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DIPLOMA IN CULINARY ARTS GENTING INTI INTERNATIONAL


COLLEGE

Welcome to the Programme

Dear Student,

Welcome to Genting Inti International College, a centre of vocational excellence in


culinary arts education provision. We are proudly to introduce you the two great
partners, Genting Malaysia Berhad and Inti Laureate to evolve one great qualification
in the field of culinary arts. We hope you will enjoy and embrace the academic and
social life of the college.

You are embarking on a new learning experience, which we are sure will be both
exciting and stimulating. This course presents you with the opportunity to develop a
range of skills enabling you to operate effectively in the hospitality industry and
progress rapidly to a senior level especially in a food production environment. Yet we
offer students a learning environment which allows you to develop your creativity,
work ethnic, leadership, teambuilding and many other life skill that are essential in
your future success be it personal or professional.

The Diploma in Culinary Arts builds the knowledge and skills you will need, enabling
you to focus on both the practical aspects of the industry, whilst encouraging you to
develop a broad knowledge of business, intellectual critical thinking and problem
solving skills, essential to your career development. You are joining a course that
welcomes students from a wide variety of cultures, international food backgrounds
and academic achievements. We hope you will find this a lively and stimulating
environment in which to learn.

This programme hand book will give you an in-depth insight into what Genting Inti
International College can offer you as a sound academic experience through various
study programs to build your future in international world of hotels and the service
industry and progress to leadership positions in the hospitality business.

We all wish you every success with your studies.

Colin Song Wong


Head of Culinary Arts
Songshing.wong@genting.com

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INTRODUCTION

THE SCHOOL

Genting Inti International College is established in 2004 between the Joint venture of
Genting Malaysia Berhad and Inti education group. We offer two programmes of
studies, namely Diploma in Hotel Management and Diploma in Culinary Arts. GIIC is
committed to evolve the development of its curriculum, adding facilities for the
students and expanding its international network, thus creating more future university
degree transfer opportunities and career tracks for you.

PURPOSE

GIIC is visualising that our graduates will embody the values of rigor in their work, a
strong team spirit, flexibility in problem solving, dedication to service, a global
perspective, and respect for other cultures. Our programme will provide students
with a deep understanding of the principles of leadership in the workplace and in
daily life and practical opportunities to develop and demonstrate leadership skills.

THE PROGRAMME

Diploma in Culinary Arts is programme is employability and personal development in


culinary arts. This is clearly identified by the progression in pastry and kitchen
techniques with the business management theme underpinning the practical
learning. Theoretical concepts and frameworks are contained within all modules,
further strengthening the academic rigor of the programme. The independent
learning with strong faculty support and a foundation for lifelong learning with skills
for immediate employment and progress to leadership positions in the industry.

HOW TO USE THE HANDBOOK

This Handbook contains the description of the DCA programme offered by the
college. This handbook also includes general administrative and academic
information. It must be noted that the Handbook is prepared well in advance of the
semester it covers; therefore changes in some programmes are to be accepted. The
section on courses to be offered each semester is subject to change without notice,
and some courses listed are not offered each year. Students should consult the
respective Head of School/Programme for more up-to-date information.

PRINCIPAL STAFF

The Principal Mr. Nicholas Ching Lai Hock


E-mail:- nicholasclh@gmail.com

Head of Programme Mr. Colin Song Wong


E-mail:-songshing.wong@genting.com

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ACADEMIC REGULATIONS

Students of the culinary arts are subjected to the College Regulations, which are
applicable to all students enrolled in Genting Inti International College. In the event
of any substantive discrepancy between this document and the College Regulations,
the latter shall be considered as authoritative.

As a student you can expect:

• To find and receive a copy of the current college regulation at enrolment


• The regulation to be updated annually

This regulation, once revised, applies to all students enrolling or re-enrolling in that
academic year.

As a student you are expected to:

• Keep your copy of these regulations


• Acquaint yourself with the regulations
• Not wilfully disregard the regulations

The College’s Academic Board periodically monitors, revises and approves the
regulations for the forthcoming academic semesters.

The following sectors illustrate regulations pertaining to:

1. Performance
2. Examination
3. Teaching and Learning

PERFORMANCE

Students who perform at high academic level will receive awards of excellence or
merit. Graduates are thus able to work in competitive practical environments,
question, analyze and evaluate industrial procedures, systems and concepts. Their
cognitive skills are well developed being able to take the subject forward. Thus, they
are able to achieve, by reflecting on the present and plan the future, synthesizing
each subject area to achieve the integrated whole. The learning gained across
modules is essential knowledge required in hospitality due to its diverse and
complicated structure. Graduateness also gives students an appreciation of the
service sector economy, an important contribution to the gross national product and
their ability to gain employment across the service sector. Students who experience
difficulty with their course work are encouraged to see their Head of Programme for
assistance and counseling.

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ACADEMIC AWARDS

To recognize the excellent academic achievement of students, awards will be


presented every semester to students who have successfully completed a full load of
study in a semester and have not dropped any course or failed any course in that
semester. The title of the awards and the required GPA scores are:

i. Award of Excellence : A student who has enrolled for at least 12 credit


hours and obtained a semester GPA of 4.00 will be
placed on the award of excellence

ii. Merit : A student who has enrolled for at least 12 credit


hours and obtained a semester GPA of 3.50 or higher
will be placed on merit

TRANSCRITPS

All requests for transcripts, records, copies of original documents are addressed to
the registrar Office. Each student is entitled to two copies of transcripts free of
charge; subsequent copies will be issued only upon the written request of the
student concerned with appropriate payment remitted. Transcripts should be
requested well in advance of the date desired to allow for processing time and
possible mail delay. The College will not assume responsibility for transcripts that
are delayed because they have not been requested in time or the student has an
outstanding debt with the College. Transcripts of work at other institutions or test
scores submitted for admission or evaluation of credit cannot be copied or reissued
by the College.

GRADE APPEAL PROCEDURE

Students may lodge an appeal to the academic committee if they believe that he or
she did not receive the grade that was deserved in a course has three weeks at the
beginning of the next semester in which the student is enrolled to initiate an appeal
of the grade. The initial reasons to be considered only when:
a. The published results of grades are suspect of containing arithmetical errors
or other errors of fact.
b. Exceptional personal circumstances could have an adverse affect on the
candidate’s performance. Besides providing third party evidence, which
substantiates the claim, the candidate must provide good reasons why the
invokes reason was not made known to the Academic committee before it
took place.
c. Appeals, which are based on facts and are ready already known to the
Academic committee before they made their recommendation for the
conferment of awards, will not be admissible.
d. Appeals, which question the academic judgement of examinations, shall not
be admissible.

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e. Appeals, which are based on factors already known to the candidate before
the assessment took place, will not be admissible, such cases should have
led the candidate to file for mitigating circumstances.
The first step in the procedure is informal consultation between the lecturer and
student; the student may also seek the advice of the Head of Programme concerned.
A formal appeal may be made to the Examinations Office according to the procedure
prescribed by the Examinations Office.

RESIT EXAMINATIONS

Students who do not meet the achievement standards at course level-a grade D in
any subject will be eligible to resit maximum 2 times for that particular subject, which
must be taken at the specified time, normally in the first two weeks of the new term.
The subsequent resit must be fulfilled within the next two weeks after the first
attempt of the first resit. However this is at the discretion of the Examination Board.
Students who did not attend resit will be automatically getting RF in their transcript.
The first resit will be free of charge unless the second attempt is made for the same
subject. In such, resit students will have to pay a resit fee before he/she is allowed to
resit for the particular subject.

If the resit student is successful in the resit examination, a maximum course grade of
C will be awarded and will be used in the computation of the quarter grade average.
The resit mark, if below these even in the second attempt of the resit, will be the final
grade whether higher or lower than the previous mark. If the student has not met the
achievement level in this resit examination and the quarter, he or she must retake
the failed course and must pay the relevant fee for that course. In addition, a student
may normally only retake a course one time. Students who have not met the
minimum achievement grade (after resit) will not be able to progress until they have
been taken. A resit examination is not permitted if the fail was due to cheating,
resulting in a zero grade for a component of the course.

