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How Sms language effect writing

skills of Students

Introduction:
Text is a form of a communication is particularly prominent.It has become well
rooted in our daily lives,it is a useful communication tool,as well as a bit of fun being
used between friends collegues,Family members.

Abstract:
Text message is hurting and damagingthe abilities thats why student in classroom
work like Exams,test,assignments etc use the short spelling or incorrect spelling of
words.
Actually due to habitually use of text messaging this habit ruined the writing skills.
There is a fear that this language might replace the standard English and the young
ones will be unable to use the standard style of writing of the english.
Some examples of todays short usage of text language.
See you later(c u l8r).
How are you(h r u).
Happy birthday(H.B)
Where are you going?(w r u g?)
According to t e Nelson study due to the habitually use of sms texting is going out
of control.
Literature review:
Text messaging has become a global phenomena.
In 2011 Alexander claimed that 60% of human beings are active texters.
That is approximately 4.2 billion people.
It is effecting the literature and its common terms badly.
According to the survey the texting messaging damaging the teen writing skills.

The Cons
Teachers are usually intolerant of texting language. They claim using symbols and/or
abbreviated words or sentences in order to save space and time distorts the students' ability
to express themselves through writing, and it distorts their ability to use words
appropriately in context. There have been many reports about poor punctuation, bad
grammar and inappropriate abbreviations in exams and papers. Students sometimes do not
realize they are using chatspeak in their academic writing.
Baroness Greenfield, the neuroscientist, is worried that sending text messages may cause
young people to have shorter attention spans. (The Telegraph, Aug 12, 2009)

A neutral view?
Some people believe texting has no effect on Standard English whatsoever. They
compare textese to some sort of modern jargon. Since every generation has its own jargon,
and English grammar is still changing, the influence of chatspeak on English grammar
should not be exaggerated. It's just a temporary phenomenon that will either fade (unlikely)
or develop into a new language used primarily in electronic communication among those
who can "decode" the abbreviations. Learning another language doesn't influence anyone's
ability to use proper English as long as students have learnt the grammar rules and
therefore know the difference between slang and correct English, Whether it is regarded as
a separate language or not, chatspeak can never be considered literate.
Examples of texting English:
b4 - before

btw - by the way

bc - because

fyi - for your information

10q - thank you

cwof - complete waste of time

bk - back

hand - have a nice day

d8 - date

ltns - long time no see

w8 - wait

urok - you are okay

ez - easy

2m2h - too much to handle

l8tr - later

2mi, tmi - too much information

2l8 - too late

yoyo - you're on your own

qt - cutie

@wrk all wk - at work all weekend

a3 - anyplace, anytime,

k - OK

anywhere

luk@dis - look at this

asap - as soon as possible

pos - parent(s) over shoulder

laff - laugh

gnblfy - got nothing but love for you

bau - business as usual

AAAAA - American Association Against Acronym

brb - I'll be right back

Abuse

Mobile phone usage: a few quick facts


- The country with the highest density of mobile phones isPanama! This Latin American state has an average of
over 202 phones per 100 people; meaning each person has at least two mobile telephones.
- The country with the lowest density of mobile phones is North Korea this is perhaps a combination of economic
factors and the regimes secretive policy towards foreigners and communication.
- The country with the most mobile phones is China, registering just over 1.2 billion (with a population of 1.3 billion)
with the exception of India (over 800 million mobiles) this is more than double every other countrys number.

About the communication our mobile phones are capable


of
Most phones run off a network that is described using a number followed by the letter G. As mobiles have developed
we have been able to use them for more and more modes of communication writing, speaking, filming, image
sharing; and this has profoundly affected our use of English.
- the G in 3G/4G networks stands for generation; 1G was used to describe the very first mobile telephones
introduced by Motorola in the mid-1980s. 1G phones used analogue technology
- 3G phones (introduced in the late 1990s) were the first to go beyond simple voice technologies and introduce digital
technologies including internet communication
- with the advent of 3G and 4G, live messaging and other forms of instant writing have become the norm for mobile
users

Talking vs texting
One conflict that has been produced by the surge in mobile phone use is a rift between people who like to talk and
people who prefer to text. Sending text messages has become a medium of choice for mobile phone users.
Young people are increasingly prone to texting and shy away from making calls, which are more direct but also less
permanent forms of communication. Ironically, the speed at which instant messaging or texting takes place means
that mistakes and shorthands are common: but we often let each other get away with them because we know what
they mean.
Many teachers in primary and secondary schools have expressed concern at the number of children whose literacy
levels are dropping; and who are not even able to write by hand, so accustomed are they to computers, tablets and
mobiles.
Some texting terms have even made it into common parlance: lol (laugh out loud), omg (oh my god), pls (please).
The craze for shortening words, absorbed from texting, is also changing how we speak amaze for amazing, totes
for totally, blates for blatantly: these are all largely teenage usages that are becoming mainstream.-

