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‘all shook up’: GLT puts on new show B5

South Carolina’S Premier Weekly
South Carolina’S Premier Weekly
GLT puts on new show B5 South Carolina’S Premier Weekly wednesday, june 3, 2015 No tax

wednesday, june 3, 2015

No tax increase coming

Preliminary

fiscal-year

budget

indicated

by amanda irwin staff writEr

Greer residents should not expect a tax increase soon, following a first look at the proposed 2015-2016 fiscal year city budget. “We have a rich history and tradition here of not raising our taxes,” City Administrator Ed Drig-

‘My

recommendation

to you is that we maintain. I believe that we are conservative in nature, and I believe that this is accurate as to what we would anticipate for year-end to be.’

ed driggers

Cityadministrator

gers. “We can look at other governmental entities and that’s just not the case. We have a long history of maintaining that. My rec- ommendation to you is that we maintain. I believe that we are conservative in nature, and I believe that this is accurate as to what we would anticipate for year-end to be.” SEEcouncil |a10

greer, south Carol Ina Vol. 102 no. 22 75 Cents
greer, south Carol
Ina
Vol. 102 no. 22 75 Cents

View the entire plan at

p l a n g r e e r. c o m

22 75 Cents View the entire plan at p l a n g r e e
by billy cannada Editor Major changes could soon be on the way in Greer. As
by billy cannada
Editor
Major changes
could soon be on
the way in Greer.
As part of a col-
laborative effort,
The Partnership
for Tomorrow, city
officials and asso-
ciates from Kimley-
Horn consulting
firm, presented the
Greer Community
Master Plan to resi-
dents last Thurs-
day.
The plan features
ideas for new rec-
reational spaces,
improvements for
prominent road-
ways and the addition
of an arts district.
“We wanted to make
sure we were able
PrEston BurCh | thE GrEEr CitizEn
Mark King and Donna Smith look over maps at the
Master Plan unveilingThursday.
to identify your
vi-
sion—the community’s
vision—moving for-
ward,” said Eric Bos-

man of Kimley-Horn. “We’ve done this work all over the country. To have the type of involvement, passion and input we’ve seen here—it’s truly remark- able.” Several workshops have been held over the past year to identi- fy residents’ needs and wants for the commu- nity. This is the second 15-year master plan for Greer. Greer City Park, City Hall and much of the streetscape for downtown Greer Sta- tion was highlighted in the first plan. “When we had our very first meeting over at City Hall, we were sitting in a facility that was in the previous plan,” Kimley-Horn’s Jonathan Whitehurst said. “That put a lot of pressure on us to make sure that, in 2030, you SEEplan |a10

sTraTeGic corridors Strategic Corridors SouthBuncombeRoad South Buncombe Road SC 101 (North) SC 101 (North) SC
sTraTeGic
corridors
Strategic Corridors
SouthBuncombeRoad
South Buncombe Road
SC 101 (North)
SC 101 (North)
SC 101 (South)
SC 101 (South)
SC 14 (North)
SC 14 (North)
SC 14 (South)
SC 14 (South)
WadeHampton(West)
Wade Hampton (West)
WadeHampton(Central)
Wade Hampton (Central)
WadeHampton(East)
Wade Hampton (East)

GraPhiCs | PartnErshiP for tomorrow

2030

plan hiGhliGhTs

‘Visual GaTeway’

Improvements suggested at the intersection of Wade Hampton Boulevard and North Main Street, stretching to downtown.

lane reducTions

Improvements to North Main Street could decrease the number of lanes on the road. The plan states, “Low traffic volumes do not justify the four travel lanes. To improve the character and walkability of North Main Street, consideration should be given to narrowing the roadway to three lanes (one in each direction with a center turn lane). The extra space should be used to add bicycle lanes (without moving the curb and gutter)…to provide wide landscape buffers and sidewalks on both sides of the street.”

arTs disTricT

The plan calls for an arts district near south Trade Street, stating “development of the Arts District could occur by ren- ovating warehouses and industrial buildings or creating open, flexible structures that lend themselves to artisan stu- dios, workspaces, and loft housing.” The documents say “proximity to the rail lines would likely keep lease rates low, which should allow the district to re- main viable…” Development of an arts district would likely include ex- tending the Trade Street sidewalks and landscaping south of the railroad tracks.

VicTor mill recreaTion faciliTy

The master plan says a rec facility at Victor Mill should consolidate nearby parks such as Stevens Field, Veterans Park and Victor Park, offering a more significant“recreation- al anchor” for the city.

desiGn sTandards

Strategies to improve Wade Hampton Boulevard include, establishing architectural standards for the Greer Station Gateway area, constructing a potential roundabout at Bun- combe and Taylor Roads, establishing sidewalk and urban design standards for Buncombe Road and establishing multi-use trails/paths along Chick Springs to Greer Station.

Time frame

The plan sets extensive short-term and long-term goals. Short-term goals (from 2015-2020) include the establish- ment of an arts district, while long-term goals feature items such as the trail along Dillard Creek and connections on Highway 101.

New fire station breaks ground in Lyman

by billy cannada Editor

A new fire station, set to open its doors in Octo- ber, is expected to bring shorter response times to rural areas of the Lyman community. The Tyger River Fire De- partment broke ground on its third facility, located off Holly Springs Road, Monday afternoon. “It’s going to cut about eight minutes off our re- sponse time to the Lyman Lake area and the north- ern end of the fire dis- trict,” Fire Chief Jim Redd said. “It’s going to be good for the people in the com- munity.” Estimated cost for the project is $518,000, but no tax increase was required. “This part of our dis- trict is growing by leaps and bounds,” said Martin

dis- trict is growing by leaps and bounds,” said Martin Billy Cannada | thE GrEEr CitizEn

Billy Cannada | thE GrEEr CitizEn

The Tyger River Fire Department broke ground on a new station in Lyman Monday afternoon, aiming to shorten response times in the Holly Springs area.

Tooke, chairman of the fire district’s board of commissioners. “We re-

ally need a station in this area.” The 4,200-square-foot

station, which will be staffed by two firefighters, will house two trucks.

“We have a little over 500 homes within a mile and a half of this station,” Redd said. “Timing has been a serious problem. There are two schools close by (Ly- man Elementary and D.R. Hill Middle), and where the schools are, people are go- ing to build.” The fire department cur- rently has a staff of 12 full-time firefighters, with around 20 volunteers. The Tyger River Fire District covers the City of Lyman, the Gap Creek Road area and parts of the Apalache community, serving 18,900 residents within 20 square miles. “(Right now) we cover this whole area with Holly Springs Fire Department and that’s a real benefit to both of us,” Redd said. “The location has been planned for about three years, but we’ve been talk-

ing about growth for more than 10 years.” The Tyger River Fire De- partment handled 1,074 calls last year, totaling around 70 structure fires. More than 40 percent of those calls were medical. “This is going to provide the service that constitu- ents want,” Spartanburg County Councilmember Bob Walker said. “If they have a fire, they’re going to have a better chance of that situation being taken care of. This is of utmost importance. The average citizen does not understand the cost and the expense that we’re going through in order to provide the services they want.” Redd, who has nearly 36 years of experience, was hired as chief in 1991, but worked with the Greer Fire Department prior.

INDEX | DEathS | classifieds b3-4 communiTy calendar/news a2 crime a7 enTerTainmenT b9 milesTones b6
INDEX
|
DEathS
|
classifieds
b3-4
communiTy calendar/news
a2
crime
a7
enTerTainmenT
b9
milesTones
b6
obiTuaries
a6
opinion
a3
our schools
b7
sporTs
b1-3
weaTher
a6
Miles Elliott Bruce
William Leo Cloninger,
Jr.
Hayden Wyatt Howell
Edith Carolyn Smith
Lynn
Rachel Pitts Neal
Brenda Watson Pearson
Joe Earl Quinn, Sr.
Charles Tapp

|

lIvINghErE

Joe Earl Quinn, Sr. Charles Tapp  |  lIvINghErE 100yearsyoung Local woman reaches milestone B5

100yearsyoung

Local woman reaches milestone

B5

|

NotablE

Greer Citizen survey winner announced

Over the past several months, The Greer Citizen has been conducting a survey in hopes of improving our product for readers. While we still welcome your input, the time to enter your name for the $100 cash prize has now come to a close. The winner of the $100 is Diane Palmer- tree of Greer. If you would like to fill out one of our sur- veys please stop by our office, located at 317 Trade St. Thank you for your participa- tion.

|

SportS

Trade St. Thank you for your participa- tion.  |  SportS Freshstart Riverside hires new

Freshstart

Riverside hires new basketball coach

B1

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A2 THE GREER CITIZEN

COMMUNITY

CALENDAR

Calendar deadline is

noon on Tuesdays. All list- ings are subject to editing and/or omission due to space constraints. Please submit information and updates about area events, meetings, etc. to Amanda Irwin at 877-2076 or air- win@greercitizen.com or by mail to The Greer Citi- zen P.O. Box 70 Greer, SC

29652.

TODAY, JUNE 3

GRACE PLACE in Greer will

have its mini-mall open from

10 a.m. - noon. Grace Place

is located at 407 Ridgewood Drive. I.D. required. THE VIETNAM VETERANS of America Chapter 523 will meet at Greenville Shrine Club, 119 Veverly Road. Greenville Chow time is 6-7 p.m. for $5, with meet- ing following. Call Chapter President Patrick Ramsey at 232-4110 or V.P. Jerry Brock at 918-4451 for more infor- mation. Signi cant others invited to join. THE NEVER ALONE GROUP OPEN at 7:30 p.m. at the Greer Recreational Center,226 Oakland Ave.

THURSDAY, JUNE 4

THE TAYLORS LIONS Club meets at 7 p.m. at the “Club- house”, 500 East Main St., Taylors. Call Jerry 420-0422.

