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To what extent do young people share

potentially damaging attitudes with far right


groups and where do these ideas come
from? What are the opportunities and risks
that this presents?
A research report developed by anti-racism educational charity Show
Racism the Red Card

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION..3
The changing face of the far right..5
Who are the English Defence League (EDL).6
METHODOLOGY.7
RESULTS 10
RESULTS: Survey version 1 (April 2012 November 2012).10
RESULTS: Survey version 2 (November 2012 March 2014).56
AKNOWLEDGEMENTS92

INTRODUCTION
Show Racism the Red Card (SRtRC) is the UKs anti-racism educational charity and
was established in January 1996. The organisation utilises the high-profile status of
football and football players to help tackle racism in society. The majority of the
campaigns output is the delivery of education to young people and adults in their
schools, their workplaces and at events held in football stadiums. Across Britain,
SRtRC delivers training to more than 50,000 individuals per year.
Show Racism the Red Card Workshops are fully participatory and contain a range of
auditory, visual and kinaesthetic activities to engage all learners. Workshops are
tailored to meet the needs of the learners and consideration is given to; time
available, their age, ability, previous knowledge and whether it is an introductory or
follow up visit from SRtRC.
In April 2012, SRtRC secured funding from the Department for Communities and
Local Government (DCLG) to deliver a two year programme of work designed to
combat the influence of far right street movements on young peoples attitudes and
behaviours.
The project represents a national initiative to challenge contemporary racism and
educate about the dangers of far right groups. The project focused on the delivery of
four distinct but inter-dependant strands designed to develop a comprehensive
approach to identifying and challenging the influence of far right groups on the
development of attitudes among young people.
The four strands of the programme are:

Full day adult and teacher training events tailored towards tackling anti
Muslim hatred and the influence of the far right.
Targeted programmes of school based education with young people
addressing the underlying causes of involvement with far right activity.
Research into the impact that the activities of the English Defence League
and other far right groups are having on young peoples attitudes and
wellbeing.
The development of a brand new educational resource No Place for Hate

Through the delivery of the four distinct strands of this targeted programme of work,
Show Racism the Red Card, the Department for Communities and Local Government
and the National Union of Teachers aim to:

Raise awareness among young people of the dangers of associating with far
right organisations such as the EDL
Help young people to think critically about the information they receive and
understand the harm that is caused by division and hatred
Empower young people with knowledge and understanding to challenge and
refute racist and Islamophobic ideals
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Provide teachers, youth leaders and educators with a better understanding of


the issues prevalent among the young people they work with and provide
them with the tools to continue to tackle racism and Islamophobia through
interaction with their pupils

This report presents the results of the two year research activity carried out in
conjunction with targeted programmes of school based education which sought to
answer the question To what extent do young people share potentially damaging
attitudes with far right groups and where do these ideas come from? What are the
opportunities and risks that this presents?
The far right and the English Defence League
The Collins English Dictionary defines the term far right as the more extreme
supporters or advocates of social, political, or economic conservatism or reaction,
based generally on a belief that things are better left unchanged.
Show Racism the Red Card accepts that the popularity of groups like the EDL may
wane, and in anticipation of this, educational activities and resources associated with
this project have been designed to challenge the ideas commonly associated with
the far right more widely and to assist both teachers and young people in the
development of a critical capacity required to make informed decisions about
organisations such as the EDL and about some of the key aspects of far right politics.

THE CHANGING FACE OF THE FAR-RIGHT


Far-right groups such as the National Front have existed in the UK for a long time.
However, recent years have seen the emergence of a new type of far-right social
movement. These groups are not political parties, but favour direct action, utilising
social media to organise marches and street demonstrations. Founded in 2009, at
the height of its popularity, the English Defence League (EDL) was the largest of
these groups.
Whereas traditional far-right groups espouse biological racism the belief that
people are biologically inferior, much of the rhetoric from the EDL and similar
groups, is of cultural racism and nationalism a belief that the British way of life is
being threatened by immigration and the presence of people who have different
religions, cultures and beliefs, particularly Muslims.
They also express dissatisfaction with the current political system and believe that
traditional political parties have little to offer. The EDL differs from traditional farright groups, in that they claim to be welcoming of Jewish and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual
and Transgender (LGBT) people and even have Jewish and LGBT divisions.
However, The Jewish Chronicle, Community Security Trust and LGBT groups have
issued statements condemning these as efforts to mask that homophobia and antiSemitism are still key features of the far-right in this current guise.
Young people who become involved with these groups are saddled with the burden
of fear, prejudice and hate and can be drawn into behaviours that are damaging,
both for themselves and the people around them.
EDL demonstrations create fear and tensions within the communities where they
take place: they are often marked by violence and arrests, both of EDL supporters
and counterdemonstrators.
They cost a considerable amount of money to police, cause damage to local
business, shops and markets as people stay away or shops remain closed.
The EDL has already begun to fragment and new groups, which also organise street
protests, flash demonstrations and other forms of direct action, have been created
by people previously associated with the group. For example, the Infidels in North
East and North West England are more violent, more extreme, and more openly
racist than the EDL, whilst Britain First are more direct in their provocation of
Muslims.
Undoubtedly, new groups will continue to emerge and existing groups will change
tactics and direction as time goes on.

WHO ARE THE EDL?


The English Defence League is a far-right social movement which was formed in
2009. The movement was formed as a response to a group of protesters who
demonstrated at a homecoming parade by the British Army in Luton, Bedfordshire.
The protesters (mainly made up of members of the, now banned, Islamist extremist
group, Al Muhajiroun) felt that the celebration of the soldiers return was wrong and
they held offensive banners condemning the actions of the British Army. This
prompted the formation of The United People of Luton, which later became the EDL.
The English Defence League was formed around a network of existing football casual
and hooligan groups and until October 2013, was led by Stephen Yaxley-Lennon,
who uses the pseudonym, Tommy Robinson.
The EDL organises street protests across England which often culminate in
drunkenness and violence. Many arrests have been made at these demonstrations,
both of EDL members and of counter-demonstrators who come to protest against
the EDL.
The EDL claims only to oppose Militant Islam (which is an extreme interpretation of
Islamic ideology, practised by a very small number of the worlds Muslims) but, much
of the rhetoric is directed against all Muslims and portrays Islam as a barbaric
religion.
Their social networking profile and the chants which can be heard on their
demonstrations clearly illustrate this, as does their violent opposition to the building
of Mosques and other buildings centred on the teachings of Islam.

