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REPUBLIC OF THE PHILIPPINES

MINDANAO STATE UNIVERSITY


GENERAL SANTOS CITY
Presented by: Shara Mae J. Cagabhion

ED103 - MTH- (1:00-2:30)

Presented to: Dr. Ava Claire Marie O. Robles

December 10, 2012

MODULE 8: RUBRICS, PORTFOLIO AND PERFORMANCE BASED


ASSESSMENT
Lesson 1: Meaning and Types of Rubrics
Learning Objectives:
To define and discuss Rubrics.
To identify and explain each Types of Rubrics

Rubrics

- is a scoring scale and instructional tool to assess the performance of student


using a task-specific set of criteria.
-contains two essential parts: the criteria for the task and levels of performance for
each criterion.
-provides teachers an effective means of students-centered feedback and evaluation
of the work of students.
-an authentic assessment tool used to measure students work.
-a scoring guide that seeks to evaluate a students performance based on the sum
of a full range of criteria rather than a single numerical score.
-scale that differentiate levels of student performance.

Well-designed rubrics include:

Performance dimensions that are critical to successful task completion;


Criteria that reflect all the important outcomes of the performance task;
A rating scale that provides a usable, easily-interpreted score;
Criteria that reflect concrete references, in clear language understandable to
students, parent, and other teachers

A rubric is a scoring tool that lists the criteria for a piece of work, or what
countsit also articulates gradations of quality for each criterion from excellent to
poor (Goodrich, 1996, p. 14).

Types of Rubrics.
1. Holistic Rubrics - does not list a separate levels of performance for each

criterion. Rather, holistic rubrics assigns a level of performance along with a


multiple criteria as a whole, in other words you put all the components
together.

Advantage: quick scoring, provide overview of students achievement


Disadvantage: does not provide detailed information about the student
performance in specific areas of the content and skills. May be difficult to
provide one overall score.

Example of Holistic Rubric


3- Excellent Researcher
Included 10-12 sources
No apparent historical inaccuracies
Can easily tell which sources information was drawn from
All relevant information is included
2- Good Researcher

2. Analytic
Rubrics

Included 5-9 sources


Few historical inaccuracies
Can tell with difficulty where information came from
Bibliography contains most relevant information
1-Poor Researcher

the
teacher or
the rater
identify
and
assess

Included 1-4 sources


Lots of historical inaccuracies
Cannot tell from which source information came
Bibliography contains very little information
components of a finished product. Breaks down the final product into
component parts and each part are scored independently.

Advantage: more detailed feedback, scoring more consistent across students


and graders.

Disadvantage: time consuming to score


Example of Analytic Rubric
Criteria

Limited

Acceptable

Proficient

Made good

1
Observations are

2
Most observations

3
All observations

observations

absent or vague

are clear and

are clear and

Made good

Predictions are

detailed
Most predictions

detailed
All predictions are

predictions

absent or

are reasonable

reasonable

Appropriate

irrelevant
Conclusion is

Conclusion is

Conclusion is

conclusion

absent or

consistent with

consistent with

inconsistent with

most observations

observations

observations
References:
Concepcion, Benjamin, et. al. (2011). Licensure Examination for Teachers. Sampaloc,
Manila. Met Review Center
Santos, Rosita (2007). Assessment of Learning. 776 Aurora Blvd., Cor. Boston St.,
Cubao, Quezon City, Manila
Mcleod and Reynolds (2007). Quality Teaching for Quality Learning. Australia.
Thomson/Social Science Press
jonathan.mueller.faculty.noctrl.edu/toolbox/howstepfour.htm
Heidi Goodrich Andrade. Understanding Rubrics. [Online] 22 October
2011.<http://www.middleweb.com/rubricsHG.html>.Teachervision.com. The

Advantages of Rubrics: Part One in a Five-part Series. [Online] 22 October 2001.


<http://edweb.sdsu.edu/webquest/rubrics/weblessons.htm>.
Nancy Pickett and Bernie Dodge. Rubrics for Web Lessons. [Online] 22 October 2001.
<http://edweb.sdsu.edu/webquest/rubrics/weblessons.htm>.