SATURDAY, JUNE 6

FOOD PANTRY DEVOTION- AL 9:30 -10 a.m. at Calvary Christian Fellowship, 2455 Locust Hill Road, Taylors. Lim- ited supplies available. First come, rst serve basis.

SUNDAY, JUNE 7

THE NEVER ALONE Group of Narcotics Anonymous meet at 7:30 p.m. at the Greer Recreational Center, 226 Oakland Ave.

MONDAY, JUNE 8

GRACE PLACE in Greer will

have its mini-mall open from

10 a.m. - noon. Grace Place

is located at 407 Ridgewood Drive. I.D. required. BARBERSHOP HARMONY CHAPTER meet at 7:30 p.m. at Memorial United Meth- odist Church, 201 N. Main St., Greer. Call Richard at

384-8093.

DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP meeting from 6-7:30

p.m. at the GHS Life Center,

875 W. Fais Road, Greenville.

Call 455-4003.

TUESDAY, JUNE 9

THE NEVER ALONE group candlelight meeting at 7:30

p.m. at the Greer Recreational Center,226 Oakland Ave. THE ROTARY CLUB of Great- er Greer meet at 7:15 a.m. at Krumms on a Plate, 3318 Brushy Creek Road. Guests welcome. Call 630-3988. GRACE PLACE in Greer holds its clothing closet from 6-8 p.m. at Grace Place,

407 Ridgewood Drive. I.D.

required. THE GREER DAY Lions Club

meets at noon at Mutts BBQ,

101 West Road. Call Caroline

at 848-5355.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 10

GRACE PLACE in Greer will have its clothing closet open from 6-8 p.m. Grace Place is located at 407 Ridgewood Drive. I.D. required. MTCC TOUR HELD at the MTCC, at 84 Groce Road, Lyman, at 10 a.m. Potential volunteers and interested parties can tour the facility and learn about programs o ered. Call 439-7760. LEAGUE OF WOMEN Voters of Greenville County meet at 1 p.m. at University Center, McAlister Square, 225 S. Pleasantburg Drive, Green- ville. Ages 18 and older, men and women, are invited. Visit the information monitor at University Center for the room number.

THURSDAY, JUNE 11

KIWANIS CLUB AT 6:30 p.m. at Laurenda’s Family Restau-

rant. Call Charmaine Helfrich at 349-1707. TRADITIONAL RUG HOOK- ING guild meet at Spalding Farm Clubhouse o Highway

14 from 6:30 - 8:30 p.m.

Contact Betsy McLeod at 270-1164 or email Patty Yoder at scupstatehooking@gmail. com

COMMUNITY

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2015

One Duncan seat up for grabs

BY AMANDA IRWIN STAFF WRITER

Residents of Duncan will have the opportunity

to cast their votes on June 9 from 7 a.m. – 7 p.m. for

a single contested council

seat. The District 1 seat candi- dates are incumbent Jason Shuler and Calvin Cowen.

The District 30 seat is also up for elect, however, as

incumbent James Waddell

is running unopposed.

Cowen’s platform is “Vote to stay informed. Vote for lower taxes. Vote for common sense.”

Cowen attended the Uni- versity of Massachusetts and worked for about 30 years as an engineer. “As an engineer, I used to be a project manager kind of thing, so I have experience managing proj- ects,” Cowen said. His decision to run came in the wake of receiving tax increases. “I believe I’ve got really more to offer Duncan than my opponent does, but

COMMUNITY NEWS
COMMUNITY
NEWS

GCM NEEDS DRIED BEANS, CANNED SOUPS

Greer Community Minis- tries is collecting canned soup, one-pound bags of dried beans and boxed gel- atin for the Food Pantry. Donations may be

dropped off from 8 a.m. to

4 p.m. Monday-Friday at

738 S. Line St. Ext., Greer. Visit gcminc.org for more information.

SHARON’S CLOSET NEEDS UNDERWEAR AND SOCKS

Greer Community Min- istries’ Sharon’s Closet needs new packs of un- derwear and socks in all

sizes. Donations may be

dropped off from 8 a.m. to

4 p.m. Monday-Friday at

738 S. Line St. Ext., Greer. Visit gcminc.org for more information.

MOW WEEKLY VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION

Meals on Wheels needs volunteer orientation is held every Thursday from 9:30–11 a.m. at 15 Oregon St., Greenville. MOW is in

need of regular on-call vol- unteers to pick up and de- liver meals to homebound neighbors throughout Greenville County. Volunteers pick up meals Monday–Friday be- tween 10 a.m.–noon at the MOW office at one of the drop off points or at a Corporate Route Partner location, depending which route the volunteer choos- es. Deliveries take 1–1.5 hours. For more information, visit mealsonwheelsgreen- ville.org or contact MOW

at 233-6565 or volunteer

@

MOBILE MAMMOGRAPHY IN DUNCAN THURSDAY

Spartanburg Regional’s mobile mammography will

mowgvl.org.

the main reason I decided to run was because of all the tax and fee increases,” he said. “I got hit with four tax increase fees this year. I started just going to council meetings.”

Insurance costs for the town, employees’ salary in- crease and mandates from DHEC to repair the sewer system all contribute the tax increases residents can expect to incur in the next fiscal year. Cowen’s plan

to lower taxes is currently uncertain. “Unfortunately, right now, no (I do not have a plan to lower taxes),” he said. “What I’d like to do though is find out more about the sewer system. Is that something we could sell to a utility? And if we did that then the cost and the utility would probably run that more efficiently, and then of course when you have a fee or something like that it gets spread over a big- ger area. But this is some- thing I can’t really, until I start looking into it, give

hold mammogram screen- ings in at Family Medicine, 1575 East Main St., Dun- can, on June 4. Call 560-7777 to regis- ter. Participants should bring their insurance card and identification.

GOLF FOR RELIEF ON JUNE 15

The event benefits Greer Relief and raises money to prevent hunger and home- lessness in the Greer area. Proper golf attire is re- quired and the event will

be held at Willow Creek Golf Club. Registration and lunch are from 11:30 a.m.–12:45 p.m. and the shotgun start is at 1 p.m. with captain’s choice for- mat. The cost is $100 per individuals and $400 per team. Visit greerrelief.org for more information.

FURMAN TAKING SENIOR LEADER APPLICATIONS

The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Fur- man is accepting applica- tions for Senior Leaders Greenville through July 1. Senior Leaders Greenville is a program designed for adults 55 and up to build awareness of the essential role seniors play in the community and the criti- cal issues they face, em- powering participants to become active in fostering

em- powering participants to become active in fostering June 11, 12, 13th Thursday & Friday 10:00
June 11, 12, 13th Thursday & Friday 10:00 am - 5:00 pm Saturday 10:00 am
June 11, 12, 13th
Thursday & Friday 10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Saturday 10:00 am - 4:00 pm
Landrum Middle School, 104 Redland Road, Landrum SC
10 Vendors - Boutique featuring hand-made items
More than 100 quilts on display - Tickets for show quilt and fat quarter baskets
Silent Auction - Used Book & Magazine Sale - Quilts for sale
Admission $5.00
Sponsored by the Landrum Quilters
www.landrumquilters.com
In partnership with
The Spartanburg County Parks Department, City of Landrum,
Landrum area Business Association &
Spartanburg District 1 Schools
LANDRUM
QUILTERS
Spend the day in Landrum. Follow the Foothills Quilt Trail.
www.foothillsquilttrail.com

any definitive suggestions. The main thing is I have a lot more time to look into these things so I could do

a better job at looking into

solutions.” Cowen said, if elected, he also would keep a close eye on zoning changes. “Zoning is just some- thing that makes me very nervous, so I’d like to be

on council just so if a zon- ing issue comes. I’d like to be there and be one of the first to keep an eye on zoning,” Cowen said. “Zon- ing can be a good things sometimes and sometimes zoning can be a bad thing

it just all depends how it’s

done.” Cowen also plans to con- tinue to push back against

a proposed smoking ban. “I’m not really against it,” Cowen said. “I don’t really see the need for it right now in Duncan. What happened in Greenville and Spartanburg — you’ve got more incidents of sec- ondhand smoke because they’re bigger cities, but the way it happened there

is the way I’d like to see it happen in Duncan… Citizens started to get concerned about the sec-

ondhand smoke, so there was a lot of uproar from the citizens and they basi- cally demanded that the city government do some- thing about it. At that point, when you have a lot of people asking for some- thing like that on each side, then put it on the bal- lot like they did and let the city decide. “There’s not that many people getting exposed to secondhand smoke in Duncan, so you have to

weigh the cost,” he said. “Is it worth the cost of in- terfering or putting more restrictions on people’s

behavior over the ben- efits?” Cowen didn’t elaborate on his statistics or as to what benefits he was re- ferring to, but he did add he is in support of putting smoking bans in areas where children play, such as the water park, but he doesn’t support interfer-

ing with businesses. In an effort to inform cit- izen, Cowen said he thinks getting email will help. “I always do stuff and I’d like to get people informed and get more contact in- formation - basically email - because if something comes up that I think is an important issue, that’s free all you have to do is send out an email,” he said. Although not a Duncan native, the town is now what he now calls home. Cowen has lived in the south for about 25 years, and in Duncan for six years. “What made me want to run is I’ve been living in Duncan for a long time and I don’t really plan on going anywhere,” Cowen said. “I really love it here. I really plan to stay here.” Shuler was unable to reached in time for pub- lication. For more infor- mation about voting, visit scvotes.gov.

airwin@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

better lives for seniors. The cost for participat- ing is $350, with 40 spots available per year and scholarships available. For more information about the program or to apply, visit furman.edu/ sites/olli/pages/default. aspx or contact direc- tor Nancy Kennedy at 294-2998 or nancykenne-

dy2767@furman.edu.