REPEAT COURSES

A student may repeat any course in which a failing grade is received and only
allowed to make a maximum of three attempts at a particular course to achieve a
pass grade.

REPEAT INSTEAD OR RESIT

Students can appeal for repeat instead of resit if they don’t want to sit for resit

EXAMINATION

At examination points, examination dates will be posted at least one week before the
examination takes place. Students shall be responsible for obtaining examination
schedules published and displayed by the Academic Office. A student may be
allowed to take an examination at other than the scheduled time only if he or she is
incapacitated due to illness or accident, which is certified or due to death in the

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immediate family. An examination which is missed for reasons other than the above
will result in a zero grade.

A student who believes that his or her circumstances fall into other than the above
categories must present supporting documentation and must request a supplemental
examination of the dean, whose decision will be final. This will be a different
examination and there will be a fee for a supplemental examination. Travel plans are
not excusable reason for missing an examination.

Any student arriving at the examination after 30 minutes will not be admitted to the
examination and the resultant grade will be zero. A student admitted late will only be
given the time until the normal conclusion of the examination to complete. Students
may not leave in the first 45 minutes of an examination or the last 15 minutes.

General examination regulations will be posted as in student handbook by then must


be observed by students and faculty without exception. Such regulations will relate
to:
a. Items allowed in the examination room
b. Items not allowed in the examination room
c. Talking during the examination
d. Finishing the examination
e. Cheating or attempted cheating
f. Question time
g. Dress code
h. To have student ID card on exam table

RELEASING EXAMINATIONS RESULTS

Individual grade reports will be issued to the student after each semester. The
lecturer, under any circumstances, will not release grades.

SPECIAL PROVISION

A student requiring special provision for his/her examinations shall submit a written
application to the Head of Programme. The application shall be supported by
documentary evidence. The Head of Programme is permitted to disregard requests
for special provision if not supported by appropriate documentary evidence.

Special examination provision may be considered for circumstances including


dyslexia, visual impairment, hearing impairment and physical impairment from writing
a script.

USE OF AUTHORISED MATERIALS

All texts and/or other material approved by the College’s Academic Board for use in
examinations shall be subject to scrutiny by invigilators.

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UNFAIR PRACTICE

It is an unfair practice to commit any act whereby a person might obtain for him or
herself or for another, an unpermitted advantage leading to a higher mark or grade
than his or her abilities would otherwise secure. In particular, but without prejudice to
the generality of the foregoing, it is unfair practice to:
• introduce into an examination room any unauthorised source of information;
• communicate with any other person, except as authorised by an invigilator;
• copy or use in any other way unauthorised materials or the work of any other
student;
• impersonate an examination student or allow oneself to be impersonated;
• engage in plagiarism by using the work of one or more other persons and
submitting that work, in whole or in part, for assessment or examination without
proper citation of the source(s), as though it were the student's own work;
• claim either to have carried out experiments, observations, interviews or any form
of research which the student has not in fact carried out or to claim to have
obtained results which have not in fact been obtained;
• Present evidence of special circumstances to examining boards which is false or
falsified or which is, in any way, intended to mislead examining boards.

Any event identified as unfair practice will be subjected to the regulation of the
Academic Dishonesty Committee.

TEST MATERIALS

All examinations, tests, and quizzes assigned as assessment requirements of the


course are the properties of the College. Students may review their tests,
assignments or quizzes but may not retain possession unless permitted to do so by
the lecturers. All examination materials will remain confidential and will be retained
by the College.

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TEACHING AND LEARNING

DOCUMENTATION TO BE ISSUED TO STUDENTS BY ACADEMIC SCHOOLS

The overall strategy is to encourage independent study and the acquisition of practical
business and management skills. The programme is designed to take account of
different learning styles through delivery and assessment. Lectures, seminars,
practical’s, case studies, presentations, reports, and industrialist lectures are all part of
the organic learning process.

Pastoral and tutorial support is essential as it recognizes each individual need, supports
and encourages the student to make sure the overall learning experience is effective.
There is also the need to gradually introduce all aspects of technology to students who
have experienced education from a variety of backgrounds and are not as familiar with
some of the technology. By gradually introducing these students to the various advances
in technology, their confidence can be increased and they are encouraged to network
with other students who are fully conversant with what is available.

The lecturer shall inform students at the beginning of each session of the information
related to the subject to be covered based on approved Course Structures. Such
pertinent information may include:

1. Course code and title


2. Session
3. Prerequisite
4. Course description
5. Course objectives
6. Course format
7. Student evaluation
8. Final examination format
9. Grading scale
10. Basic texts
11. References
12. Class syllabus

Description of Courses
Curricular and courses listed in this Handbook are subject to change through normal
academic channels.

FULL TIME STUDENT

It is imperative that a full time student at Genting Inti International College does at least
12 credit hours in a long semester and 6 credit hours in a short semester.

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CONDUCT AND DRESS CODE

Students are to behave and display proper conduct at all times. Students are also
expected to be decently dressed and in their proper attire (uniform), when attending
classes or attending to any educational related matters of the College. The following are
considered as improper and unacceptable by the College:

• Revealing clothes
• Singlets, hot pants, mini-skirts
• Clothes with offensive or obscene wordings.
• Slippers, sandals without heel straps

Students are expected to be in their Failure to abide to the rules and regulations may
result in suspension or denial of entry at the campus ground.

ATTENDANCE Policy

Attendance in class is important to succeed at college and students are expected to


have commitment to their studies ad work ethos, which is display through excellent
attendance. For this reason, attendance is required at all theory and practical classes.
Students are expected to be in class on time. Students may not be allowed in the
classroom if they arrive late. This will recorded as an absence. The attendance policy
said:

1. Attendance is compulsory. Students with unsatisfactory attendance may be barred


from the final examinations.

2. Student is subjected to fulfill the attendance not less than 80% of the required credit
hours.

3. If a student cannot attend class due to valid reasons, he/ she has to apply for LEAVE
OF ABSENCE before the intended leave. The forms for this are available at the
student service. Application and approval of the leave has to be done before the
intended leave.

4. The LEAVE OF ABSENCE form must be accompanied by any documentary proof


where appropriate. If a student is ill, he/ she should submit a medical certificate to the
respective lecturers. For humanitarian and other reasons, supporting documents (e.g.
letter from parent/guardian) must be submitted to the head of programme at the
earliest possible moment. Students are accountable for any work missed during the
period of absence.

5. The form is then submitted to the Head of Programme who may or may not approve
the application.

6. Actions will be taken against students if they fail to do so.

7. Two lateness equivalent to one absence.

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8. Student who absent from the subsequent 3 classes will be considered as dismissal.
However, student is required to attend the remaining class while appealing for the re-
sit.

All Students:

During the 1st absence Verbal warning is given to the student.


During the 2nd absence First warning letter is issued to the student.
During the 3rd absence Second warning letter is issued to the student and parent.
After the 4th absence Letter barring the student from sitting for any test and
examination of that course will be issued.

9. When a student stops attending class or fail to attend the Final Examination but does
not officially withdraw from that class, the student is awarded a failed grade for the
course involved.

Absence from class does not release students from responsibilities of submitting work
and projects on time, or taking exams, quizzes and group work. The tutor may elect to
give a failing mark if a student does not attend a scheduled class even of the student is
within the absence limit for that particular course.

LEAVE OF ABSENCE

A student who intends to apply for leave must obtain approval from the relevant lecturers
by completing the ‘leave of Absence from Class” form, available at the student service.
The form is then submitted to the Head of programme who may or may not approve the
application.

PRACTICAL DUTY PUNTUALITY

The period is considered missed if at start of the period the student is not present.
Lecturers may decide not to accept students to class and will deduct the full day from the
hours for students who are frequently late or who miss periods that are crucial to achieve
the planned daily learning outcome.

A craft-based learning course is considered failed if a student misses the limit allowance
of the attendance requirement without evidence of a valid reason or without the
permission of the programme leader of any circumstances that will have an effect on the
failed course policy. A student who has exceeded the unexcused maximum hours will
receive a written warning that the course has been failed but will be expected to continue
participating in the course.

An excused absence is when there is a valid reason and this reason has been
communicated to the appropriate person before the start of the schedule. Valid reason in
case of illness has to be certified by a doctor’s certificate. However, the programme
leader reserved the right to have the final said.

