Written Off


Statutory & Voluntary Pensioner Rebates
Other Rates Written Off (including postponed rates)

$1,509,081.94
36,620.59

Rates & Charges Written Off 2006/2007

$1,545,702.53

Summary of Works on Private Land


Council did not undertake any private work on private land in 2006/2007 in terms of Section 67 of
the Local Government Act.

Grants and Contributions under Section 356


Council donated $72,400 to various charities and community groups under Section 356 of the
Local Government Act.

142

Audited Financial Reports

 
 













!
"#$

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


General Purpose Financial Reports
for the year ended 30th June 2007
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Statement by Councillors and Management [Section 413 (2)(c)]

Principal Financial Statements


Income Statement
Balance Sheet
Statement of Changes in Equity
Cash Flow Statement

2
3
4
5

Notes to, and forming part of, the Principal Financial Statements
Note 1 - Significant Accounting Policies
Note 2 - Functions
Note 3 - Revenues
Note 4 - Expenses
Note 5 - Gain or Loss on Disposal of Assets
Note 6 - Cash and Investments
Note 7 - Receivables
Note 8 - Inventories & Other Assets
Note 9 - Infrastructure, Property, Plant & Equipment
Note 10 - Liabilities
Note 11 - Reconciliation to Cash Flow Statement
Note 12 - Commitments for Expenditure
Note 13 - Statement of Performance Measurement
Note 14 - Investment Property
Note 15 - Financial Instruments
Note 16 - Significant Variations from original Budget
Note 17 - Statement of Developer Contributions
Note 18 - Contingencies & Assets & Liabilities not recognised
Note 19 - Investments accounted for using the equity method
Note 20 - Retained Earnings

6 - 14
15 - 16
17 - 19
20
21
22 - 23
24
25
26 - 27
28
29
30
31
32
33 - 34
35
36
37
38
39

Auditors Report on the Conduct of the Audit [s 417 (3)]

40a-c

Auditors Report on the Financial Statements [s 417 (2)]

41

SPECIAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL REPORTS


Statement by Councillors and Management

42

Special Purpose Financial Reports


- Income Statement of Business Activities
- Balance Sheet of Business Activities

43
44

Notes to the Special Purpose Financial Reports


Note 1 - Significant Accounting Policies

45 - 47

Independent Auditors' Report

48

SPECIAL SCHEDULES
Special Schedule 1:
Special Schedule 2:
Special Schedule 7:
Special Schedule 8:

Net Cost of Services


Statement of Long Term Debt (All Purpose)
Condition of Public Works
Financial Projections

49 - 50
51
52 - 54
55

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


INCOME STATEMENT
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Budget
2007
$'000

36,286
9,002
1,954
1,334
5,697
1,124
150

Notes
INCOME
Revenue:
Rates & Annual Charges
User Charges & Fees
Investment Revenues
Other Operating Revenues
Grants & Contributions - Operating
Grants & Contributions - Capital
Other Income:
Profit from Disposal of Assets

55,547

Revenues from Continuing Operations

26,445
241
9,997
9,296
10,037

EXPENSES FROM ORDINARY ACTIVITIES


Employee Costs
Borrowing Costs
Materials & Contracts
Depreciation & Amortisation
Other Operating Expenses

56,016
(469)

Expenses from Continuing Operations


OPERATING RESULT FROM CONTINUING
OPERATIONS

Actual
2007
$'000

Actual
2006
$'000

3 (a)
3 (b)
3 (c)
3 (d)
3 (e & f)
3 (e & f)

36,775
7,752
2,645
1,650
8,050
5,271

34,585
7,665
2,220
2,512
7,728
3,003

1,173

579

63,316

58,292

25,375
233
17,121
8,474
6,051

25,555
358
15,639
8,632
5,748

57,254

55,932

6,062

2,360

2,360

4 (a)
4 (b)
4 (c)
4 (d)
4(e)

(469)

NET OPERATING RESULT FOR YEAR

6,062

(1,593)

Net Operating Result Before Grants &


Contributions - Capital

791

(643)

This Statement is to be read in conjunction with the attached Notes.

Page 2

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


BALANCE SHEET
as at 30 June 2007

Notes

CURRENT ASSETS
Cash and cash equivalents
Investments
Receivables
Inventories - realisable < 12 months
Other
TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS
NON-CURRENT ASSETS
Receivables
Inventories
Property, Plant & Equipment
Investment Property
TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS
TOTAL ASSETS
CURRENT LIABILITIES
Payables - expected to be paid < 12 months
Payables - expected to be paid > 12 months
Borrowings
Provisions - payable < 12 months
Provisions - payable > 12 months
TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES
NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES
Borrowings
Provisions
TOTAL NON CURRENT LIABILITIES
TOTAL LIABILITIES

NET ASSETS

Actual
2006
$'000

6
6
7
8
8

1,304
38,188
2,817
354
7
42,670

747
34,679
3,347
308
44
39,125

498
1,929
661,835
3,695
667,957
710,627

362
1,929
660,417
3,695
666,403
705,528

2,855
10,482
1,035
2,080
5,153
21,605

2,841
9,840
1,960
1,884
4,884
21,409

1,475
256
1,731
23,336

2,510
380
2,890
24,299

687,291

681,229

687,291
687,291
687,291

681,229
681,229
681,229

8
9
14

10
10
10
10
10

10
10

EQUITY
Accumulated Surplus
Council Equity Interest

TOTAL EQUITY

Actual
2007
$'000

This Statement is to be read in conjunction with the attached Notes

Page 3

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY
for the year ended 30th June 2007

Accum
Surplus

2007
$'000
Council
Equity
Interest

Total

Accum
Surplus

2006
$'000
Council
Equity
Interest

Total

Note

Balance at beginning of the


reporting period
Change in Net Assets
recognised in the Balance
Sheet
Balance at end of the
reporting period

681,229

681,229

681,229

678,869

678,869

678,869

6,062

6,062

6,062

2,360

2,360

2,360

687,291

687,291

687,291

681,229

681,229

681,229

This Statement is to be read in conjunction with the attached Notes

Page 4

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


CASH FLOW STATEMENT
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Budget
2007
$'000

Notes

36,286
9,002
1,954
6,821
1,335
(26,042)
(9,997)
(242)
(10,037)
9,080

720
(6,464)
(981)
(6,725)

CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES


Receipts
Rates & Annual Charges
User Charges & Fees
Interest Received
Grants & Contributions
Other operating receipts
Payments
Employee Costs
Materials & Contracts
Interest Paid
Other operating payments
Net Cash provided by (or used in) Operating
Activities
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES
Receipts
Proceeds from sale of Infrastructure, Property,
Plant & Equipment
Proceeds from sale of Real Estate for resale
Payments
Purchase of Infrastructure, Property, Plant &
Equipment
Purchase of Real Estate for resale
Net purchase of Investment Securities
Net Cash provided by (or used in) Investing
Activities

11

5, 8

Actual
2006
$'000

Actual
2007
$'000

36,552
7,189
2,616
11,021
4,264

34,344
8,194
2,223
9,952
4,507

(25,032)
(17,698)
(179)
(7,356)

(25,023)
(16,842)
(44)
(6,551)

11,377

10,760

722

738

1,039

518

(7,091)

(7,044)

(21)
(3,509)

(1)
(2,896)

(8,860)

(8,685)

CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES


-

Receipts
Proceeds from Borrowings & Advances

399

Payments
Repayments of Borrowings & Advances
Net Cash provided by (or used in) Financing
Activities
Net Increase (Decrease) in cash held

747

Cash Assets at beginning of reporting period


Cash Assets at end of reporting period

(1,956)
(1,956)

1,146

(1,960)
(1,960)

(1,835)
(1,835)

557

240

11

747

507

11

1,304

747

This Statement is to be read in conjunction with the attached Notes

Page 5

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30 June 2007

Note 1

SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The Local Government Reporting Entity


1.1

For the period 1 July 2006 to 30 June 2007, Holroyd City Council had its principal business office
at 16 Memorial Avenue Merrylands, NSW 2160. Holroyd City Council is empowered by the New
South Wales Local Government Act (LGA) 1993 and its Charter is specified in Section 8 of the
Act.

1.2

The General Fund


In accordance with the provisions of S409 (1) of the Local Government Act 1993, all money and
property received by Council is held in Councils General Fund unless it is required to be held in
Councils Trust Fund.

1.3

The Trust Fund


The Council is required under the Local Government Act (Section 411) to maintain a separate and
distinct Trust Fund to account for all moneys and property received by the Council in trust which
must be applied only for the purposes of or in accordance with the trusts relating to those moneys.
Trusts monies and property subject to Councils control have been included in these reports. Trust
monies and property held by Council but not subject to Councils control have been excluded from
these reports. A separate statement of moneys held in the Trust Fund is available for inspection at
the Councils office by any person free of cost.

The principal accounting policies adopted in the preparation of the financial report are set out below.
These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented, unless otherwise stated.
(a)

Basis of Accounting

Compliance
This general purpose financial report has been prepared in accordance with Australian equivalents to
International Financial Reporting Standards (AIFRS), other authoritative pronouncements of the Australian
Accounting Standards Board, Urgent Issues Group Interpretations, the Local Government Act (1993) and
Regulations and the Local Government Code of Accounting Practice and Financial Reporting.
AAS27
Holroyd City Council is required to comply with AAS 27 Financial Reporting by Local Government
and where AAS27 conflicts with AIFRS the requirements of AAS 27 have been applied. Where
AAS 27 conflicts with AIFRS, the requirements of AAS 27 have been applied. Where AAS 27
makes reference to another Australian accounting standard, the new Australian IFRS equivalent
standard will apply. The specific not for profit reporting requirements also apply.

Page 6

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


for the year ended 30 June 2007

Note 1 - Significant Accounting Policies (cont)


Historical Cost Convention
These financial statements have been prepared under the historical cost convention, as modified by the
revaluation of available-for-sale financial assets, financial assets, financial assets and liabilities at fair
value through profit or loss, certain classes of property, plant and equipment and investment property.
Critical Accounting Estimates
The preparation of financial statements in conformity with AIFRS requires the use of certain critical
accounting estimates. It also requires management to exercise its judgement in applying Councils
accounting policies.
(b)

Revenue Recognition

Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable. Revenue is measured
on major income categories as follows:
Rates, annual charges, grants and contributions
Rates, annual charges, grants and contributions (including developer contributions) are recognised as
revenues when the Council obtains control over the assets comprising these receipts. Developer
contributions may only be expended for the purposes for which the contributions were required but the
Council may apply contributions according to the priorities established in work schedules.
Control over assets acquired from rates and annual charges is obtained at the commencement of the
rating year as it is an enforceable debt linked to the rateable property or, where earlier, upon receipt of the
rates.
A provision for doubtful debts on rates has not been established as unpaid rates represent a charge
against the rateable property that will be recovered when the property is next sold.
Control over granted assets is normally obtained upon their receipt (or acquittal) or upon earlier
notification that a grant has been secured, and is valued at their fair value at the date of transfer.
Income is recognised when the Council obtains control of the contribution or the right to receive the
contribution, it is probable that the economic benefits comprising the contribution will flow to the Council
and the amount of the contribution can be measured reliably.
Where grants or contributions recognised as revenues during the financial year were obtained on
condition that they be expended in a particular manner or used over a particular period, and those
conditions were undischarged at balance date, the unused grant or contribution is disclosed in Note 3(g).
The note also discloses the amount of unused grant or contribution from prior years that was expended on
Councils operations during the current year.
A liability is recognised in respect of revenue that is reciprocal in nature to the extent that the requisite
service has not been provided at balance date.
User charges and fees
User charges and fees are recognised as revenue when the service has been provided or when the
payment is received, whichever first occurs.
Sale of plant, property, infrastructure and equipment
The profit or loss on sale of an asset is determined when control of the asset has irrevocably passed to
the buyer.

Page 7

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


for the year ended 30 June 2007

Note 1 - Significant Accounting Policies (cont)


Interests and rents
Interest and rents are recognised as revenue on a proportional basis when the payment is due, the value
of the payment is notified, or the payment is received, whichever first occurs.
(c)

Principles of Consolidation

(i)
The Consolidated Fund
In accordance with the provisions of Section 409(1) of the LGA 1993, all money and property received by
Council is held in the Councils Consolidated Fund unless it is required to be held in the Councils Trust
Fund. The consolidated fund and Councils Section 355 Committees through which the Council controls
resources to carry on its functions have been included in the financial statements forming part of this
report.
(ii)
The Trust Fund
In accordance with the provisions of Section 411 of the Local Government Act 1993 (as amended), a
separate and distinct Trust Fund is maintained to account for all money and property received by the
Council in trust which must be applied only for the purposes of or in accordance with the trusts relating to
those monies. Trust monies and property subject to Councils control have been included in these reports.
(iii)
Joint Venture Entities
Council is a member of an insurance group named Metro Pool which provides public liability and
professional indemnity coverage for a number of councils.
Joint ventures and associated entities in relation to which Council does not exert influence as defined in
the standards are disclosed in Note 19.
(d)

Leases

Leases of property, plant and equipment where the Council has substantially all the risks and rewards of
ownership are classified as finance leases. Council does not have any finance leases as at 30 June, 2007.
Leases in which a significant portion of the risks and rewards of ownership are retained by the lessor are
classified as operating leases. Payments made under operating leases (net of any incentives received
from the lessor) are charged to the income statement on a straight-line basis over the period of the lease.
Lease income from operating leases is recognised in income on a straight-line basis over the lease term.
(e)

Acquisition of Assets

The purchase method of accounting is used to account for all acquisitions of assets. Cost is measured at
the date of acquisition at fair value.
Where settlement of any part of cash consideration is deferred, the amounts payable in the future are
discounted to their present value as at the date of exchange. The discount rate used is the Councils
incremental borrowing rate, being the rate at which a similar borrowing could be obtained from an
independent financier under comparable terms and conditions.

Page 8

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


for the year ended 30 June 2007

Note 1 - Significant Accounting Policies (cont)


(f)

Impairment of Assets

Assets that have an indefinite useful life are not subject to amortisation and are tested annually for
impairment. Assets that are subject to amortisation are reviewed for impairment whenever events or
changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be recoverable. An impairment loss
is recognised for the amount by which the assets carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount. The
recoverable amount is the higher of an assets fair value less costs to sell and value in use.
For non-cash generating assets of the Council such as roads, drains, public buildings and the like, value
in use is represented by the replacement cost.

(g)

Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents includes cash on hand, deposits held at call with financial institutions, other
short-term, highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less that are readily
convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value,
and bank overdrafts. Bank overdrafts are shown within borrowings in Current Liabilities on the Balance
Sheet.
(h)

Receivables

Receivables are recognised initially at cost, less provision for doubtful debts.
Collection of receivables is reviewed on an ongoing basis. Debts which are known to be uncollectible are
written off. A provision for doubtful debts is established when there is objective evidence that the Council
will not be able to collect all amounts due according to the original terms of receivables.
(i)

Inventories

(i)
Raw materials and stores
Raw materials and stores are stated at the lower of cost and net realisable value.
(ii)
Land held for resale/capitalisation of borrowing costs
Land held for resale is stated at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Cost is assigned by specific
identification and includes the cost of acquisition, and development and borrowing costs during
development. When development is completed borrowing costs and other holding charges are capitalised
as incurred.
(j)

Non-current Assets Held for Sale

Non-current assets that are classified as held for sale are stated at the lower of their cost and realisable
value.
Non-current assets are not depreciated or amortised while they are classified as held for sale.
(k)

Investments and Other Financial Assets

Classification
Council classifies its investments in the following categories: financial assets at fair value through profit or
loss, loans and receivables, held to maturity investments and available for sale financial assets. The
classification depends on the purpose for which the investments were acquired. Management determines
the classification of its investments at initial recognition and, in the case of assets held-to-maturity, reevaluates this designation at each reporting date.

Page 9

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


for the year ended 30 June 2007

Note 1 - Significant Accounting Policies (cont)


(i)
Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss
Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss are financial assets held for trading. A financial asset is
classified in this category if acquired principally for the purpose of selling in the short term. Derivatives are
classified as held for trading unless they are designated as hedges. Assets in this category are classified a
th
current assets. Council holds a number of investments at fair value through profit and loss as at 30 June
2007.
(ii)
Loans and receivables
Loans and receivables are non-derivative assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted
in an active market. They are included in current assets, except for those with maturities greater than 12
months after the balance sheet date which are classified as non-current assets. Loans and receivables
are included in trade and other receivables in the balance sheet.
(iii)

Held-to-maturity investments

Held-to-maturity investments are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments and
fixed maturities that the Councils management has the positive intention and ability to hold to maturity. If
council were to sell other than an insignificant amount of held to maturity financial assets, the whole
category would be tainted and reclassified as available for sale. Held to maturity financial assets are
included in non-current assets, except those with maturities less than 12 months from the reporting date,
th
which are classified as current assets. Council hold a number of term deposits as at 30 June 2007.
(iv)
Available- for- sale financial assets
Available for sale financial assets, comprising principally marketable equity securities, are non derivatives
that are either designated in this category or not classified in any other categories. They are included in
non-current assets unless management intend to dispose of the investment within 12 months of the
th
balance sheet date. Council does not hold any available for sale financial assets as at 30 June 2007.
Recognition and De-recognition
Regular purchases and sales of investments are recognised on trade-date the date on which the
Council commits to purchase or sell the asset. Investments are initially recognised at fair value plus
transaction costs for all financial assets not carried at fair value through profit or loss. Financial assets
carried at fair value through profit and loss are initially recognised at fair value and transaction costs are
expensed in the income statement. Financial assets are derecognised when the rights to receive cash
flows from the financial assets have expired or have been transferred and the Council has transferred
substantially all risks and rewards of ownership.
Subsequent Measurement
Loans and receivables and held to maturity investments are carried at amortised cost using the effective
interest rate.
Available for sale financial assets and financial assets at fair value through profit and loss are
subsequently carried at fair value. Gains or losses arising from changes in the fair value of the financial
assets at fair value through profit and loss category are presented in the income statement within other
income or other expenses in the period in which they are arise. Dividend income from financial assets at
fair value through profit and loss is recognised in the income statement as apart of revenue from
continuing operations when Councils right to receive payments is established. Changes in the fair value of
other monetary and non-monetary securities classified as available for sale are recognised in equity.
Fair Value
The fair values of quoted investments are based on current bid prices. If the market for a financial asset is
not active (and for unlisted securities), Council establishes fair value by using valuation techniques. These
include the use of recent arms length transactions, reference to other investments that are substantially
the same, discounted cash flow analysis and option pricing models making maximum use of market
inputs and relying as little as possible on equity-specific inputs.