YMCA ICAN BIKE CAMP IS AUGUST 3-7

Eastside Family YMCA’s iCan Bike Camp is August

3-7 at Taylors First Bap- tist Church. The camp is to teach individuals with disabilities mobility by teaching them how to ride

a bike. The cost is $50 and in- cludes a new bike, helmet

and a week of camp. Rider registration is open and volunteers are needed. For more information, contact Lindsay Buckles at lbuckles@ymcagreen- ville.org or 292-2790.

CPR SATURDAY BEGINS AUGUST 1

The Greer Fire Depart- ment is offering CPR Sat- urday to the general pub- lic beginning Aug. 1 at the department’s headquar- ters, 103 W. Poinsett St. Classes will be held on the first Saturday of each month. The four-hour class is designed for anyoe with limited or no medi- cal training who desires to learn infant, child and

adult CPR and AED use, though not intended to re- place healthcare provider

certification. GFD person- nel will serve as instruc- tors. The GFD will cover the cost of the first class, which is limited to 12 stu- dents and begins at 9 a.m. on Aug. 1. For more information or to register, search CPR Sat- urday at eventbrite.com or email jholzheimer@cityof- greer.org.

CORRECTION

In last week’s special publication listing the 2015 Readers’ Choice win- ners, favorite photogra- pher Amy Clifton Keely’s contact information was

misspelled. The website is

amycliftonkeelyphotogra-

phy.com. We apologize for the error.

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2015

OPINION

The Greer Citizen

Now that’s love

N ews anchors have all been atwitter at the bold proclamation of love from a Nairobi lawyer, who goes

by the name, Kiprono, and is offering President Obama 50 cows, 70 sheep and 30 goats in exchange for the hand of his beautiful and eldest daughter, Malia. He’s serious and his ardor, albeit pretty creepy since it began in 2008 when Malia was about 10, can be felt in the letter he has drafted and turned over to embassy officials, hoping it will be passed on to the President upon his arrival in Kenya this July:

“If my request is granted, I will not re- sort to the cliche of popping champagne. Instead, I will surprise her with mursik, the traditional Kalenjin sour milk. As an indication that she is my queen, I will tie sinendet, which is a sacred plant, around her head. I will propose to her on a popular hill in Bureti near my father’s land where leaders and warriors are usu- ally crowned. The place is called Kapka- tet, which means ‘victory.’” When you take into consideration the vast cultural differences between Ameri- ca and Kenya, even I have to admit to be-

I’M JUST SAYING PAM STONE
I’M JUST
SAYING
PAM STONE

ing slightly swayed by that declaration:

sacred plants, leaders, warriors, crowned a queen? Pretty romantic, heady stuff. But then, oh, yeah, here’s what follows after the bloom is off the sinendit:

“Ours will be a simple life. I will teach Malia how to milk a cow, cook ugali, and prepare mursik like any other Klaenjin woman.” Which, essentially, is the American equivalent of a fresh faced bride imme- diately being expected to drive a minivan and spend her days clipping coupons for toilet bowl cleaners and Hamburger Helper. Woot! It’s a pretty safe bet that Malia is going to turn down Kiprono’s offer with the eye roll and curled upper lip that only a teenage girl can dispense with devastat-

ing results, usually accompanied with, “Whateverrrrr,” but I still applaud his generous offer and think that perhaps if here in America, we used a barter sys- tem to secure a spouse, our marriages would fare far better than the present rate of only 50% not resulting in divorce. Let me tell you something: 70 cows, 50 sheep and 30 goats is a huge deal in Kenya. It really is all your worldy posses- sions- possessions that would actually keep you alive, if need be. So perhaps if Americans, instead of beginning mar- riage fighting over debt accrued from exorbitant weddings and Caribbean honeymoons, instead gave each other everything they had in the first place, prior to the wedding, not only would they stay together forever (as they would be too broke to go anywhere else), but they would also know for a fact that their sweetheart was truly besotted with them. “If you give me your hand in mar- riage,” we would hear ‘Tyler’ say to his paramour, ‘Amber,’ “I’ll give you my cross-bow, my Gator atv, and (gulp) my 2013 Dodge Ram. With gun rack.”

THE GREER CITIZEN

A3

Now, that’s loooooove. “And Tyler,” Amber would gush, “If you will be my husband, I will give you my entire collection of Gun and Garden, front row tickets to see Jason Aldean, and my i-phone 6.” Done! That’s what I’m talking about:

giving until it hurts from the get-go. Knowing that you’re willing to sacrifice everything with your pledge of devotion. Knowing that material things pale in comparison to what is honestly felt in the heart. Which is why Paul and I remain, after 24 years, white trash common-law. I don’t want his stupid roses and he doesn’t want my stupid horses. And neither one of us ever wanted any stupid kids. But it works beautifully because horses are a 24/7 production facility for what is needed most to keep roses happy. Sorta like The Gift of the Magi. Plus we both have to shovel it if we want the benefits. Not exactly romantic, but practical, and it works for us. And no Mursik needed.

THE UPPER ROOM

|

Doubts

Read Mark 9: 14-29

T he boy’s father exclaimed,

“I do believe; help me over-

come my unbelief!” – Mark

9:24 (NIV)

From Moses to Thomas, many people in the Bible experienced moments of doubt. Today’s reading tells of a father who brought his son to Jesus to be healed. When Jesus told him, “Everything is possible for one who believes,” the father im- mediately replied, “I do believe; help me overcome my unbe- lief!” I can certainly identify with the innter turmoil that caused the father to confess his doubts and at the same time as for help with them. As a young man I went through a period when I struggled in my faith and relationship with God. During this time I also found myself in many difficult, high-stress situ- ations. Because of my doubts, I wondered if God would be will- ing to help. Nevertheless, I still prayed. I recall once starting a prayer with the words, “I can’t seem to get over these doubts, Lord, but I’m coming to you in spite of them.” Every time I prayed, the strength to endure and carry on seemed to com. Doubt is not a sin. In fact, honest doubt can be the launching point toward deep faith. The remedy for doubt is trust and prayer. As I discov- ered in my doubting time, God is always there. We have only to take that first prayerful step to find rest in God’s presence.

Prayer: Dear God, when we are weary with doubts and burdened with unbelief, help us not to give up. Thank you for your constant presence with us. Amen.

Thought for the day: De- spite our doubts, God chooses for service in the world.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

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Submission guidelines

T he Greer Citizen accepts Let-

ters to the Editor. Letters

should be 125 words or less

and include a name and a phone number for verification.

reserves the

right to edit any content. Letters to the Editor

mailed to 317 Trade St., Greer

can be

The Greer Citizen

29651.

to 317 Trade St., Greer can be The Greer Citizen 29651. | GUEST EDITORIAL SC lawmakers

|

GUEST EDITORIAL

SC lawmakers brie y consider budget cuts

After six months of meaningless resolutions, behind-the-scenes negotiations with lobbyists, lengthy “debates” over bills that don’t matter to anyone, and early adjournments to attend receptions hosted by multibillion-dollar corpo- rations, lawmakers have finally noticed that the state budget contains things that shouldn’t be in the state budget. The entire session has been dominated by pro-

posals to “pay for roads” with an increase in the gas tax – an idea premised on the idea that our roads are falling apart because the state doesn’t have enough money. Leave aside, if you can, the demonstrable baselessness of that premise

– the premise that putting more money into a

backward and unaccountable funding system will somehow improve results – and consider what might have been a reasonable response to the alleged need for an increase in road mainte- nance money. Someone might have asked whether there are items in the state budget that don’t need to be there. In a $26 billion budget (reminder: each bil-

lion is 1,000 millions), it seems at least theoreti- cally possible that some items could be deleted and the money sent to road maintenance. There are, after all, two ways to increase revenue for

a program or agency: 1) raise taxes and/or fees,

and 2) cut the unnecessary budget items. All the talk’s been about the first. With only a tiny number of honorable exceptions, no one in the legislature has mentioned the second. (Well, except when House members took enor- mous heat for trying to pass a bond bill full of boondoggles. In that instance, members cut a few budget items in order to make room for the boondoggles – thus proving, if nothing else, that budget cuts are possible.) Recently, however, on the floor of the House, Rep. Ralph Norman (R-York) raised a fascinat- ing question: Why is there a $700,000 appro-

priation for a “bird hatchery program”? Rep. Mike Pitts (R- Laurens) – Ways and Means Natu- ral Resources subcommittee chairman – ex- plained that the appropriation was for a “pilot program” to hatch quail, pheasants, and other commonly hunted birds. Rep. Pitts, explaining the program, insisted that lawmakers are “con- stitutionally” required to maintain the state’s natural resources. The logic, we’re left to as- sume, is that while this 700 grand appropria- tion to a hatchery might be debatable, the con- stitution just requires it. So their hands are tied. No choice about it. But that led to another question. Rep. Walt McLeod (D-Newberry) noted that there had been several fish hatcheries in his district, but they were forced to close. So could he get similar ap- propriations for Newberry’s hatcheries? Pitts’ response was typical of the way things work among lawmakers: If you support the quail hatchery provision, he said (I’m relaying this from memory), we could talk about getting you those funds. The hatchery item was just one appropriation in a 26-plus page amendment to the budget sponsored by the Ways and Means Committee chairman, Rep. Brian White (R-Anderson). The entire amendment was adopted by the House. No further serious debate. The question of whether a budget appro- priation is really necessary has finally come up. That’s great, but it would be even better if lawmakers could have many more of these dis- cussions, and far earlier in the session – ideally before the budget has already passed the House and the Senate. And of course it’d be great if the unnecessary items were actually struck from the budget.

This guest editorial was submitted by Jamie Murguia, director of research at the South Carolina Policy Council.