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KITCHEN STANDARD OF EXCELLENCE

Kitchen uniform

The kitchen uniform comprises a chef jacket, chef pant, scarf, bandana, apron, and
safety boot. It is part of the college’s image and also that of students, which is well
received by the prospective employers who visit the school every year on the hiring trips.
Whenever and wherever the kitchen uniform is worn, it must be worn correctly, with
pride, in order to help the school maintain it reputation.

General Appearance

Unnatural hair colorings are not acceptable in the school.

Male students:
• Hair must be short without excessive length or bulk
• Extreme styles- visible piecing including earrings tongue or nose pins or rings,
platform shoes, etc. are not acceptable.
• For reasons of hygiene beards are undesirable. Male students are expected to be
well shaven at all times.

Female students:
• Long hair must be kept neat and orderly. To comply with hygiene regulations in
food production areas headscarves will be worn when provided.
• Colored nail polish and obtrusive jewelry are not acceptable.
• One pair of non-obtrusive earrings on the lobes

Access may be denied to classes, examinations, dining rooms of the college building to
students who fail to respect any of the requirements mentioned above. This reflects the
exacting standards demanded in the industry.

Lecturer is entitled to evict a student in the event of significant misconduct or un-


preparedness for a scheduled class.

Classroom

Classroom, laboratories, production kitchen and study rooms are places of work.
SILENCE is therefore required to enable students to concentrate on work. Eating and
drinking are not permitted in these areas. The use of mobile phones during academic or
practical class time, and when on duty, is not allowed for obvious courtesy reasons.
These devices must be properly switched off to avoid any undue disruption. Students are
expected to take care of furniture and material. The responsible party must pay for any
loss or damages.

DISMISSAL FROM THE PROGRAMME

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Students failed all courses enrolled for the semester or failed a subject for three times
are advised to change course or programme. They are normally not allowed to
enrol for the following semester. They may appeal to the Principal.

SUSPENSION/EXPULSION FROM COLLEGE

Disciplinary action will be taken against students for any misconduct and academic
dishonesty such as cheating in an examination, plagiarism or falsification of any
document. Students are warned that such proven misconduct will be noted in the
student’s record and they may be liable to suspension or expulsion from the College.

DISMISSAL FROM COLLEGE

Students can be dismissed from the college under the following conditions:

1. Repeated a subject or semester for more than three times.


2. Directed by the Disciplinary Committee as a result of misbehavior in the college or
cheating during an examination/test/assignment.

WITHDRAWAL

Students wishing to terminate their enrolment in the College should make an


appointment with the Head of Programme to complete the appropriate forms (refer to the
student withdrawal form). However, 70% of the fees is refundable if the withdrawal is
done prior to the commencement of the class and 50% is refundable if the student has
attended less than 2 weeks class. Any of the subsequent reason, none refundable of the
tuition fees is pursued.

LEAVING COLLEGE WITHOUT FORMAL WITHDRAWAL

A student who leaves the college without formal withdrawal will be deemed to have
withdrawn automatically after one calendar year. The student will be informed of this,
and that he/she may collect his or her deposit. If the deposit is not claimed within 7
years, it will be sent to the treasury.

EARLY WARNING NOTIFICATION

An early warning notification procedure is to alert students of poor academic


performance in time for them to take corrective measures. Lecturers are encouraged to
identify students who are performing at the ‘D’ and ‘F’ levels. These deficiencies are
reported to the students so that they can seek special help from the lecturer and Head of
Programme.

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STUDENT EVALUATION

In all our activities the School strive to promote quality of education experience within the
College. One way is through student evaluation of lecturers. This is conducted once
every semester, usually during the 7th or 8th week of the semester, for all lecturers. The
evaluation is approximately 15 minutes.

The evaluation is based on a set of questions which are classified under different
headings. However, these headings are not printed on the questionnaire given to the
students. The same questions are used for all lecturers. The students are to choose one
answer from A to E by using a multiple choice OMR form with ‘A’ as excellent and ‘E’ as
not applicable to the course/subject/class. Students are also given a blank sheet to write
other comments, if any. Feedback received from these evaluations is used to improve
the quality of teaching and facilities offered.

ACADEMIC PROGRESS
DIPLOMA IN HOTEL MANAGEMENT (DHTM)

Subjects Credits
Semester 1

1. Food fundamental & Theory of catering 3.0


2. Basic Cookery 2.0
3. Applied Bakery 2.0
4. F & B Management 1 3.0

Semester 2

1. Commercial Cooking 4.0


2. Kitchen Sanitation Management 3.0
3. Hospitality English 1 3.0
4. Pengajian Malaysia 3.0
5. Applied Pastry 2 3.0

Semester 3

1. F&B Cost Control 3.0


2. Hospitality English 2 3.0
3. Food Production 2 3.0
4. Oriental & Continental Cooking 4.0
5. Supervision in Hospitality Industry 3.0

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Semester 4

1. Customer Service in Hospitality Industry 3.0


2. Fundamental of Marketing 3.0
3. Pengajian Islam/ Moral 3.0
4. Food Production 3 3.0
5. Entrepreneurship 3.0

Semester 5

1. Hospitality Accounting 4.0


2. Human Resource Management 4.0
3. Bahasa Kebangsaan A/B 3.0
4. Applied IT in Food Service Industry 3.0
5. Food Production 4 3.0

Semester 6

1. Management of Food Service Operations 3.0


2. Event Management 3.0
3. Research & Creative Culinaire 4.0

Semester 7

1. Industrial Training 6.0

Note:
1. Malaysian students with SPM qualification are required to
complete all Mata Pelajaran Wajib (MPW), namely Malaysian Studies, Islamic
Studies (for Muslim students) / Moral Education (for non-Muslim students), and
Bahasa Kebangsaan A (exempted if a credit in BM has been obtained at the SPM
level).
2. Malaysian students without SPM qualification are also required
to fulfil the above condition, plus Bahasa Kebangsaan B as a pre-requisite to Bahasa
Kebangsaan A.

OVERALL FORMAT AND STRUCTURE

In general, institutions of higher education in Malaysia operate on four long and two short
semesters.

Short semester
• The programme is modular, full time and operates within 10 weeks semesters.
7 weeks are designated for teaching and another 1 week for examinations.
• The short semester student workload is a minimum of 3 credit hours to a
maximum of 10 credit hours for short semester.

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Long Semester
• The programme is modular, full time and operates within 20 weeks
semesters. 9 weeks of teaching and 6 weeks of training. While another week
for examination.
• The long semester student workload is a minimum 16 credit hours up to a
maximum of 18 credit hours for long semester.

ASSESSMENT & STUDENT EVALUATION

Examinations

The examinations, class tests and assignments/projects/term papers for all courses are
indicated in the detailed course structures. The student course evaluation consists of
continuous assessments (CA) during the semester and one final written examination at
the 8th week of the short semester or 17th of the normal semester.

There are various components in the continuous assessments; tests, quizzes,


assignments, term papers, as listed in the detailed course structures. Students are
entitled to know the CA marks achieved for these components.

Course Assessment

Grades are awarded for the purpose of recognizing different levels of achievement in the
pursuit of course objectives. Different subjects may have different evaluation scheme
and the students should consult the course structure for details.

In general, unless otherwise stated in the course structure, each course assessment
consists of the following evaluative components::
• 40% assessed coursework;
• and 60% final examination

The assessed coursework (tests, assignments) may be in the form of essays, projects,
research papers, problem solution etc. relevant to the course syllabus. The final
examination covers the entire course syllabus and the format for the examination papers
is specified in the course structure for each academic subject.

The results, in letter grades, are normally released by the Examinations Office before the
enrolment. Please note that GIIC’s policy is to award only letter grades to students; the
total marks scored are not released to students. The ranges of marks for the letter
grades awarded are as follows:

Grade Mark Range Grade Point


(GP)

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A 80 – 100 4.00
B+ 75 – 79 3.50
B 65 – 74 3.00
C+ 55 – 64 2.50
C 50 – 54 2.00
D 40 – 49 1.00
F 0 – 39 0.00
RP 50-100 2.00
RF 0-49 0.00

• RP – RESIT PASS
• RF – RESIT FAIL

Notes:

In general, unless otherwise stated in the course structure, a student is deemed to have
passed the subject module if the total of the coursework mark and examination is at least
50% or a grade C.