Page 10

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


for the year ended 30 June 2007

Note 1 - Significant Accounting Policies (cont)


Impairment
Council assesses at each balance date whether there is objective evidence that a financial asset or group
of financial assets is impaired.
Policy
Council has an approved investment policy complying with Section 625 of the Local Government Act and
S212 of the LG (General) Regulations 2005. Investments are placed and managed in accordance with
that policy and having particular regard to authorised investments prescribed under the Local Government
Investment Order. Council maintains an investment policy that complies with the Act and ensures that it or
its representatives exercise care, diligence and skill that a prudent person would exercise in investing
council funds.
(l)

Fair Value Estimation

The fair value of financial assets and financial liabilities must be estimated for recognition and
measurement or for disclosure purposes.
The fair value of financial instruments traded in active markets is based on quoted market prices at the
balance sheet date.
The fair value of financial instruments that re not traded in an active market is determined using valuation
techniques. Council uses a variety of methods and makes assumptions that are based on market
conditions existing at each balance date. Quoted market prices or dealer quotes for similar instruments
are used for long term instruments held. Other techniques, such as estimated cash flows are used to
determine fair value for the remaining financial instruments.
The nominal value less estimated credit adjustments of trade receivables and payables are assumed to
approximate their face values. The fair value of financial liabilities for disclosure purposes is estimated by
discounting the future contractual cash flows at the current market interest rate that is available to the
Council for similar financial instruments.

(m)

Infrastructure, Property, Plant and Equipment

All infrastructure, property, plant and equipment [except for investment properties refer Note 1(n)] is
stated at cost (or deemed cost). Cost includes expenditure that is directly attributable to the acquisition of
the items.
Councils assets will be progressively re-valued to fair value in accordance with a staged implementation
advised by the Department of Local Government.
Property, plant and equipment, land buildings and other

2007/2008

Roads, bridges, footpaths and drainage

2008/2009

Increases in the carrying amounts arising on revaluation are credited to the asset revaluation reserve. To
the extent that the increase reverses a decrease previously recognising profit or loss, the increase is first
recognised in profit or loss. Decreases that reverse previous increases of the same asset are first charged
against revaluation reserves directly in equity to the extent of the remaining reserve attributable to the
asset; all other decreases are charged to the income statement.
Subsequent costs are included in the assets carrying amount or recognised as a separate asset, as
appropriate, only when it is probable that future economic benefits associated with the item will flow to
Council and the cost of the item can be measured reliably. All repairs and maintenance are charged to the
income statement during the financial period in which they are incurred.

Page 11

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


for the year ended 30 June 2007

Note 1 - Significant Accounting Policies (cont)


Land is not depreciated. Depreciation on other assets is calculated using the straight line method to
allocate their cost, over their estimated useful lives, as follows:
Buildings
Plant & Road-making Equipment
Office Equipment, Furniture & Fittings
Other Plant & Equipment
Roads, Footpaths
Concrete Bridges
Stormwater Drainage

50 to 100 years
4 to 8 years
20 to 100 Years
5 to 15 years
50 to 100 years
50 to 100 years
50 to 100 years

The assets residual values and useful lives are reviewed, and adjusted if appropriate, at each balance
sheet date.
Gains and losses on disposals are determined by comparing proceeds with carrying amount. These are
included in the income statement.
(n)

Investment Property

Investment property, principally comprising rented commercial buildings, is held for long-term rental yields
and is not occupied by the Council. Investment property is carried at fair value, representing open-market
value determined annually by external valuers. Changes in fair values are recorded in the income
statement as part of other income.
(o)

Payables

These amounts represent liabilities for goods and services provided to the Council prior to the end of
financial year which are unpaid. The amounts are unsecured and are usually paid within 30 days of
recognition.
(p)

Borrowings

Borrowings are initially recognised at fair value, net of transaction costs incurred. Borrowings are
subsequently measured at amortised cost. Any difference between the proceeds (net of transaction costs)
and the redemption amount is recognised in the income statement over the period of the borrowings using
the effective interest method.
Borrowings are classified as current unless the Council has an unconditional right to defer settlement of
the liability for at least 12 months after balance sheet date.
(q)

Borrowings Costs

Borrowing costs incurred for the construction of any qualifying asset are capitalised during the period of
time that is required to complete and prepare the asset for its intended use or sale. Other borrowing costs
are expensed.
The capitalisation rate used to determine the amount of borrowing costs to be capitalised is the weighted
average interest rate applicable to the Councils outstanding borrowings during the year.

Page 12

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


for the year ended 30 June 2007

Note 1 - Significant Accounting Policies (cont)


(r)
Provisions
Provisions are recognised when: the Council has a present legal or constructive obligation as a result of
past events; it is more likely than not that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation;
and the amount has been reliably estimated. Provisions are not recognised for future operating losses.
Where there are a number of similar obligations, the likelihood that an outflow will be required in
settlement is determined by considering the class of obligations as a whole. A provision is recognised
even if the likelihood of an outflow with respect to any one item included in the same class of obligations
may be small.
(s)
(i)

Employee Benefits
Wages and salaries, annual leave and sick leave

(ii)
Liabilities for wages and salaries, including non-monetary benefits, annual leave and accumulating
sick leave expected to be settled within 12 months of the reporting date are recognised in the provision for
employee benefits in respect of employees services up to the reporting date and are measured at the
amounts expected to be paid when the liabilities are settled. Liabilities for non-accumulating sick leave are
recognised when the leave is taken and measured at the rates paid or payable.
(iii)
Long service leave
Council also uses the nominal method in calculating the liability and expense for long service leave
entitlements in accordance with existing State Government policy and the relevant provisions in the NSW
Treasurers directions. This is because the difference arising from the use of the nominal method,
compared to the use of a present value calculation, does not result in a material error in the financial
statements.
Current Employee Leave Entitlements have also been calculated using rates of pay expected to be paid in
2007/2008 as per AASB 1028.
(t)

Rounding of Amounts

Unless otherwise indicated, amounts in the financial report have been rounded off to the nearest thousand
dollars.
(u)

Land Under Roads

Council has elected not to recognise land under roads in accordance with the deferral arrangements
available under AASB 1045.
(v)

Provisions for close down and restoration and for environmental clean up costs tips and
quarries

Council is not required to carry out remediation works at 30 June, 2007.


(w)

Allocation between current and non-current

In the determination of whether an asset or liability is current or non-current, consideration is given to the
time when each asset or liability is expected to be settled. The asset or liability is classified as current if it
is expected to be settled within the next 12 months, being the Councils operational cycle. In the case of
liabilities where Council does not have the unconditional right to defer settlement beyond 12 months, such
as vested long service leave, the liability is classified as current even if not expected to be settled within
the next 12 months. Inventories held for trading are classified as current even if not expected to be
realised in the next 12 months.

Page 13

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


for the year ended 30 June 2007

Note 1 - Significant Accounting Policies (cont)


(x)

New accounting standards and UIG interpretations

Certain new accounting standards and UIG interpretations have been published that are not mandatory for
30 June 2007 reporting periods. Councils assessment of the impact of these new standards and
interpretations is set out below.
(i)

AASB 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures and AASB 2005-10 Amendments to Australian


Accounting Standards [AASB 132, AASB 101, AASB 114, AASB117, AASB133, AASB139,
AASB 1, AASB 4, AASB 1023 & AASB 1038]

AASB 7 and AASB 2005-10 are applicable to annual reporting periods beginning on or after 1 January
2007. The Council has not adopted the standards early. Application of the standards will not affect any of
the amounts recognised in the financial statements, but will impact the type of information disclosed in the
financial instruments.
(y)

Self insurance

Council does not self insure however it is a member of Metro Pool, an insurance group which provides
public liability and professional indemnity coverage for a number of local government areas.
(z)

Land

Land is classified as either operational or community in accordance with Part 2 of Chapter 6 of the Local
Government Act (1993). This is disclosed in Note 9(a).
(aa)

Superannuation

The Superannuation expense for the reporting period is the amount of the statutory contribution the
Council makes to the superannuation plan, which provides benefits to its employees.
The following disclosures are made pursuant to AASB 1028, paragraph 6.10:
As at the balance date, a number of council staff had been making contributions to a defined benefit
scheme referred to as the Local Government Superannuation Scheme. That scheme was one of five
superannuation schemes provided by State Super, which were incorporated without change into the Local
Government Superannuation Scheme from 1 July 1997. It is referred to in the Trust Deed as Division D.
The Local Government Superannuation Scheme Pool B (the Scheme) is a defined benefit plan that has
been deemed to be a multi-employer fund for purposes of AASB 119. Sufficient information is not
available to account for the Scheme as a defined benefit plan because the assets to the Scheme are
pooled together for all Councils. The amount of employer contributions recognised as an expense for the
year ending 30 June 2007 was $316,713. The last valuation of the Scheme was performed by Mr Martin
Stevenson BSc, FIA, FIAAA on 18 March 2004 and covers the period to 30 June 2003. This valuation
found that the Schemes assets were $2,453.7million and its past service liabilities $2,251.7million, giving
it a surplus of $202.0million. The existence of this surplus has resulted in Councils contributing in
2006/2007 at half the normal level of contributions. The financial position is monitored annually.
Accumulation Fund Members
The accumulation fund receives both employer and employee contributions on a progressive basis. Employer
contributions are normally based on a fixed percentage of employee earnings in accordance with Superannuation
Guarantee Legislation (9% in 2006/07). No further liability accrues to the employer as the superannuation benefits
accruing to employees are represented by their share of the net assets of the Fund.

Page 14

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 2 - FUNCTIONS
REVENUES, EXPENSES AND ASSETS HAVE BEEN DIRECTLY ATTRIBUTED TO THE FOLLOWING FUNCTIONS & ACTIVITIES

REVENUES
ORIGINAL
BUDGET
2007
$'000

ADMINISTRATION
PUBLIC ORDER & SAFETY
HEALTH
COMMUNITY SERVICES &
EDUCATION
HOUSING & COMMUNITY
AMENITIES
RECREATION & CULTURE
MINING, MANUFACTURING
& CONSTRUCTION
TRANSPORT &
COMMUNICATION
ECONOMIC AFFAIRS

TOTALS - FUNCTIONS
GENERAL PURPOSE
REVENUES
Page 15

TOTALS

ACTUAL
2007
$'000

EXPENSES
ACTUAL
2006
$'000

ORIGINAL
BUDGET
2007
$'000

ACTUAL
2007
$'000

OPERATING RESULT
ACTUAL
2006
$'000

ORIGINAL
BUDGET
2007
$'000

ACTUAL
2007
$'000

ACTUAL
2006
$'000

TOTAL
ASSETS HELD

GRANTS
INCLUDED
IN REVENUES

(CURRENT &
NON-CURRENT)
2007
2006
$'000
$'000

2006
$'000

2007
$'000

1,748
670
27

379
710
321

848
829
213

11,117
1,838
29

11,696
1,741
870

11,703
1,800
742

(9,369)
(1,168)
(2)

(11,317)
(1,032)
(549)

(10,855)
(971)
(528)

110

54
1
78

42,861
1,559
1,023

42,081
1,302
731

6,885

6,461

6,304

8,615

8,077

8,276

(1,729)

(1,616)

(1,972)

2,016

2,083

20,909

20,321

8,628
1,835

10,025
3,211

8,820
3,303

12,952
9,526

13,391
11,766

12,696
11,338

(4,324)
(7,691)

(3,366)
(8,555)

(3,877)
(8,035)

261
585

346
544

84,564
364,842

88,635
364,198

350

418

416

656

795

857

(306)

(376)

(441)

35

33

1,440
-

5,034
1,052

3,300
875

9,373
-

8,509
409

8,098
422

(7,933)
-

(3,475)
643

(4,798)
453

1,532
-

1,135
-

191,139
3,695

184,531
3,695

21,583

27,611

24,908

54,106

57,254

55,932

(32,522)

(29,643) (31,024)

4,504

4,241

710,627

705,527

32,473
54,056

35,705

33,384

63,316

58,292

54,106

57,254

55,932

710,627

705,527

32,473

(49)

35,705

33,384

3,568

3,514

6,062

2,360

8,072

7,755

The above functions conform to those used by the Australian Bureau of Statistics and provide a basis for comparison with other Councils.

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30 June 2007
Note 2 (cont) - COMPONENTS OF FUNCTIONS

The activities relating to Council functions are as follows:


Governance
Costs relating to Councils role as a component of democratic government, including elections,
meetings and associated activities, area representation, and public disclosure and compliance,
together with related administration costs.
Administration
Costs not otherwise attributed to functions.
Public Order & Safety
Fire protection, animal control, enforcement of local government regulations, emergency services,
other.
Health
Administration and inspection, immunisations, food control, insect & vermin control, noxious plants,
health centres, other.
Community Services & Education
Administration, family day care, child-care, youth services, other services to families and children,
aged and disabled, migrant services, Aboriginal services, other community services, education.
Housing & Community Amenities
Housing, town planning, domestic waste management services, other waste management services,
street cleaning, other sanitation and garbage, urban stormwater drainage, environmental protection,
public conveniences, other community amenities.
Recreation & Culture
Public libraries, community centres, public halls, other cultural services, swimming pools, sporting
grounds, parks and gardens, other sport and recreation.
Mining, Manufacturing & Construction
Building control, other.
Transport & Communication
Roads and streets, bridges, footpaths, aerodromes, parking areas, bus shelters and services, street
lighting, other.
Economic Affairs
Tourism and area promotion, real estate development, private works, other business undertakings.

Page 16

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 3 - REVENUES
(a) RATES & ANNUAL CHARGES

2007
$'000

2006
$'000

Ordinary Rates
Residential
Business

19,056
8,281

17,669
8,004

27,337

25,673

Special Rates
Civic Centre Refurbishment

2,059

1,929

2,059

1,929

Annual Charges
Domestic Waste Management

Total Rates & Annual Charges


BASE DATE

7,379

6,983

7,379
36,775
01-Jul-04

6,983
34,585
01-Jul-04

(b) USER CHARGES & FEES


User Charges
Other Waste Management

59

56

59

56

126
71
109
4,192
1,047
1,474
395
279

117
73
107
3,919
1,072
1,651
391
279

7,693
7,752

7,609
7,665

Fees
Administration
Public Order & Safety
Health
Community Services & Education
Housing & Community
Recreation & Culture
Manufacturing & Construction
Transport & Communication

Total User Charges & Fees


(c ) INVESTMENT REVENUES
Interest on overdue rates & charges
Interest on cash and investments
externally restricted
internally restricted
unrestricted
Total Interest Received

102

87

781
773
989
2,645

592
710
831
2,220

(d) OTHER OPERATING REVENUES


Fair value adjustments - investment property
Miscellaneous Sales
Fines
Legal Fees Recovery (Rates)
Administration
Public Order & Safety
Health
Community Services & Education
Housing & Community Amenities
Recreation & Culture
Mining, Manufacturing & Construction
Economic Affairs
Total Other Operating Revenues

1
673
98
423
34
199
143
72
7
1,650

245
688
69
683
128
8
198
108
286
8
91
2,512

Page 17

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 3 - REVENUES (cont)
(e) GRANTS
General Purpose (Untied)
Financial Assistance
Pensioner Rates Subsidies (General)
Specific Purpose
Domestic Waste Management
Administration
Public Order & Safety
Health
Community Services & Education
Housing & Community Amenities
Recreation & Culture
Transport & Communication
Other
Total Grants & Subsidies

OPERATING
2007
2006
$'000
$'000

CAPITAL
2007
2006
$'000
$'000

2,785
587

2,716
598

196
40
2,016
231
222
740
1
6,818

200
53
1
47
2,064
346
215
397
1
6,638

70
30
363
791
1
1,255

32
19
328
737
1,116

995
5,823
6,818

1,118
5,520
6,638

741
514
1,255

387
729
1,116

(f) CONTRIBUTIONS & DONATIONS


Developer Contributions
Section 94
Open Space
Community Facilities
Studies/Administration
SEPP59 Contributions
Subdivider dedications
RTA Contributions
Administration
Public Order & Safety
Health
Community Services & Education
Housing & Community Amenities
Recreation & Culture
Mining, Manufacturing & Construction
Transport & Communication
Total Contributions & Donations

32
13
9
27
69
196
24
862
1,232

1
21
10
11
21
111
172
18
725
1,090

328
84
17
199
3,388
4,016

324
126
16
301
1,117
3
1,887

TOTAL GRANTS & CONTRIBUTIONS

8,050

7,728

5,271

3,003

Comprising:
- Commonwealth funding
- State funding

Page 18

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 3 - REVENUES (cont)
CONDITIONS OVER GRANTS & CONTRIBUTIONS
Grants and contributions which were obtained on the condition that they be expended for specified purposes or in a
future period, but which are not yet expended in accordance with those conditions, are as follows:

2007
$'000
Grants
Contrib
Unexpended at the close of the previous
reporting period
Less: expended during the current period from
revenues recognised in previous reporting
periods

Section 94/64 Developer Contributions


Health Services
Community Services & Education
Housing & Community Services
Recreation & Culture
Transport & Communication
Other

2006
$'000
Grants
Contrib

627

10,209

596

9,522

3
160
42
3
5
5

342
-

158
13
3
172
-

672
-

218

342

346

672

1
2
78
84
234
554
-

1,319
-

10
174
92
30
66
5

1,359
-

953

1,319

377

1,359

1,362

11,186

627

10,209

735

977

31

687

Plus: amounts recognised as revenues in this


reporting period but not yet expended in
accordance with the conditions
Roads & Infrastructure
Health Services
Community Services & Education
Housing & Community Services
Recreation & Culture
Transport & Communication
Other

Unexpended at the close of this reporting period


and held as restricted assets
Net increase (decrease) in restricted assets in
the current reporting period.