List of Text Messaging & SMS Abbreviations


Abbreviations A to L

Abbreviations M to Z

2moro

Tomorrow

MoF

Male or Female

2nte

Tonight

MTFBWY

May the Force be with You

MYOB

Mind Your Own Business

AEAP

As Early as Possible

ALAP

As Late as Possible

N-A-Y-L

In a While

ASAP

As Soon as Possible

NAZ

Name, Address, ZIP

ASL

Age / Sex / Location?

NC

No Comment

NIMBY

Not in my Backyard

B3

Blah, Blah, Blah

NM

Never Mind / Nothing Much

B4YKI

Before You Know it

NP

No Problem

BFF

Best Friends, Forever

NSFW

Not Safe for Work

BM&Y

Between Me and You

NTIM

Not that it Matters

BRB

Be right Back

NVM

Never Mind

BRT

Be right There

BTAM

Be that as it May

OATUS

On a totally Unrelated Subject

OIC

Oh, I See

C-P

Sleepy

OMW

On My Way

CTN

Cannot talk now

OTL

Out to Lunch

CUS

See You Soon

OTP

On the Phone

CWOT

Complete Waste of Time

CYT

See You Tomorrow

P911

Parent Alert

PAL

Parents are Listening

E123

Easy as 1, 2, 3

PAW

Parents are Watching

EM?

Excuse Me?

PIR

Parent in Room

EOD

End of Day

F2F

Face to Face

FC

Fingers Crossed

FOAF

Friend of a Friend

GR8

Great

HAK

Hugs and Kisses

POS

Parent over Shoulder

PROP(S)

Proper Respect / Proper Recognition

QT

Cutie

RN

Right Now

RU

Are You

SEP

Someone else's Problem

IDC

I Don't Care

SITD

Still in the Dark

IDK

I Don't Know

SLAP

Sounds like a Plan

ILU / ILY

I Love You

SMIM

Send Me an Instant Message

IMU

I Miss You

SO

Significant Other

IRL

In Real Life
TMI

Too Much Information

UR

Your / You are

W8

Wait

WB

Welcome Back

J/K

Just Kidding

JC

Just Checking

JTLYK

Just to Let You Know

KMN

Kill Me Now

WYCM

Will You Call Me?

KPC

Keeping Parents Clueless

WYWH

Wish You Were Here

L8R

Later

Origins of SMS

Because text messages are transmitted over networks designed for


telephone calls rather than data transfer, the messages must be limited in
size, usually to 140 bytes, which can contain about 160 characters. In order
to save space, text message users adopt abbreviations from internet slang,
such as "lol" for "laughing out loud" or "idk" for "I don't know." In addition,
new abbreviations, often involving numbers, have become common, such as
"2nite" for "tonight." "2nite" also avoids the difficult letter-combination igh,
all of which are on the same key on a phone keypad, meaning the same key
must be tapped repeatedly.

Effects on Everyday English

Some abbreviations originally used in text speak have become


common in other areas. The common abbreviation "u" for "you" appears in
song titles such as Pink's "U + Ur Hand," although this usage was not
unknown before SMS became popular. In some cases, students have begun
to use SMS abbreviations in written work. A brief controversy erupted in
2006 in New Zealand when speculation arose that students would even be
allowed to use SMS speak in exams. However, these rumors were quickly
quashed.

Criticism

Writers and language experts have come out against the use of SMS
abbreviations. British journalist and broadcaster John Humphrys has said that
texting is "wrecking our language" and has called its users "vandals."
Linguistic traditionalists worry that text speak will reduce users' ability to
write correct English sentences, and will harm their spelling and vocabulary.
Because SMS speak originated from the need to send very short messages, it
discourages complex vocabulary and prevents the creation of longer, more
sophisticated phrases.

Other Negative Effects

In other countries, there are concerns that the prevalence of text speak
tends to Americanize the way its users write. For example, French and
German text speak includes abbreviations such as "lol" and "brb," which are
based on English phrases ("brb" stands for "be right back"). Early SMS
messages could not represent the accents used in Polish spelling, leading
many people to omit them. This practice is now beginning to turn up in
writing outside of SMS. In other languages, as in English, SMS speak
simplifies and abbreviates language, thereby robbing language of its subtlety
and complexity.