A student who resit an examination and pass the subject will be given an RP grade. If he
fails a resit examination then it will be a RF grade. Such grading will be recorded as
accordingly as the student result for the subject in the transcript.

The semester grade report will be issued and sent by the Academic Office to each
student and his or her parent each semester except under special circumstances.
These reports should be kept carefully; they may be required for overseas university
application later.

The classification of the diploma will be based upon the following criteria

• Good Standing : GPA ≥ 2.00


• Warning : GPA < 2.00 for any one semester
• Probation : GPA < 2.00 for any two consecutive semesters
• Dismissal : GPA < 2.00 for any three consecutive semesters

Students who achieved a GPA of less than 2.00 will be allowed to repeat the subject 3
times. After which, the student will be asked to leave the programme. The status of the
student’s attempt will determined as follows:

1st attempt 2nd attempt


rd
3 attempt

GPA < 2.00 GPA < 2.00 GPA < 2.00

Warning Probation
Dismissal

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EXAMINATION REGULATIONS

The Academic office oversees all examinations and the processing of students’
examination results. Only the Academic Office is authorized to release the examination
grades after the Board of Examinations meetings. Vital information on Examinations
Time-Tables (Finals, Make-ups and Re-sits), quarantine schedules, Schedule for release
of results’ dates which will include last dates to submit petition for review of grades, etc.
are displayed on the Examinations Notice Boards. Students are advised to read the
notices and announcements on the Examinations Notice Boards regularly.

EXAMINATION REGULATIONS FOR STUDENTS

Before the Examinations


1. Thoroughly check through the examination time-table displayed on the notice board
outside the Examinations Centre / Unit and ascertain the examination date, time and
venue. Wrong reading of the time-table will not be accepted as a reason for being
absent from an examination.
STUDENTS ARE ADVISED TO BOOK THEIR FLIGHT TICKETS (IF APPLICABLE)
ONLY AFTER THE RELEASE OF THE FINAL VERSION OF THE TIME-TABLE.

2. REPORT TO THE EXAMINATIONS CENTRE / UNIT ANY CLASHES (3 subjects in


one day or 2 subjects at the same time slot) latest by the EIGHTH week of the
semester (for long semesters) and by the FIFTH week of the semester (for short
semesters).

3. If students have to sit for two subjects, which, are offered at the same time slot, they
will be QUARANTINED. The candidates must ensure that they receive the
quarantine schedule from the Examinations Centre / Unit. Non-compliance of the
quarantine rules may cause the candidate to lose the chance to sit for the
Examination paper(s). The details are given under “Quarantine regulations during
Final, Resit and make-up Examinations”.

4. Candidates must ensure they have brought their student ID to be eligible to sit for their
exams. In the event that they have forgotten, they must go to the Office of
Admissions and Records to get a temporary ID.

5. Candidates cannot leave the Examinations Venue for the first half hour.

6. Only materials permitted by the Exams Centre will be allowed to be brought into the
Examinations venue. Handphones will not be permitted into the Exams venue.

7. Follow the instructions of the invigilator carefully in filling up the attendance slip and
signing the declaration on the front page of the answer booklet.

8. A candidate who arrives more than half an hour late will not be allowed to sit for the
examination, unless the management through the Examinations Centre/Unit grants
permission.

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During the Examinations

1. Candidates are to remain silent during the entire duration of the examination.

2. If a candidate has any queries or questions concerning the examination, he or she


should raise the hands to get the attention of the invigilator and tell his or her
problem.

3. Candidates should not keep pieces of notes in their immediate vicinity while taking
the Exams. If found out, the student may have to face disciplinary action.

4. If a candidate needs to use the washroom, he or she should raise the hands and
inform the Chief Invigilator. The candidate will then be designated to a washroom and
MUST be accompanied by an invigilator.

5. Candidates are not allowed to leave the examination venue during the last half hour
of the examination.

At the End of the Examinations

1. When the invigilator announces the end of the examination, candidates MUST stop
writing immediately and continue to observe silence.

2. Candidates should tie up the answer scripts and wait for them to be collected.

3. No unused examination materials or papers used for rough work should be taken out
from the examination room.

4. Candidates should leave the Examination Venues in an orderly manner after being
released by the invigilator.

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Absent from Final Examinations

A student who did not sit for a subject in the final examination may be given a
resit/make-up examination provided the following conditions are fulfilled:

1. The student has informed the Examinations Centre/Unit of his/her absence WITHIN
72 HOURS after the scheduled examination for that particular subject.

2. For absence due to valid reasons such as serious illness or bereavement, etc. proper
documents (medical certificate, etc) are to be presented to the Examinations Centre /
Unit before any resit / make-up examination is granted.

3. The student has fill up the make-up form and returned to the Examinations Centre
WITHIN 72 HOURS after the scheduled examination.

4. The respective Head of Programme must recommend the resit examination to the
Chairman of the Examinations Board for approval. The list of students eligible for
resit examinations will be displayed on the Examinations Notice Boards before the
commencement of the Resit Examinations.

Resit Examinations during the Resit Exams week

1. All dates of resit examinations are displayed on the Examinations Notice Boards.

2. Students who have transferred from other INTI campuses MUST resit in the campus
they are enrolled in.

3. Students are encouraged to come to the Examinations Centre/Unit for verification if


they have any queries.

Release of Final Examination Results

1. The Examinations Centre / Unit is the sole authority for issuing and releasing of
examination grades. Lecturers will inform their students of the continuous
assessment marks before the final examinations. Telephone enquiries on grades
are not encouraged.

2. Student can apply for authorization for collection of grade report by filling in a form at
the Examination Office.

Semester Grade Report

All students should go to the Examinations Centre / Unit to obtain a copy of their
semester grade report which is the official document.

Petition to Review the Semester Final Grades

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A student who wishes to have his/her final grades reviewed must file an official petition
to the Examinations Centre. There is a petition fee payable to the Finance Office.
Students are advised to refer to the Examinations Notice Boards for the last day for filing
such a petition. There is no review of make-up/resit grades.

Verification of previous Grades

In the event that students need verification of previous grades, they must do so within
the time period of ONE YEAR after the release of that grade concerned after which, the
given grades will remain as they are.

QUARANTINE REGULATIONS DURING FINAL, RESIT AND MAKE-UP


EXAMINATIONS

1. Students with two (2) subjects in the same time slot or three (3) subjects in one day
are required to sit for the examinations in the Quarantine Room (determined by the
Examinations Centre / Unit). The relevant information will be pasted on the
Examinations Notice Boards before the final exams period. Students are required to
check and to inform the Examinations Centre / Unit at least ONE week before the
start of the final exams period if their names are not listed.

2. Students must report to the Quarantine Room 15 minutes BEFORE THE START of
the examinations.

3. Students cannot leave the Quarantine Room without the permission of the Invigilator
and/or the Exams Officer.

4. Students will take both the “clashed” subjects in the Quarantine Room.

- Students are required to bring their lunch packs and have their food in the
Quarantine Room itself from 11am - 12noon.

- An invigilator must escort any student who would like to go to the washroom.

5. The invigilators will collect all question papers and materials.

6. Any student caught passing information to other students will be subjected to


disciplinary action, including dismissal, if found guilty.

7. The quarantine students MUST NOT leave the quarantine room even though they
have finished their examination earlier than the scheduled time. Students who leave
the quarantine room without authorization MAY BE disqualified from their
examinations.

8. Revision or reading is allowed during the break time.

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HOW TO WRITE AN ASSIGNMENT

Assignment should be:

 Typed
 Pages numbered
 Sources of information clearly acknowledged in the text and detailed in the
bibliography or reference sections.

Overall, the report should be organised and professionally presented. It must be clean,
categorised, properly paragraphed, equipped with good spelling, punctuation and
grammar, so as to make it easy to read and mark. Wide margins and double or one-
and-half-spacing, typed work will further make the report easier to read and for the
examiner to add comments.

The following suggested format may help to present a consistent framework for the
report:

TITLE PAGE: should include the Title or Question, the student’s name, the course and
module to which it refers and the lecturer’s name.