OPERATING LEASES providing revenue to the Council


Council owns various buildings, plant and other facilities that are available for hire or lease (on a noncancellable basis wherever practicable) in accordance with the published revenue policy. Rentals received
from such leases are disclosed as rent and hire of property above.
Investment Property
Rentals received, and outgoings reimbursed, in relation to Investment Property are also included above.
These lease agreements, all of which are classified as operating leases, are made on a non-cancellable
basis wherever practicable.
Lessees' commitments under all non-cancellable lease agreements, including those relating to Investment
Property, are as follows:

2007
$'000

Not later than one year


Later than one year and not later than 5 years
Later than 5 years

239
658
683
1,580

2006
$'000

379
738
842
1,959

Page 19

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 4 - EXPENSES
2006
$'000

2007
$'000

(a) EMPLOYEE COSTS


Salaries and Wages
Travelling
Employee Leave Entitlements
Superannuation - defined contribution plan contributions
Workers' Compensation Insurance
Fringe Benefits Tax
Training Costs (excluding Salaries)
Less: Capitalised and distributed costs
Total Operating Employee Costs

18,846
519
3,256
1,727
669
239
155
(36)
25,375

18,434
475
3,059
1,650
1,611
257
121
(52)
25,555

404

406

4
229
233

2
356
358

15,830

14,720

46

46

697
357

362
323

190
1
17,121

187
1
15,639

Total Number of Employees


(Full time equivalent at end of reporting period)

(b) BORROWING COSTS


Interest on Overdraft
Interest on Loans
Total Borrowing Costs
(c) MATERIALS & CONTRACTS
Raw Materials & consumables
Auditor's Remuneration
- Audit Services
Legal Expenses
- Planning & Development
- Other Legal Expenses
Operating Leases
- Minimum Lease payments
Other
Total Materials & Contracts

IMPAIRMENT
2007
2006
$'000
$'000
(d) DEPRECIATION, AMORTISATION & IMPAIRMENT
Plant and Equipment
Office Equipment
Furniture & Fittings
Land Improvements
Buildings
Other Structures
Infrastructure
- roads, bridges & footpaths
- stormwater drainage
Other assets
- library books
- other
Total Depreciation & Amortisation

DEPRECIATION
2007
2006
$'000
$'000

1,560
552
117
15
1,183
636

1,532
262
112
11
1,179
651

2,898
1,225

3,367
1,223

281
7
8,474

292
3
8,632

2007
$'000
(e) OTHER OPERATING EXPENSES
Bad and Doubtful Debts
Mayoral Allowance
Councillors' Fees & Allowances
Councillors' (incl Mayor) Expenses
Street Lighting
Light, Power & Heating
Donations & Contributions to Local & Regional Bodies
Fire Brigade Levy
Consumables
Valuation Fees
Gas Charges
Water Rates & Charges
Waste Disposal Tipping Fees
Other
Total Other Operating Expenses

5
31
169
118
1,011
355
222
870
154
92
161
246
2,583
34
6,051

2006
$'000
1
29
162
85
973
294
271
885
148
92
168
189
2,419
32
5,748
Page 20

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 5 - GAIN OR LOSS ON DISPOSAL OF ASSETS
2006
$'000

2007
$'000
DISPOSAL OF INFRASTRUCTURE, PLANT & EQUIPMENT
Proceeds from disposal
Less: Carrying amount of assets sold

722
588

738
677

Gain (Loss) on disposal

134

61

DISPOSAL OF REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT ASSETS


Proceeds from disposal
Less: Carrying amount of assets sold

1,039
-

518
-

Gain (Loss) on disposal

1,039

518

16,500
16,500

24,785
24,785

1,173

579

DISPOSAL OF INVESTMENT SECURITIES


Proceeds from disposal
Less: Carrying amount of assets sold
Less: Revaluation increments previously transferred to
Asset Revaluation Reserve
Gain (Loss) on disposal
TOTAL GAIN (LOSS) ON DISPOSAL

Page 21

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 6 - CASH AND INVESTMENTS
2007
$'000
Current Non-Current
CASH ASSETS
Cash on Hand and at Bank
Total cash & equivalents

2006
$'000
Current Non-Current
747
747

1,304
1,304

Cash equivalents comprise highly liquid investments with short periods to maturity subject to insignificant risk of
changes of value.

INVESTMENTS
Summary
Financial Assets at fair value through
Income Statement
Total

38,188
38,188

34,679
34,679

Financial Assets at fair value through Income Statement


34,679
At beginning of year
3,509
Additions
38,188
At end of year

31,783
2,896
34,679

34,679
34,679

Held for Trading:


- Managed Funds

38,188
38,188

The permitted forms of investment in financial instruments of the Council are defined
Minister of Local Government on 15 July 2005, and may broadly be described
Accordingly, credit risk is considered to be insignificant. Deposits are with banks while
organisations with credit ratings that comply with the Minister's Order and bear various
6.54% (2006 - 5.88%).

in an order made by the


as "Trustee Securities".
Managed Funds are with
rates of return averaging

Page 22

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 6 - CASH & INVESTMENTS (cont)

RESTRICTED CASH AND INVESTMENTS


Ref

2006
$'000
Current
Non-Current

2007
$'000
Current
Non-Current

Cash & equivalents


Investments

1,304
38,188

747
34,679

TOTAL CASH & INVESTMENTS

39,492

35,426

External Restrictions
Internal Restrictions
Unrestricted

18,233
8,736
12,523
39,492

15,724
8,955
10,747
35,426

DETAILS OF MOVEMENTS & UTILISATION OF


RESTRICTED CASH ASSETS & INVESTMENT SECURITIES

Notes

External Restrictions
Developer Contributions
Unexpended Grants
Domestic Waste Management
Civic Centre Refurbishment Rate
Other
Total External Restrictions

17

Movements

Opening
Balance 30
June 2006

Transfers To
Restriction

Transfers From
Restriction

Closing
Balance 30
June 2007

$'000

$'000

$'000

$'000

10,209
627
3,161
1,666
61
15,724

1,319
868
797
2,000
1
4,985

342
217
1,916
1
2,476

11,186
1,278
3,958
1,751
60
18,233

External Restrictions arise pursuant to section 409(3) of the Local Government Act, the Local Government
(Financial Management) Regulation 1999 and other applicable legislation. Further information relating to
Developer Contributions is provided in Note 17. Amounts raised by special rates for Domestic Waste Management
may only be used for those purposes.
Internal Restrictions
Employee Leave Entitlements
Construction of Buildings
Childrens Services - Fund Raising
Comm Services - Transport Provision
Contributions to FDC/ME Building
Drainage
Drainage & Parks Improvements
Election Reserve
Family Day Care Bank Account
Guildford Community Centre
Holroyd/Guildford Sports Grounds Fac
Information Technology
Insurance/Public Risk Contingency
Loan Funds Unexpended
Meals on Wheels
Sale 2-4 Nelson Street
Off-Street Parking Contributions
Open Space Contributions
Petfest
Street Car Parking Fines
Tennis Courts Funds
Wenty Childrens Centre - Third Room
Other
Total Internal Restrictions

885
247
290
26
256
28
157
109
148
202
244
2,324
849
941
60
85
1,335
105
7
348
91
150
68
8,955

103
291
55
43
134
155
177
203
90
262
48
172
70
1,803

2
133
4
116
36
3
2
1,275
14
246
47
2
51
41
50
2,022

883
114
389
26
431
28
157
164
112
242
376
1,204
1,012
695
263
85
1,378
105
5
559
139
281
88
8,736

Internal Restrictions arise pursuant to resolutions of Council to set aside reserves of cash resources either relating
to liabilities recognised in these reports or to fund future expenditure for the stated purpose. Such reserves are
not permitted to exceed the amounts of cash assets and cash investments not otherwise restricted.

Page 23

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 7 - RECEIVABLES
2007
$'000
Current Non-Current

2006
$'000
Current Non-Current

Rates & Annual Charges


Interest & Extra Charges
User Charges & Fees
Other levels of Government
Superannuation
Contributions
Fines & Costs
Restoration Charges
Lease/Rental of Properties
Community Services
Childrens Services
Other Councils
Sale of Vehicles & Plant
Australian Taxation Office (GST)
Environment Protection Authority
Other
Total

870
155
126
316
79
14
423
203
92
4
9
81
61
122
12
275
2,842

380
118
498

781
128
86
812
75
10
426
325
8
4
8
109
46
144
8
397
3,367

246
116
362

Less: Allowance for Doubtful Debts


Rates & Annual Charges
Interest & Extra Charges
User Charges & Fees
Other
Total Receivables

12
3
10
2,817

498

12
3
5
3,347

362

Rates and Annual Charges


Overdue rates and annual charges (being amounts not paid on or before the due date determined in
accordance with the Local Government Act) are secured over the relevant land and are subject to simple
interest at a rate of 9.00% (2006: 9.00%). Although Council is not materially exposed to any individual
ratepayer, credit risk exposure is concentrated within the Council boundaries in the State of New South
Wales.
Government Grants and Subsidies
Amounts due have been calculated in accordance with the terms and conditions of the respective
programs following advice of grant approval, and do not bear interest. All amounts are due by
Departments and Agencies of the Government of New South Wales and the Government of Australia.
Other Receivables
Amounts due (other than User Charges which are secured over the relevant land) are unsecured and do
not bear interest. Although Council is not materially exposed to any individual debtor, credit risk
exposure is concentrated within the Council's boundaries in the State of New South Wales.

RESTRICTED RECEIVABLES
Domestic Waste Management
Other
Total Restrictions
Unrestricted Receivables
Total Receivables

246
33
279

90
90

196
23
219

97
97

2,538
2,817

408
498

3,128
3,347

265
362

Page 24

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 8 - INVENTORIES & OTHER ASSETS
2007
$'000
Current Non-Current

2006
$'000
Current Non-Current

INVENTORIES
Stores & Materials
Real Estate Developments

258
96

1,929

233
75

1,929

Total Inventories

354

1,929

308

1,929

OTHER ASSETS
Prepayments

44

Total Other Assets

44

(Valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value)


Residential
Industrial & Commercial

96
-

1,249
680

75
-

1,249
680

Total Real Estate for Resale

96

1,929

75

1,929

Represented by:
Other Holding Costs
Other Properties - Book Value

96
-

1,929

75
-

1,929

Total Real Estate for Resale

96

1,929

75

1,929

Real Estate Developments

Page 25

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 9 - PROPERTY, PLANT & EQUIPMENT

AT
COST
Plant & Equipment
Office Equipment
Furniture & Fittings
Land
- Council owned (freehold)
- Council controlled
- non deprec land improv'ts
- land under roads
Land Improvements - depreciable
Buildings
Other Structures
Infrastructure
- Roads, bridges, footpaths
- Bulk earthworks (non-deprec.)
- Stormwater drainage
Other Assets
- Library Books
- Other
Totals

2006
$'000
ACCUM
DEPN

CARRYING
AMOUNT

CARRYING AMOUNT MOVEMENTS


DURING YEAR
$'000
Asset
Asset
Depreciation
Purchases Disposals

16,039
2,719
2,428

(10,292)
(2,300)
(1,735)

5,747
419
693

2,919
1,985
107

39,404
322,585
4,863
550
56,657
25,560

(283)
(27,331)
(15,068)

39,404
322,585
4,863
267
29,326
10,492

319
4
236
524

237,193
122,500

(70,916)
(43,078)

166,277
79,422

4,572
107

(3,759)
(10)

835,177

(174,772)

(588)
-

AT
COST

2007
$'000
ACCUM
DEPN

CARRYING
AMOUNT

Page 26

(1,560)
(552)
(117)

17,590
4,704
2,535

(11,058)
(2,852)
(1,853)

6,532
1,852
682

(15)
(1,183)
(636)

39,404
322,585
5,182
554
56,868
26,083

(298)
(28,489)
(15,703)

39,404
322,585
5,182
256
28,379
10,380

3,013
1,015

(2,898)
(1,225)

239,503
123,515

(73,124)
(44,303)

166,379
79,212

813
97

257
113

(281)
(7)

4,829
220

(4,040)
(17)

789
203

660,405
Renewals
New Assets

10,492
4,102
6,390

(8,474)

843,572

(181,737)

661,835

(588)

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 9 (cont) - RESTRICTED PROPERTY, PLANT & EQUIPMENT

AT
COST

2007
$'000
ACCUM
DEPN

CARRYING
AMOUNT

AT
COST

2006
$'000
ACCUM
DEPN

CARRYING
AMOUNT

Domestic Waste Management


Plant & Equipment
Total Domestic Waste

4,612
4,612

2,944
2,944

1,668
1,668

4,522
4,522

3,308
3,308

1,214
1,214

TOTAL RESTRICTIONS

4,612

2,944

1,668

4,522

3,308

1,214

Page 27

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 10 - LIABILITIES
2007
$'000
Current Non-Current

2006
$'000
Current Non-Current

PAYABLES
Goods & Services
Payments received in advance
Accrued Expenses
Deposits, Retentions & Bonds < 12 Months
Deposits, Retentions & Bonds > 12 Months
Other

1,539
210
808
285
10,482
13

1,065
733
754
285
9,840
4

Total Creditors

13,337

12,681

INTEREST BEARING LIABILITIES


Borrowings

1,035

1,475

1,960

2,510

Total Borrowings

1,035

1,475

1,960

2,510

All interest bearing liabilities are secured over the future revenues of the Council.

PROVISIONS
Annual Leave
Sick Leave
Long Service Leave
Other

2,502
593
4,013
125

203
53

2,355
690
3,670
53

253
127

Total Provisions

7,233

256

6,768

380

6,715

253

AGGREGATE LIABILITY ARISING FROM EMPLOYEE BENEFITS


7,108
Movements in Provisions
Opening Balance
Add:
Additional amounts recognised
Unwinding of present value discounts
(Less): Payments
Add (Less): Remeasurement Adjustments
Add (Less): Transfer on Council Restructure
Closing Balance

Employee
Benefits
6,968
343
7,311

203
Insurance
Losses

Reinstatement, etc
-

2007
$'000
Current Non-Current
LIABILITIES relating to RESTRICTED ASSETS
Domestic Waste Management
Payables
Provisions
TOTAL

246
791
1,037

4
4

Other
-

180
(2)
178

2006
$'000
Current Non-Current
203
690
893

12
12

Page 28

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 11 - RECONCILIATION TO CASH FLOW STATEMENT
(a)

Reconciliation of Cash

Cash equivalents comprise highly liquid investments with short periods to maturity
subject to insignificant risk of changes of value. Cash at the end of the reporting period
as shown in the Statement of Cash Flows is reconciled to the related items in the
Statement of Financial Position as follows:
2007
2006
$'000
$'000
Total cash & equivalents
1,304
747
Balances per Statement of Cash Flows
1,304
747
(b) Reconciliation of Change in Net Assets to Cash
from Operating Activities
Change in Net Assets resulting from Operations
Add: Depreciation, Amortisation & Impairment
Increase in provision for doubtful debts
Increase in employee leave entitlements
Increase in other provisions
Decrease in receivables
Decrease in other current assets
Increase in creditors
Increase in accrued expenses payable
Increase in other payables
Less: Decrease in provision for doubtful debts
Decrease in other provisions
Increase in receivables
Increase in inventories
Decrease in creditors
Gain on Sale of Assets
Fair value adjustments as revenue items
Non-cash acquisitions of assets

Net Cash provided by (or used in) operations


(c)

2,360

8,474
5
343
389
37
54
651
16,015
2
25
49
1,173
3,389

8,632
532
98
1
276
524
314
213
12,950
2
191
56
579
245
1,117

11,377

10,760

3,388

1,117

3,388

1,117

Non-Cash Financing and Investing Activities

Acquisition of assets by means of:


- Developer Contributions received in kind

(d)

6,062

Financing Arrangements

Unrestricted access was available at balance date to the following lines of credit:
Bank Overdrafts
Total Facilities
Corporate Credit Cards

1,000
5

1,000
5

The bank overdraft facilities may be drawn at any time and may be terminated by the
bank without notice. Interest rates on overdrafts are variable while the rates for loans are
fixed for the period of the loan.

Page 29

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 12 - COMMITMENTS FOR EXPENDITURE
2007
$'000
(a)

2006
$'000

Other Expenditure Commitments

Other expenditure committed for (excluding inventories) at the reporting date but not recognised in
the financial statements as liabilities:
Audit Services
Corporate Information System
Waste Management Services
These expenditures are payable:
Not later than one year
Later than one year and not later than 5 years
Later than 5 years

230
1,384
12,077

35
854

13,691

889

1,656
6,314
5,721

889
-

13,691

889

2007
$'000
(b)

2006
$'000

Operating Lease Commitments (Non-Cancellable)

Commitments under non-cancellable operating leases at the reporting date but not recognised in
the financial statements are payable as follows:
Total Future Minimum Lease Payments
Not later than one year
Later than one year and not later than 5 years

(c)

199
304

131
151

503

282

Remuneration Commitments

Commitments for the payment of salaries and other remuneration under long-term employment contracts in
existence at reporting date but not recognised as liabilities, payable:

Not later than one year


Later than one year and not later than 5 years

859
2,353

791
1,573

3,212

2,364

Page 30

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 13 - STATEMENT OF PERFORMANCE MEASUREMENT
2007
Indicators

2006

2005

2004

4.9:1

4:1

3.68:1

3.06:1

Current Liabilities not relating to Restricted Assets

$24,158
$4,934

Debt Service Ratio


Net Debt Service Cost
Operating Revenue

$2,193
$53,367

4.11%

4.31%

5.08%

5.50%

Rate & Annual Charges


Coverage Ratio
Rates & Annual Charges Revenues
Total Revenues

$36,775
$63,316

58.08%

59.33%

59.50%

59.76%

Rates & Annual Charges


Outstanding Percentage
Rates & Annual Charges Outstanding
Rates & Annual Charges Collectible

$1,509
$38,233

3.95%

3.52%

2.95%

3.16%

$4,103
$8,474

0.48:1

New ratio introduced 2007 - no


comparatives available

Amounts
Unrestricted Current Ratio
Unrestricted Current Assets

Assets Renewals Ratio


Asset Renewals
Depreciation, Amortisation, Impairment

Detailed methods of calculation of these indicators are defined in the Code.