METHODOLOGY
Show Racism the Red Card has conducted research into the attitudes of young
people and the extent to which these attitudes are shared with far right groups
including the English Defence League.
It is the intention of this report to present the key findings from this two year
research activity; however the purpose of this study is not to paint a complete
picture of the situation across the country but to highlight some of the issues which
exist for some young people in some educational institutions and communities.
The intended outcomes of this research are:

An indication of the prevalance of attitudes advocated by far right groups


such as the EDL amongst young people
An understanding of where young people are acquiring attitudes that
increase their vulnerability to becoming involved with these groups
An indication of what attracts young people to get involved with the far right
Increased awareness of the impact that the influence that far right street
movements are having on young peoples attitudes and behaviours

In order to add validity to the work and to reinforce findings, SRtRC employed a
mixed-method approach, including questionnaires, focus groups with young people
and staff journals. Multiple methods can add validity to the work and reinforce
findings (Denscombe, 1998:23)
Questionnaires
Between April 2012 and April 2014 Show Racism the Red Card attempted to survey
the opinions of all of the young people who took part in anti-racism education
workshops focused on addressing the underlying causes of involvement with far
right activity.
By the end of the project we worked with 8,793 young people from a variety of
educational institutions throughout nine distinct regions within England. We
developed a pre-intervention, self-completion questionnaire, in order to collect
quantitative data from young people, aged between 11 and 14. The young people
were from schools where teachers have expressed an interest in undertaking further
work on this issue with their young people, and in the majority of cases Show Racism
the Red Card went on to work with these young people in a classroom environment.
The survey results were used not only to contribute towards this wider research
project and report, but to provide insight into specific attiudes and issues present
amoung the young people we would be working with in preperation of our
educational interventions.
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Pre-intervention questionnaires were undertaken by 5,945 young people, with 4,443


(75%) completing surveys in full. Each of the 8,793 young people who benefited from
tailored anti-racism education workshops as part of the wider two year project were
given the opportunity to complete the survey, providing an overall response rate of
68%. Whilst this sample size is clearly not representative of the population of 11-16
year olds in full time education in England, Show Racism the Red Card believes this
to be the largest survey into the shared attitudes of young people and far right
groups undertaken to date.
Questionnaires were distributed to schools in electronic format for completion by
participating young people and were also available in paper format to those who
stated a preference.
The survey was designed using a range of data capture techniques including simple
yes and no responses to statements and psychometric scales to gauge the
strength of opinions. Young people were encouraged to provide more detailed
responses in their own words and free text boxes were used to capture this
information. A full analysis of these free text responses fell outside of the scope of
this project so it has not been possible to include them as part of this report.
Requests to make this information available for research purposes will be considered
on a case by case basis.
Survey questions were amended in November 2012 to reduce the burden of
completion for participants and to better reflect some of the key issues raised during
the first six months of classroom interventions including what Education Workers
perceived to be a lack of understanding about the religion of Islam. The presentation
of data from both versions of the survey in the Results section will highlight the
changes to questioning mentioned above.
The numbers of respondents to each survey question will match the data presented
within graphs and tables except for those instances where respondents were given
the opportunity to provide multiple answers to a single question.
Staff Journals
As part of the wider project Combating the Influence of Far Right Social Movements
on Young Peoples Attitudes and Behaviours, Show Racism the Red Card Education
Workers delivered anti-racism workshops aimed at countering the influence of far
right street movements on young peoples attitudes and behaviours throughout the
country, working with over 8,500 young people between April 2012 and March 2014.
During this period, Show Racism the Red Card Education Workers completed
journals in which they recorded some of the experiences that they have had whilst
working in schools and delivering teacher training.
Journals encouraged Education Workers to record their overall impressions of the
intervention delivered, including the appetite for engagement among young people
and school teachers, and their perspective on specific issues or behaviours displayed
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by young people during the intervention. Each core workshop was reflected upon
alongside additional elements of interventions including opening and closing
assemblies and free-time observations to create a picture of each school visit.
Challenges and opportunities were recorded to support continuous assessment and
future delivery.
The journals have proved to be a valuable source of rich information, which can not
necessarily be gathered through other methods, where worries about how they
would be perceived may create a contradiction between real attitudes and a desire
to create a particular impression.
Show Racism the Red Card employs four full-time Education Workers who deliver
anti-racism workshops to young people throughout the country. These Education
Workers are supported by a team of ex professional footballers and education
specialists, and staff journals were a great way of capturing the perspectives of a
diverse team, perspectives which are used in this report to illustrate a number of the
key themes that are supported by the results of this research activity.

RESULTS
This section will present the results of the activity to capture the opinions of young
people via the surveys described in the previous methodology section.
The results from surveys completed between April 2012 and November 2012 will be
clearly marked as Survey 1, whilst those completed between November 2012 and
March 2014 will be presented under the heading Survey 2. As described in the
Methodology section of this report, survey questions were amended in November
2012 to reduce the burden of completion for participants and to better reflect some
of the key issues raised during the first six months of classroom interventions
including what Education Workers perceived to be a lack of understanding about the
religion of Islam.
Survey 1 results (April 2012 November 2012)
During this period, the survey was completed by 3362 young people in preparation
for their participation in tailored anti-racism workshops delivered by Show Racism
the Red Card. The results from each question, together with the response rate is
presented below.
Q1. What is your age and sex?
2,638 respondents provided an answer, 126 skipped the question.

18% of respondents were aged 10


30% of respondents were 11.
17% of respondents were aged 12
11% aged 13
15% of respondents to the survey were 14
6% were 15
Less than 1% of respondents to the survey were aged 16+
(see Table 1 & Figure 1)

50% of respondents were male


50% were female
(see Table 2 & Figure 2)

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Table 1 - What is your age?

Table 2 What is your sex?

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Figure 1 What is your age?

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Figure 2 What is your sex?

Questions two and three (What is the name of your school? and Do you have any
pets?) were used as markers or identifiers to enable deeper analysis of responses
whilst maintaining the anonymity of respondents. The presence of such questions
could enable investigation into trends at a regional or individual school level and an
isolated analysis of an individuals response to the full survey. Whilst Show Racism
the Red Card recognise that there may be further, very valuable data which could be
drawn from such analysis, this was not part of the original research brief and is
therefore not included within this report.
Q4. How would you describe your ethnicity?
3,065 respondents provided an answer, 297 skipped the question.

10% of respondents described their ethnicity as Asian or British Asian


o 4% of those further identified themselves as Bangladeshi
o 60% specifically identified themselves as Asian or British Asian
o 7% of the above as Indian
o 16% as Pakistani
o 12% as Any other Asian background

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5% described themselves as Black or Black British


o 20% of the above further described their ethnicity as African
o 40% further described their ethnicity as Black British
o 9% further described their ethnicity as Caribbean
o 28% of the above further described their ethnicity as Other Black
background
3% of respondents to the survey described themselves as Chinese or other
ethnic group
o 23% of the above further described their ethnicity as Chinese
o 77% of the above further described their ethnicity as Other Ethnic
Group
5% described themselves as Mixed
o 45% of the above further described their ethnicity as Black & White
o 22% of the above further described their ethnicity as White & Asian
o 3% of the above further described their ethnicity as Black & Asian
o 30% of the above further described their ethnicity as Any other
mixed background
80% of respondents described their ethnicity as White
o 96% of the above further described their ethnicity as White
o 1% of the above further described their ethnicity as Irish
o 1% of the above further described their ethnicity as Gypsy or
Traveller
o 2% of the above further described their ethnicity as Other
4% of respondents described their ethnicity as Other
o 40% of those selected the option Id rather not say
o 60% of those selected the option I dont know
(see Table 3 & Figure 3)

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Table 3 How would you describe your ethnicity?

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Figure 3 How would you describe your ethnicity?

Q5. Which of the following best describes your religious background?