SUMMARY: To summarised the contents of the assignments

CONTENTS LIST: framework of assignment.

PAGE NUMBERING: essential as your lecturer may drop the assignment on the floor.

MAIN BODY: this includes the introduction, problem identification (where appropriate),
analysis, discussion and use of theoretical concepts, critical evaluation on main theories
and viewpoints, discussion of alternative scenarios and solutions, application and
relevance to management, conclusions and possible recommendations. References in
the text should use the author-date system e.g. Drucker (1987) defines efficiency as…
or after a specific quotation, which should be inverted, e.g. Efficiency can be defined
as “doing things right” (Drucker, 1987). The full citation of the reference should
appear in the References table and NOT in the main text.

APPENDICES: if required, use Roman Numerals.

REFERENCES: make sure all citations and sources of references made are given in full
details as explained above.

BIBLIOGRAPHY: a list of books consulted by the writer. The usual way of setting this
out is in alphabetic order by Author, Initials/first name., Year. Title of book. Edition. (only
include this if not the first edition) Place: Publisher.

Redman, P., 2006. Good essay writing: a social sciences guide. 3rd ed. London:
Open University in assoc. with Sage.

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For e-books the required elements for a reference are:

Author, Year, Title of book. [type of medium] Place of publication: Publisher. Followed by
“Available at:” (then) include e-book source and web site address/URL(Uniform
Resource Locator) and routing details if needed. [Accessed date].

Fishman, R., 2005. The rise and fall of suburbia. [e-book] Chester: Castle Press.
Available at: University Library/Digital Library/e-books http://libweb.anglia.ac.uk/E-
books
[Accessed 5 June 2005].

Journal articles

For journal articles the required elements for a reference are:

Author, Initials., Year. Title of article. Full Title of Journal, Volume number (Issue/Part
number), Page numbers.

Perry, C., 2001. What health care assistants know about clean hands. Nursing
Times, 97(22), pp.63-64.

Journal abstract from a database

For journal abstract from a database where you have been unable to access the full
article the required elements for a reference are:

Author, Initials., Year. Title of article. Full Title of Journal, [type of medium] Volume
number (Issue/Part number), Page numbers if available, abstract only.
Available at: include web site address/URL(Uniform Resource Locator) and additional
details of access. [Accessed date].

Boughton, J.M. 2002 The Bretton Woods proposal: an in-depth look. Political
Science Quarterly, [Online]. 42 (6). Abstract from Blackwell Science Synergy
database.
Available at: http://www.pol.upenn/articles, Blackwell Science Synergy.
[Accessed 12 June 2005].

N.B. the URL should be underlined

Newspaper articles

For newspaper articles the required elements for a reference are:

Author, Initials., Year. Title of article. Full Title of Newspaper, Day and month before
page numbers and column line.

Slapper, G., 2005. Corporate manslaughter: new issues for lawyers.


The Times, 3 Sep. p.4b.

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Online newspaper articles

For newspaper articles found in online newspapers the required elements for a reference
are:

Author or corporate author, Year. Title of document or page. Name of newspaper, [type
of medium] additional date information.
Available at: include web site address/URL (Uniform Resource Locator) and additional
details of access, such as the routing from the home page of the source. [Accessed
date].

Chittenden, M., Rogers, L. & Smith, D., 2003. Focus: ‘Targetitis ails NHS. Times
Online, [internet] 1 June. Available at:
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/printFriendly/0,,11-1506-669.html
[Accessed 17 March 2005].

N.B. the URL should be underlined


It is good practice to keep a copy of the front page of any website you use.

HOW TO PRESENT A DYNAMIC PRESENTATION

In order to present dynamically, follow the steps below:


• First, think about your presentation styles, likes/dislikes.
• Ponder on your strengths and weaknesses then take appropriate action.
• The first step is planning your presentation based on six key questions:
- How?
- Where?
- When?
- What?
- Why?
- Who?
• After you have analysed the above, prepare your presentation based on your answer
for the above questions.
• Then think about "how" you are going to open and close the presentation.
• When you write your presentation, follow these steps:
1. Collect ideas
2. Select & order materials
3. Illustrate points
4. Write the beginning & ending
5. Prepare the notes.

• Always act natural in presentation.

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• Have eye contact, gestures, facial/expression, body motion and posture, spatial
distance and at times create silence.
• Always have visual support such as, slides, flip chart, models, films, videos and
multimedia presentation aids.
• Always ask questions throughout your presentation.
• When answering questions be brief, convincing, honest and accurate.
• Always breathe and practise relaxation all through your presentation.

With all the above you will be a dynamic presenter.

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ACADEMIC PROGRESS CHECKLIST


DIPLOMA IN HOTEL MANAGEMENT

NAME ___________________________ BEGAN: _____________

Code Subject Credits Pre- Tick when Session HOP


Req. completed Completed Verification
Semester 1

DCA1101 Cooking Principles 2

DCA1102 Cooking Theory & 3


Techniques
DCA1103 Patisserie Theory & 2
Techniques
DCA1104 F&B Mgmt 1 3

Semester 2
DCA1205 Commercial Food 4
Operations
DCA1206 Kitchen Management 3

DCA1207 English for Hospitality 1 3

DCA1208 Pengajian Malaysia 3

DCA1209 Advanced Patisserie 3

Semester 3
DCA1310 Food Operations Cost 3
Mgmt
DCA1311 Hospitality customer 3
Service
DCA1312 English For Hospitality 2 3

DCA1313 Arts of Garde Manger 3

DCA1314 Asian Cooking 3

Semester 4
DCA2415 Principles of Marketing 3

DCA2416 Hospitality Accounting 4

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DCA2417 Pendidikan Moral/ P. 3


Islam

DCA2418 Oriental &Continental 4


Cooking
DCA2419 Supervision in Hospitality 3
Industry

Semester 5
DCA2520 Hospitality HRM 4

DCA2521 Applied IT in Food Service 3


Technology
DCA2522 Bahasa Kebangsaan A/B 3

DCA2523 Contemporary Fine 3


Cuisine
DCA2524 Entrepreneurship 3

Semester 6
DCA2625 Food Operations 3
Management
DCA2626 Event Management 3

DCA2627 Culinaire Research & 4


Development

Semester 7
DCA3728 Internship 6

NOTE : This is not to be taken as a certificate of programme completion. It is


meant to be a checklist for progression.

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Programme Philosophy, Mission Statements, and Learning Outcomes

Program Philosophy

The course is intended for school leavers and mature students, both from the Malaysia
and overseas, where hospitality is a major economic driver. Students entering the course
will have achieved academically and have both potential and motivation to acquire a high
level of culinary and management skills, leading eventually to work at senior levels of
food production, food production management, food and beverage management,
hospitality and allied disciplines.

The course provides a vehicle for personal and professional development crucial to
success in the hospitality industry, where the ability to communicate your vision
effectively with colleagues and customers alike is vital. The subjects develops an
understanding for specific culinary concepts such as: heating and cooling, equipment
option for various applications and energy consumptions, catering, kitchen planning and
installation. Convenience food systems are detailed. Safe and unsafe working
environments are analyzed. The course is designed to look at menu planning for various
catering system outlets, taking into consideration the marriage of nutrition and the
imaginative, flavorful cuisines demand by today’s customers.

Apart from the basic understanding of digestion and metabolism the emphasis is upon
use of fresh seasonal produce, safe and wholesome produce and non-processed food.
The survey of different concepts incorporates culinary history, culinary knowledge and
food science elements. All the same to distinguish restaurant and institutional catering
from hotel food & beverage. It analyses organizational, marketing, operational and
financial aspects of modern food & beverage operations. The banquet and catering
markets are spotlighted. The students are exposed to various concepts of hotel outlets
and free standing restaurant. Relevant systems for planning and design, service
production, F&B cost accounting and labor cost controls are discussed and applied.
Managing capacity and menu analysis are introduced. Providing service excellence is
discussed and aspects of managing quality highlighted.

The hospitality industry is diverse, comprising major sectors such as hotels, public sector
catering, contract catering, restaurants, gastro-pub retailing and leisure centers. The
demand for skilled practitioners and managers with operational ability is paramount. The
hospitality and tourism industry employs over 112 million people worldwide and is
currently the largest industry in the world.