Page 31

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 14 - INVESTMENT PROPERTY
2007
$'000
At fair value
Opening balance at 1 July
Net gain (loss) from fair value adjustment
Closing balance at 30 June

Amounts recognised in profit and loss


Rental income
Net gain (loss) from fair value adjustment
Repairs, maintenance & other operating expenses
- property generating rental income

2006
$'000

3,695
3,695

3,450
245
3,695

80
80

97
245
342

6
86

342

Page 32

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007

Note 15 - FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS


Interest Rate Risk Exposures
2007
Financial Assets
Cash Assets
Investment Securities
Receivables
Rates & Annual Charges
User Charges & Fees
Deferred Debtors
Other levels of Govt.
Other

Floating
Interest
Rate
'000

Total
Weighted Average Interest Rate
Financial Liabilities
Payables
Goods & Services
Payments in advance
Deposits, Retentions, Bonds
Other
Interest Bearing Liabilities
Total
Weighted Average Interest Rate
NET FINANCIAL ASSETS
(LIABILITIES)
2006
Financial Assets
Cash Assets
Investment Securities
Receivables
Rates & Annual Charges
User Charges & Fees
Deferred Debtors
Other levels of Govt.
Retirement Home Contribs.
Other
Total
Weighted Average Interest Rate
Financial Liabilities
Payables
Goods & Services
Payments in advance
Deposits, Retentions, Bonds
Other
Interest Bearing Liabilities
Total
Weighted Average Interest Rate
NET FINANCIAL ASSETS
(LIABILITIES)

Fixed interest maturing in


< 1 year
'000

Total

38,188

1,010
-

498
-

126
316
1,366

1,508
126
316
1,366

39,198
5.88%

498
9.00%

3,112

42,808
5.49%

1,035

739

736

1,539
210
10,767
12
-

1,539
210
10,767
12
2,510

1,035
6.39%

739
6.25%

736
6.35%

12,528

15,038
1.06%

38,163

(9,416)

27,770

34,679

747
-

747
34,679

909
-

362
-

81
812
1,545

1,271
81
812
1,545

35,588
5.88%

362
9.00%

3,185

39,135
5.43%

1,960

2,510

1,065
733
10,125
4
-

1,065
733
10,125
4
4,470

1,960
6.43%

2,510
6.43%

11,927

16,397
1.75%

(8,742)

22,738

0.00%

0.00%
-

33,628

(2,148)

3 - 4 years 4 - 5 years
'000
'000
-

> 5 years
'000
-

1 - 2 years
'000
-

(241)

2 - 3 years
'000
-

Noninterest
bearing
'000
1,304
-

(736)

0.00%

0.00%

0.00%

0.00%

0.00%

0.00%

0.00%

'000
1,304
38,188

0.00%
-

Page 33

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 15 (CONT) - RECONCILIATION OF FINANCIAL ASSETS & LIABILITIES
Credit Risk Exposures
Credit risk represents the loss that would be recognised if counterparties fail to perform as
contracted. The maximum credit risk on financial assets of the Council is the carrying
amount, net of any provision for doubtful debts. Except as detailed in Note 7 in relation to
individual classes of financial assets, exposure is concentrated within the Council's
boundaries within the State of New South Wales, and there is no material exposure to any
individual debtor.

Reconciliation of Financial Assets & Liabilities


Net financial assets from previous page
Financial Assets
Financial Liabilities

2007
$'000

2006
$'000

42,808
15,038
27,770

39,135
16,397
22,738
2,237
660,405
3,695
44
(754)
(7,148)

NETT ASSETS

2,283
661,835
3,695
7
(808)
(7,489)
(2)
659,521
687,291

658,479
681,217

Net Assets as per Balance Sheet

687,291

681,217

Non-financial assets and liabilities


Inventories
Property, Plant & Equipment
Investment Property
Other Assets
Accrued Expenses
Provisions
Other liabilities

Net Fair Value


All carrying values approximate fair value for all recognised financial instruments. With the
exception of investments, there is no recognised market for the financial assets of the
Council.

Page 34

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30 June 2007

Note 16 - SIGNIFICANT VARIATIONS FROM ORIGINAL BUDGET


Councils original budget comprised part of the Management Plan adopted by Council on 20 June 2006.
The original projections on which the budget was based have been affected by decisions and new grant
programs initiated by State and Federal Governments, by the weather and by the Council.
This Note sets out the principal variations between the Original Budget and Actual Results for the Income
Statement.
Further information of the nature and amount of all variations is available from the Council office upon
request.
1
INCOME STATEMENT
1.1
Grants & Contributions Received Operating & Capital
In many instances, the actual amount of grants received depends on decisions made by State and
Federal governments after the original Budget was adopted. Grants (both Operating and Capital)
increased by $2.6M (F) (25%) from that provided in the original budget. In particular, major
variations occurred in grants and contributions received for the following purposes:
Subdivider Dedications
- $2271K (F) Not Provided in Budget
Transport & Communication
- $534K (F) (29%)
1.2

Profit from Disposal of Assets


Council disposed of a number of items of plant during 2006/7 which were not included in the
original budget - $1023K (F) (682%).

1.3

Interest Received
The increase in Interest Received was due to higher than expected principal invested and higher
than forecast interest rates. Council's average return on investment was 5.88% - $691K (F) (36%).

1.4

Employee Costs
During the year Council employees are engaged in both maintenance and capital works, the proportions of
which vary from year to year. Costs in relation to the capital works are excluded from the Operating
Statement, and it is not Councils practice to make detailed calculations for this as part of its budgeting
procedures. Accordingly, significant variations will often arise in this area.

1.5

Materials & Contracts/Other Operating Expenses


Materials & Contracts - $1.4M (U) (10%) which were not included in the original budget. A factor contributing
to this variance was expenditure on amounts revoted from 2005/06.
Councils budget is based on a normal mix of self-constructed and contract works. The process of calling
and accepting tenders during the year can result in substantial changes in this mix, resulting in significant
budget variations in this item.

Page 35

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 17 - STATEMENT OF CONTRIBUTION PLANS
SUMMARY OF CONTRIBUTIONS
OPENING
BALANCE
PURPOSE

Local Open Space


District Open Space
Regional Open Space
Open Space
Community facilities
Studies/Administration
Subtotal S94 under plans
Planning Agreements
Sec 94 not under plans
Total Contributions

$'000
6,381
1,556
660
199
18
8,815
1,224
170
10,209

CONTRIBUTIONS RECEIVED
DURING YEAR
CASH

NON-CASH

$'000

$'000
96
121
111
84
17
429
199
628

INTEREST
INTERNAL
EXPENDED
EARNED
BORROWINGS
DURING YEAR
DURING YEAR
(to)/from

$'000
-

$'000
412
106
48
19
2
586
93
11
691

$'000
226
70
37
2
3
338
5
342

HELD AS
RESTRICTED
ASSET

$'000
6,663
1,713
783
300
34
9,493
1,512
181
11,186

Note: The above summary of contribution plans represents the total of Council's individual contribution plans. Individual plan details
CONTRIBUTION PLAN - 1
OPENING
BALANCE

CASH

PURPOSE

Local Open Space


District Open Space
Regional Open Space
Community facilities
Studies/Administration
Total

CONTRIBUTIONS RECEIVED
DURING YEAR

$'000
6,381
1,556
660
199
18
8,815

NON-CASH

$'000

$'000
96
121
111
84
17
429

INTERNAL
INTEREST
EXPENDED
EARNED
BORROWINGS
DURING YEAR
DURING YEAR
(to)/from

$'000

$'000
6,663
1,713
783
300
34
9,493

INTEREST
INTERNAL
EXPENDED
EARNED
BORROWINGS
DURING YEAR
DURING YEAR
(to)/from

HELD AS
RESTRICTED
ASSET

$'000
412
106
48
19
2
586

$'000

HELD AS
RESTRICTED
ASSET

226
70
37
2
3
338

CONTRIBUTION PLAN - 2
OPENING
BALANCE

CASH

PURPOSE

$'000
SEPP 59 - Open Space
SEPP 59 - Comm Facilities
SEPP 59 - Road Works
SEPP 59 - Plan Admin
Total

CONTRIBUTIONS RECEIVED
DURING YEAR
NON-CASH

$'000

305
683
206
30
1,224

$'000
34
136
21
8
199

$'000
-

$'000
22
54
15
3
93

$'000
5
5

$'000
-

356
874
242
40
1,512

INTEREST
INTERNAL
EXPENDED
EARNED
BORROWINGS
DURING YEAR
DURING YEAR
(to)/from

HELD AS
RESTRICTED
ASSET

CONTRIBUTIONS NOT UNDER PLANS


OPENING
BALANCE

CASH

PURPOSE

$'000
Open Space
Northern Employ Lands
Total

CONTRIBUTIONS RECEIVED
DURING YEAR
NON-CASH

$'000
32
138
170

$'000
-

$'000
-

$'000
11
11

$'000
-

$'000
-

43
138
181

Page 36

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 18 - CONTINGENCIES & ASSETS & LIABILITIES NOT RECOGNISED
IN THE STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION
Holroyd City Council participates in the following cooperative organisation, the activities of which
are not controlled by any one member:
Metro Pool
The Council is a member of an insurance group named Metro Pool which provides public liability and professional indemnity
coverage for the local government areas of Auburn, Botany Bay, Holroyd, Hunters Hill, Lane Cove, Marrickville and Rockdale.

Public Liability insurance is one that can take many years to mature so it is likely that the cooperative will continue to carry old
claims for the past and present member councils for some time into the future.

Member councils provide the contributions towards insurance coverage which is arranged on their behalf by Metro Pool. Metro
Pool organises the administration of the funds and of claims made against the insurance policies.

Metro Pool has a net equity of $4.042 million as at 30 June 2007 compared with $3.707 million in 2006. The surplus has been
allocated between members by applying their share of contributions made in each past pool year to the surplus or deficit that
has e

The surplus attributable to Holroyd City Council is

2007
$'000
541

2006
$'000
522

Council has not applied the equity method of accounting for this joint venture in these accounts as the value is considered to
be immaterial for the scope of these accounts.

Page 37

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 19 - INVESTMENTS ACCOUNTED FOR USING THE EQUITY METHOD
Council does not have any investments using the Equity method.

Page 38

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
for the year ended 30th June 2007
Note 20 - RETAINED EARNINGS
2007
$'000

2006
$'000

Balance at beginning of reporting period


Net operating result for the year

681,229
6,062

678,869
2,360

Balance at end of reporting period

687,291

681,229

Movements in Retained Earnings were as follows:

Page 39

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


INCOME STATEMENT of BUSINESS ACTIVITIES
As at 30th June 2007
BUSINESS ACTIVITIES
CATEGORY 1
HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL
CHILD CARE CENTRES

2006
$'000

2007
$'000

CATEGORY 2
HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL
SWIMMING CENTRES

FUNCTION CENTRES

2006
$'000

2007
$'000

CATEGORY 2
HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL

COMMERCIAL WASTE

2006
$'000

2007
$'000

CATEGORY 2
HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL
2006

2007
$'000

$'000

EXPENSES FROM ORDINARY ACTIVITIES

Employee Costs
Materials & Contracts
Borrowing Costs
Interest Charges
Depreciation & Amortisation
Other Operating Expenses
Loss on Disposal of Assets
Taxation Equivalent Payments

2,239
216
0
0
14
385
0
93
2,947

2,083
219
0
0
79
376
0
94
2,852

719
346
0
0
0
282
0
25
1,769

914
320
0
0
213
282
0
39
1,769

570
274
0
0
193
204
0
23
1,264

398
272
0
0
193
135
0
19
1,017

16
29
0
0
2
7
0
1
54

12
29
0
0
2
6
0
1
50

0
2,327
0
136
8
0
2,471

0
2,215
0
127
11
0
2,353

0
515
0
0
36
0
551

0
500
0
0
36
0
536

0
879
0
1
2
0
882

0
830
0
1
2
0
833

0
59
0
0
0
0
59

0
55
0
0
0
0
55

(476)

(499)

(1,218)

(1,233)

(382)

(184)

8
(468)
0
(468)
0
(468)
0
(468)

19
(480)
0
(480)
0
(480)
0
(480)

0
(1,218)
0
(1,218)
0
(1,218)
0
(1,218)

57
(1,176)
0
(1,176)
0
(1,176)
0
(1,176)

0
(382)
0
(382)
0
(382)
0
(382)

0
(184)
0
(184)
0
(184)
0
(184)

0
5
0
5
2
3
0
3

0
5
0
5
2
3
0
3

Opening Retained Profits

(1,009)

(624)

2,146

Adjustments for Amounts Unpaid


* Taxation Equivalent Payments
* Corporate Taxation Equivalent
* Dividend Payment
Closing Retained Profits

93
0
0
(1,384)

95
0
0
(1,009)

RATE OF RETURN ON CAPITAL


REQUIRED RETURN ON CAPITAL
NOTIONAL SUBSIDY FROM COUNCIL

-17.27%
5.00%
612

-18.79%
5.00%
613

TOTAL
REVENUE FROM ORDINARY ACTIVITIES

Rates & Annual Charges


User Charges & Fees
Interest Received
Grants & Contributions - Operating
Other Revenues from Ordinary Activities
Profit on Disposal of Assets
TOTAL
ORDINARY ACTIVITIES RESULT BEFORE CAPITAL
AMOUNTS

Grants & Contributions for Capital Purposes


RESULT FROM ORDINARY ACTIVITIES

Extraordinary Items
SURPLUS (DEFICIT) BEFORE TAX

Corporate Taxation Equivalent (30%)


SURPLUS (DEFICIT) AFTER TAX

Dividend Payment
SURPLUS (DEFICIT) AFTER DIVIDENDS

Page 43

This Statement is to be read in conjunction with the attached Notes.

3,283

794

959

45

39

25
0
0
953

39
0
0
2,146

23
0
0
435

19
0
0
794

1
2
0
50

1
2
0
45

-15.81%
5.00%
1,603

-16.61%
5.00%
1,147

-7.81%
5.00%
626

-3.91%
5.00%
522

83.33%
5.00%
0

83.33%
5.00%
0

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


BALANCE SHEET of BUSINESS ACTIVITIES
As at 30th June 2007
BUSINESS ACTIVITIES
CATEGORY 2
CATEGORY 2
HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL
HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL

CATEGORY 1
HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL
CHILD CARE CENTRES

CURRENT ASSETS
Cash Assets
Investment Securities
Receivables
Due From Council
Inventories
Other
TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS

NON-CURRENT ASSETS
Cash Assets
Investment Securities
Receivables
Inventories
Property, Plant & Equipment
Other
TOTAL NON-CURRENT ASSETS

TOTAL ASSETS
CURRENT LIABILITIES
Payables
Due to Council
Interest Bearing Liabilities
Provisions
TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES

NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES
Payables
Interest Bearing Liabilities
Provisions
TOTAL NON-CURRENT LIABILITIES

TOTAL LIABILITIES
NET ASSETS
EQUITY
Accumulated Surplus
Asset Revaluation Reserve
Council Equity Interest
Outside Equity Interest in Controlled Entities
TOTAL EQUITY

SWIMMING CENTRES

2006
$'000

2007
$'000

FUNCTION CENTRES

2006
$'000

2007
$'000

COMMERCIAL WASTE

2006
$'000

2007
$'000

CATEGORY 2
HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL
2006

2007
$'000

$'000

0
0
9
0
0
0
9

0
0
4
0
0
0
4

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
0
0
0
0
0

0
0
51
0
0
0
51

0
0
44
0
0
0
44

0
0
0
97
0
0
97

0
0
0
46
0
3
49

0
0
0
0
2,757
0
2,757
2,766

0
0
0
0
2,656
0
2,656
2,660

0
0
0
0
7,704
0
7,704
7,704

0
0
0
0
7,422
0
7,422
7,422

0
0
0
0
4,889
0
4,889
4,940

0
0
0
0
4,710
0
4,710
4,754

0
0
0
0
6
0
6
103

0
0
0
0
6
0
6
55

154
2,124
0
457
2,735

184
1,731
0
332
2,247

0
6,529
0
0
6,529

5
4,987
0
66
5,058

6
1,335
0
214
1,556

0
1,139
0
0
1,139

43
0
0
5
48

2
1
0
5
8

0
0
20
20
2,755

0
0
27
27
2,274

0
0
0
0
6,529

0
0
53
53
5,111

0
0
128
128
1,684

0
0
0
0
1,139

1
0
3
4
52

1
0
0
1
9

11

386

1,118

2,311

3,256

3,615

51

46

(1,384)
1,395
11

(1,009)
1,395
386

Page 44

This Statement is to be read in conjunction with the attached Notes

953
165
1,118

2,146
165
2,311

435
2,821
3,256

794
2,821
3,615

50
1
51

45
1
46

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE
SPECIAL PURPOSE FINANCIAL REPORTS
for the year ended 30 June 2007

Note 1 Significant Accounting Policies


1.

The Special Purpose Financial Reports

These financial statements are a Special Purpose Financial Report prepared for use by the Council
and the Department of Local Government. They have been prepared to report the results of Business
Units determined by Council in accordance with the requirements of National Competition Policy
Guidelines.
In preparing these reports, each Business Unit has been viewed as a separate unit and accordingly,
transactions between different Business Units and between Business Units and other Council
operations have not been eliminated.
2.