3,155 students responded to this question, 207 students skipped this question

3% of respondents answered Agnostic


8% of respondents said Athiest
Less than 1% of respondents said Buddhist
32% of respondents said Christian
1% of respondents said Hindu
46% of respondents said that they had no religion
5% of respondents said they would rather not say
Less than 1% of respondents said Jewish
5% of respondents said Muslim
Less than 1% said Sikh
(See Table 4 & Figure 4)

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Table 4 Which of the following best describes your religious background?

Figure 4 - Which of the following best describes your religious background?

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Q6. Do you belong to any clubs or groups? This can either be through school or in
your local area.
2,888 respondents answered this question. 474 respondents skipped this question.

50% of respondents said that they belonged to sports clubs


7% of respondents said they belonged to the Scouts
5% of respondents said that they belonged to the Guides
2% were members of the cadets
6% of respondents were involved in a local youth group
11% were part of a music group
9% of respondents were part of a drama group
3% were part of an art group
Less than 1% were involved in political groups
4% of respondents were part of other social groups
31% of respondents said that did not belong to any groups
(See Table 5 & Figure 5)

Table 5 Do you belong to any groups or clubs?

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Figure 5 - Do you belong to any clubs or groups?

Q7. Which social media sites do you use?


3,059 respondents answered this question. 301 respondents skipped this question.
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o

63% of the respondents use Facebook


34% of the respondents use Twitter
8% of the respondents use Tumblr
3% of the respondents use Myspace
39% of the respondents use Google +
1% of the respondents use Pinterest
2% of the respondents use Bebo
18% of the respondents dont use social networking sites
(See table 6 & Figure 6)
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Table 6 - Which social media sites do you use?

Figure 6 Which social media sites do you use?

Q8. Please state how much you agree with the statements below
3,154 respondents provided an answer. 206 skipped the question.
In response to the statement I have a fun and interesting life

59% of respondents said This is a lot like me


34% of respondents said This is a bit like me
4% of respondents said This isnt really like me
2% of respondents said This is not like me at all
2% of respondents said they were unsure
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In response to the statement I have good friends

80% of respondents said This is a lot like me


16% of respondents said This is a bit like me
2% of respondents said This isnt really like me
1% of respondents said This is not like me at all
2% of respondents said they were unsure

In response to the statement If I have a problem, I know where to get help

53% of respondents said This is a lot like me


33% of respondents said This is a bit like me
7% of respondents said This isnt really like me
3% of respondents said This is not like me at all
3% of respondents said they were unsure

In response to the statement I feel good about who I am

54% of respondents said This is a lot like me


31% of respondents said This is a bit like me
8% of respondents said This isnt really like me
4% of respondents said This is not like me at all
3% of respondents said they were unsure

In response to the statement I find it easy to trust people

23% of respondents said This is a lot like me


48% of respondents said This is a bit like me
18% of respondents said This isnt really like me
7% of respondents said This is not like me at all
5% of respondents said they were unsure

In response to the statement I believe I will achieve what I want in life

51% of respondents said This is a lot like me


37% of respondents said This is a bit like me
6% of respondents said This isnt really like me
2% of respondents said This is not like me at all
4% of respondents said they were unsure

In response to the statement I feel there are lots of opportunities for me

48% of respondents said This is a lot like me


36% of respondents said This is a bit like me
8% of respondents said This isnt really like me
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3% of respondents said This is not like me at all


4% of respondents said they were unsure

In response to the statement People listen to me and value what I say

30% of respondents said This is a lot like me


46% of respondents said This is a bit like me
12% of respondents said This isnt really like me
7% of respondents said This is not like me at all
7% of respondents said they were unsure
(See table 7 & Figure 7)

Table 7 - Please state how much you agree with the statements below.

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Figure 7 - Please state how much you agree with the statements below.

23

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Q9 - Do you think that any of the following might stop you from achieving your
goals in the future? Please choose up to 4 answers
2,988 respondents answered this question. 372 respondents skipped this question.
o 44% of respondents believe not having enough money might stop them
reaching their goals
o 40% of respondents believe a lack of jobs might stop them reaching their
goals
o 27% of respondents believe jobs been taking by foreign workers might
stop them reaching their goals
o 12% of respondents believe lack of support from their family might stop
them reaching their goals
o 13% of respondents believe lack of support from their school might stop
them reaching their goals
o 38% of respondents believe not knowing what job they would like might
stop them reaching their goals
o 12% of respondents believe not having role models or someone to look
up to might stop them reaching their goals
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o 23% of respondents believe not being able to afford further education


(college, university etc) might stop them reaching their goals
o 22% of the respondents believe these options wont stop them reaching
their goals
o 9% of the respondents chose the option I dont have any goals
(See table 8 & figure 8)
Table 9 - Do you think that any of the following might stop you from achieving your
goals in the future? Please choose up to 4 answers

Figure 9 - Do you think that any of the following might stop you from achieving
your goals in the future? Please choose up to 4 answers

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Q10 Which of these newspapers do you see at home?


2,953 respondents answered this question. 407 respondents skipped this question.
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o

4% of the respondents see The Independent newspaper at home


11% of the respondents see The Telegraph newspaper at home
2% of the respondents see The Financial Times newspaper at home
21% of the respondents see their local newspaper at home
19% of the respondents see The Times newspaper at home
10% of the respondents see The Guardian newspaper at home
4% of the respondents see The Observer newspaper at home
60% of the respondents see The Sun newspaper at home
8% of the respondents see The Metro newspaper at home
35% of the respondents see The Daily Mail newspaper at home
12% of the respondents see The Daily Express newspaper
13% of the respondents see The Daily Star newspaper at home
26% of the respondents see The Mirror newspaper at home
4% of the respondents see The I newspaper at home
14% of the respondents dont see any newspapers at home
(See Table 9 and figure 9)

Table 9 - Which of these newspapers do you see at home?

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Figure 9 - Which of these newspapers do you see at home?

Q11. Take a moment to think about your life in Britain, then tell us something you
really like about living here and something that you dislike.
2,511 respondents answered this question, 851 respondents skipped the question.
Respondents were provided with a free text box in which to detail their likes and
dislikes about living in Britain.
A full analysis of these free text responses fell outside of the scope of this project so
it has not been possible to include them as part of this report. Requests to make this
information available for research purposes will be considered on a case by case
basis.
Q12. Imagine you're speaking to somebody who lives in another country. They ask
you what it means to be British. What would you say to them?
2,231 respondents answered the question. 1,131 respondents skipped the question.
Respondents were provided with a free text box in which to detail their likes and
dislikes about living in Britain.
A full analysis of these free text responses fell outside of the scope of this project so
it has not been possible to include them as part of this report. Requests to make this
information available for research purposes will be considered on a case by case
basis.