The Greer Citizen

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L ast week, I fought the urge to sleep as I sat through a 5-hour budget presenta-

tion at Greer Council. Though painful for me, for residents it should standout. Transparency matters. I challenge Lyman, Duncan and Wellford to take a page from Greer Council as it strives to not only maintain transpar- ency but in also continuing to spray Windex on the dirty governmental window, making it clearer for the rest of us to see through. While agendas are published and sent newspapers prior to meetings, some are vague about ordinances, resolutions or topics of discussion, leaving residents in the dark. And, when councils glide through agenda items, reading footnote- like descriptions about what it entails, items the public may not support are more easily passed passed without their knowledge. The steps Greer takes are beyond what law requires, and it makes a difference. Agendas are publicly posted online with attached minutes from previ- ous meetings, departmental reports (including financial report) and ordinances and resolutions being discussed. All meetings are also recorded and available online to view, and following meetings a summary of what council voted in favor of and against is sent to us. Lyman and Duncan councils’ lack of transparency is evident, whether intentional or not. Despite requests for ordinances and resolutions to be attached to agendas for the public’s ben- efit, Lyman has yet to adhere to the request, which is further exasperated by the multitude of special-called, last-minute meetings they hold. Further- more, Lyman hasn’t publicly posted any of its agendas or minutes online since February. Duncan Council, on the other hand, hasn’t updated or main- tained its website since before former Mayor John Hamby died (September 2013). Information for the current council and mayor is not listed on the city’s website for residents to access, agendas and minutes are not posted nor is date and time of council meetings. If your council isn’t providing information you want access to, don’t simply request transpar- ency, instead provide them with concrete, reasonable requests they can fulfill but maybe sim- ply hadn’t considered.

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A6 THE GREER CITIZEN

Miles E. Bruce

Veteran

Miles Elliott Bruce, 83, of Greer, passed away Sunday, May 31, 2015, at McCall Hospice House in Simpsonville surrounded by his wife, children and grandchildren. Born July 11, 1931, to Edgar and Genelle Dobson Bruce, Miles was a lifelong resident of Greer. He graduated from Greer High School in 1949, then went on to major in Arts and Sciences at Clemson University. A natural born leader, he served as the University’s Student Body President. Upon graduation, Miles received a regular commis- sion from the U.S. Army. He spent three years serv- ing in Korea and Missouri as an ROTC instructor. Dis- charged from regular duty in 1956, Miles remained in the Army Reserves for 28 years, earning the rank of

full colonel prior to retire- ment. Miles was a salesman for Richtex Corporation for 35 years. He served his community in numer- ous ways, as a little league coach, as president of the Greer Peach Festival, and as an officer with the Chamber of Commerce. He was a lifetime member of the Greer Lions Club. Miles was a loyal member of IPTAY for 64 years. He was consistently among the top representatives, always promoting the uni- versity and his Tigers.

A lifelong member of

Greer First Baptist Church, Miles was a faithful ser- vant of the Lord. He was a choir member and deacon. Miles loved to be around people, always teasing them in a kind-natured way. He was proud of his family and loved taking them on annual beach va- cations. He made the best cakes and pimento cheese. He was as strong and structured as one would expect an Army colonel to be but was also lovable and affectionate, always offering a big hug and a “Love you, shug.” Miles was married to the former Shirley Jones, of Greer, and together they had two sons. Following Shirley’s passing in 1996, Miles married the former Betty Long Powers.

In addition to his wife,

he is survived by: two sons, Meb Bruce and wife Vivian of Atlanta; and Jeff Bruce and wife Cindy, of Chattanooga, Tenn.; one stepson, Jeff Powers of Lexington; six grandchil- dren, Keisha Shoun and husband Corey of John- son City, Tenn.; Miles E. Bruce III and wife Sara of Atlanta; Maren Valerio and husband Tom of At- lanta; Nick Bruce of Chat- tanooga; Zach Powers and wife Samantha of Greer; and Jacob Powers and wife Brittani of Lexington; and five great grandchil- dren; Carson Miles Bruce, Lyla Elaine Shoun, Mason Baynes Bruce, Thomas El- liott Valerio, and JP Pow- ers. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Wednes- day at Greer First Baptist Church, conducted by Dr. Wilson Nelson and Dr. Rick Ezell. Burial will be held at Wood Memorial Park with full military honors. Jay Crim and Bo Ed- wards will serve as pall- bearers alongside Miles’ grandsons, Miles, Nick, Zach and Jacob. Honorary pallbearers will be Dottie Bryson, John Rush, Den- nis Sides, and Ken Tucker along with members of the Greer Lions Club and the Willing Workers Sunday School class of Greer First Baptist Church. The family received friends from 6-8 p.m. Tuesday at The Wood Mor- tuary. Memorials may be made to Alzheimer’s Associa- tion, 301 University Ridge, Suite 5850, Greenville, SC 29601 or Greer Commu- nity Ministries, P.O. Box 1373, Greer, SC 29652. Online condolences may be made at thewoodmor- tuary.com.

Billy Cloninger

William Leo “Billy” Clon- inger, Jr., 60, of 112 Silver Ridge Court, died May 31, 2015, at Greenville Memo- rial Hospital of chronic

heart failure.

A native of Greenville,

SC, son of Janie Duncan Cloninger of Greer and the late William Leo Clon- inger, Sr., he was a mem- ber of Greer First Baptist Church. Also surviving are one brother, Patrick Clon- inger (Holly) of Greer; two sisters, Harriet Johnson (Ralph) and Lesli Clon- inger all of Greer; special nieces and nephews, Liza

Price (Tyler), Will Edwards and Lyndsey Cloninger all

of

A memorial service was held at 3 p.m. Tuesday, June 2, at Greer First Bap- tist Church, conducted by Dr. Rick Ezell and Dr. Wil- son Nelson. Visitation was held after the service at the church. The family is at the home. Memorials may be made to Greer First Baptist Church Building Fund, 202 W. Poinsett St., Greer, SC 29650. Online condolences may be made at thewoodmor- tuary.com.

Greer.

Brenda Jean Henson

Brenda Jean Burriss Henson, 69, of 663 Ar- lington Road passed away on Thursday, May 21, 2015. She was the wife of Paul Allen Henson of the home and the daughter of the late Thomas Earl Bur- riss and Alda Mae Fowler Burriss. She was a mem- ber of Apalache Baptist Church and Helping Hands and Sisters in Christ Sun-

day School Class. Survivors also include

a son, Todd Henson and

wife Rhonda of Inman; a daughter, Cindy Raina and husband Rick of Greer; two brothers, Tommy Burriss and wife Cheryl of Hines- ville, GA and Leon Burriss of Lyman; a sister, Mar- tha Emory of Lyman; four grandchildren, Kayla Rit- tenberg, Magen Brown, Eli and Deacon Henson; and three great-grandchildren, Lorilie and Isaac Ritten- berg and Jude Brown. She was predeceased by a brother, Carroll Burriss. Funeral services were at 3 p.m. Sunday, May 24, 2015 at the Apalache Baptist Church with Rev. Eddie Cooper, Dr. Henry Johnson and Rev. Jim Carpenter officiating. The family received friends

from 2-3 p.m. prior to the

funeral. The interment fol- lowed at Hillcrest Memory Gardens. Memorials may be made to the Apalache Baptist Church, 1915 Gap Creek Road, Greer, SC 29651, or to the Greer Christian Learning Center, 3055 E Gap Creek Road, Greer, SC

29651.

The family is at the home. Condolences may be made at striblingfuneral- home.net.

Hayden W. Howell

Hayden Wyatt Howell,

74, of 125 Pinewood Drive, died June 1, 2015, at his home.

A native of Greenville

County, son of the late Hayden W. Howell, Sr. and Dora Lou Bomar Howell Ford, he was co-owner of Tuck and Howell Inc., a member of Bailey Masonic Lodge #146 and Hejaz Shrine Temple where he was Captain of the Hejaz mini car unit. He was a loving and devoted hus- band, father and grandfa- ther and of the Methodist faith. Surviving are his wife of 54 years, Barbara McGowan Howell of the home; one daughter and son-in-law, Kim Howell Reeve and Da- vid of Taylors; one son and daughter-in-law, Mike and Dana Howell of Taylors; one sister, Rebecca Bar- brey of Greer; three grand- children, Tanner Backman (Morgan) of Birmingham, AL, Chandler Backman of Greer and Justin Howell (Amanda) of Greer and one nephew, Steve Barbrey (Nancy). Funeral services will be

held at 2 p.m. Friday, June

5, at Wood Mortuary con-

ducted by Dr. Drew Hines and Rev. Pete Campbell. Burial will follow in Hill- crest Memory Gardens with Masonic rites. Pallbearers will be Jerry Tuck, Tanner Backman, Chandler Backman, Jus- tin Howell, Jim Hunt and

The Greer Citizen

OBITUARIES

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2015

Steve Barbrey.

Honorary escort will be the employees of Tuck and Howell. Visitation will be held

6:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday at Wood Mortuary. The family is at the

home.

Memorials may be made to United Christian Church, 105 Daniel Ave., Greer, SC 29651 or Greer Communi-

ty Ministries, PO Box 1373, Greer, SC 29652. Online condolences may be made at thewoodmor-

tuary.com

Online condolences may be made at thewoodmor- tuary.com Weekend Outlook Warm, drier weekend weather After a

Weekend Outlook

Warm, drier weekend weather

After a warm and humid week with afternoon rain and thunderstorms, will see drier weather for the weekend. Partly sunny skies will stay with us for the remainder of the week as tem- peratures stay in the low to middle 80s with af- ternoon rain and thunderstorms possible each afternoon. Highs on Saturday and Sunday will climb to the middle 80s with overnight lows in the upper 60s. Have a great weekend!