Basis of Accounting
2.1 Compliance

This Special Purpose Financial Report complies with the Local Government Code of
Accounting Practice and Financial Reporting and the Local Government Asset Accounting
Manual and with the principles of the June 1996 NSW Government Policy Statement
Application of National Competition Policy to Local Government and the Department of Local
Governments July 1997 guidelines Pricing & Costing for Council Businesses: A Guide to
Competitive Neutrality.
Except where directed to the contrary by the above documents, the financial report also
complies with all applicable Australian Accounting Standards and professional
pronouncements, and is based on information consistent with that forming the basis of
Councils Annual Financial Reports for the year.
2.2 Basis

This financial report has been prepared on the accrual basis of accounting and, except where
specifically indicated in the Notes or in the Notes to the Annual Financial Reports, in
accordance with the historical cost convention.
3.

National Competition Policy

Council has adopted the principal of competitive neutrality to its business activities as part of the
national competition policy which is being applied throughout Australia at all levels of government.
The framework for its application is set out in the June 1996 Government Policy statement on the
Application of National Competition Policy to Local Government. The Pricing & Costing for Council
Businesses - A Guide to Competitive Neutrality issued by the Department of Local Government in
July 1997 has also been adopted.
The pricing and costing guidelines outline the process for identifying and allocating costs to activities
and provide a standard for disclosure requirements. These disclosures are reflected in Councils
pricing and/or financial reporting systems and include taxation equivalents, council subsidies, return
on investments (rate of return on capital) and dividends paid.
4.
Declared Business Activities

Page 45

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


for the year ended 30 June 2007

Note 1 - Significant Accounting Policies (cont)


In accordance with Pricing & Costing for Council Businesses A Guide to Competitive Neutrality,
council has declared that the following are to be considered as business activities:
Category 1

Name
Holroyd City
Council
Child Care Centres

Brief Description of Activity


Provision of Child Long Day Care Service

Category 2

5.

Name
Holroyd
City
Council
Swimming Centres

Brief Description of Activity


Swimming/Leisure Centre Activities

Holroyd
City
Council
Function Centres
Holroyd
City
Council
Commercial Waste

Hire Halls for Functions/Weddings including


Catering
Collection and Disposal of Commercial Waste

Taxation Equivalent Payments

Council does not pay certain taxes and duties that are paid by equivalent private sector operations,
but are liable for others. The Special Purpose Financial Reports disclose the effect of imputing these
taxes and financial duties to the declared Business Units at the rates that would have applied to
equivalent private sector operations. The following taxation equivalents have been applied to all
council nominated business activities (this does not include councils non-business activities):
Notional Rate Applied %
Corporate Tax Rate
Sales Tax
Land Tax
Stamp Duty
Payroll Tax
Other Taxes or Charges-Debt Guarantee
Fees

6.

30%
Not Applicable
Not Applicable
Not Applicable
6%
Not Applicable

Income Tax

An income tax equivalent has been applied on the profits of the business. Whilst income tax is not a
specific cost for the purpose of pricing a good or service, it needs to be taken into account in terms of
assessing the rate of return required on capital invested. Accordingly, the return on capital invested is
set at a pre-tax level (Ordinary Activities Result Before Capital Amounts) as would be applied by a
private sector competitor that is, it should include a provision equivalent to the corporate income tax
rate, currently 30%.

Income Tax is only applied where a positive Ordinary Activities Result Before Capital Amounts has
been achieved. Since the taxation equivalent is notional, that is, it is payable to the Council as the

Page 46

NOTES TO AND FORMING PART OF THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS


for the year ended 30 June 2007

Note 1 - Significant Accounting Policies (cont)


owner of business operations, it represents an internal payment and has no effect on the operations
of the Council.
Accordingly, there is no need for disclosure of internal charges in the GPFR. The rate applied of 30%
is the equivalent company tax rate prevalent as at balance date. No adjustments have been made for
variations which have occurred during the year.
7.

Council Rates, Charges & Fees

A calculation of the equivalent rates and charges for all Business Activities has been applied to all
assets owned or exclusively used by the business activity.
8.

Loan & Debt Guarantee Fees

The debt guarantee fee is designed to ensure that council business activities face true commercial
borrowing costs in line with private sector competitors. In order to calculate a debt guarantee fee,
council has determined what the differential borrowing rate would have been between the commercial
rate and the Councils borrowing rate for its business activities.
9.

Notional Subsidy from Council

Government policy requires that subsidies provided to customers and the funding of those subsidies
must be explicitly disclosed. Subsidies occur where council provides services on a less than cost
recovery basis. This option is exercised on a range of services in order for Council to meet its
community service obligations. The overall effect of subsidies is contained within the Income
Statement by Business Activities.
10.

Return on Investments (Rate of Return on Capital)

The Policy statement requires that councils with Category 1 business would be expected to generate
a return on capital funds employed that is comparable to rates of return for private businesses
operating in a similar field. Funds are subsequently available for meeting commitments or financing
future investment strategies. The rate of return is disclosed for each of Councils business activities
on the Income Statement of Business Activities and Balance Sheet of Business Activities.
11.

Dividends Paid

Council is not required to pay dividends to either itself as owner of a range of businesses or to any
external entities. Consequently, any form of dividend payment is purely notional. Dividend payments
to Council are also restricted to those activities that do not levy special rates or charges (water,
sewer, domestic waste management).
Council operates restricted activities for Domestic Waste Management (DWM). The Local
Government Act 1993 requires that all operating surpluses or deficits of these funds are
credited/debited to the equity of those funds.
******

Page 47

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


SPECIAL SCHEDULE NO 1
NET COST OF SERVICES
for the year ended 30th June 2007
$'000
Expenses from continuing
operations
Function or Activity
GOVERNANCE

Expenses

Revenues from continuing operations

Non-capital
Group Totals
revenues

1,228

Capital
revenues

NET COST OF SERVICES

Group Totals
-

1,228

Net Cost

Group Totals

1,228
-

1,228

ADMINISTRATION
Corporate Support
Engineering & Works
Other Support Services

7,729
2,623
116

187
193
(1)

10,468

7,542
2,430
117
379

10,089

PUBLIC ORDER & SAFETY


Statutory Contribution - Fire Service Levy
Animal Control
Enforcement of Local Govt Regulations
Emergency Services
Other

870
194
548
38
92

71
638
1

1,742

870
123
(90)
38
91
710

1,032

HEALTH
Administration & Inspection
Immunisations
Health Centres

803
34
33

211
40
-

70
-

870

522
(6)
33
321

549

COMMUNITY SERVICES & EDUCATION


Administration
Family Day Care
Child Care
Youth Services
Aged & Disabled
Migrant Services
Other Community Services

1,487
907
4,317
391
939
8
28

113
919
4,382
108
939
-

8,077

1,374
(12)
(65)
283
8
28
6,461

1,616

HOUSING & COMMUNITY AMENITIES


Housing
Town Planning
Domestic Waste Management
Other Waste Management
Street Cleaning
Urban Stormwater Drainage
Environmental Protection
Public Cemeteries
Other Community Amenities

9
2,462
6,475
59
1,452
1,610
914
411
(1)

87
1,192
7,499
153
19
2
34
13,391

1,039
-

(78)
1,270
(1,024)
(94)
1,433
569
880
411
(1)
10,025

3,366

Page 49

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


SPECIAL SCHEDULE NO 1 - NET COST OF SERVICES (cont)
Expenses from continuing
operations
Function or Activity

Expenses

Revenues from continuing operations

Non-capital
Group Totals
revenues

Capital
revenues

Group Totals

NET COST OF SERVICES


Net Cost

Group Totals

RECREATION & CULTURE


Public Libraries
Community Centres
Public Halls
Other Cultural Services
Swimming Pools
Parks & Gardens, Lakes
Other Sport & Recreation

2,549
218
111
1,245
1,881
5,761
1

258
196
642
552
572
-

317
674
-

11,766

1,974
218
(85)
603
1,329
4,515
1
3,211

8,555

MINING, MANUFACTURING & CONSTRUCTION


Building Control

794

418

794

376
418

376

TRANSPORT & COMMUNICATION


Urban Roads: Local
Urban Roads: Regional
Sealed Rural Roads: Local
Footpaths
Parking Areas
Bus Shelters & Services
Street Lighting
Other

6,358
171
103
629
146
67
1,036
(1)

1,349
222
8
4
280
(1)

1,894
554
405
319

8,509

3,115
(51)
103
67
142
(338)
756
(319)
5,034

3,475

ECONOMIC AFFAIRS
Tourism & Area Promotion
Real Estate Development
Other Business Undertakings

TOTALS - FUNCTIONS
General Purpose Revenues

48
1
360

13
1,039
-

35
(1,038)
360

409

1,052

57,254

27,611
35,705

29,643
35,705

35,705
NET OPERATING RESULT FOR YEAR

(643)

35,705
6,062

Page 50

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


SPECIAL SCHEDULE NO 2 (1)
STATEMENT OF LONG TERM DEBT (ALL PURPOSE)
for the year ended 30th June 2007
$'000
Classification of Debt

Principal Outstanding
at beginning of year
Current Non-Current
Total

Debt Redemption
New
Loans From
Sinking
Raised Revenue Funds

Tfrs to Interest
Principal outstanding
Sinking applicable
at end of year
Funds for year
Current Non-Current
Total

LOANS (by source)


Financial Institutions
Total Loans

1,960
1,960

2,510
2,510

4,470
4,470

1,959
1,959

229
229

1,036
1,036

1,475
1,475

2,511
2,511

TOTAL LONG TERM DEBT

1,960

2,510

4,470

1,959

229

1,036

1,475

2,511

This Schedule excludes Internal Loans and refinancing of existing borrowings.

Page 51

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


SPECIAL SCHEDULE NO 7
CONDITION OF PUBLIC WORKS
as at 30 June 2007

Asset Class

Asset Category

References

Depreciation Depreciation
Rate (%)
Expense

Note 9

'000
Note 3

Cost

'000

Accumulated
Depreciation

Carrying
Value

'000
Note 9

'000

Estimated
Estimated
Program
Asset
Cost to bring
Maintenance
Annual
Condition
to a
Maintenance
Works for
(see Notes Satisfactory
Expense
current year
attached)
Standard
'000

'000

'000

Local Govt. Act 1993, Section 428 (2d)

PUBLIC BUILDINGS
All Buildings

1,183
1,183

56,868
56,868

(28,489)
(28,489)

28,379
28,379

2
3
6
7

1,567
4,944
6,511

746
451
399
139
1,735

440
266
235
81
1,022

1,762
103
430
585
18
2,898

163,001
8,213
26,300
41,390
599
239,503

(43,407)
(4,262)
(8,809)
(16,478)
(168)
(73,124)

119,594
3,951
17,491
24,912
431
166,379

1
2
3
6
7
3
2
3
6
7
2
3
6
7
1
3
7

10,600
371
100
568
469
422
100
12,630

5,767
100
598
319
150
6,934

2,375
174
119
136
2,804

TOTAL PUBLIC BUILDINGS

PUBLIC ROADS
Sealed Roads

Bridges
Footpaths

1.25
2

Kerb and Gutter

1.4

Street Furniture

10

TOTAL PUBLIC ROADS

This Schedule is to be read in conjunction with the explanatory notes following.


Page 52

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


SPECIAL SCHEDULE NO 7 - CONDITION OF PUBLIC WORKS (cont)
as at 30 June 2007

Asset Class

Asset Category

References

Depreciation Depreciation
Rate (%)
Expense

Note 9

'000
Note 3

Cost

'000

Accumulated
Depreciation

Carrying
Value

'000
Note 9

'000

Estimated
Estimated
Program
Asset
Cost to bring
Maintenance
Annual
Condition
to a
Maintenance
Works for
(see Notes Satisfactory
Expense
current year
attached)
Standard
'000

'000

'000

Local Govt. Act 1993, Section 428 (2d)

DRAINAGE WORKS
All Works
TOTAL DRAINAGE WORKS

TOTAL CLASSES - ALL ASSETS

1,225
1,225

123,515
123,515

(44,303)
(44,303)

79,212
79,212

5,306

419,886

(145,916)

273,970

This Schedule is to be read in conjunction with the explanatory notes following.

319
319

19,460

472
472

293
293

9,141

4,119

Page 53

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


SPECIAL SCHEDULE NO 7 - CONDITION OF PUBLIC WORKS (cont)
0
"SATISFACTORY" CONDITION OF PUBLIC ASSETS
In assessing the condition of Public Assets Council has had regard to the condition, function and
location of each asset, based on the original design standard. Changes in standards or
proposed or potential enhancements to the existing asset have been ignored Code p A702).
Assets within each Asset Category have been assessed on an overall basis, recognising that an
average standard of "satisfactory" may be achieved even though certain assets may be above
or below that standard on an individual basis.
Council recognises that the standard that it considers to be "satisfactory" may be different from
that adopted by other Councils.
The information containe din this Schedule comprises accounting estimates formulated in
accordance with the NSW Code of Accounting Practice and Financial Reporting. Nothing
contained within this Schedule may be taken to be an admission of any liability to any person.
ASSET CONDITION
The following condition codes have been used in this Schedule.
1
2
3
4
5
6
7

Newly constructed
Over 5 years old but fully maintained in "as new" condition
Good condition
Average condition
Partly worn - beyond 50% of economic life.
Worn but serviceable
Poor - replacement required

Page 54

HOLROYD CITY COUNCIL


SPECIAL SCHEDULE NO 8 - FINANCIAL PROJECTIONS
as at 30 June 2007
2008
$'m

2007
$'m
Recurrent Budget
Income from continuing operations
Expenses from continuing operations
Operating result from continuing operations
Capital Budget
New Works
Replacement of existing assets
Funded by
- Loans
- Asset Sales
- Reserves
- Grants/Contributions
- Recurrent revenue
- Other

2009
$'m

2010
$'m

2011
$'m

63
57
6

60
54
6

61
55
6

63
56
7

64
57
7

1
5
6

1
5
6

6
6

6
6

6
6

6
6

6
6

6
6

Page 55

State of the Environment Report

Holroyd City Council


State of Environment Report
2006/2007
Supplementary Report to the 2003/2004 State of Environment Report

Including the annual report on


Living Holroyd: A Sustainable Future

Council Contact Details


Postal Address:
PO Box 42, Merrylands NSW 2160
Street Address:
16 Memorial Avenue, Merrylands NSW 2160
DX:
25408 Merrylands 2160
Phone: (02) 9840 9840
Fax: (02) 9840 9734
Email: hcc@holroyd.nsw.gov.au
Web: www.holroyd.nsw.gov.au
Council Meetings:

1st and 3rd Tuesday at 6.30pm

Councillors (12)
Mayor:
Clr Dr. John H Brodie
Deputy:
Clr Josie Moncreiff

Clr Doug Bourchier, Clr Elizabeth Culgan, Clr Greg Cummings, Clr Allan Ezzy, Clr Ken Morrisey, Clr
Mark Pigram, Clr Yvette Whitfield, Clr Mal Tulloch, Clr David Van Brussel, Clr Eddy Sarkis
Senior Staff
General Manager:
Director Corporate & Financial Services:
Director Engineering Services:
Director Environmental & Planning Services:
Director Library & Community Services:

Mr Merv Ismay
Mr Tim Butler
Mr Stan Antczak
Mr Rick Beers
Ms Diane Jogia

Acknowledgments

The 2006/2007 State of Environment Report has been prepared by Councils Environmental Health
Unit, with the assistance of Council staff, other government agencies and the community.
i

CONTENTS
PAGE
1.0

2.0

3.0

INTRODUCTION
1.1
Overview
1.2
About State of Environment Reporting
1.3
Holroyd City Management Plan 2006-2010
1.4
Living Holroyd: A Sustainable Future
1.5
Community Consultation
1.6
State of Environment 2006/2007 Format
1.7
State of Environment 2006/2007 Highlights
HUMAN SETTLEMENT
2.1
Overview
2.2
Population & the Social Environment
2.2.1 The Issue
2.2.2 State
2.2.3 Responses to the issues
2.3
Urban Development
2.3.1 The Issue
2.3.2 State
2.3.3 Responses to the issues
2.4
Water Consumption
2.4.1 The Issue
2.4.2 State
2.4.3 Responses to the issues
2.5
Energy
2.5.1 The Issue
2.5.2 State
2.5.3 Responses to the issues
2.6
Waste Management
2.6.1 The Issue
2.6.2 State
2.6.3 Responses to the issues
2.7
Amenity
2.7.1 The Issue
2.7.2 State
2.7.3 Responses to the issues
2.8
Future Actions
BIODIVERSITY
3.1
Overview
3.2
The Issue
3.3
State
3.4
Responses to the issues
3.5
Future Actions

1
1
1
3
3
3
3

4
4

10

12

13
13
13
13
16

ii

4.0

5.0

6.0

7.0

8.0

9.0

STORMWATER
4.1
Overview
4.2
The Issue
4.3
State
4.4
Responses to the issues
4.5
Future Actions

17
17
17
20
21

ATMOSPHERE
5.1
Overview
5.2
The Issue
5.3
State
5.4
Responses to the issues
5.5
Future Actions

22
22
22
23
23

SOIL LANDSCAPE
6.1
Overview
6.2
Contaminated Land
6.2.1 The Issue
6.2.2 State
6.2.3 Responses to the issues
6.3
Salinity
6.3.1 The Issues
6.3.2 State
6.3.3 Responses to the issues
6.4
Soil Erosion
6.4.1 The Issues
6.4.2 State
6.4.3 Responses to the issues
6.5
Acid Sulfate Soils
6.5.1 The Issues
6.5.2 State
6.5.3 Responses to the issues
6.6
Future Actions
HERITAGE
7.1
Overview
7.2
The Issue
7.3
State
7.4
Responses to the issues
7.5
Future Actions
TOWARD SUSTAINABILITY
8.1
Overview
8.2
How is Holroyd working towards a Sustainable Future?
8.3
The Pillars of Sustainability
8.3.1 Ecological Sustainability
8.3.2 Social and Cultural Sustainability
8.3.3 Economic Sustainability
8.4
Future Actions
REFERENCES

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28

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2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

Introduction

1.1 Overview
Local Government plays an important role in managing its local environment. In preparing
a State of Environment Report, information on the local environment is collected, analysed
and presented to assist Council and the community to have a clear understanding of the
pressures exerted by human activities on our immediate environment. This in turn reflects
the impact those pressures have on the state of the environment and helps define responses
not only implemented by Council, but government agencies, organisations and the
community.
As most environmental conditions do not change dramatically over the short term, the
2006/2007 State of Environment Report is designed to supplement the comprehensive
2003/2004 State of Environment Report and subsequent supplementary reports. Should
more information be required about environmental and sustainability issues pertinent to the
Holroyd City Council area, the 2003/2004 State of Environment Report and 2004/2005 &
2005/2006 Supplementary State of Environment Reports should be consulted. The
2006/2007 State of Environment Report informs Council, the community and interested
parties about notable changes which occurred during the reporting year.
1.2 About State of Environment Reporting
The requirements for State of Environment Reporting are outlined in the Local Government
Act 1993. This document is the twelfth State of Environment Report for the Holroyd City
Council area and satisfies the requirements of the Local Government Act for the 1 July
2006 to 30 June 2007 reporting period.
1.3 Holroyd City Management Plan 2006-2010
To continue in providing direction to Councils Management Planning process, Table 1.1
below details status/outcome of management plan actions that are linked to the themes
reported in the State of Environment Report.