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Q13. Many people describe Britain as a Multicultural society. This means that
people in this country have many different backgrounds, skin colours, cultures and
religions. Can you take a guess at the following:
% non-white people in Britain
% of people living here (Britain) who were not born here
2,380 respondents answered the question. 982 respondents skipped the question

The average estimate for the percentage of non-white people in Britain was
48%
The average estimate for the percentage of people living in Britain who were
not born here is 47% (See Table 10 and Figures 10)

Table 10 - Can you take a guess at the % non-white people in Britain and the % of
people living here (Britain) who were not born here

Figure 10 - Can you take a guess at the % non-white people in Britain and the % of
people living here (Britain) who were not born here

47
46
46
45

Estimations as percentages

45
44
44
non-white

not British

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Q14. What kind of things might you see in a community where people have
different backgrounds, cultures and religions?
2,105 respondents answered this question. 1,257 respondents skipped this question.
Respondents were provided with a free text box in which to provide details of
good/positive examples and bad/negative examples.
A full analysis of these free text responses fell outside of the scope of this project so
it has not been possible to include them as part of this report. Requests to make this
information available for research purposes will be considered on a case by case
basis.

Q.15 Our political system is made up of lots of different parties who all have
different values and ideas about how Britain should be. Below are some political
statements. Please rate how much you agree with each of them.
2,515 respondents provided an answer. 845 skipped the question.
In response to the statement I'd always support my country, whether it was right
or wrong

26% of respondents said they Strongly agree


36% of respondents said they Agree
17% of respondents said they Disagree
5% of respondents said they Strongly disagree
16% of respondents said I dont know

In response to the statement No one chooses his or her country of birth, so it's
foolish to be proud of it

14% of respondents said they Strongly agree


18% of respondents said they Agree
29% of respondents said they Disagree
17% of respondents said they Strongly disagree
22% of respondents said I dont know

In response to the statement The rich are too highly taxed

15% of respondents said they Strongly agree


22% of respondents said they Agree
24% of respondents said they Disagree
15% of respondents said they Strongly disagree
24% of respondents said I dont know
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In response to the statement We need to do far more to protect the environment

50% of respondents said they Strongly agree


26% of respondents said they Agree
4% of respondents said they Disagree
2% of respondents said they Strongly disagree
8% of respondents said I dont know

In response to the statement Students have to sit far too many exams

32% of respondents said they Strongly agree


27% of respondents said they Agree
24% of respondents said they Disagree
6% of respondents said they Strongly disagree
11% of respondents said I dont know

In response to the statement The legal drinking age should raised to 21

20% of respondents said they Strongly agree


19% of respondents said they Agree
26% of respondents said they Disagree
23% of respondents said they Strongly disagree
12% of respondents said I dont know

In response to the statement Migration to the UK is out of control/not being


managed properly

22% of respondents said they Strongly agree


27% of respondents said they Agree
15% of respondents said they Disagree
5% of respondents said they Strongly disagree
31% of respondents said I dont know

In response to the statement In my town, there are lots of things for young people
to do and get involved in

28% of respondents said they Strongly agree


35% of respondents said they Agree
19% of respondents said they Disagree
10% of respondents said they Strongly disagree
8% of respondents said I dont know

In response to the statement I would trust the police to deal effectively with any
problem I had

34% of respondents said they Strongly agree


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36% of respondents said they Agree


13% of respondents said they Disagree
7% of respondents said they Strongly disagree
10% of respondents said I dont know
(see Table 11 & Figure 11)

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Table 11 - Our political system is made up of lots of different parties who all have
different values and ideas about how Britain should be. Below are some political
statements. Please rate how much you agree with each of them.

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Figure 11 - Our political system is made up of lots of different parties who all have
different values and ideas about how Britain should be. Below are some political
statements. Please rate how much you agree with each of them.

Q16. Politicians and the Government are the people who make decisions affecting
all of the issues you have just considered. When you have been unhappy with
something in your local community or in this country, have you done any of the
following...
981 respondents answered the question whilst 2,379 respondents skipped this
question.

16% of respondents answered email my MP


17% of respondents answered write to my MP
11% of respondents answered meet with my MP
35% of respondents answered contact the council
8% of respondents answered sign political petitions
8% of respondents answered go on a protest march
11% of respondents answered write to a newspaper/contact press
15% of respondents answered write a blog
4% of respondents answered occupy (remain in a building/place as a way of
protesting)
11% of respondents answered give out flyers
19% of respondents answered put up posters
34% of respondents answered write about it or take action on
Facebook/Twitter
(See Table 12 and Figure 12)

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Table 12 Politicians and the Government are the people who make decisions
affecting all of the issues you have just considered. When you have been unhappy
with something in your local community or in this country, have you done any of
the following...

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Figure 12 Politicians and the Government are the people who make decisions
affecting all of the issues you have just considered. When you have been unhappy
with something in your local community or in this country, have you done any of
the following...

Question 17: If you haven't done any of these, why not?


2,039 respondents answered the question whilst 1,321 respondents skipped this
question.

21% of respondents answered that they cant be bothered


41% of respondents answered that they havent felt the need
19% of respondents answered that they wouldnt know how to
15% of respondents answered that they didnt know they could
20% of respondents answered that they didnt think it would make a
difference
5% of respondents answered that they have tried before and nothing
happened
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11% of respondents answered that no-one listens to them


12% of respondents answered that they would feel scared
9% of respondents answered that they would want to find somebody else
you thought the same way as them
15% of respondents answered that they think they would in the future
(See Table 13 and Figure 13)

Table 13 If you haven't done any of these, why not?

37

Figure 13 If you haven't done any of these, why not?

Q18. Treating somebody badly because of their religious beliefs or religious


identity is an example of racism. People who follow the religion of Islam are called
Muslims. What do you know about Islam? Please state whether you agree with the
statements below:
2,375 respondents answered the question whilst 985 respondents skipped this
question.
Islam is a peaceful religion
23% of respondents answered that they agreed
26% of respondents answered that partly agreed
8% of respondents answered that they partly disagreed
6% of respondents answered that they disagreed
36% of respondents answered that they didnt know
Muslims believe in the same God as Christians
12% of respondents answered that they agreed
12% of respondents answered that partly agreed
10% of respondents answered that they partly disagreed
38

33% of respondents answered that they disagreed


34% of respondents answered that they didnt know

Muslim women are oppressed


13% of respondents answered that they agreed
16% of respondents answered that partly agreed
7% of respondents answered that they partly disagreed
7% of respondents answered that they disagreed
57% of respondents answered that they didnt know
Islam encourages terrorism/extremism
12% of respondents answered that they agreed
14% of respondents answered that partly agreed
11% of respondents answered that they partly disagreed
22% of respondents answered that they disagreed
42% of respondents answered that they didnt know
There are poor relations between Muslims and non-Muslims in England
18% of respondents answered that they agreed
24% of respondents answered that partly agreed
10% of respondents answered that they partly disagreed
6% of respondents answered that they disagreed
42% of respondents answered that they didnt know
Muslims are taking over England
15% of respondents answered that they agreed
16% of respondents answered that partly agreed
13% of respondents answered that they partly disagreed
28% of respondents answered that they disagreed
28% of respondents answered that they didnt know
Forced marriages are common in Islam
21% of respondents answered that they agreed
20% of respondents answered that partly agreed
7% of respondents answered that they partly disagreed
6% of respondents answered that they disagreed
47% of respondents answered that they didnt know
Muslims contribute positively to society in England
16% of respondents answered that they agreed
19% of respondents answered that partly agreed
9% of respondents answered that they partly disagreed
9% of respondents answered that they disagreed
47% of respondents answered that they didnt know
(See Table 14 and Figure 14)
39

Table 14 Treating somebody badly because of their religious beliefs or religious


identity is an example of racism. People who follow the religion of Islam are called
Muslims. What do you know about Islam? Please state whether you agree with the
statements below:

40

Figure 14 Treating somebody badly because of their religious beliefs or religious


identity is an example of racism. People who follow the religion of Islam are called
Muslims. What do you know about Islam? Please state whether you agree with the
statements below:

Q19. Do you know what racism is? Racism is treating somebody badly because of...
[tick all that apply]
2,358 respondents answered the question whilst 1,002 respondents skipped this
question.