Moonlight Movies

What: ‘Monsters University

Where: Greer City Park

Date: Thursday, June 4 6-10 p.m.

Temps: Partly sunny. 78-72 degrees.

June 4 6-10 p.m. Temps: Partly sunny. 78-72 degrees. 77/59 Partly sunny 79/61 Partly sunny 78/60

77/59 Partly sunny 79/61 Partly sunny

78/60 Partly sunny 80/62 Partly sunny

86/62 Partly sunny 83/66 Partly sunny

87/63 Partly sunny 84/67 Partly sunny

77/59 PS

79/61 PS

81/62 RN

81/63 RN

84/71 PS

84/68 PS

86/69 RN

84/71 RN

87/68 RN

86/68 RN

87/66 RN

84/66 PS

89/68 RN

87/68 RN

85/65 RN

86/66 SUN

June 9

June 16

June 24

July 1

Edith Lynn

Edith Carolyn Smith Lynn, beloved mother,

grandmother, great-grand- mother and aunt, died peacefully on May 26, 2015, surrounded by her

children.

Born in Greer Dec. 31, 1925, she was the daugh- ter of the late William Car- ey and Maude S. Smith. Mrs. Lynn was a re- tired employee of Bank of America with over 25 years of service. A mem- ber of Greer First Baptist Church since 1963, she

felt blessed to be a part of the Polly Lineberger WMU

Circle.

Surviving are three daughters, one son and their spouses: Debby and Fred Parker of Greer, Tina and Joe Stansbury of Beau-

fort, Bill and Lisa Lynn of Greer, Ginny and John McKenzie of Huntersville, North Carolina; six grand- daughters: Keven and Craig Langston, Kim Parker, Lisa and Byron Hagan, Christy and Lance Kurtz, Lauren McKenzie and her fiancé, Lars Isaacson; one grand- son, Eric and Mindy Parker; ten great-grandchildren:

Haleigh Hagan; Elizabeth, Parker, Caroline and Re- becca Langston; Jackson and Izabella Kurtz; Wil- liam and Nathaniel Parker and a great-grandson ar- riving in November. Mrs. Lynn was preceded in death by her husband,

W. T. Lynn, Sr., three broth-

ers: Paul, Tom and Harry Smith, a sister, Virginia Parker, a great-grandson, Donovan Kurtz and a son- in-law, Jimmy Anderson. Mrs. Lynn was known by many for her sweet spirit and kindness. Her fam- ily feels privileged to have had a mother and grand- mother of faith who truly lived Christ’s example of unconditional love. A service to celebrate her life was held at The Wood Mortuary on Friday, May 29. Visitation with family was from 2:30-3:45 p.m. with the service fol-

lowing at 4 p.m., led by Dr. Rick Ezell and Reverend Craig Langston. Burial will

be private. The family would like to thank Dr. Karen Hunter, Dr. Dev Vaz and the nurs- ing staff at Greer Memorial Hospital for the compas- sionate healthcare provid- ed to Mrs. Lynn. In lieu of flowers, memo- rials may be made to Greer Community Ministries,

P. O. Box 1373, Greer, SC

29652. Online condolenc- es may be expressed at thewoodmortuary.com.

Wednesday

es may be expressed at thewoodmortuary.com. Wednesday 86 63 Thursday Friday 85 62   0.03” 18.62”

86

63

Thursday

Friday

85

62

 

0.03”

18.62”

90

-0.93”

68

6:16 AM

8:38 PM

81

81 80 85

80

81 80 85

85

67

65

64

Sunday

6:16 AM 8:38 PM 81 80 85 67 65 64 Sunday 83 66 Monday 84 67

83

66

Monday

PM 81 80 85 67 65 64 Sunday 83 66 Monday 84 67 Saturday Tuesday Rachel

84

67

Saturday

85 67 65 64 Sunday 83 66 Monday 84 67 Saturday Tuesday Rachel P. Neal Rachel

Tuesday

67 65 64 Sunday 83 66 Monday 84 67 Saturday Tuesday Rachel P. Neal Rachel Pitts
67 65 64 Sunday 83 66 Monday 84 67 Saturday Tuesday Rachel P. Neal Rachel Pitts

Rachel P. Neal

Rachel Pitts Neal, 90, widow of James Morris

Neal, died May 31, 2015, at her home.

A native of Anderson

County, daughter of the late William Z. and Viola Hinton Pitts, she was a homemaker and a member of Pelham Church of God of Prophecy. Surviving are three daughters, Sylvia Clark (John) of Greer, Margaret Hostetler (Ray) of Greer and Marcelle Earwood (Robert) of Greer; three sisters, Helen Hendrix, Bertha McCall and Jenny

Phillips all of Pickens; sev- en grandchildren, Gayla Young, Mark Hostetler, Jer- ry Earwood, Lori Earwood, Patricia Earwood, DeeDee Waddell and Misty Jones; and twelve great-grand- children, Laura, Leah, Car- oline, Luke, Logan, Trent, Caitlyn, Tiffany, Megan, Chris, Matt and T.J. Mrs. Neal was prede- ceased by one daughter, Sharon N. Caporino, five brothers, Earl Pitts, Jack Pitts, Ralph Pitts, John Pitts and James Hinton, and five sisters, Jessie Mae Neal, Mildred Middleton, Louise Pitts, Ola Faye Sim- mons and Marilyn Cooper. Funeral services were held at 4 p.m. Tuesday, June 3, at The Wood Mor- tuary, conducted by Rev. Tim Huckaby and Rev. Wayne Hinton. Burial fol- lowed in Hillcrest Memory Gardens. Visitation was held 2:30- 3:45 p.m. Tuesday at The Wood Mortuary. The family is at the home of her daughter, Margaret Hostetler.

In lieu of flowers, me-

morials may be made to Journey Hospice, 665 N. Academy St., Greenville, SC 29601 or Burnsview Baptist Church Building Fund, 9690 Reidville Road,

Greer, SC 29651. Online condolences may be made at thewoodmor- tuary.com.

Brenda Watson Pearson

Brenda Watson Pearson, 52, of 107 Woodward St., passed away on Monday, May 25, 2015. Born Janu-

ary 20, 1963 in New Or-

leans, Louisiana., she was the daughter of Barbara Smith Watson and the late Herman Watson. She was a member of O’Neal Church of God and retired from Cannons Restaurant

in Greer.

Survivors also include two sons, Matthew Sat- terfield of Landrum and

Samuel Pearson of Greer;

a daughter, Elaine Satter-

field of Greer; four broth- ers, Gary Watson and Jimmy Watson of Greer, Timmy Watson of Pau- line, and David Watson of Greer; two sisters, Robin Russell of St. Joseph, Mis- souri. and Vickie Watson of Greer; and four grand- children. Service was at noon Sat- urday, May 30, 2015, at O’Neal Church of God with Rev. Tim McConnell offici- ating. The family is at the home. Condolences may be made at striblingfuneral- home.net.

Joe E. Quinn, Sr.

Joe Earl Quinn, Sr., 77, of 553 Memorial Drive, died May 31, 2015, at Green- ville Memorial Hospital. A native of Spartanburg County, son of the late James Ronzo Quinn, Sr. and Myrtle Fowler Quinn, he was a retired employee of Cunningham Waters and a member of Calvary Baptist Church. Surviving are his wife, Hilda Loftis Quinn of the home; four sons, Joel Quinn (Maurissa) of Ly-

man, Robbie Quinn (Tra- cy) of Greer, Steve Quinn (Cindy) of Taylors and Tim Quinn (Angie) of Townville; a step-son, Scott Taylor of Greer; two step-daughters, Amanda Laws (Eddie) of Inman and Melody Patter- son of Greer; a brother, Donald Quinn (Kate) of Blythewood; a sister, Lin- da Vaughn (Joe) of Greer; twenty grandchildren and five great-grandchildren;

and father-in-law, Calvin Loftis of Taylors. Mr. Quinn was prede- ceased by his first wife, Faye Arms Quinn, two

brothers, James Quinn, Jr. and Larry Quinn and one sister, Dot Henson. Funeral services will be held at 2 p.m. Thursday, June 4, at Calvary Baptist Church, conducted by Rev. John Mark Turner and Rev.

Mike Miller. Burial will fol- low in Hillcrest Memory Gardens. Grandsons will serve as pallbearers. Visitation will be held from 7-9 p.m. Wednesday, June 3, at The Wood Mor- tuary. The family is at the home of his son, Robbie Quinn, 115 Apollo Ave., Greer, SC

29651.

Memorials may be made to Calvary Baptist Church Bus Ministry or Golden Age Group, 101 Calvary St., Greer, SC 29650. Online condolences may be made at thewoodmor- tuary.com.

SEE OBITS | A10

OBITUARIES

Can be e-mailed to billy@ greercitizen.com or dropped o at 317 Trade St. Deadline:

noon Tuesday. Cost: $30; with photo $45.

Trade St. Deadline: noon Tuesday. Cost: $30; with photo $45. © lisa marie albert © lisa
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The Greer Citizen

POLICE AND FIRE

MARIJUANA: PART II

THE GREER CITIZEN

A7

The myths, the movement and the medical agenda

BY WILLIAM BUCHHEIT STAFF WRITER

Marijuana is one of the most popular and contro- versial topics in the news today, as cultural per- ceptions around it have shifted dramatically. A

CBS poll released this year revealed that 53 percent

of Americans now support

legalization of the drug, the highest percentage ever, and up 13 percent from 2009. With its re- cent decriminalization in Washington, Colorado and the District of Columbia, the legalization move- ment is gaining steam and changing attitudes. These days, some people view smoking weed as more acceptable than smoking cigarettes. But are the media’s and public’s relaxed views of marijuana consumption justified? Is the drug as harmless as the major- ity of people think? What about weed’s long-stand- ing reputation as a gate- way drug, and the poten- tial benefits and hazards of medical marijuana? Seeking answers to these questions, I interviewed three of the most knowl- edgeable and experienced addiction/recovery ex- perts in Greenville County. This is what they told me.