Human Settlement

TABLE 1.1: LINKING 2006-2010 MANAGEMENT PLAN ACTIONS TO THE STATE OF


ENVIRONMENT REPORT
Management Plan Action
Status/Outcome
Link
to SoE
Coordinate annual Clean Up Australia Day
Council coordinated
over 100
volunteers at 25 sites in March 2007.
Educate community to reduce waste to landfill Ongoing through free composting and
by composting putrescibles; using free mulching worm farming courses and Council
service; buying worm farm kits from Council
events.
Review, assess and implement new recycling Completed.
contract
To work within policies of Department of Ongoing Councils Environmental
Environment & Conservation & in particular to Health & Waste Education Officer
require compliance with Councils DCP No 35 conducts audits of constructions and
to
maximise
waste
avoidance
during demolition sites.
development and construction activities

2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

Ongoing

Ongoing
Ongoing

Refer to Chapter 2.2

Prepare a City Wide Bushland Management Consultants engaged and draft report
Plan
expected to be completed September
2007
Prepare Plans of Management for Jones Park, Awaiting funding
Graeme Park, Greystanes Woodland Parks and
sportsgrounds
Review the Landscape Masterplan to include Awaiting funding
additional areas of open space & new initiatives
for greening Holroyd
To preserve, wherever possible, the existing tree Ongoing through Tree Management
stock within the City, to promote the planting of Order, National Tree Day
trees & to improve the publics general
awareness of the importance of tree preservation
Implement
Councils
Tree
Preservation Ongoing
Order/Tree Management Plan and Tree
Management Policies
Liaison and involvement with projects initiated
by the Upper Parramatta River Catchment Trust
Develop and implement floodplain management
strategies and stormwater management plans
Seek government grants for drainage, flood
mitigation and water quality projects
As the ARA under the POEO Act 1997 accept
responsibility for non-scheduled industrial
premises including those not licensed by the
EPA

Trust ceased operation in December


2006
Refer to Chapter 4
Opportunities
are
continually
monitored
Ongoing through environmental
assessments of industry and the
investigation of complaints.

Biodiversity

Refer to Chapter 2.2

Stormwater

Preparation of Local Environmental Plans,


Development Control Plans and Section 94
Contribution Plans under the provisions of the
Environmental Planning and Assessment Act
1979 and its Regulation
Preparation of Council policies regarding
planning, environmental and development issues
Review Councils strategies and policies for
effective land use planning to ensure the
efficient, economic, social and sustainable use of
land in Holroyd for the benefit of its residents,
owners and workforce
Coordinate the implementation/update of
relevant Council plans and publications i.e.
Access and Equity, Social, City Health and
Cultural Plans and the Community Profile
Provide cultural and public art programs and
opportunities to raise awareness of local artists

2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

Refer to Chapter 5
Atmosphere

Implementation of Greenhouse Reduction Local


Action Plan (CCP Program)
Monitor and review the impact of the LiverpoolParramatta Transitway
Develop Cycleway Masterplan for Holroyd
Implement transport study recommendations
short-term to long-term

Ongoing
Awaiting funding
In progress

Heritage

Continue to record oral histories of local Ongoing


residents
Ensure statutory controls and policies exist for Ongoing
the effective management of Holroyds heritage,
integration of heritage issues into the planning
framework for Holroyd and heritage education
and promotion programs

Towa
rds
Susta

Review and enhance Local Agenda 21 Program Ongoing


Encompass Triple Bottom Line reporting in the Ongoing
Management Plan
1.4
Living Holroyd: A Sustainable Future
Following on from the previous State of Environment Reports, the progress of Councils
Local Agenda 21 action plan, Living Holroyd: A Sustainable Future continues to be
monitored through this State of Environment Report. A summary of the indicators and
further detail is provided in Chapter 8, Towards Sustainability.
1.5
Community Consultation
During the reporting period, Council provided several avenues for facilitating community
involvement in decision-making, including public meetings, special committees, and Council
meetings. Thirty-seven committees were active in 2006/2007, including twenty-one park
committees.
1.6
State of Environment Report 2006/2007 Format
Similar to the 2004/2005 & 2005/2006 State of Environment Reports, the 2006/2007 State
of Environment Report addresses environment, social and economic issues in seven
chapters being:
 Human Settlement
 Soil Landscape
 Biodiversity
 Heritage
 Stormwater
 Towards Sustainability
 Atmosphere

1.7
State of Environment Report 2006/2007 Highlights
Major achievements for the Holroyd City Council area during the reporting period include:
 Progress in relation to 25 strategies within the Holroyd Social Plan 2005-2009
 Adoption of a new Cultural Plan 2006-2011
 Adoption and implementation of the City Health Plan 2006-2010
 Preparation and submission of Energy Savings Action and Water Savings Action Plans
 Active involvement of bushcare volunteers, resulting in the planting of over 9,500 plants as
part of revegetation programs

2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

Human Settlement

2.1 Overview
Population increases and demographic changes detailed in the 2003/2004 State of Environment
Report, continue to place demands on infrastructure, services and resources, such as housing,
community and health facilities, energy, water and waste disposal.
2.2

Population & the Social Environment


2.2.1 The Issue
There have been no significant changes to the issues associated with Population and the
Social Environment during the reporting period.
2.2.2 State
The 2005/2006 State of Environment Report provides a detailed description of the
population and social environment from the Australian Bureau of Statistics 2001 census.
The results of the census undertaken on 8 August 2006 were still being processed at the
time of writing.
2.2.3 Responses to the issues
During the reporting period, the following new responses were initiated to address
changes in the dynamics of Holroyds social environment.

 Social Plan
During 2006/2007 steady progress has been made in relation to twenty-five (25) strategies within
the Holroyd Social Plan 2005-2009. This includes:
securing funding to enhance the Domestic Violence resource kit through the provision of
training for local services on local needs
supporting volunteer community groups and organisations in accessing additional funding
for community activities
implementation of actions within the Holroyd City Health Plan in partnership with Sydney
West Area Health Service
delivery of community development training for volunteer community groups and
organisations
advocacy and lobbying on behalf of services for increased funding to the Holroyd LGA for
services for carers, people with disabilities, seniors, women and children
working in partnership with other Councils and Western Sydney Regional Organisation of
Councils to explore affordable housing policies and continuing contributions to developing
the WSROC Housing Impact Assessment document
completion of development application assessments to increase access for people with
disabilities to public facilities
provision of education and training for people from CALD backgrounds on a range of
Australian governance issues
continuing implementation of the Local Government Framework for Women

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 Cultural Plan
Holroyd City Councils Cultural Plan creates and enhances opportunities for our communities to
participate in cultural expression and increase cultural vitality in Holroyd City. This involves
celebrating the diversity of interests in our community, promoting creativity, and embracing our
collective values to work toward the communitys aspirations for Holroyd City.
Cultural vitality is supported through:
Providing opportunities for and encouraging active community participation in cultural
initiatives
Promoting creative arts practices as a medium for cultural expression
Showcasing the identity, diversity and distinctiveness of our communities
Developing creative and artistic talent in the community
Facilitating local and regional partnerships that contribute to arts and cultural development
Facilitating employment, skills and training opportunities for artists and communities in
Holroyd City
Arts focused urban redevelopment strategies
Increasing access to cultural activities, facilities and services
Encouraging cultural and social harmony and pride in the community
 City Health Plan
Holroyd Council's first City Health Plan was launched in 1996 and reviewed, amended and readopted in 2000 and most recently, 21 March 2006.
Whilst the City Health Plan is a Council document it is in fact a product of collaboration between
a number of key stakeholders. Including Sydney West Area Health Service, Merrylands
Community Health Centre, Holroyd Local Area Command and the community.
During the reporting period, Council was successful in obtaining a $20,000 grant from the Local
Government and Shires Association (LGSA) as part of the Healthy Local Governments grant
program. The funding will focus on the key health issues of; Childhood Obesity, Mental Health,
Tobacco Control and Physical Activity. The grant program is due for completion in the
2007/2008.

2.3

Urban Development
2.3.1 The Issue
There has been no significant change to the issues associated with Urban Development
during the reporting period.
2.3.2 State
During the reporting period, changes to the landscape of the Holroyd City Council area
continue to be observed as the construction of dwellings on the Boral site and the former
CSIRO site, and the old brickworks site in the suburb of Holroyd) nears completion.
Table 2.1 below summarises the number and type of development applications approved
(received) by Council during the reporting period compared to previous reporting
periods. As indicated in the table, there was a slight decrease in the number of
applications received and an increase in the number of applications approved. Measures

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to reduce the backlog of development applications continue to be successful resulting in


more applications being approved than received again this year.
TABLE 2.1: DEVELOPMENT APPLICATIONS APPROVED (RECEIVED)
Development Type
2003/2004
2004/2005
2005/2006
2006/2007
Residential
1,168
1,051
968
1,003
Commercial
106
84
81
92
Industrial
104
120
96
74
Other
183
105
52
66
TOTAL
1561 (1374) 1354 (1272) 1197 (1167) 1235 (1129)
2.3.3 Responses to the issues
During the reporting period, the following new responses were initiated to ensure urban
development continues to meet the needs of the Holroyd community and reduce the
pressure it places on finite water and energy resources and waste disposal and community
and health facilities.
 Building Sustainability Index (BASIX) assessment tool
Changes to the Building Sustainability Index (BASIX) during the reporting period include:
 The BASIX energy target increased for most new homes meaning all new homes
in NSW will use up to 40% less potable water and produce up to 40% fewer
greenhouse gas emissions than the average home.
 The BASIX energy target will vary according to building type and location with
the maximum targets applying to more than 80% of all new homes.
 The BASIX Completion Receipt came into effect a user-friendly system
that will identify completed and occupied BASIX-compliant homes.
The Completion Receipt is a mandatory component of the reporting process for all
principal certifying authorities once an occupation certificate has been issued. The BASIX
Energy targets are due to be reviewed in 2008.
Since October 2006, the Building Sustainability Index (BASIX) has applied to new home
alterations and additions valued at $100,000 or more and swimming pool of 40,000 litres
capacity or more, which required planning approval. From 1 July 2007, the threshold for
alterations and additions requiring BASIX certificates will fall from $100,000 to $50,000.
 Subregional Strategies
Subregional planning was recognised as a way to effectively implement the planning aims and
directions of the Metropolitan Strategy throughout 43 local government areas. In order to
facilitate subregional planning, the Department of Planning has arranged Sydney into ten
subregions that combine local government areas with similar issues and challenges. The purpose
of this arrangement is to ensure that planning and change management is undertaken in a
cohesive and coherent manner. Subregional planning will essentially translate the Metropolitan
Strategy into strategies for each grouping of local government areas (LGA).
Subregional planning, in consultation with Councils, will be lead by the Department with a
strategy for every subregion currently being prepared. A draft is expected for consideration by
October 2007. Subregional strategies will address issues including urban renewal, transport,

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2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

infrastructure, housing and employment and provide details on the future role of the subregion
and relevant centres.
Holroyd comprises part of the West Central subregion, with the local government areas of
Auburn, Bankstown, Fairfield and Parramatta also contained within this subregion. The
Metropolitan Strategy stipulates that the West Central subregion will provide 95,500 new
dwellings and 35,000 additional jobs from 2004.
 Local Environmental Plans and Development Control Plans
Holroyd Local Environmental Plan 2009
Under the State Governments planning reforms, Council is required to prepare a new Local
Environmental Plan (LEP) by March 2009. All new LEPs are to be consistent with the
Governments Standard LEP Template. Preparation of the new LEP has commenced. It is
anticipated that a draft of the new LEP will be exhibited in mid-2008.
Holroyd Development Control Plan 2009
Under the State Governments planning reforms, Council is required to have only development
control plan (DCP) applicable to any land. This is effective from the introduction of a new LEP
in 2009. To comply with this requirement, Council has elected to prepare a single DCP for the
entire City. As a first stage, Council has prepared Draft Holroyd City Council DCP 2007, which
consolidates all its current DCPs into one document. Draft DCP 2007 will be exhibited in JuneJuly 2007. The second stage, a thorough review of Councils development controls, will inform
preparation of a Draft Holroyd DCP 2009. This will be exhibited in mid-2008.
 Holroyd Residential Development Strategy
Council is preparing a Residential Development Strategy (RDS) to guide future housing
development. The RDS will ensure future residential development:
is sustainable;
promotes social well-being;
provides the type of housing needed by the future population;
allows good access to shops, services, parks and public transport;
protects urban character and scenic values.
The RDS will inform the preparation of other land use planning documents, including a new
Local Environmental Plan and a new Development Control Plan.

2.4

Water Consumption
2.4.1 The Issue
Once again, Sydney recorded below average rainfall during the reporting period and most
of the rain did not fall in the catchment area. As at 9 August 2007, the water storage for
the Sydney Water catchment was 57.6%, up from 41.5% at 10 August 2006.
2.4.2 State
Data from Sydney Water shows that in 2006/2007, houses in Holroyd local government
area consumed an average of 216kL/dwelling, decreasing by 5kL/dwelling in the last
reporting period and flats/units consumed 164kL/dwelling, decreasing by 2kL/dwelling
in the last reporting period. On average, houses in Holroyd consume less than the Sydney
wide average (222kL/dwelling), however units in Holroyd consume more/less than the
Sydney wide average (152kL/dwelling). This trend is consistent with previous reporting
periods.

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As an organisation, Holroyd City Council consumed an average of 373 321 litres a day,
which is a 3% decrease on the last reporting period.
2.4.3 Responses to the issues
During the reporting period, the following new responses were initiated to reduce the
demand on finite water resources.
 Water Restrictions
Water Restrictions remain at Level 3 only allowing hand-held hosing of lawns and gardens and
drip irrigation on Wednesdays and Sundays before 10 am and after 4 pm.
 Water Savings Action Plan
Under the Energy Administration Amendment (Water and Energy Savings) Act 2005 Council is
required to prepare and implement a Water Savings Action Plans to improve its water efficiency.
During the reporting period Council was notified by the Minister for the Department of Energy,
Utilities and Sustainability (DEUS) that the Water Savings Action Plan had been approved.
Actions that Council implemented during the reporting period include replacing single flush
cisterns with dual flush cisterns, replacing urinal cisterns with sensor controlled cisterns and
retro-fitting water saving showerheads.
Further information on the implementation of the Water Savings Action Plan will be provided in
future State of Environment Reports.
2.5

Energy
2.5.1 The issue
There has been no significant change to the issues associated with Energy during the
reporting period.
2.5.2 State
During the reporting period, Council was unable to obtain residential consumption data
from energy suppliers for the Holroyd City Council area. Council continues to address its
own energy use through participating in the Cities for Climate Protection program (Refer
to Chapter 5 Atmosphere) and through the development of the Energy Savings Action
Plan.
2.5.3 Responses to the issue
During the reporting period, the following new responses were initiated to reduce the
demand on energy resources.

 Energy Savings Action Plan


Under the Energy Administration Amendment (Water and Energy Savings) Act 2005 Council is
required to prepare and implement an Energy Savings Action Plan to improve its energy
efficiency.
During the reporting period Council continued the preparation of a Draft Energy Savings Action
Plan which contained actions to improve the energy efficiency at Councils highest energy
consuming facilities. The Draft Energy Savings Action Plan was submitted to the Department of

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Energy, Utilities and Sustainability (DEUS) on 4 April 2007 for approval by the Minister for
DEUS.
Although the Energy Savings Action Plan is yet to be approved by the Minister for DEUS,
Council has commenced implementation of the cost-effective energy efficient initiatives
identified in the plan, including installing non-return dampers on vents at Guildford Pool,
enabling Energy Smart settings on computers, upgrading air-conditioning controls at Councils
Administration Building and installing power factor correction devices.
Further information on the approval and implementation of the Energy Savings Action Plan will
be provided in future State of Environment Reports.

2.6

Waste Management
2.6.1 The Issue
There has been no significant change to the issues associated with Waste during the
reporting period.
2.6.2 State
During the reporting period, Council collected 28,355 tonnes of general waste for
transport to landfill and 7,389 tonnes of recyclable waste. As indicated in the Table 2.2
below, this represents a current diversion rate of 20.75%, a decrease of 1.62% on the
previous reporting period.

TABLE 2.3: AMOUNT AND TYPE OF WASTE COLLECTED IN THE HOLROYD LGA
1/7/03 TO 30/6/07
Period
Garbage
Recyclables
Total
Diversion Rate (%)
(Tonnes)
(Tonnes)
(Tonnes)
2006/2007
28,355
7,389
35,744
20.75
2005/2006
26,394
7,073
33,467
21.13
2004/2005
27,933
6,720
34,653
19.40
2003/2004
27,502
6,318
33,820
18.68
19.99
Average diversion rate over four years
2.6.3 Responses to the issue
During the reporting period, the following new responses were initiated to reduce waste
generation and manage waste.