95% of respondents answered skin colour


81% of respondents answered religion
30% of respondents answered disability
21% of respondents answered hair colour
20% of respondents answered sex
59% of respondents answered nationality
66% of respondents answered culture
24% of respondents answered sexuality
(See Table 15 and Figure 15)

41

Table 15: Do you know what racism is? Racism is treating somebody badly because
of... [tick all that apply]

Q15. Do you know what racism is? Racism is treating somebody badly because of...
[tick all that apply]

42

Q20. The EDL are a street movement group that have very particular views about
Britain. Do you know what the letters EDL stand for?
2,355 respondents answered the question. 1,005 respondents skipped this question.

16% of respondents answered yes


84% of respondents answered no
(See Table 16 and Figure 16)

Table 16 The EDL are a street movement group that have very particular views
about Britain. Do you know what the letters EDL stand for?

Figure 16 The EDL are a street movement group that have very particular views
about Britain. Do you know what the letters EDL stand for?

Q21. The EDL stands for English Defence League. What do you think they are trying
to defend England from?
1,498 respondents answered this question. 1,864 respondents skipped the question.
Respondents were provided with a free text box in which to answer this question.
A full analysis of these free text responses fell outside of the scope of this project so
it has not been possible to include them as part of this report. Requests to make this
information available for research purposes will be considered on a case by case
basis.
43

Q22 Do you have any experiences of the English Defence League (EDL)?
2,100 respondents answered the question whilst 1,260 respondents skipped this
question.

82% of respondents answered that they I don't know anything about them
7% of respondents answered that they have heard people talking about them
positively
7% of respondents answered that they have heard people talking about them
negatively
8% of respondents answered that they have seen them on TV
6% of respondents answered that they have seen them in newspapers
3% of respondents answered that they their friends support the messages of
the EDL
1% of respondents answered that they have been to an EDL demonstration
3% of respondents answered that they have seen an EDL demonstration
5% of respondents answered that they have seen EDL-related graffiti or
messages
3% of respondents answered that they support the messages of the EDL
1% of respondents answered that they are involved in the EDL online
4% of respondents answered that they seen things from the EDL on Facebook
and other social media sites
2% of respondents answered that they have friends who are involved in the
EDL
2% of respondents answered that members of their family are involved in the
EDL
2% of respondents answered that they I have taken action/protested against
the EDL
(See Table 17 and Figure 17)

44

Table 17 Do you have any experiences of the English Defence League (EDL)?

45

Figure 17 Do you have any experiences of the English Defence League (EDL)?

46

Q23. What do you think are the main reasons that a person may join the EDL?
1,990 respondents answered the question whilst 1,370 respondents skipped this
question.

11% of respondents answered that if they have racist ideas and attitudes
3% of respondents answered that if they think it is exciting to get involved in
street protests
12% of respondents answered that if they feel they have very few
opportunities in the UK now and in the future
18% of respondents answered that if they are fearful/unhappy with the
number of immigrants in the country
18% of respondents answered that if they are unhappy with multiculturalism
in the country
20% of respondents answered that if they feel the country is under threat
from terrorism
12% of respondents answered that if they do not agree with Islam
15% of respondents answered that if they are being treated unfairly in
society
9% of respondents answered that if they do not have any trust in/do not
agree with the current government
8% of respondents answered that if they have friends who are involved
5% of respondents answered that if they want to make friends
47% of respondents answered that they dont know
(See Table 18 and Figure 18)

Table 18 What do you think are the main reasons that a person may join the EDL?

47

Figure 18 What do you think are the main reasons that a person may join the
EDL?

Q24. Thinking a little bit more about why people join groups like the EDL: do you
think there could be any positive/negative things about belonging to the EDL?
1,347 respondents answered this question. 2,015 respondents skipped this question.
Respondents were provided with a free text box in which to provide details of
positives and negatives.
A full analysis of these free text responses fell outside of the scope of this project so
it has not been possible to include them as part of this report. Requests to make this
information available for research purposes will be considered on a case by case
basis.

48

Q.25 Have you ever considered getting involved with groups like the EDL?
2,049 respondents provided an answer, 1,311 skipped the question.
2% of respondents said Definitely
7% of respondents said Possibly
43% of respondents said Unsure
47% of respondents said Definitely not
(see Table 19 & Figure 19)
Table 19 - Have you ever considered getting involved with groups like the EDL?

Figure 19 - Have you ever considered getting involved with groups like the EDL?

49

Q26. An EDL march has been arranged in your town. Would you...
1,787 respondents provided an answer. 1,573 skipped the question.

11% of respondents said definitely go along


7% of respondents said actively get involved & encourage others to go
13% of respondents said probably go along
29% of respondents said try and find out more
17% of respondents said chat about it with friends
9% of respondents said talk about it on Facebook or other social networking
sites
32% of respondents said stay well clear
9% of respondents said feel frightened
4% of respondents said join a counter demonstration
10% of respondents said try to stop it from happening
(see Table 20 & Figure 20)

Table 20 - An EDL march has been arranged in your town. Would you

50

Figure 20 - An EDL march has been arranged in your town. Would you

Q27. Your friend has written a joke against immigrants as their Facebook status.
Would you...
2,048 respondents provided an answer. 1,312 skipped the question.

10% of respondents said Like the status


5% of respondents said Copy & paste the status
4% of respondents said Comment in agreement with the status
35% of respondents said Ignore it
13% of respondents said Argue against it
16% of respondents said send him a message asking them to delete it
22% of respondents said Report it
3% of respondents said Hide the friend
8% of respondents said Unfriend them
14% of respondents said Do nothing
23% of respondents said I dont use Facebook
(see Table 21 & Figure 21)

51

Table 21 - Your friend has written a joke against immigrants as their Facebook
status. Would you...

52

Figure 21 Your friend has written a joke against immigrants as their Facebook
status. Would you...

Q28. You are in your dining hall. Paul is a white British classmate. He angrily shouts
to Helena, a student with Asian heritage, "Go back to where you come from & stop
stealing our jobs". Would you...
1,982 respondents provided an answer. 1,378 skipped the question.

7% of respondents said laugh along with Paul


19% of respondents said talk to Paul afterwards about what he said
21% of respondents said do nothing - you wouldn't want to get involved
5% of respondents said do nothing - you'd be scared to say anything
37% of respondents said tell a teacher
38% of respondents said stand up for Helena
9% of respondents said leave the dining hall
35% of respondents said check later on if Helena is ok
16% of respondents said feel confident the school would take action
(see Table 22 & Figure 22)
53

Table 22 - You are in your dining hall. Paul is a white British classmate. He angrily
shouts to Helena, a student with Asian heritage, "Go back to where you come from
& stop stealing our jobs". Would you...