1. The argument that marijuana is safer than alcohol does not justify its legalization.

In a 2013 poll conduct- ed by the federal govern- ment’s Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), 75 percent of kids aged 12-17 perceived “no great risk” from smoking mari- juana once a month. In contrast, only 60 percent of them saw no great risk in consuming at least five drinks once a week. In other words, kids, like

CRIME REPORT
CRIME
REPORT

(Note: All information contained in the following blotter was taken directly from the official incident reports filed by the Greer Police Department or The Spartanburg County Sher- iff’s Office or The Green- ville County Sheriff’s Of- fice. All suspects are to be considered innocent until proven guilty in the court of law.)

DUI

Jeffrey Lee Mccullough, of 304 Boling Ct., Taylors, was arrested for driving under the influence and no proof of insurance on May 23. According to incident reports, a Greer Police officer was on patrol when he noticed a vehicle swerving from right to left. Upon a traffic stop, it was observed that Mccullough had red, bloodshot eyes. During questioning, the subject stated he and some friends had split two pitchers of alcohol. Standardized field sobriety tests were performed, which Mccullough failed. He was transported to the Greer City Police Department where a breath sample determined he had a blood alcohol content of .18.

CDV

Deondre Vontavious Whiteside, of 205 Roe St., Greer, was arrested for criminal domestic violence (second) and resisting ar- rest. According to incident reports, Greer Police re- sponded to the area of 1310 West Poinsett St. on Sunday, May 24, in re- sponse to a male subject “actively assaulting a fe- male subject.” Officers separated the two and observed two superficial

abrasions on the right side of the female’s face. There were also abrasions on her right arm and she had

a torn t-shirt. The female

most adult Americans, believe booze is more de- structive and deadly than weed. But the addiction experts

I talked to believe that’s an absurd rationale for legal- izing pot. “People say it (mari- juana) is no more harmful than alcohol. Well, that’s not saying much. Alco- hol is probably one of the most harmful substances

on the planet,” says Adam

Brickner, Executive Direc- tor of the Phoenix Center, Greenville County’s sub- stance abuse authority. Indeed, the potential dangers of drinking are widely known. The news media bombards us each day with the nightmarish

aftermath of alcohol abuse

– the crashes, organ fail-

ure, murder, suicides and domestic violence. Even the slightest overuse of the substance can inhibit caution and cloud judg- ment, leading to mistakes that ruin lives. “Alcohol certainly does

not come without its share

of issues,” admits James

Campbell, the director of Greenville’s White Horse Academy, a 16-bed addic-

tion recovery center for ad- olescent boys from across the state. “To suggest that marijuana should be legalized because alcohol

is legal is to suggest that

bringing home a panther

for a pet [is okay] because one already has a pet bob- cat.” But here’s the thing:

Those who aren’t alcohol-

ic can consume and enjoy

booze with virtually no consequences. Wine, many doctors have asserted, even has health benefits when consumed in small doses. In addition, it’s well known to compliment

certain foods and works to make social events more endurable. Clearly, most people can ingest a drink

or two without any delete-

subject stated the two had

a 9-month-old child to-

gether and that they had

begun arguing earlier that night. During the argu- ment, Whiteside reported-

ly scratched the female’s

face with his nails, causing the victim to depart for a friend’s house with their child. According to the report, Whiteside showed up at the friend’s house

to continue the argument

and more physical contact ensued. Whiteside was searched

by police and, after kicking,

yelling and cursing at officers, was placed in a patrol car. Whiteside had a prior criminal domestic violence

charge on Jan. 28. and has

a current pending charge from April 8.

DUI

Aaron Lee Steen, of Hen- dersonville, NC, was ar- rested for driving under the influence on May 24. According to incident re- ports, an officer was con-

ducting a routine patrol in the area of Highway 80 and Highway 101 when a vehi-

cle was observed swerving

from left to right across

the solid white lines in the roadway. Upon initiating

a traffic stop, the officer

made contact with Steen, who had red, bloodshot eyes. Steen stated that he had at his friend’s house and had not had anything to drink all night. Steen was asked to perform a standardized field sobri- ety test, which he failed. Steen was transported to the Greer City Police De- partment, where a breath sample was refused. A body camera was worn and was active during the incident.

POSSESSION

Anna Vaughn McDan- iel, of 602 Bennett St., Greenville, was arrested for possession of drug paraphernalia and public drunkenness on June 1. According to incident re-

ports, an officer respond-

ed to reports of a person

passed out behind the wheel of an SUV located

on Reddington Drive in

behind the wheel of an SUV located on Reddington Drive in WILLIAM BUCHHEIT | THE GREER

WILLIAM BUCHHEIT | THE GREER CITIZEN

Adam Brickner, executive director of the Phoenix Center, explains a few common arguments for and against the legalization of marijuana.

rious effect on judgment, mood or driving ability. In contrast, the sole pur- pose of smoking weed is to get stoned, and even one hit off a bong, pipe, blunt or joint can put someone in another state of mind altogether. “Marijuana generally has the impairment as the point of its use,” Campbell

concisely puts it. With the THC levels of today’s pot much higher than what they were a gen-

eration ago, it doesn’t take much to get high. Legaliz- ing marijuana would force

law enforcement to invent

a device to measure THC

levels in the blood and de- termine what level made driving and other activi- ties unsafe.

2. The medical marijua- na movement is an agen- da for total legalization.

Most of the coverage we

see in the papers and on

cable news seems to draw

a hard line between medi-

cal marijuana consump- tion and recreational use of the drug. In general Americans perceive them differently as well. While only about half of all US citizens polled in the SAMHSA study favored to- tal legalization, some 85% support the legalization of marijuana for medical purposes. All three of the local ad- diction authorities I spoke to, however, insist the pro- medical marijuana move- ment isn’t as straight- forward or innocent as it

sounds. “Voting on the legal- ization of a drug under the pretense of medical research is disingenu- ous and misguided at best,” Campbell explains. “Medical marijuana is a proverbial smoke screen for those who wish to see marijuana legalized for other reasons.”

Rich Jones, director of

Faces and Voices of Recov- ery of Greenville, agrees wholeheartedly. “I believe medical mari- juana is politically linked to the decriminalization and full-fledged legaliza- tion of marijuana,” he says. “… It doesn’t really have anything to do with medical marijuana.” Brickner isn’t buying it either. He believes most people who obtain medical marijuana cards in states where it’s legal have, if anything, very minor med- ical conditions. “It’s just a trumped up rationale for getting mari- juana,” he says. The fact that most medi- cal marijuana is consumed by smoking makes Brick- ner all the more dubious. “Smoking is a horrible way to deliver a medica- tion,” he says. “No other medication is smoked. It’s just a horrible way to get it into your bloodstream.

Brickner’s point is both a compelling and oft-over- looked one. For years, doctors have prescribed

Marinol to patients under- going chemotherapy. Like the name implies, Marinol

is basically marijuana in

pill form – THC in a cap- sule. It was approved by the FDA three decades ago and has proven effective

in treating some common

symptoms of cancer such

as pain, nausea and loss of

appetite. So, with prescription marijuana (Marinol) effec-

tively already on the mar- ket and readily available

to patients who could ac-

tually benefit from it, the recent medical weed push does seem a bit suspicious and political. From all accounts, it’s ridiculously easy for peo- ple to acquire medical marijuana cards in states where it is legal. A con- vincing complaint of anxi- ety, insomnia, glaucoma, chronic pain or headaches

is generally all it takes to

secure the coveted docu- ment. And once you do, “medical pot” dispensaries selling high-THC weed are virtually on every corner. As Brickner suggests, with that much wheeling and dealing going on, it might be more about the mullah than the medicine. “The people who are trying to move us towards legalization are people who are going to make millions and millions of dollars off of it,” he says. “They’re going to grow it and they’re going to sell it. They don’t really care about the children that are affected by it, just like the tobacco industry didn’t care about the children affected by tobacco. The

parallels are very clear. It’s

a tremendous economic

motivation to have medical marijuana.”

the Riverwood Farms Sub-

division. Upon arrival, the officer observed a female sitting in the driver’s seat of a gold Chevy Trailblazer,

appearing unconscious. The officer opened the driver’s side door and turned the vehicle off, asking McDaniel if she knew where she was.

According to the officer,

the subject’s responses were unintelligible. McDaniel was arrested, and an inventory of her vehicle revealed three spoons and one syringe in the front passenger seat.

A grey scale was found in

the plastic lining on the driver’s side floorboard. Inside of a cooler in the

bck seat was a 1.75L bottle

of Skol Vodka. The subject

was issued two uniform traffic tickets for public intoxication.

CDV

Demetrius Cortez Batemane, of 12 9th St., Greer, was arrested for criminal domestic violence on May 30. According to incident reports, an officer was dispatched to Batemane’s address to talk to the victim of an assault. The

victim state her boyfriend (Batemane) got really mad and got in her face. When she picked up the phone to call the police, Batemane grabbed the victim’s arm and pulled the phone from it. The victim said she could feel her arm twist and it felt like her arm broke. The victim’s daughter said she was in another room, but could hear the fight. The son was in the room where the fight took place and stated “my dad did bad.” The officer determined Batemane was the primary aggressor, charging the subject with criminal domestic violence. The victim was advised on how to obtain an order of protection.