New Recycling Service

During the reporting period Council implemented a new recycling service. All households now
have a yellow lidded recycling bin which is collected every 2 weeks by Councils recycling
contractor, J.J Richards & Sons.
The service is now a co-mingled recycling service, which means that all recyclables can be
placed in the bin together. The new service was introduced due to the expiration of the previous
contract and to facilitate increasing recycling rate. The trend is showing an increase in per capita
recycling rates.

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 Clean Up Australia Day


Council registered and coordinated 25 sites for Clean Up Australia Day on 4 March 2007
including the following locations:
- Merrylands CBD
- Long Street, Smithfield
- Civic Park, Pendle Hill
- Nancy Street, Pendle Hill
Over 100 local volunteers took part in the nation's largest community based environmental event,
cleaning up at the 25 sites with 100 bags of rubbish collected. This year 17 local schools in the
Holroyd City Council area took part in the Clean Up Schools Day.
An estimated 1 million people across Australia took part in the day at more than 7000 sites.
Some of the more unusual finds around the country were a parking meter, half a boat and a
maintenance leg. Feedback from site supervisors around Australia, which was supported by
collections in the Holroyd City Council area, shows beverage containers are one of the most
commonly found items.
 Annual Clean Up Service
Council provides residents with two annual clean up services, including the collection of garden
waste and white goods. During the reporting period 2,845 tonnes of clean up material was
collected by Council, comprising of 2,744 tonnes of general waste, 25 tonnes of white goods and
76 tonnes of garden waste.
 Regional Illegal Dumping (RID) Squad
During the reporting period, the RID Squad investigated illegal dumping incidents in the
Holroyd City Council area and issued Environmental Protection Notices and Penalty
Infringement Notices for these incidents.

2.7

Amenity
2.7.1 The Issue
There has been no significant change to the issues associated with amenity during the
reporting period.
2.7.2 State
Noise
During the reporting period, 58 sites were monitored as part of Councils background
noise monitoring program to assess the general noise levels throughout the Holroyd City
Council area compared to NSW EPA guidelines. Results of the sites monitored are
presented in Table 2.3, together with the results for the previous three years for the
purposes of comparison.
TABLE 2.4: SUMMARY OF NOISE ASSESSMENTS TAKEN
THROUGHOUT HOLROYD LGA
Period
Number of sites Number of sites with Number of sites with
monitored
55dBA>LA90<60dBA
LA90>60dBA
2006/2007
58
0
0
2005/2006
58
0
0
2004/2005
37
12
0
2003/2004
57
7
4

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The Department of Environment & Conservations recommended acceptable noise level


for suburban residential areas during the day is 55 dbA and the recommended maximum
level is 60dbA (EPA 2000 Industrial Noise Policy). As illustrated in the table above, of
the sites monitored in the 4 years prior to the reporting period, no sites were above the
recommended noise level for suburban residential areas during the day. In addition,
during the reporting period there was a slight increase in background noise levels.
Table 2.5 provides a comparison of noise complaints for the reporting period and the
three previous reporting periods.
TABLE 2.5: SUMMARY OF NOISE COMPLAINTS
Year
Pollution Line (DEC)
Complaints
2006/2007
7
160
2005/2006
9
82
2004/2005
Not Available*
74
2003/2004
0
79
* The Department of Environment & Conservation was unable to provide data for the reporting
period

Council received 160 complaints about noise during 2006/2007, significantly increasing
on the complaints received in the previous reporting period. The significant increase in
complaints is considered to be attributable to the increasing density of the area.
Council has also introduced new Computer Request Management software to record
complaints. The functionality of this software may also have led to a more reflective
recording of complaints received.
Odour
Table 2.6 provides a comparison of odour complaints for the reporting period and the
three previous reporting periods.
TABLE 2.6: SUMMARY OF ODOUR COMPLAINTS
Year
Pollution Line (DEC)
Complaints
2006/2007
14
37
2005/2006
16
24
2004/2005
Not Available*
44
2003/2004
23
23
* The Department of Environment & Conservation was unable to provide data for the reporting
period

During the reporting period Council received 37 complaints regarding air pollution,
which was an increase from the previous reporting period, but comparable to the
2004/2005 reporting period.
As indicated above, Council has introduced new Computer Request Management
software to record complaints. The functionality of this software may also have led to a
more reflective recording of complaints received.
2.7.3 Responses to the issue
No new responses were initiated during the reporting period.

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2.8

Future Actions
1. Implementation of the Holroyd Social Plan 2005-2009
2. Implementation of the Cultural Plan
3. Implementation of the City Health Plan 2006-2010
4. Continue to assess development applications in accordance with relevant planning
instruments and legislation, to ensure sustainable use and development of land , and
safeguard the urban character of the area
5. Continue preparation of the Holroyd Local Strategy
6. Continue current waste management strategies and implement new strategies in order
to improve the rate of diversion from waste from landfill
7. Implementation of the Water and Energy Savings Action Plans
8. Continue to increase public awareness of air and noise issues

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2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

Biodiversity

3.1
Overview
Biodiversity in the Holroyd City Council area continues to be under threat from continuing
fragmentation and degradation of aquatic and terrestrial habitats, the impact of pollutants, weed
invasion and introduced species. Council has yet to develop a method of recording local
biodiversity and as such relies on local knowledge, regional reports and biodiversity reports
which are often submitted with large Development Applications to prioritise responses to
protecting and enhancing the biodiversity of Holroyd.
3.2

The Issue
There has been no significant change to the issues associated with biodiversity during the
reporting period.

3.3

State
There has been no known change to the state of biodiversity during the reporting period.

3.4

Responses to the issue


During the reporting period, the following new responses were initiated to protect and
enhance biodiversity in the local government area.

 Bush Regeneration Activities


Council continued to support local bushcare groups active in the local government area. During
the reporting period, no new groups were established. And 9,738 plants were planted as part of
revegetation programs.
TABLE 3.1: NUMBER OF SHRUBS, TREES AND GRASSES PLANTED AND AREA OF
LAND SUBJECT TO BUSH REGENERATION ACTIVITIES DURING THE
REPORTING PERIOD
Location
Number
Area
Central Gardens
6,500
2 ha
Hyland Road
878
900 m2
Pendle Hill Creek
2,000
400 m2
TOTAL
9,738
The following provides an overview of each of the Bushcare Groups activities for the reporting
period.
Greystanes Creek
During the reporting period, the following activities were completed in the Greystanes Creek
Reserve:
Seed Collection on site for riparian revegetation works along a tributary stream.
Preparation of area for buffer planting along tributary.
Primary work along tributary to remove noxious and environmental weeds.
Regeneration works to allow native plant regeneration adjacent to revegetation areas.
Ongoing maintenance across the reserve by Council employed staff and contractors.
Monitoring is continuing on an ongoing basis to prevent weed competition with
regenerating natives and revegetated areas.

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2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

Alpha Park Bushland


During the reporting period, volunteers and Holroyd City Council staff undertook the following
activities in the Alpha Park Bushland Corridor:
Zone T/S/O
Seed Collection for revegetation project Widemere Reserve corridor extension.
Secondary work in Zone T/S removing woody weeds.
Secondary and further primary removal of woody weeds has been carried out in a mosaic
pattern in Zone T and adjoining area, Zone S. Follow-up works are continuing in these
areas.
Monitoring of 2 quadrats @ 10m X 10m each in Zone T/S has been hindered due to
continuing drought conditions.
Good Bush Neighbours Booklet continues to be a valuable resource in promoting
bushland generally in the local government area.
Illegal dumping of rubbish at corridor edges continues to be a problem. Rubbish and fill
are removed as soon as possible after detection.
Zone K/J/Widemere Reserve
Indigenous grasses, ground-covers, shrubs and trees grown to tube stock size and planted
in corridor extension at Widemere Reserve.
Installation of further bollards to widen vegetative corridor by 2-6 metres. Bollards also
guide tractor operators maintaining asset protection zone.
Further interpretive signs have been fixed to bollards promoting the Woodland as an
endangered ecological community.
Secondary and follow up work is continuing in Zone K and J.
Secondary work continuing with Volunteers, Contractors and Council employed staff.
Regenerating native species in zone K and J include Bursaria spinosa, Sida spinosa,
Dianella longifolia var. longifolia, Paspalidium distans, Microlaena stipoides,
Brunoniella australis, Wahlenbergia gracilis, Dichondra repens, Pratia purpurascens,
Asperula conferta, Glycine clandestina, Glycine microphylla, Glycine tabacina, Einadia
hastata, Eucalyptus moluccana and Einadia hastata. B. spinosa germination has
increased in 2006.
Lower Prospect Canal Reserve
During the reporting period, volunteers and Holroyd City Council staff undertook the following
activities in the Lower Prospect Canal Reserve:
The Landscape Plan of Management is currently being updated, with this reserve being
included in Holroyd City Councils City Wide Bushland Management Plan.
A Fire Management Plan is also being developed, together with vegetation mapping.
Maintenance works in revegetation zones mainly the eastern end of the reserve and
entrance points.
Secondary and follow-up work in area located adjacent the Aqueduct along Boothtown
Creek.
Monitoring of quadrat @ 5m X 5m in first Primary weed control site along creek-line.
Initial monitoring has been hindered due to continuing drought conditions.
Secondary works are being carried out by Volunteers, Contractors and Council employed
staff in all sections of the reserve.
Blackberry thickets are being phased out over a long period of time to protect small bird
and reptile habitat.

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2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

Monitoring will continue on an ongoing basis in those areas where arson fire has
occurred.
A second population of Lotus australis, previously unrecorded for Holroyd City Council
area, generated after a fire west of Cumberland Highway, Woodpark.
Renewed fencing around Acacia pubescens east of Sherwood Road, Guildford. This
fencing will also help curb disturbance by undirected foot traffic and erosion.
Ongoing weed control around populations of threatened species Pimelia spicata and
Acacia pubescens.
Herbicide treatment to blackberry thickets, commencing with small populations. Large
thickets will be phased out in a mosaic pattern over a longer period of time.
Follow up weeding and spot spraying after arson burns.
Arson burns are currently being mapped and will be incorporated into the Fire
Management Plan.

 National Tree Day


National Tree Day was held on 30 July 2006 at Central Gardens. 72 volunteers helped to
establish a new planting bed (720m2) that will serve as a vegetation buffer zone between
Merrylands Road and the Parkland.
Approximately 400 trees, 400 shrubs and 500 native grasses were planted. All these species,
including Eucalyptus tereticornis (Forest red Gum), Eucalyptus mollucana (Grey Box),
Melaleuca linarifolia (Paperbark), Acacia falcata (Sickle wattle), Acacia parramattensis
(Sydney Green Wattle), Dodonea debilis (Hop Bush), Eremophila debilis, Corex spp.,
Indigofera australis (Native Indigo), Dianella spp (Flax Lily) and Lomandra spp (Mat Rush) are
typical plants found in the bushlands of the Cumberland Plain.
Residents from the local community including representatives from the Girl Guides, the Mayor
Dr. John H Brodie, fellow Councillors, Council staff and even residents from adjoining Councils
volunteered at the event. At the end of the day the Lions Club provided a barbeque and free
drinks for all the dedicated volunteers.
 Sydney West-Blue Mountains Regional Weeds Committee
In the reporting period, the following activities were undertaken by the Sydney West-Blue
Mountains Regional Weeds Committee:
Basic regional mapping of Alligator Weed, Ludwigia, Salvinia, Senegal Tea and Water
Hyacinth.
Organisation of Mapping workshop for the Sydney Region to foster the use of national
weed mapping guidelines and encourage the collection of consistent regional mapping
data.
Securing of funds from the Sydney Metro CMA to undergo comprehensive weeds
density mapping for priority weeds in the Sydney Metro catchment for 2007-2008.
On-ground regional works for the control of Ludwigia, Salvinia, Senegal Tea and Water
Hyacinth, Willows, Gorse and Broom.
Preparation of funding applications to DPI to continue works on; Aquatic weeds,
willows, gorse and brooms and green cestrum
Involvement in the Sydney Metro CMA funded weeds education program including;
development of a bilingual education program / package for all to use, for more info visit
http://www.sydneyweeds.org.au/

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2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

Development of Weeds Education Display Material for the shared use of Committee
members.
Implementation of the Sydney Metro CMAs Weeds Strategy

 Bushcare Grants
In the reporting period, two EnviroTrust grants were awarded to the Pendle Hill Creek Bushcare
Goup and Hyland Road Reserve Bushcare Group. Details of the completed projects are as
follows:
Pendle Hill
Creek bank restoration works and follow up revegetation using endemic grasses, herbs, sedges,
rushes and trees. $25,000
Hyland Road Reserve
Bush regeneration / revegetation & creekline restoration works. $31,513.00.
 Acquisition of No Development Strip
During the reporting period, Council was still in negotiations with the owners of the
development strip at the rear of the premises in Woodpark, Smithfield. It is anticipated that the
purchase will be completed in 2007/2008.
 Catchment Management Authorities
The Sydney Metropolitan Catchment Management Authority (SMCMA) has been established to
provide leadership on key natural resource issues in Sydney Harbour, Georges River Botany Bay
and Hacking River Catchments.
During the reporting period, the SMCMA reviewed its draft Catchment Action Plan (CAP). The
CAP will guide the activities of the SMCMA while forming the basis for partnerships with the
community, business, industry and government. The CAP will assist the SMCMA in ensuring
that natural resource management projects are undertaken in priority areas within the catchment
and that these projects lead to the best outcomes for the environment and the community. The
CAP is based on five themes of Water, Land, Biodiversity, Coastal and Community.
The initial draft CAP was reviewed by the Natural Resources Commission. The SMCMA will
submit the revised draft in August 2007 following further input regarding the Catchment Targets
and Management Targets. It is expected that the NRC will recommend conditional approval of
the CAP later in 2007.

3.5

Future Actions
1. Continue negotiations with the land owner to acquire the no development strip in
Woodpark Road Smithfield
2. Continue to support bushcare activities
3. Identify opportunities to work with other government and private agencies, and
voluntary groups to extend, enhance and preserve green corridors
4. Continue to raise community awareness of the value of local biodiversity

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2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

Stormwater

4.1
Overview
Human induced actions continue to place pressure on our urban waterways and the preservation
of water quality continues to be an ongoing challenge for Council and the community.
4.2

The Issue
There has been no significant change to stormwater issues during the reporting period.

4.3

State
Table 4.1 below presents information regarding the amount of litter and silt which has
been collected from GPTs maintained by Council and Sydney Water during the reporting
period. The data does not present a complete picture of the extent of pollutants diverted
from the local creek systems as some devices are managed by other agencies and the data
is not available. However it does provide an indication of the enormous amount of
rubbish and debris which is not disposed of properly.
TABLE 4.1: KILOGRAMS OF AQUATIC LITTER /SILT REMOVED FROM
GROSS POLLUTANT TRAPS
Period
Kg removed from GPTs
Kg removed from silt
traps/wetland
2006/2007
47,230
943,000
2005/2006
34,000
48,000
2004/2005
16,260
65,460
2003/2004
20,180
52,690
The litter removed from the GPTs for the year 2006/2007 has increased significantly due
to the following reasons:
1. Sydney Waters GPT in Ringrose Park, which was commissioned in August 2006,
has been cleaned recently. Data is included in this report.
2. The GPT in Elizabeth St has been cleaned by Sydney Water and data is included
in this report.
The data indicates that these type of devices installed by Sydney Water are more
effective than the other designs.
Council has recently undertaken the cleaning of Civic Park wetland. Since it was last
cleaned in September 2000, an enormous amount of sediment was accumulated. When
cleaned from September 2006, the total silt/soil removed was estimated at 880,000 kg.
The removal of silt from the silt trap will be undertaken again in 2007/2008.
The figures listed above are the recorded litter and silt removed from the traps throughout
the Holroyd City Council area. However, there are sites where material has been removed
from devices that has not been recorded leading to an incomplete picture of the pollution
loading.

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2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

To compliment the data presented above, Table 4.2 provides the details of the location,
type and number of GPTs in the Holroyd City Council area, including those managed by
other agencies.