Figure 22 You are in your dining hall. Paul is a white British classmate. He angrily
shouts to Helena, a student with Asian heritage, "Go back to where you come from
& stop stealing our jobs". Would you...

54

Q29. Thank you for taking the time to complete this questionnaire! We have asked
you about a wide range of issues. Now can you tell us
Has your school ever talked to you about any of the things this survey has been
discussing?
If so when? (in Assembly, lessons, one-to-one etc)
If not, are there any issues that you would like to talk about in school?
1,686 respondents answered the question. 1,676 skipped the question.
Respondents were provided with a free text box in which to provide answers to each
of the three sub-questions.
A full analysis of these free text responses fell outside of the scope of this project so
it has not been possible to include them as part of this report. Requests to make this
information available for research purposes will be considered on a case by case
basis.

55

Survey 2 results (November 2012 March 2014)


Survey questions were amended in November 2012 to reduce the burden of
completion for participants and to better reflect some of the key issues raised during
the first six months of classroom interventions including what Education Workers
perceived to be a lack of understanding about the religion of Islam.
During this period, the survey was completed by 2,638 young people in preparation
for their participation in tailored anti-racism workshops delivered by Show Racism
the Red Card. The results from each question, together with the response rate is
presented below.
Q1. What is your age and sex?
All 2,638 respondents answered the questions.

Less than 1% of respondents were aged 10


5% of respondents were 11
26% of respondents were aged 12
41% of respondents were aged 13
18% of respondents to the survey were 14
4% were 15
6% of respondents to the survey were aged 16+.
(see Table 23 and Figure 23)

49.73% of respondents to survey 1 were male


50.27% were female
(see Table 24 and Figure 24)

Table 23 - What is your age?

Table 24 What is your sex?

56

Figure 23 - What is your age?

57

Figure 24 - What is your sex?

Questions two, three, four & five (What is the name of your school? Do you have
any pets? What pets do you have? & What was the name of your first pet?) were
used as markers or identifiers to enable deeper analysis of responses whilst
maintaining the anonymity of respondents. The presence of such questions could
enable investigation into trends at a regional or individual school level and an
isolated analysis of an individuals response to the full survey. Whilst Show Racism
the Red Card recognise that there may be further, very valuable data which could be
drawn from such analysis, this was not part of the original research brief and is
therefore not included within this report.
Q6. How would you describe your ethnicity?
2,481 respondents provided an answer, 157 skipped the question.

5% of respondents described their ethnicity as Asian or British Asian.


6% described themselves as Black or Black British.
Less than 1% of respondents to the survey described themselves as Chinese
or other ethnic group
5% described themselves as Mixed.
83% of respondents described their ethnicity as White. (see Table 25 &
Figure 25)

58

Table 25 - How would you describe your ethnicity?

Figure 25 How would you describe your ethnicity?

Q7. Which of the following best describes your religious background?


2,393 students responded to this question, 245 students skipped this question

2% of respondents answered Agnostic


9% of respondents said Athiest
Less than 1% of respondents said Buddhist
38% of respondents said Christian
Less than 1% of respondents said Hindu
3% of respondents said they would rather not say.
8% of respondents said Jewish
5% of respondents said Muslim
Less than 1% said Sikh
40% of respondents said that they had no religion
(See Table 26 & Figure 26)
59

Table 26 Which of the following best describes your religious background?

Figure 26 - Which of the following best describes your religious background?

60

Q8. Which social media sites do you use?


2,434 respondents answered the question. 204 skipped the question.

81% of respondents use Facebook


48% of respondents use Twitter
13% of respondents use Tumblr
3% of respondents use Myspace
37% of respondents use Google+
3% of respondents use Pinterest
3% of respondents use Bebo
10% of respondents do not use any of the social media sites listed
(see Table 27 and Figure 27)

Table 27 - Which social media sites do you use?

61

Figure 27 - Which social media sites do you use?

Q9. Do you think that any of the following might stop you from achieving your
goals in the future? (You can select up to 4 answers)
2,499 respondents provided an answer, 139 skipped the question.

40% of respondents said Not having or earning enough money.


43% of respondents said A lack of job opportunities.
29% of respondents said Jobs being taken by foreign workers.
12% of respondents said A lack of support from my family.
17% of respondents said Not enough support from my school.
33% of respondents said Being unsure what I want to do as a job.
11% of respondents said Not having positive role models or people to look
up to.
21% of respondents said Unable to afford further education.
17% of respondents said I dont think any of these things will stop me.
9% of respondents said I dont have any goals.
(See Table 28 & Figure 28)

62

Table 28 - Do you think that any of the following might stop you from achieving
your goals in the future? (You can select up to 4 answers)

63

Figure 28 Do you think that any of the following might stop you from achieving
your goals in the future? (You can select up to 4 answers)

Q10. Which of these newspapers do you see at home?


2,499 respondents answered the question whilst 139 respondents skipped this
question.

12% of respondents answered the Daily Express


10% of respondents answered the Guardian
2% of respondents answered the Financial Times
51% of respondents answered the Sun
15% of respondents answered the Daily Star
7% of respondents answered the Observer
3% of respondents answered the Independent
3% of respondents answered the Times
26% of respondents answered the Daily Mail
21% of respondents answered the Mirror
3% of respondents answered the i
64

4% of respondents answered the Telegraph


11% of respondents answered the Metro
24% of respondents answered a local newspaper
25% of respondents didnt see any newspapers in their home
(See Table 29 and Figure 29)

Table 29 Which of these newspapers do you see at home?

65

Figure 29 Which of these newspapers do you see at home?

66

Q11. Tell us something you really like about living here and something you that
you dislike.
2461 respondents answered this question. 177 skipped this question
Respondents were provided with a free text box in which to detail their likes and
dislikes about living in Britain.
A full analysis of these free text responses fell outside of the scope of this project so
it has not been possible to include them as part of this report. Requests to make this
information available for research purposes will be considered on a case by case
basis.

Q12. Can you take a guess at the percentage of the British population who are
Muslim? Can you take a guess at the percentage of non-white people in Britain?
2418 respondents answered this question. 220 skipped this question.

The average estimate for the percentage of the British population who are
Muslim is 36%
The average estimate for the percentage of non-white people in Britain was
46%
(see Table 30 and Figure 30)

Table 30 - Can you take a guess at the percentage of the British population who are
Muslim? Can you take a guess at the percentage of non-white people in Britain?

67

Figure 30 - Can you take a guess at the percentage of the British population who
are Muslim? Can you take a guess at the percentage of non-white people in
Britain?
50
45
40
35
30
25

Estimate in percentage

20
15
10
5
0
Muslim

Non-white

Q13. Do you think there are good/positive things about living in a multicultural
country like England?
2,043 respondents answered this question. 595 skipped this question.
Respondents were provided with a free text box in which to provide details of
good/positive things about living in England.
A full analysis of these free text responses fell outside of the scope of this project so
it has not been possible to include them as part of this report. Requests to make this
information available for research purposes will be considered on a case by case
basis.