POSSESSION

Jeffrey Caleb Baxter, of 1038 357 Highway, Greer, was arrested for posses- sion of schedule IV drugs,

possession of marijuana (first) and possession of drug paraphernalia on May 29. According to incident reports, an officer was on patrol when a vehicle was spotted weaving in its own lane and changing

lanes without signal. Upon

a traffic stop, the officer

noticed Baxter’s glossy eyes and observed that he appeared sedated. When asked if he had been using drugs, Baxter stated, “no.” The officer called for a K-9 unit and a search of the vehicle yielded a silver and black box containing

a pill bottle with seven alprazolam pills and a plastic container with about a gram of marijuana inside. Baxter stated he did

not have a prescription for the pills. The drugs were sent to a lab for analysis.

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A8 THE GREER CITIZEN

PAGE LABEL

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2015

And they were calling to one another: “Holy, holy, holy is the LORD Almighty; the whole earth is full of his glory.” - Isaiah 6:3

the whole earth is full of his glory.” - Isaiah 6:3 Worship With Us Good News

Worship With Us

earth is full of his glory.” - Isaiah 6:3 Worship With Us Good News Baptist Church

Good News Baptist Church 1592 South Highway 14 • Greer

BAPTIST

Abner Creek Baptist Church

2461Abner Creek Rd., Greer • 877-6604

Airport Baptist Church

776 S. Batesville Rd., Greer • 848-7850

Apalache Baptist

1915 Gap Creek Rd., Greer • 877-6012

Bible Baptist Church

6645 Mountain View Rd., Taylors • 895-7003

Blue Ridge Baptist Church

3950 Pennington Rd., Greer • 895-5787

BridgePointe

600 Bridge Rd., Taylors • 244-2774

Burnsview Baptist Church

9690 Reidville Rd., Greer • 879-4006

Calvary Baptist

101 Calvary St., Greer • 877-9759

Calvary Baptist

108 Forest St., Greer • 968-0092

Calvary Hill Baptist

100 Edward Rd., Lyman

Calvary Road Baptist Church

108 Bright Rd., Greer • 593-2643

Camp Creek Baptist Church

1100 Camp Creek Rd., Taylors

Cedar Grove Baptist Church

109 Elmer St., Greer • 877-6216

Community Baptist Church

642 S. Suber Rd., Greer • 848-3500

Double Springs Baptist Church

3800 Locust Hill Rd., Taylors • 895-1314

Ebenezer-Welcome Baptist Church

4005 Highway 414, Landrum • 895-1461

El Bethel Baptist Church

313 Jones Ave., Greer • 877-4021

Emmanuel Baptist Church

423 S. Buncombe Rd., Greer • 877-2121

Enoree Fork Baptist Church

100 Enoree Dr., Greer • 268-4385

Fairview Baptist Church

1300 Locust Hill Rd., Greer • 877-1881

First Baptist Church

202 W. Poinsett St., Greer • 877-4253

FreedomFellowship Greer High • 877-3604

Friendship Baptist Church

1600 Holly Springs Rd., Lyman • 877-4746

Good News Baptist Church

1592 S. Highway 14, Greer • 879-2289

Grace Baptist Church

760 W. Gap Creek Rd., Greer • 879-3519

Grace Place

407 Ridgewood Dr., Greer

Greer Freewill Baptist Church

110 Pine Ridge Dr., Greer • 968-0310

Heritage Chapel Baptist Church

218Alexander Rd., Greer • 989-0170

Highland Baptist Church

3270 Hwy. 414, Taylors • 895-5270

Hillcrest Baptist Church

111 Biblebrook Dr., Greer • 877-4206

Hispanic Baptist Iglesia Bautista Hispana

199 Hubert St., Greer • 877-3899

Holly Springs Baptist Church

250 Hannon Rd., Inman • 877-6765

Locust Hill Baptist Church

5534 Locust Hill Rd., Travelers Rest • 895-1771

Maple Creek Baptist Church

609 S. Main St., Greer • 877-1791

Milford Baptist Church

1282 Milford Church Rd., Greer • 895-5533

Mount Lebanon Baptist Church

572 Mt. Lebanon Church Rd., Greer • 895-2334

New Hope Baptist Church

561 Gilliam Rd., Greer • 879-7080

New JerusalemBaptist Church

413 E. Poinsett St., Greer • 968-9203

New Life Baptist Church

90 Becco Rd., Greer • 895-3224

Northwood Baptist Church

888Ansel School Rd., Greer • 877-5417

O’Neal Baptist Church

3420 N. Highway 101, Greer • 895-0930

PelhamFirst Baptist Church

2720 S. Old Highway 14, Greer • 879-4032

People’s Baptist Church

310 Victor Avenue Ext., Greer • 848-0449

Piney Grove Missionary Baptist Church

201 Jordan Rd., Lyman • 879-2646

Pleasant Grove Baptist Church

1002 S. Buncombe Rd., Greer • 877-6436

Pleasant Hill Baptist Church

4899 Jordan Rd., Greer • 895-3546

Providence Baptist Church

2020 Gibbs Shoals Rd., Greer • 877-3483

Rebirth Missionary Baptist Church

2375 Racing Road, Greer • 877-0449

Riverside Baptist Church

1249 S. Suber Rd., Greer • 879-4400

Second Baptist Church

570 Memorial Drive Ext., Greer • 877-7061

Southside Baptist Church

410 S. Main St., Greer • 877-2672

St. John’s Baptist Church

2 Groveland Rd., Taylors • 879-2904

Suber Road Baptist Church

445 S. Suber Rd., Greer • 801-0181

Taylors First Baptist Church

200 W. Main St., Taylors • 244-3535

United Family Ministries

13465 E. Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer • 877-3235

Victor Baptist

121 New Woodruff Rd., Greer • 877-9686

Washington Baptist Church

3500 N. Highway 14, Greer • 895-1510

Welcome Home Baptist Church

1779 Pleasant Hill Rd., Greer • 901-7674

CATHOLIC

Blessed Trinity Catholic Church

901 River Rd., Greer • 879-4225

CHURCH OF CHRIST

Riverside Church of Christ

2103 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer • 322-6847

CHURCH OF GOD

Church of God - Greer

500 Trade St., Greer • 877-0374

Church of God of Prophecy

2416 N. Highway 14, Greer • 877-8329

Eastside Worship Center

601 Taylors Rd., Taylors • 268-0523

O’Neal Church of God

3794 Berry Mill Rd., Greer • 895-4273

Pelham Church of God of Prophecy

139Abner Creek Rd., Greer • 801-0528

Praise Cathedral Church of God

3390 Brushy Creek Rd., Greer • 879-4878

EPISCOPAL

Good Shepherd Episcopal

200 Cannon St., Greer • 877-2330

LUTHERAN

Abiding Peace Ev. Lutheran Church

401 Batesville Rd., Simpsonville •288-4867

Apostolic Lutheran Church

453 N. Rutherford Rd., Greer • 848-4568

Immanuel Lutheran Church &School LCMS

2820 Woodruff Rd., Simpsonville • 297-5815

Redeemer Lutheran Church, ELCA

300 Oneal Rd., Greer • 877-5876

Saints Peter and Paul Evangelical Lutheran

400 Parker Ivey Dr., Greenville • 551-0246

METHODIST

Bethel United Methodist Church

105 E. Arlington Ave., Greer • 879-2066

Covenant United Methodist Church

1310 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer • 244-3162

Ebenezer United Methodist Church

174 Ebenezer Road, Greer • 987-9644

Faith United Methodist Church

1301 S. Main St. (S. Hwy. 14), Greer • 877-0308

Fews Chapel United Methodist Church

4000 N. Highway 101, Greer • 895-2522

Grace United Methodist Church

627 Taylor Rd., Greer • 877-7015

Lee Road United Methodist Church

1377 East Lee Rd., Taylors • 244-6427

Liberty Hill United Methodist Church

301 Liberty Hill Rd., Greer • 968-8150

Liberty United Methodist Church

4276 Highway 414, Landrum • 292-0142

Memorial United Methodist Church

201 N. Main St., Greer • 877-0956

Mountain View UMC

6525 Mountain View Rd., Taylors • 895-8532

Sharon United Methodist Church

1421 Reidville Sharon Rd., Greer • 879-7926

St. Mark United Methodist Church

911 St. Mark Rd., Taylors • 848-7141

St. Paul United Methodist Church

3856 N. Highway 101, Greer • 895-5570

Victor United Methodist Church

1 WilsonAve., Greer • 877-5520

Woods Chapel United Methodist Church

2388 Brown Wood Rd., Greer • 879-4475

Zoar United Methodist Church

1005 Highway 357, Greer • 877-0758

PRESBYTERIAN

Blue Ridge Presbyterian Church

2094 Highway 101 North, Greer • 483-2140

Devenger Road Presbyterian Church

1200 Devenger Rd., Greer • 268-7652

Fellowship Presbyterian Church

1105 Old Spartanburg Rd., Greer • 877-3267

First Presbyterian Church

100 School St., Greer • 877-3612

Fulton Presbyterian Church

821Abner Creek Rd., Greer • 879-3190

OTHER DENOMINATIONS

Agape House

900 Gap Creek Rd., Greer • 329-7491

Anglican Church of St. George the Martyr

427 Batesville Rd., Simpsonville • 281-0015

Barton’s Memorial Pentacostal Holiness

Highway 101 North, Greer

Bethesda Temple

125 Broadus St., Greer • 877-8523

Beulah Christian Fellowship Church

1017 Mauldin Rd., Greenville • 283-0639

Calvary Bible Fellowship

Holiday Inn, Duncan • 266-4269

Calvary Chapel of Greer

104 New Woodruff Rd. • Greer • 877-8090

Christ Fellowship

343 Hampton Rd., Greer • 879-8446

Christian Heritage Church

900 N. Main St., Greer • 877-2288

Christian Life Center 2CountryPlaza• 322-1325 Christian Outreach 106 West Rd. • 848-0308