TABLE 4.2: GPTS IN THE HOLROYD LGA 2006/2007


Location
Type of
Owner
No of
Device
Devices
Upper Parramatta Catchment
Greystanes Creek
Portia Road
Oklahoma Ave
Fox Hill Golf Course
CSIRO Basin
Greystanes Estate

Girraween Park
C V Kelly Park
Toongabbie SC

Trash Screen

HCC

Litter Boom
Silt Trap
Trash Rack
Silt Trap
Trash Rack
Wetland
Underground
GPT
Screen
Trash Rack
Silt Trap
Litter Boom
Silt Trap
Pit Basket

HCC

1
1*
1

HCC
Private
HCC

HCC

1
1*
9
1

HCC

1
1*
1
1*
3

HCC

M4, opp Toongabbie Rd

GPT

SWR

M4, opp Toongabbie Rd

Wetland

SWR

M4, opp Toongabbie Rd

GPT

SWR

HCC

M4, Behind Finch Pl

Wetland
Silt Trap
Boom
GPT

SWR

1
1*
1
1

M4, near Sapphire St

GPT

SWR

M4, near Opal Pl

GPT

SWR

Finlaysons and Coppers Creeks


M4, behind 411 Gt Western Hwy

GPT

SWR

M4, behind 431 Gt Western Hwy

GPT

SWR

M4, behind 433 Gt Western Hwy

GPT

SWR

M4, behind Crosby St

GPT

SWR

M4, behind Gregory St

GPT

SWR

Pit Basket

HCC

Pendle Hill Creek


Civic Park

Wentworthville SC

Rubbish Collected
(tonnes)
Device cleaned data not
recorded
0.66
Device cleaned data not
recorded
Maintained by Lakewood Estate
Developer
Turned over to Council recently

Device cleaned data not


recorded
0.12
Device cleaned data not
recorded
Device cleaned data not
recorded
Device cleaned data not
recorded
Device cleaned data not
recorded
880
(material removed from wetland)
Device cleaned data not
recorded
Device cleaned data not
recorded
Device cleaned data not
recorded
Device cleaned data not
recorded
Device cleaned data not
recorded
Device cleaned data not
recorded
Device cleaned data not
recorded
Device cleaned data not
recorded
Device cleaned data not
recorded

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2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

Location

Type of
Device

Owner

No of
Devices

Rubbish Collected
(tonnes)

GPT

SW

Pit Baskets

HCC

63
(15 tonne litter & 48 tonne silt)
Device cleaned data not
recorded

Retention/
Detention Basin
CDS Unit
GPT
GPT
GPT
GPT

HCC

HCC
HCC
HCC
SWR

2
1
1*
1*
1

M4, near Richmond St

GPT

SWR

M4, near Gt Western Hwy

GPT

SWR

M4 near Allen St

GPT

SWR

Litter Boom
Silt Trap
Wetland
GPT

HCC

1
1*
1
1

Ringrose Park
Greystanes Shopping Centre
Domain Creek
Sydney Smith Park

Alexandra Ave
Bailey St
Oakes St
M4, near Frances St

6.6

No Data Available
No Data Available
No Data Available
Device cleaned data not
recorded
Device cleaned data not
recorded
Device cleaned data not
recorded
Device cleaned data not
recorded

Duck River Catchment


ABecketts Creek
Holroyd Garden Wetland
Elizabeth St
Merrylands Road
(Shopping Centre)

Private
SW

Pit Basket

2.85
Maintained by developer
36.70
(22 tonne litter & 15 tonne silt)
Device cleaned data not
recorded

Prospect Creek Catchment


Herbert Place

Long Street GPT (near Britton


Street)
Long Street GPT (near Gipps
Road)
Liverpool-Parramatta Transitway
near Hyland Rd, Greystanes
Liverpool-Parramatta Transitway
between Gipps & Tarlington,
Liverpool-Parramatta Transitway
near Hume Rd, Smithfield
Liverpool-Parramatta Transitway
near Sammut St, Smithfield
Liverpool-Parramatta Transitway
west of Dupas St, Smithfield
Liverpool-Parramatta Transitway
east of Dupas St, Smithfield
Liverpool-Parramatta Transitway
north of Britton St, Smithfield
Liverpool-Parramatta Transitway
near Percival Rd, Smithfield

Wetland
Boom
Silt Trap
Litter Boom
Silt Trap
Litter Boom
Silt Trap
Transitway CDS
1
Transitway CDS
3
Transitway CDS
4
Transitway CDS
5
Transitway CDS
6
Transitway CDS
7
Transitway CDS
8
Trash Rack

HCC

Device cleaned data not


recorded

RTA

1
1
1*
1
1*
1
1*
1

RTA

No Data Available

RTA

No Data Available

RTA

No Data Available

RTA

No Data Available

RTA

No Data Available

RTA

No Data Available

RTA

No Data Available

TOTAL

47,230 kg (Rubbish)
943,000 kg (Silt)

HCC
HCC

Negligible
Negligible
No Available Data

* Designed to be cleaned every 2-3 years; SW Sydney Water; HCC Holroyd City Council; SWR Statewide Roads

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2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

Table 4.3 below provides a summary of the number, of water pollution complaints
received by DECs Pollution Line and Council over the past four years.
TABLE 4.3: SUMMARY OF STORMWATER COMPLAINTS
Year
Pollution Line (DEC)
Council Complaints
2006/2007
8
47
2005/2006
28
48
2004/2005
Not Provided*
67
2003/2004
50
30
* The Department of Environment & Conservation has been unable to provide data for the
reporting period

During the reporting period Council received and investigated 47 stormwater complaints,
a similar number in comparison to the number complaints received in the previous
reporting period.
Council has introduced a new Computer Request Management software to record
complaints. The functionality of this software may also have led to a more reflective
recording of complaints received.
4.4

Responses to the issue


During the reporting period, the following new responses were initiated to address
stormwater issues in the local government area.
Stormwater Management Plans
Council has implemented several long-term actions in the SMP. Long-term actions are those
activities which involve continuing consultation with the community and other agencies. The
following are examples of long-term actions that Council has previously implemented and is
continuing:
a) Implementation of Councils Floodplain Management Program
b) Stormwater Education Program
c) Stormwater Quality Improvement Devices (SQIDs)
SQIDs completed by other Government Agencies
The RTA has installed SQIDs along the proximity of the Bus Transitway from Hyland Road
to Cumberland Highway. Although they are not included in the SMP, they help protect the
water quality of the catchment.
Similarly, Sydney Water has completed the installation of a GPT in Ringrose Park,
Wentworthville which became operational in August 2006. Sydney Water has advised that in
the 10 months of operation, a total of 63,000 kg of pollutants have been removed (15,000 kg
of litter and 48,000kg of sediment).
The responsibility for maintenance of these devices remains with those agencies.

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2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

TABLE 4.4: SUMMARY OF COMPLETED SMP ACTIONS


Category
Number of
Number of
Council
Joint Actions
Actions
Policy & Management (PM)
5
20
Education (E)
1
18
Nutrient Reduction (NR)
Litter (L)
23
Sediment, Oil & Grease (SOG)
4
1
Monitoring & Auditing (MA)
2
11
Public Health (PH)
Urban Stream Rehab &
8
3
Management (USR)
43
53
TOTAL ACTIONS

Total Number
Completed to
Date
13
16
12
1
10
4

Total
Completed
(%)
48
79
52
20
77
36

56

58

The common actions undertaken are as follows:


 Floodplain Management Program The nomination of delegates to Councils Floodplain
Management Committee was completed. There were eight delegates nominated and each
Council Ward will be represented by two delegates. The first Committee meeting was
held on 3 May 2007.
 Cleaning and maintenance of Stormwater Quality Improvement Devices (SQID)
The specific actions are as follows:
Upper Parramatta River Catchment
Completed Projects
 Darling St Park Car Park The filtration system component was completed in September
2006.
 Ringrose Park Gross Pollutant Trap (GPT) (under Sydney Waters SMP) has been
completed.
 Pemulwuy GPTs Nine underground GPTs in Pemulwuy were recently handed over by
the developer to Council for maintenance (this is not included in the SMP as an action
but relates to the water quality of the catchment).
Duck River Catchment
No specific actions implemented on this catchment at this stage.
Prospect Creek Catchment
 Bus Transitway GPT - The RTA has installed SQIDs along the proximity of the Bus
Transitway from Hyland Road to Cumberland Highway.

4.5

Future Actions
1. Continue to implement strategies from the Stormwater Management Plan
2. Recommence Councils Water Quality Monitoring Program
3. Continue to education and enforce the provision of the Protection of the Environment
Operations Act 1997 through Councils Environmental Assessment Program

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2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

Atmosphere

5.1
Overview
Human activity and the combustion of fossil fuels continue to impact on urban air quality and
increasing the levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Council continues to be committed
to improving urban air quality and reducing greenhouse gas emissions through its participation in
the Cities for Climate Protection program.
5.2

The Issue
There has been no significant change to the issues associated with urban air quality and
greenhouse gas emissions during the reporting period.

5.3

State
Table 5.1 below shows the air monitoring results for the south-west Sydney region in
2006-2007.

TABLE 5.1: NUMBER OF HIGH POLLUTION INSTANCES RECORDED IN THE


SOUTH WEST REGION UPDATE
Month

Time
Period

02/03 No. of 03/04 No. of 04/05 No. of 05/06 No. of


high pollution high pollution high pollution high pollution
incidents
incidents
incidents
incidents
July
AM
6
2
0
1
PM
0
0
0
0
August
AM
1
0
0
4
PM
0
0
0
0
September
AM
1
0
0
1
PM
3
0
0
1
October
AM
0
0
0
1
PM
4
1
0
0
November
AM
0
0
0
1
PM
1
1
1
0
December
AM
3
0
1
4
PM
3
1
0
0
January
AM
3
2
3
4
PM
3
1
2
3
February
AM
0
3
1
3
PM
0
1
1
3
March
AM
0
0
0
0
PM
1
0
0
0
April
AM
0
0
0
0
PM
0
0
2
0
May
AM
0
0
1
0
PM
0
0
1
0
June
AM
0
0
0
0
PM
0
0
0
0
TOTAL
27
29
12
26
Note: Morning Period - 3pm the previous day to 6am, Afternoon Period - 6am to 3pm.
Source: EPA web site www.epa.nsw.gov.au

06/07 No. of
high pollution
incidents
0
0
6
2
0
0
0
0
4
5
2
2
3
4
0
0
1
0
1
1
0
0
0
0
31

As can be seen in the table above, the number of high pollution days has slightly increased in
comparison to the number of high pollution in the previous reporting period, however is
similar to the number of high pollution days in the 2003/2004, 2002/2003 & 2001/2002
reporting periods. The cluster of high pollution days between November and January is

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2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

consistent with previous years and is representative of pollution caused by smoke from
bushfires and from dust storms. Interestingly this year, there was a cluster of high pollution
days in August and September.
5.4

Responses to the issue


During the reporting period, the following new responses were initiated to respond to
urban air quality and greenhouse gas issues.

 Cities for Climate Protection Program


Council continued to work towards achieving Milestone 4 of the Cities for Climate Protection
Program.
A summary of activities completed in the 2006/2007 financial year has been submitted to
International Council Local Environmental Initiatives (ICLEI) for verification. The activities
include actions taken under the Energy Savings Action Plan and community based actions.
 Western Sydney Alliance
The Western Sydney Alliance continues to lobby on the second Sydney airport issue at both
levels of Government and with the appropriate agencies.

5.5

Future Actions
1. Implement the Greenhouse Reduction Local Action Plan and achieve Milestone 4 of
the Cities for Climate Protection Program
2. Continue to educate the community on air quality and greenhouse issues
3. Continue to participate in the Western Sydney Alliance in opposing the second
Sydney Airport at Badgerys Creek

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2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

Soil Landscape

6.1
Overview
Impacts of land degradation occur over a period of time. During the reporting period, Council
continued to implement suitable strategies for managing problems such as contamination of land,
dryland salinity, soil erosion and acid sulfate soils.
6.2

Contamination Land
6.2.1 The Issue
There has been no significant change to issues associated with contaminated land during
the reporting period.
6.2.2 State
There is no new data available.
6.2.3 Responses to the issue
There were no new responses initiated during the reporting period.

6.3

Salinity
6.3.1 The Issue
There has been no significant change to issues associated with salinity during the
reporting period.
6.3.2 State
There is no new data available.
6.3.3 Responses to the issue
There were no new responses initiated during the reporting period.

6.4

Soil Erosion
6.4.1 The Issue
There has been no significant change to issues associated with soil erosion during the
reporting period.
6.5.2 State
There is no new data available.
6.5.3 Responses to the issue

 Sediment and Erosion Control


Council considers erosion and sedimentation to be a significant risk to our environment and is
detecting many instances of companies and persons allowing the local government areas
stormwater drains to be polluted.
Most soil erosion problems in the Holroyd City Council local government area stem from the
poor site practices of builders and developers, including removal of more grass and other
vegetation than is necessary, failure to erect sediment barriers and construct proper vehicle
access to sites and failure to protect gully traps from escaping sediment.

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2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

During the reporting period, Council continued with the Erosion and Sediment Control Program
through the use of a consultant. The inspection program has now been active for approximately
four years. The consultant has continued to progressively visit building sites to determine the
degree of compliance and issue Environment Protection Notices and/or Penalty Infringement
Notices depending on the circumstances. During the reporting period, approximately 1,100
inspections were conducted resulting in 146 Environment Protection Notices and 17 Penalty
Infringement Notices.
6.5

Acid Sulfate Soils


6.5.1 The Issue
There has been no significant change to issues associated with acid sulfate soils during
the reporting period.
6.5.2 State
There is no new data available.
6.5.3 Responses to the issue
There were no new responses initiated during the reporting period.

6.6

Future Actions
1. Continue to assess potential contaminated sites in accordance with Councils
Contamination Land Policy
2. Continue to enforce sediment and erosion requirements

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2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

Heritage

7.1
Overview
Heritage comprises of both Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal and takes physical and/or nonphysical forms. In the Holroyd City Council area there are places of heritage significance for
both the Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal communities.
7.2
The Issue
There has been no significant change to issues associated with Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal
heritage during the reporting period.
7.3
State
There is no new information available.
7.4
Responses to the issue
 Heritage Initiatives
Eleven applications for financial assistance under the 2006 Local Heritage Grants Program were
received, 3 more than the precious year. Council considered each application as worthy of
receiving grants and subsequently awarded all eleven recipients financial assistance, totalling
$11,489. Council also recognised and commended four owners for their efforts in conserving
and maintaining local heritage items.
7.5

Future Actions
1. Continue to promote an understanding and recognition of Aboriginal culture and
heritage
2. Continue to promote community awareness of issues of heritage significance
3. Continue to encourage heritage conservation through the Local Heritage Grant
Program

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2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

Toward Sustainability

8.1
Overview
Holroyd City Council continued to demonstrate its commitment to working with the community
at the local level to progress towards achieving a sustainable community through implementation
of actions identified in Living Holroyd: A Sustainable Future.
8.2
How is Holroyd working towards a Sustainable Future?
Table 8.1 below provides a summary of the trend of the indicators, showing whether we are
moving towards sustainability or away from sustainability.
TABLE 8.1: SUMMARY OF INDICATORS FROM LIVING HOLROYD: A
SUSTAINABLE FUTURE FOR 2006/2007

ECONOMIC
SUSTAINABILITY

SOCIAL & CULTURAL


SUSTAINABILITY

ECOLOGICAL SUSTAINABILITY

INDICATOR

KEY:

Water use per capita


Percentage compliance with ANZECC Water
Quality Guidelines
Amount of waste to landfill per capita
Amount of waste recycled per capita
Energy use per capita
Area of indigenous vegetation as a percentage of
the local government area
Number and diversity of indigenous birds and
animals
Background noise levels
Number of high pollution incidents for the region
Number of meeting places and opportunities for
meeting places
Number and types of social and leisure activities
available in the local government area
Number and type of cultural activities available in
the local government area
Level and types of crime in Holroyd local
government area
Number of public art projects
Number of art groups/networks
Number of registered/listed items in the Holroyd
local government area
Number of participants in community events
Unemployment in Holroyd local government area

Movement Towards Sustainability


No change

DATA

MOVEMENT TOWARDS
SUSTAINABILITY

216kL/dwelling (houses)
& 164kL/dwelling (units)
Data not available refer
to Chapter 4
332 kg
86 kg
Data not available
6%

Data not available

Refer to Table 2.4


31
31
(does not include
Churches or Parks)
Precise data not available

Precise data not available

Comparison not
available
Comparison not
available

Refer to Table 8.2

9
10
Refer to Chapter 7

>50,000

7.5%

Movement away from Sustainability

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2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

8.3

The Pillars of Sustainability


8.3.1 Ecological Sustainability
There is no new information.
8.3.2 Social and Cultural Sustainability
Meeting places, social, sporting and leisure activities, public art and community events
continue to play an important role in maintaining the social health of the community.
There are 31 identified meeting places or opportunities for community members to meet,
decreasing by one from the previous year.
Community safety continues to be an important issue in the Holroyd City Council area.
Table 8.2 provides a summary of recorded crime statistics for the Holroyd City Council
area for the past four years. All offences have decreased during the reporting period.
TABLE 8.2: COMPARISON OF CRIME STATISTICS FOR THE HOLROYD
LGA 2003-2006
Type of Offence
2003
2004
2005
2006
Homicide
8
3
4
1
Assault
895
857
948
803
Sexual Offences
114
95
119
76
Robbery
270
164
127
62
Break and enter dwelling
949
1050
955
647
Motor Vehicle Theft
665
676
668
459
Steal from motor vehicle
827
807
905
702
Steal from person
200
161
140
90
Source: NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research, www.lawlink.nsw.gov.au/bocsar

In comparing the rate of crime to other local government areas in NSW, based on rate of
crime per 100,000 population, Holroyd City Council was ranked 8th for robbery, 21st for
break and enter dwelling, and 21st for steal from motor vehicle, 18th for steal from person.
8.3.3 Economic Sustainability
There is no new information.
8.4

Future Actions
1. Continue to implement strategies from Living Holroyd: A Sustainable Future
2. Encourage community empowerment in local sustainability issues and projects
3. Ensure the principles of ecologically sustainable development are incorporated into
all of Councils operations

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2006/2007 State of Environment Report


Holroyd City Council

9 References
Council Documents
 Holroyd City Council, 2006, Holroyd City Council Management Plan 2006-2010
 Holroyd City Council, 2005, Holroyd City Health Plan 2006-2010
 Holroyd City Council, 2004, Holroyd Social Plan 2005-2009
 Holroyd City Council, 2003, Public Art Policy Distinctive Lifestyle Environments
 Holroyd City Council, 2003, Living Holroyd: A Sustainable Future
 Holroyd City Council, 2004, Greenhouse Reduction Local Action Plan
 Holroyd City Council, 2004, State of the Environment Report 2003/2004
 Holroyd City Council, 2005, Supplementary State of the Environment Report 2004/2005
 Holroyd City Council, 2005, Supplementary State of the Environment Report 2005/2006
 Holroyd City Council, 2006, Water Savings Action Plan
 Holroyd City Council, 2007, Draft Energy Savings Action Plan
Legislation
 Energy Administration Amendment (Energy and Water Savings) Act 2005
Other References
 Clean Up Australia, www.cleanup.org.au
 Duck Creek Catchment Stormwater Management Plan 1999
 NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research, www.lawlink.nsw.gov.au/boscar
 NSW Department of Environment and Conservation, www.environment.nsw.gov.au
 Prospect Creek Catchment Stormwater Management Plan 2004
 Upper Parramatta River Catchment Stormwater Management Plan 2002
 Western Sydney Regional Organisation of Councils, www.wsroc.nsw.gov.au
 NSW Department of Infrastructure, Planning & Natural Resources, 2004, Meeting the
challenges Securing Sydneys water future
 Sydney Metropolitan Catchment Management Authority, www.cma.nsw.gov.au
 Sydney West-Blue Mountains Regional Weeds Committee, www.sydneyweeds.org.au
 NSW Department of Planning, www.basix.nsw.gov.au

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