Q14. What do you think are the bad/negative things about living in a multicultural
country like England?
1,984 respondents answered this question. 654 skipped this question
Respondents were provided with a free text box in which to provide details of
bad/negative things about living in England.
A full analysis of these free text responses fell outside of the scope of this project so
it has not been possible to include them as part of this report. Requests to make this
information available for research purposes will be considered on a case by case
basis.

68

Q15. Our political system is made up of lots of different parties who all have
different values and ideas about how Britain should be. Below are some political
statements, please rate how much you agree with each of them:
2,268 respondents answered this question. 370 skipped this question
Id always support my country whether it was right or not

17% strongly agreed with this statement


32% agreed
21% disagreed
7% strongly disagreed
23% selected dont know

No-one chooses his/her country of Birth so its foolish to be proud of it

9% strongly agreed with this statement


17% agreed
26% disagreed
20% strongly disagreed
28% selected dont know
(See Table 31 and Figure 31)

Table 31 - Our political system is made up of lots of different parties who all have
different values and ideas about how Britain should be. Below are some political
statements, please rate how much you agree with each of them

69

Figure 31 - Our political system is made up of lots of different parties who all have
different values and ideas about how Britain should be. Below are some political
statements, please rate how much you agree with each of them

Q16. When you have been unhappy with something in your local community or in
this country, have you done any of the following:
2,194 respondents answered the question whilst 444 respondents skipped this
question.

6% of respondents answered Email/write to my MP


3% of respondents answered Meet mi MP
11% of respondents answered Contact the council
4% of respondents answered Sign political petition
4% of respondents answered Go on a protest march
3% of respondents answered Write to a newspaper/contact press
4% of respondents answered Write a blog
2% of respondents answered Occupation (remain in a building/place as a
way of protesting)
4% of respondents answered Give out flyers
5% of respondents answered Put up posters
14% of respondents answered Write about it or take action on
Facebook/Twitter
72% of respondents answered None of these
(See Table 32 and Figure 32)

70

Table 32 - When you have been unhappy with something in your local community
or in this country, have you done any of the following

Figure 32 - When you have been unhappy with something in your local community
or in this country, have you done any of the following

71

Q17. If you havent done any of these, why not?


2,194 respondents answered the question whilst 444 respondents skipped this
question.

30% of respondents answered Cant be bothered


40% of respondents answered I havent felt the need
15% of respondents answered I wouldnt know how to
9% of respondents answered I dont know if I could
24% of respondents answered I dont think it would make a difference
2% of respondents answered I have tried to before and nothing happened
7% of respondents answered Nobody listens to me
7% of respondents answered I would feel scared
2% of respondents answered I wouldnt want to find somebody else who felt
the same way as me
12% of respondents answered I think I would in future
(See Table 33 and Figure 33)

Table 33 - If you havent done any of these, why not?

72

Figure 33 - If you havent done any of these, why not?

Q18: Treating somebody badly because of their religious beliefs or religious


identity is an example of racism. People who follow the religion of Islam are called
Muslims. What do you know about Islam? Please state whether you agree with the
statements below:
2,200 respondents answered the question whilst 438 respondents skipped this
question.
Islam encourages terrorism/extremism
13% of respondents answered that they agreed
19% of respondents answered that partly agreed
12% of respondents answered that they partly disagreed
32% of respondents answered that they disagreed
23% of respondents answered that they didnt know
There are poor relations between Muslims/Non-Muslims in England
21% of respondents answered that they agreed
31% of respondents answered that partly agreed
73

14% of respondents answered that they partly disagreed


10% of respondents answered that they disagreed
24% of respondents answered that they didnt know

Muslims are taking over England


21% of respondents answered that they agreed
19% of respondents answered that partly agreed
13% of respondents answered that they partly disagreed
30% of respondents answered that they disagreed
16% of respondents answered that they didnt know
Muslims contribute positively to society in England
19% of respondents answered that they agreed
25% of respondents answered that partly agreed
14% of respondents answered that they partly disagreed
14% of respondents answered that they disagreed
29% of respondents answered that they didnt know
(See Table 34 and Figure 34)

Table 34 Treating somebody badly because of their religious beliefs or religious


identity is an example of racism. People who follow the religion of Islam are called
Muslims. What do you know about Islam? Please state whether you agree with the
statements below:

74

Figure 34 Treating somebody badly because of their religious beliefs or religious


identity is an example of racism. People who follow the religion of Islam are called
Muslims. What do you know about Islam? Please state whether you agree with the
statements below:

75

Q19. Take a look at the statements below and decide whether they are true or
false:
2,157 respondents answered the question whilst 481 respondents skipped this
question.
Asylum seekers and immigrants are stealing our jobs
60% of respondents answered true
40% of respondents answered false
Immigrants are all here illegally
31% of respondents answered true
69% of respondents answered false
Newspapers can contribute to racism
75% of respondents answered true
25% of respondents answered false
Racism is taken more seriously when it is towards a black or Asian person than
when it's towards a white person
84% of respondents answered true
16% of respondents answered false
Stereotypes can be dangerous
72% of respondents answered true
28% of respondents answered false
(See Table 35 and Figure 35)

76

Table 35 - Take a look at the statements below, decide whether they are true or
false

Figure 35 - Take a look at the statements below, decide whether they are true or
false

77

Q20. Do you know what racism is? (Tick all that apply)
2,174 respondents answered the question. 464 skipped the question.

96% of respondents associate racism with skin colour


87% of respondents associate racism with religion
31% of respondents associate racism with disability
22% of respondents associate racism with hair colour
22% of respondents associate racism with sex
72% of respondents associate racism with nationality
77% of respondents associate racism with culture
28% of respondents associate racism with sexuality
(see Table 36 and Figure 36)

Table 36 - Do you know what racism is? (Tick all that apply)

78

Figure 36 - Do you know what racism is? (Tick all that apply)

Q21. The EDL are a street movement group that have very particular views about
Britain. Do you know what the letters EDL stand for?
2,193 respondents answered the question. 445 skipped the question.

37% of respondents answered that they know what the letters EDL stand for
63% of respondents answered that they do not know what the letters EDL
stand for
(see Table 37 and Figure 37)

Table 37 The EDL are a street movement group that have very particular views
about Britain. Do you know what the letters EDL stand for?

79

Figure 37 - The EDL are a street movement group that have very particular views
about Britain. Do you know what the letters EDL stand for?

Q22. The EDL stands for English Defence League. What do you think they are trying
to defend England from?
1,852 respondents answered this question. 786 respondents skipped this question.
Respondents were provided with a free text box in which to answer this question.
A full analysis of these free text responses fell outside of the scope of this project so
it has not been possible to include them as part of this report. Requests to make this
information available for research purposes will be considered on a case by case
basis.
Q23. Do you have any experiences of the English Defence League (EDL)?
2,015 respondents answered the question. 623 skipped the question.