Mission Statements

We realize that this vision in our graduate programs by providing close faculty-student
interaction in a craft based learning environment. This environment gives students the
practice, theories and support to develop values, essential tools for immediate

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employment, and the desire for continued learning as they progress in their careers. Our
graduate programs similarly balance theory with practice to meet the individualized
needs of professionals. Honoring and building the strong reputations, traditions, and
histories of the school within the system, GIIC school of hospitality undertakes to provide
the system services and support that enable its school to:

• Educate students in purposefully designed learning environments


• Offer and develop programs responsive to the needs of the market in the
industries
• Design programs responsive to the needs of the market in service industries
• Design programs that reflect international standards of quality
• Enroll an appropriately-qualified, multi- national student body
• Connect experience with theory during both academic and internship semester
• Ensure the students understand the approaches to knowledge of the broad areas
of human learning
• Equip students with core, transferable skills such as communication, creativity
and critical thinking.
• Assure that graduates meet the intended educational outcomes
• Create a learning and working environment that is transparent, operates with
integrity and is respectful to all members of community.
• To support relationships with industry and educational partners
• To behave responsibly towards the environment
• To provide a transformative education

Learning Outcomes

Genting Inti International College prepares students committed to a career in the


hospitality industries for success. Its model hospitality education programs balance
theory with practice, independent learning with strong faculty support, and a foundation
for lifelong learning with the skills for immediate employment and progress to leadership
position in the industry.

The values that guide us at GIIC as we work toward our learning outcomes are:

• To focus on the outcome of our students


• To be a successful leaders in the field of hospitality
• To be able to practice leadership, teamwork and entrepreneurship
• To be compatible in the international perspective with a local hospitality
education
• To act with integrity
• To be aggressive and responsive to the industrial environment and trends
• Perform effectively in a variety of food operational settings
• Use the knowledge they have gained to develop managerial competences in a
junior management setting
• Apply common skills enhancing effectiveness in a personal and professional
context
• Contribute to both society and the work place

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Programme Outline

Included in each module, learning aims and outcomes are critical to the areas of both
practical skills acquisition and essential underpinning knowledge vital to understanding
and applying the subject knowledge.

The learning outcomes have been developed based on employability and professional
development with eventual mastery of the subject being desirable. The curriculum meets
these outcomes through its relevance to the modern hospitality industry and, in
particular, the development needs of the industry and the knowledge identified by
employers and in consultation with People First.

On successful module completion, students will have the practical skills required by
employers together with the intellectual underpinning required for fast track career
development with the business skills necessary to become an active practitioner and
model citizen.

Module Contents

Course Title and Course Description and Credits

Diploma in Culinary Arts Management

First year

Semester 1

DCA1101-Cooking Principles 2 Credits

This subject develops an understanding for specific culinary concepts such as: heating
and cooling, equipment options for various applications and energy consumption,
catering, kitchen planning and installation. Convenience food systems are detailed. Safe
and unsafe working environments are analyzed. Student will learn how to apply a recipe
to food processes. Student will understand the connection between time; temperature,
methods and proportion of ingredients to the quality of food. Students will become
creative and team oriented through demonstration, group work and individual
assignments during practical work.

DCA1102- Cooking Theory & Techniques 3 Credits

The course is designed to look at the menu planning for various catering system outlets,
taking into consideration the marriage nutrition and the imaginative, flavorful cuisine
demanded by today’s cooking trends. Apart from the basic understanding of digestion
and metabolism the emphasis is upon the use of fresh seasonal produce, safe and
wholesome produce and non-processed foods. The survey of different concepts
incorporates culinary history, culinary knowledge and food science elements. Discussion
will include appreciation of the issue relating to healthy eating and implications of dietary
requirements to special groups and individuals with specific dietary needs. Students can

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then start to develop recipes and put together healthier menus. Current food labeling
systems can be compared. Finally diets can be nutritionally analyzed and
recommendations made for improvement. The effect of cooking and processes on food
components and effects of cooking and processing on their properties.

DCA1103- Patisserie Theory & Techniques 2 Credits

This course is designed to give students an understanding of the pastry kitchen


operations. Students will learn to understand and follow recipes. They will understand
the need to be attentive to the sights, sounds and smells of the pastry lab. Students will
learn to appreciate that small different in time, temperature, method and proportion of
ingredients can have major effects on quality. Specifically, this course will develop the
skill of following established preparation methods and accurate measuring ingredients.

DCA1104- F&B Management 3 Credits

Craft based learning is designed for students to establish a basic knowledge of table
service principles and to enhance skills that focus on effective customer service. Topics
to be examined includes guest relations, professional communication, order taking,
service sequence, cashier system, cash handling, table skills, and restaurant opening
operation as well as restaurant closing duties. The concept of service will further
reinforce through the hand on operation as well as restaurant closing duties. The
concept of service will be further reinforcing through the hand on practice flow in different
simulated outlets of a hotel setting. The training also emphasis the establishment of a
safe and secure environment, and the building of guest relationship through effective
professional communication and team building.

Semester 2

DCA1205- Commercial Food Operations 4 Credits

This course provide the basic cooking techniques on how to cook and performing, that is
the mastery of a set of manual skills and the ability to apply them in a wide range of
coking styles and products. This module is a sequence from the earlier module on basic
cooking. Students will be provided with the practical skills needed as well as those from
kitchen management and the theory of food. Their theoretical knowledge will be put to
practice in preparing and cooking in a commercial setting. A mixture of western and
continental as well as Asian cooking is emphasized. The course examines and analyzes
the nature of good cooking methods and food knowledge. Hence will ensure that
students appreciate and are able to select the appropriate cooking techniques and
styles.

DCA1206- Kitchen Management 3 Credits

This course is designed to ensure that students understand the importance of hygiene
and sanitation within a food and beverage production area. The student will develop

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skills that will assist him or her in serving safe food during practical work. Hygiene and
sanitation expose the student to the importance application of correct food and beverage
establishment. Practical and theoretical knowledge will underpin safety and hygiene
routines in work.

DCA1207- English for Hospitality 1 3 Credits

Students will be exposed to drills on pronunciation, transformation of sentences,


synthesis of sentences and understanding the correct writing and dialogue skills.
Students will have a better understanding when using the language, improving their
fluency in speech and writing as well as communication. Students identify significant
contributing to effective communication and apply this knowledge to improve their skill
and accuracy in speaking and writing in English, as well as developing their
interpersonal skills. Emphasis is placed on identifying the purpose of communication-
what the sender wants to achieve, identifying the audience and developing the message
by selecting and practicing business language appropriate for various contexts.

DCA1208- Pengajian Malaysia 3 Credits

This module improves and develops student’s understanding of the revolutions of


Malaysia history. It introduces the students to a diversity of cultures blend and
languages. Students will be able to review the development of the country and the
civilization of the cultures toward the modern age. This is to serve as building up
students patriotic towards their home country.

DCA1209- Advanced Patisserie 3 Credits

This module develops and enhances the range of preparation and serving skills for
dessert design and construction. It introduces the students to a variety of methods and
ideas for creating desserts. Students are required to investigate commercial aspects
regarding realistic and rational methods for manufacture and utilization of the ingredients
and products in accordance with quality and portion control. This module builds student’s
ability to express themselve accurately and improve communicative competence when
analyzing and appraising others work.

Typically the class time will comprise some formal sessions enabling the presentation
and demonstration of new, key topic information and kitchen sessions where students
can develop cooking skills and finishing techniques. These sessions may be taught
consecutively allowing for some diversification of activity to include individual and
teamwork

Semester 3

DCA1310- Food Operations Cost Management 3 Credits

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The module requires the student to develop a range of business techniques to enable
you to work more effectively as a manager. For example formulate a food and beverage
business plan, forecasting the probable outcomes involving the critical analysis of data.
Design and systematize a new food and beverage management system, evaluate aims,
policies and standards embedded in food and beverage cost management systems and
critically assess new systems. This course will allow students to understand
commercially viable food and beverage management concepts of planning, organizing
and controlling. Students need to be able to have an overview of resources like
materials, labor costs, equipments, time and costs to achieve high productivity while
retaining suitable standards and culminate in the process of food and beverage
management within the given budgetary.

DCA1311- Hospitality Customer Service 3 Credits

The course covers theory relevant to service types and styles used in international
hospitality operations. The course examines and analyzes the nature of good service
and food knowledge. The course will ensure that students appreciate and are able to
select the appropriate service techniques and styles. Craft based learning is designed for
students to establish a basic knowledge of table service principles and to enhance skills
that focus on effective customer service. Topics to be examined include guest relations,
professional communication, order taking, and service sequence. The course
familiarizes the student with the role of selling, guest service etiquette and waiter
psychology.

DCA1312- English for Hospitality 2 3 Credits

Writing is both a skill and a process of discovery and this course treats writing as a
powerful communicative act involving a writer, an audience and a text. This course
approaches writing in terms of traits that contribute to effective writing. Students identify
significant factors contributing to effective communication. The course is designed to
extend and develop oral communication and presentation skills necessary to enhance
individual student’s effectiveness, particularly in the workplace and for further academic
study.

DCA1313- Arts of Garde Manger 3 Credits

This module will introduce you to a range of essential practical skills used in the cold
kitchen. The emphasis is on practical application relevant to the modern restaurant or
hotel environment. Preserved foods, such as hams, sausages, and cheeses were held in
this area. Cold foods were prepared and arranged in concord with the current practice of
trends and presentations. The essential skills required to manage a cold food production
operation are many fold and require a highly systematic approach throughout. Often
labour intensive, this module looks at the alternatives to “just in time” and examines
modern production systems.

DCA1314- Asian Cooking 4 Credits

This module will introduce you to a range of essential practical skills used in the Asian
kitchen. The emphasis is on practical application relevant to the modern restaurant or

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hotel environment. All the same, the students will be given the opportunities to explore
themselves into some of the local activities and visit to historical places to earn the
different dimension of living lifestyle. This multi-ethnicity is also well-presented in the
diverse gastronomy which is undeniably unrivalled. Out of the exciting differences in the
cultural and social structure of this multi-hued society, has emerged a cuisine which is
individualist.

Second year

Semester 4

DCA2415- Principles of Marketing 3 Credits

This course will allow students to understand the fundamental of the marketing
principles. Students are exposed and being able to explore general marketing concepts
as applied to services in general, and hospitality in particular. Service marketing is
differentiating from goods marketing, and marketing from sales. The students will be
familiarized with basic marketing mix tools, market segmentation and customer behavior
analysis. The students will be exposed to a variety of hospitality applications of the sales
mix. The course will also explore the relationship between customer and staff of a
hospitality company.

DCA2416- Hospitality Accounting 4 Credits

Financial understanding is an essential element in a hospitality manager’s range of


required skills. The student is introduced to the basic accounting practices, concept and
branches and the production of financial statements within the uniform system of
account format is examined. As the student becomes familiar and comfortable with the
income statement and balance sheet, various form of analysis are introduced and
practiced through exercise work. The control of acquisitions of the hospitality operation is
examined and the student becomes aware of hospitality inventory and cost control
systems. Actual financial statements from hospitality operations are introduced to the
student and various forms of ratio analysis are applied as the student begins the process
of using these documents to assist in the business decision-making process.

DCA2417- Pendidikan Moral 3 Credits

This module is to teach the Hotel Management student moral values in conjunction to
form a good- natured individual. Students will learn the moral values theoretically and
philosophically, community rules and personal values. Students will also learn how to
overcome values conflict and issues, including religions. The goal of this course is to
help students to become better employees by looking at human behavior, attitude and
performance within organizational settings.

DCA2418- Oriental & Continental Cooking 3 Credits

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This module encourages students to examine the broader issues of food production
management of oriental & continental cooking. This module requires the student to
investigate some of these influences and affords the student the opportunity to develop
an understanding of this subject area. An aspect of the module is to develop an
understanding of various cultural and religious dietary demands in the general food offer,
but more specifically through dish content and design. It is therefore essential that the
student prepares thoroughly for each session with background research and reading.

DCA2419- Supervision in Hospitality Study 3 Credits

Students will learn on the underlying ideas of management, explain the different
approaches to managing people, the activities of an organization and the many complex
structures of an organization and their complications. In addition, various management
skills are described and how a manager can adapt to the environmental changes in the
working industry. This course is designed for students to have a basic understanding of
Organizational Behavior concept as well as practical cases in the hospitality industry.
The course focuses on the organization performance management in the hospitality
industry. Key concepts include work behavior, intercommunication and self performance.

Semester 5

DCA2520- Hospitality Human resource Management 4 Credits

This course is designed for students to have a basic understanding of Human resources
management concept as well as practical cases in the hospitality industry. This course
focuses on the management of labors in hospitality industry and policies environment.
Key concepts include recruitment, job analysis, orientation design and training plan.

DCA2521- Applied IT in Food Service Management 3 Credits

This course prepares the student to achieve a professional level of competence in


manipulating standard office application and initiates the student in the use of
management applications in personal computing. Utilizing his/her own personal
notebook or computer, the student will learn to master Microsoft Office. By using
practical exercises relative to the industry, students should be competent in using words,
producing a professional Power point presentation and use Excel to create dynamic
spreadsheets.

DCA2522- Bahasa Kebangsaan A/B 3 Credits

This course preparing the student’s skills toward phonics, spelling, grammar, terms and
using bahasa melayu affectively in terms of pronunciations, intonation and phrases.

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Students will learn the correct way to pronounce and spell words, structure the
sentences and communicate effectively in public.

DCA2523- Contemporary Fine Cuisine 3 Credits

The practical works covered in this course uses contemporary and modern dishes based
upon classical preparation methods which are referenced throughout the guide. This
module will provide the skills acquisition, theory and underpinning knowledge required
for competency at this level. The module will require the student to apply current relevant
legislation and protocols in respect of hygiene, health and safety and good practice. The
student will develop the ability to select, prepare, cook and present a range of
commodities and foods within the scope of the competency level.

DCA2524- Entrepreneurship 3 Credits

The aim of this course is to provide a practical advice on starting a small and medium
size enterprise business from financial planning to financial control for small businesses.
It covers the principles and problems associated with effective financial control and
offers advice on everything the businessman needs to know, from finding sources of
finance and understanding profit and loss accounts, to fixing pricing policies and drawing
up budgets. All the same to improve the understanding of what is happening in the
hospitality industry. Current trends, developments and the required attitude for a
successful career in the hospitality industry will be researched.

Semester 6

DCA2625- Food Operation Management 3 Credits

This course will allow students to understand commercially viable food and beverage
management concepts of planning, organizing and controlling. It’ approaches also to
instill management perspective to issues of service, quality, protecting assets and
improving profitability, so that the undergraduate has a better grasp of the industry as a
whole. The students are exposed to various concepts of hotel outlets and free standing
restaurants. Relevant systems for planning and design, service production, F&B cost
accounting and labor cost controls are discussed and applied. Managing capacity and
menu analysis are introduced. Providing service excellence is discussed and aspects of
managing qualitity highlighted.

DCA2626- Event Management 3 Credits

At the completion of this subject, students will have a clear knowledge to identify and
manage different types of events. Also, the students will able to understand their roles
and responsibilities to the industry. The students will be exposed to a variety of
hospitality applications of the sales mix. The course will also explore the relationship

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between customer and staff of a hospitality company. The course will be based on
theoretical knowledge of the industry. Students will put theory into practice by
researching to organize various conceptual of the events. The project based exercises
will also allow students to explore the wide world of hospitality and look for career
opportunities within the exciting industry.

DCA2627- Culinaire Research & Development 3 Credits

This course will provide the skills acquisition, theory and underpinning knowledge
required for competency at this level. The student will develop the ability to select,
prepare, cook and present a range of commodities and foods within the scope of the
competency level. Practical sessions are subject divided through the semester allowing
4 sessions for complex areas such as seafood, poultry and meat with less complex
areas having one or two sessions. Your learning progression should reflect practical
development in the areas of “What you should do” and theoretical background reading
and research for “What you must know” both required for confirming competency at
higher level experience.