68% of respondents answered I dont know anything about them


9% of respondents answered I have seen them on TV
5% of respondents answered I have heard people talking about them
positively
5% of respondents answered I have heard people talking about them
negatively
3% of respondents answered I have seen them in the newspaper
2% of respondents answered I have seen EDL demonstrations
2% of respondents answered I have seen EDL related graffiti or messages
2% of respondents answered I have things from the EDL on Facebook and
other social media sites
1% of respondents answered I support the message of the EDL
80

1% of respondents answered Members of my family are involved in the EDL


1% of respondents answered I have friends who are involved in the EDL
1% of respondents answered I have been on an EDL demonstration
1% of respondents answered I have taken action/protested against the EDL
demonstration
Less than 1% of respondents answered I am involved in the EDL online
(see Table 38 and Figure 38)

Table 38 - Do you have any experiences of the English Defence League (EDL)?

81

Figure 38 - Do you have any experiences of the English Defence League (EDL)?

Q24. What do you think are the main reasons a person may join the EDL?
652 respondents answered the question. 1,986 skipped the question.

8% of respondents answered They want to make friends


28% of respondents answered They are fearful/unhappy with the number of
immigrants in the country

82

6% of respondents answered They feel they have very few opportunities in


the UK now or in the future
3% of respondents answered They have friends who are involved
11% of respondents answered They are unhappy with multiculturalism in the
country
9% of respondents answered They feel the country is under threat from
terrorism
3% of respondents answered They do not have any trust in/do not agree
with the current government
5% of respondents answered They do not agree with Islam
3% of respondents answered They feel they are being treated unfairly in
society
8% of respondents answered They have racist ideas and attitudes
2% of respondents answered They think its exciting to get involved in street
protests
15% of respondents answered I dont know
(see Table 39 and Figure 39)

Table 39 - What do you think are the main reasons a person may join the EDL?

83

Figure 39 - What do you think are the main reasons a person may join the EDL?

Q25. Thinking a little bit more about why people join groups like the EDL: do you
think there could be any positive/negative things about belonging to the EDL?
461 respondents answered this question. 2,177 respondents skipped this question.
Respondents were provided with a free text box in which to provide details of
positives and negatives.
A full analysis of these free text responses fell outside of the scope of this project so
it has not been possible to include them as part of this report. Requests to make this
information available for research purposes will be considered on a case by case
basis.

84

Q26. Have you ever considered getting involved in groups like the EDL?
627 respondents answered the question. 2,011 skipped the question.

7% of respondents answered Definitely


13% of respondents answered Possibly
25% of respondents were unsure
55% of respondents answered Definitely not
(see Table 40 and Figure 40)

Table 40 - Have you ever considered getting involved in groups like the EDL?

Figure 40 - Have you ever considered getting involved in groups like the EDL?

85

Q27. Your friend on Facebook has written a joke against immigrants as their status.
Would you?
1,999 respondents answered the question. 639 skipped the question.

15% of respondents answered that they would Like the status


5% of respondents answered that they would Copy and paste the status
6% of respondents answered that they would Comment in agreement with
the status
38% of respondents answered that they would Ignore it
10% of respondents answered that they would Argue against it
13% of respondents answered that they would Send a message asking him to
delete it
15% of respondents answered that they would Report it
4% of respondents answered that they would Hide the friend from their
newsfeed
7% of respondents answered that they would Unfriend him
23% of respondents answered that they would Do nothing
15% of respondents answered that they Do not use Facebook
(see Table 41 and Figure 41)

Table 41 - Your friend on Facebook has written a joke against immigrants as their
status. Would you?

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Figure 41 - Your friend on Facebook has written a joke against immigrants as their
status. Would you?

Q28. An EDL march has been arranged in your town. Would you?
1,652 respondents answered the question. 986 skipped the question.

8% of respondents answered that they would Definitely go along


2% of respondents answered that they would Actively get involved and
encourage others to go
6% of respondents answered that they would Probably go along
17% of respondents answered that they would Try and find out more
9% of respondents answered that they would Chat about it with friends
3% of respondents answered that they would Talk about it on Facebook and
other social network sites
39% of respondents answered that they would Stay well clear
4% of respondents answered that they would Feel frightened
Less than 1% answered that they would Join a counter demonstration
87

10% of respondents answered that they would Try to stop it from


happening
(see Table 42 and Figure 42)

Table 42 - An EDL march has been arranged in your town. Would you?

88

Figure 42 - An EDL march has been arranged in your town. Would you?

Q29. Thank you for taking the time to complete this questionnaire, we have asked
you about a wide range of issues. Has your school ever talked to you about the
things we have been discussing?
2,026 respondents answered the question. 612 skipped the question.

38% of respondents answered Yes


25% of respondents answered No
37% of respondents answered Not sure
(see Table 43 and Figure 43)

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Table 43 - Thank you for taking the time to complete this questionnaire, we have
asked you about a wide range of issues. Has your school ever talked to you about
the things we have been discussing?

Figure 43 - Thank you for taking the time to complete this questionnaire, we have
asked you about a wide range of issues. Has your school ever talked to you about
the things we have been discussing?

Q30. When were these issues discussed?


750 respondents answered the question. 1,888 skipped the question.

56% of respondents answered In assembly


71% of respondents answered In lessons
7% of respondents answered In a one to one
(see Table 44 and Figure 44)

Table 44 - When were these issues discussed?

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Figure 44 - When were these issues discussed?

Q31. Are there any issues you would like to talk about in school?
1,478 respondents answered this question. 1,160 respondents skipped this question.
Respondents were provided with a free text box in which to provide details.
A full analysis of these free text responses fell outside of the scope of this project so
it has not been possible to include them as part of this report. Requests to make this
information available for research purposes will be considered on a case by case
basis.
Q32. Finally, do you have any questions that you would like Show Racism the Red
Card to answer when we visit your school?
1,310 respondents answered this question. 1,328 respondents skipped this question.
Respondents were provided with a free text box in which to provide details.
A full analysis of these free text responses fell outside of the scope of this project so
it has not been possible to include them as part of this report. Requests to make this
information available for research purposes will be considered on a case by case
basis.

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AKNOWLEDGEMENTS
Show Racism the Red Card would like to thank the following individuals and
organisations for their participation and assistance with the initial research activity
and the subsequent compilation of this report.

All 5, 945 young people from across the UK who gave up their time to
complete the survey with honesty and maturity.

Over 80 participating schools that embraced the opportunity to engage their


students in safe, constructive discussions on the issue of racism and
recognised the significance of this study.

The Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) for funding
such a valuable and comprehensive programme of work and for guidance in
the development of this report.

Dr Paul Jackson, Senior Lecturer in Modern History at the University of


Northampton who generously gave of his time and expertise to write an
accompanying narrative on the results of the research activity in addition to
supporting other strands of the overall funded project.

All local authority partners that provided access to schools and promoted
participation in the entire programme including this research project.

Neil Shashoua and Stephanie Cole of Trapeze Consulting; responsible for


completing the external evaluation of the project.

Show Racism the Red Card Education Workers and staff Laura Pidcock, Lizz
Bennett, Sarah Soyei, Kate Hollinshead, Paul Mortimer, Manisha Tailor, Steve
Goodsell, Laura Watkins, Wendy Watts, James Kingett, Gavin Sutherland,
Paul Kearns, Ged Grebby, Osei Sankofa, Anwar Uddin, Dominic Healy, Rose
Greenfield & Ryan Cullen.

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