Semester 7

DCA3728- Internship 6 Credits

Student following the program is expected to have experienced the equivalent of a six
months employment in one sector of the Hospitality Industry. Students should have
experienced the environment of a work place, how the demand for its products and
services are identified and how resources are acquired, allocated and used for the
purpose of achieving organizational aims. Students are required to develop and
demonstrate a responsibility for their own role so that they can receive, quickly
understand and carry out instruction to the satisfaction of their employer as a means of
developing towards more responsible tasks. Students could have identified, analyzed
and discussed with experienced practitioners, how theoretical concepts are applied and
adapted to suit practical requirements.

Module Summaries

Included in each module, learning aims and outcomes are critical to the areas of both
practical skills acquisition and essential underpinning knowledge vital to understanding
and applying the subject knowledge. The learning outcomes have been developed
based on employability and professional development with eventual mastery of the
subject being desirable. The curriculum meets these outcomes through its relevance to
the modern hospitality industry and, in particular, the development needs of the industry
and the knowledge identified by employers and in consultation with People First.

On successful module completion, students will have the practical skills required by
employers together with the intellectual underpinning required for fast track career
development with the business skills necessary to become an active practitioner and
model citizen.

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The scheme of practical work covered contemporary dishes based upon classical
preparation methods which are referenced throughout the guide. This course assumes a
high level of practical competency in the recognition, selection, costing and application of
resources. All food handlers will be competent to an appropriate level of hygiene and
food safety awareness reflecting current relevant legislation and industry best practice.

The student will have a knowledge of team structures and kitchen hierarchy reflecting
commercial food production. The student will use effective communication to
disseminate information to groups and individuals using IT and group presentation skills.
The student will embrace dietary diversity at all times integral to the menu food offer,
reflecting contemporary and traditional demands.

Written Work

Work which fulfils the criteria below but at a quite exceptional standard 90+

Work of distinguished quality which is based on a very extensive reading and


which demonstrates an authoritative grasp of concepts, methodologies and
content appropriate to the subject and to the assignment task. There is a
clear evidence of originality and insight and an ability to sustain an argument,
to think analytically and/or critically, to effectively synthesize and reflects a
complex engagement with the aesthetic material 85 to 89

Work which clearly demonstrates all the qualities expressed below but which
reveals greater imaginative insight and more originality. 80 to 84

Work which demonstrate a sound and above average level of understanding


of the aesthetics, concepts, methodologies, and content appropriate to the
subject and which draws on a wide range of properly referenced sources.
There is some evidence of critical judgement in selecting, ordering and
analyzing content. Demonstrates some ability to synthesize material and to
construct responses, which reveal some insight and may offer occasional
originality. 75 to 79

Work of the qualities expressed below but which contains a greater degree of
critical analysis and original insight or creativity and perception. A range of
methods will be used. 70 to 74

Work derived from a solid base of reading and which demonstrates a grasp of
relevant material and key concepts and an ability to structure and organize
arguments. The performance may be routine but the work will be accurate,
clearly written, include some critical analysis but little or no original insight or
creative thinking. There will be no serious omissions or irrelevancies. 65 to 69

It is anticipated that all assessment criteria are met. Competent and suitability
organized work which demonstrates a reasonable level of understanding but

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which lacks sufficient analysis and interpretation to warrant a higher grate. It


will display some of the weakness of a pass grade. 60 to 64

A pass standard for the level of work- Work which covers the basic subject
matter adequately and which is appropriately organized and presented but
which is rather too descriptive and insufficiently analytical. There may be
some misunderstanding of certain key concepts and limitations in the ability
to select relevant material so that work may be flawed by some omissions
and irrelevancies. There will be some evidence of appropriate reading but it
may be too narrowly focused. 55 to 59

Work, which show a very basic understanding. Important information may be


omitted. The work may be descriptive, but of poor structure meaning it does
not meet the requirements of a pass. 50 to 54

Work, which evidently shows a lack of preparation and suggests that it has
been quickly constructed without though or argument. Major elements of
assessment criteria are not addressed or are inappropriately treated. The
student may have problems with understanding and writing. Credits are
awarded at this minimum standard. 40 to 49

Work, which shows no evidence of preparation, understanding and/or fails to


address the assessment criteria. The student may have problems with
understanding and writing. 10 to 39

Student is not present or has submitted work which has either not met the
official deadline or which has been submitted on time, but shows clear
evidence of plagiarism or cheating. 0

Practical Work

Students demonstrate high levels of professional capability. They are


objective and self critical in their self evaluation. They work a very positive
attitude showing leadership potential but respecting peers and superiors. 95%

Students show highly developed professional performance. They show a


positive attitude and team spirit. They are objective in self evaluation. 85%

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Students show well developed professional performance. They have a


positive attitude and are objective in self evaluation. 75%

The student makes an effort to progress and learn. Professional capabilities


are sufficient and attitude is adequate however, may lack team spirit and
fails to take initiative. 65%

Professional capabilities are sufficient and attitude is adequate. Capable of


being a leader, but remains a follower. The student lacks initiative and their
self evaluation is insufficient. 55%

The student has acquired professional knowledge, but may lack of


punctuality or a hygienic approach or positive attitude. There are no positive
efforts made for improvement. 45%

The level of professional performance is insufficient. The student recognised


errors but does not appear to make an effort in order to improve. The student
may be easily influenced by peers in a detrimental way. 35%

The student’s attitude is often negative and they are not motivated. There is
likely to be difficult in placing the student in a training position due to lack of
enthusiasm for the industry and ability level which is below average. 25%

A very negative attitude with no motivation for the industry. The student over
estimates him/herself and does not recognise mistakes. Professional
capabilities are insufficient to place in a training position. 15%

Student often absent making it impossible to evaluate. 1%

Student has not attend duties and has not taken part in theory work. 1%

Mitigation

This is the term which refers to a process by which students may request that
exceptional circumstances be taken into account when reviewing their progress and
assessment. It refers to one off events that may have occurred during an assessment
period which may have adversely affected their performance in the assessment.
Students are required to advise the Dean, in writing, with evidence of the problem before
the assessment grades are known.

Academic Difficulties

Students are required to make known any medical problems they have which will affect
their ability to progress. A problem such as dyslexia and other learning difficulties will be
accommodated as far as is possible by the school.

Incomplete Work

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Students prevented by illness or other legitimate reasons acceptable to the lecturer from
completing requirements of a course before its completion, will have the designation “I”
assigned on the grade report sheet. No grade point is recorded and the quarter average
is not affected. At this point, a completion date will be stated. If, by time the Awards
committee meets, no new grade has been submitted by the lecturer and no “Deferment
of Grade” has been granted by Award Committee, or if the stated completion ate has
been passed an F (fail) will be assigned. The quarter average will then be recalculated.

Plagiarism and Cheating

Plagiarism is the act of presenting another’s ideas or words as one’s own. Cheating
includes, but is not limited to, the intentional falsification or fabrication of any academic
activity, unauthorized copying of another person’s work, or aiding and abetting any such
acts. These acts are forbidden for any graded work assignment such a quiz, test,
examination, case study, project or report and such acts will result in a zero grade for
that piece of work. Should the student fail a course due to such a zero grade, a re-sit
examination is not permitted. A fail given in these circumstances is part of the
progression consideration. There is no excuse for the students to be involved I any
aspect of unfair practise and the Award Board will not entertain or tolerate these
activities.

The Award Committee

The Award Committee comprises:


• The Dean
• Faculty Members

The registrar receives and examines the eligibility of an appeal. Formally, the Awards
Committee acts on behalf of the Academic Committee and forwards eligible appeals
commission meeting. These meetings only take place upon the request of the Award
Committee and no more than twice a year within three months following the end of the
quarter assessment periods. The appeals commission will be empowered to take either
of the following decisions:

• Reject the appeal and no further action will be taken


• Refer the matter back to the Awards Committee with appropriate
recommendations

These recommendations are received by the Awards Committee, which transmits them
for execution to the Chairman of the Academic Committee.

The Awards Committee and the Academic Committee may only question these
recommendations if and when errors of fact or procedural mistakes are suspected to
have influenced the Appeals Commission’s recommendation(s). If such is the case, the
Awards Committee and/or the Academic Committee must resubmit the case to the

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Appeals Commission with all the necessary documentation. Appellants are required to
pay an administration fee.

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