El-Bethel Holiness 103 E. Church St. • 968-9474

Faith Family Church

3339 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors • 244-0207

Faith Temple

5080 Sandy Flat Rd., Taylors • 895-2524

Glad Tidings Assembly of God

Highway 290, Greer • 879-3291 Greer Mill Church 52 Bobo St., Greer • 877-2442

Harmony Fellowship Church

468 S. Suber Rd., Greer • 877-8287

Harvest Christian Church

2150 Highway 417, Woodruff • 486-8877

International Cathedral of Prayer

100 Davis Avenue • Greer • 655-0009

Lifesong Church

12481 Greenville Highway, Lyman • 439-2602

Living Way Community Church

3239 N. Highway 101, Greer • 895-0544

Mountain Bridge Community Church

1400B Wade Hampton Blvd., Greer • 350-1051

New Beginnings Outreach

104 New Woodruff Rd., Greer • 968-2424

New Covenant Fellowship

2425 Racing Rd., Greer • 848-4521

New Hope Freedom

109 W. Wade Hampton Blvd. • Greer • 205-8816

New Life in Christ 210 Arlington Rd. • 346-9053

Point of Life Church

Wade Hampton Blvd. • Duncan • 426-4933

Springwell Church

4369 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors • 268-2299

Trinity Fellowship Church

3610

Brushy Creek Rd., Greer • 877-0419

1700

N. Pleasantburg Dr, Greenville • 244-6011

United Anglican Fellowship

1001 W. Poinsett St., Greer • 629-3350

United Christian Church

105 Daniel Ave., Greer • 895-3966

United House of Prayer

213 Oak St., Greer • 848-0727

Upstate Friends’ Meeting (Quaker)

P.O. Box 83, Lyman • 439-8788

Upstate Tree of Life

203 East Bearden St., Greer • 848-1295

Victorian Hills Community Church

209 Victor Ave. Ext., Greer • 877-3981

Vine Worship Center

4373 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors • 244-8175

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2015

NEWS

THE GREER CITIZEN

A9

DAVE SAYS DAVE New subdivision coming to Greer RAMSEY Don’t give a flighty explanation BY
DAVE
SAYS
DAVE
New subdivision
coming to Greer
RAMSEY
Don’t give
a flighty
explanation
BY AMANDA IRWIN
STAFF WRITER
Q: I’ve been in my cur-
rent job for five years.
I’ve also had a second job
for three of those years,
but now I’d like to make a
change. Do you have any
advice on how to convince
a potential employer that
I’m a good hire, even
though I had a couple of
jobs in the past that I quit
after a month or two?
MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN
DR: Quitting a job
after a month or so isn’t
normally some kind of
sin that automatically
disqualifies you from
being hired. It might be
with some corporate
goober who’s looking at
For the dogs
Tank shows o his talent as a professional cartoon watcher with owners Alex and Stephen
Remeta during Pet Idol. The event was part of the Tuesdays on Trade series.
Properties on Pleasant
Drive and Old Highway 14
may soon undergo devel-
opment.
During a recent Planning
Advisory Meeting, Swaf-
ford Properties discussed
expandion of its facilities
and a proposed subdivi-
sion on Pleasant Drive was
reviewed.
“We’re wanting to add
120,000 square feet of
warehouse space,” Van
Swafford with Swafford
Properties LLC.
The property, located at
1672 Old Highway 14, is
currently zoned as R-15
single family residential.
To move forward with
construction, S-1 service
district zoning is being
requested and will be re-
viewed at the Planning
Commission meeting on
June 15 at Greer City Hall.
Buffering will be required
along Highway 14, and a
45-foot setback along the
front and 25-foot setbacks
along the side and rear of
the property.
A traffic study will not
be required.
The proposed Pleasant
Drive subdivision is seek-
ing R-12 single-family zon-
ing for a proposed 28 units
with off-street parking.
Construction is tenta-
tively expected to begin in
four months, and follow-
ing another four months
of construction all homes
in the subdivision should
be completed.
If developers choose to
forward with planning and
construction, the Planning
Commission and Greer
Council will review the
projects prior to construc-
tion being permitted.
ariwn@greercitizen.com | 877-2076
things through some silly,
one-size-fits-all hiring
paradigm, but that alone
wouldn’t be the kiss of
death around my office.
Now, would we look
at something like that
and want to know what
happened and what your
explanation was? Ab-
solutely! But if it made
sense, there wouldn’t be
Springwell to host mega sports camp
BY KATIE CRUICE SMITH
FOR THE GREER CITIZEN
For the fourth year,
Springwell Church will be
‘We increased our budget because this is
an outreach for the community to have a
safe place to go for the summer.’
a problem. However, if it
made you sound flighty
or disgruntled with things
in general, we’d probably
pass.
My guess is that the
fields you’re interested
in are like most — there’s
offering its Mega Sports
Camp on June 7-11 from 6
p.m. until 8:30 p.m.
The camp is free for kids
ages five years old through
the fifth grade. Children
have the opportunity to
register for baseball, bas-
Kristine Bugeson
Children’s Director, Springwell Church
a lot of importance put
on who you know. And I
don’t mean this in a nega-
tive way. Work and try to
develop good relation-
ships with people in your
field and those associated
with it. If that’s in place,
they can honestly give out
positive references.
Knowing someone
within the field or at the
company, or being con-
nected to someone with
ketball, cheerleading, flag
football, or soccer. For
children who are not in-
terested in sports, cooking
and crafts are also avail-
able choices.
“This is the first year the
camp is free,” said Kris-
tine Burgeson, who is the
children’s director at the
church. “We increased our
budget because this is an
outreach for the commu-
nity to have a safe place to
go for the summer.”
While the camp depends
heavily on volunteers
from the church, Burgeson
said that they do strive
to get people who have
either coached the sport
or played the sport in col-
lege. Plus, all volunteers
have background checks
to ensure the safety of the
children.
“We do this camp in
place of VBS,” said Burge-
son. “We want to make it
as safe as possible.”
The theme for this year’s
camp is “Get Ready: The
Game is Coming.” The
theme comes from My
Healthy Church, which
provides churches with
outreach curriculum. In
addition to learning about
their sport, the children
will also have time to sing
and dance. Plus, they will
be studying people in the
Bible who were preparing
for Jesus’ coming.
“We currently have close
to 100 who have already
signed up,” said Burgeson.
“We usually have between
100 to 150 kids who end
up coming, but so far,
each year, we have seen a
major increase in pre-reg-
istration. A lot of them
are returning kids, too.”
Although pre-registra-
tion is suggested to make
check-in easier, anyone is
welcome to register at the
door as well. All equip-
ment will be provided for
the children, but they can
also bring their own.
“We do start to see a lot
of the families start at-
tending our church after
this event,” said Burgeson.
“Or we see some of the
families who have been at-
tending our church start
stepping up to volunteer.”
Each child who attends
the camp will receive a
t-shirt designed by the
church and a water bottle.
There will also be a give-
away to win an iPad mini
and a $15 iTunes gift
card.
For more information or
to pre-register, visit www.
springwell.org.
a positive reputation, can
help you avoid the résumé
slush pile.
CHURCH
‘GOLDEN HEARTS’
Big debt on
an old car
CALENDAR
NEWS
Q: My wife cosigned a
loan on a 2007 car for
her sister. Now, it’s being
repossessed, and $23,000
is still owed on it at 20
percent. What can we do
in this situation?
VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL
AT MILFORD CHURCH
DR: Tell the bank or
dealer where the car is,
and tell them to come
pick it up. There’s no way
to get out of the rest, my
friend. You and your wife
are going to be liable for
whatever the car doesn’t
bring in afterward. Let’s
say it sells for $4,000.
That would be subtracted
from what is owed, and it
Milford Baptist Church
will host a Vacation Bible
School titled “Journey Off
the Map!” from June 15-
19 from 6:15-8:30 p.m.
There will be classes for
all ages and adults. Mil-
ford Baptist Church is
located at 1282 Milford
Church Road, Greer. For
more information, visit
milfordbaptistgreer.org.
ABNER CREEK
DRAMA CAMP
A “Fish Fry” is on the
senior adult calendar for
June 9 in the CLC at 6 p.m.
The Golden Hearts will be
served fish, hush puppies,
slaw, fried potatoes, and all
types of desserts. Ashlan
Village will attend the fish
fry. Special guest speaker
for this event is Dr. Drew
Hines from Washington
Baptist Church.
On June 15 the seniors
are planning a one day
trip to Mayberry, North
Carolina beginning with
breakfast at Bojanles.
June 25 at 6 p.m. the
“Golden Hearts” are going
to Lake Bowen Fish Camp
for the evening meal.
There will be inflatables,
games, sports, snacks and
more--all free. Come and
get a sneak peek at “Ever-
est” vacation bible school,
where we “Conquer Chal-
lenges with God’s Mighty
Power.” For more informa-
tion, visit gracegreer.org.
BLUE RIDGE
BAPTIST VBS
ABNER CREEK
OFFERS VBS
will still be up to you guys
to pay the rest. You could
always try to negotiate
to settle it for pennies on
the dollar. Based on what
you’ve told me, that’s a
best-case scenario.
The other thing I would
do is demand a full audit
on the account from day-
one to present, because
Abner Creek Baptist
Church will host a kid’s
summer Drama Camp Au-
gust 3 – 7 from 8:30 a.m.
Blue Ridge Baptist
Church will host a free
Kids Bible Club at 3950
Pennington Road June 9-
12 from 11 a.m.-2 p.m.
Tuesday through Friday.
The event will feature
bible Stories, Fun, Games,
Making new Friends, Food
and Crafts. Please visit
Blueridgebc.org to regis-
ter. Ages 5 through 12 are
preferred.
until 2:30 p.m. daily. The
cost of camp is $25 per
child up to a $65 fam-
Join Abner Creek Baptist
Church for Lifeway’s Jour-
ney Off The Map!, June
21-25 from 6:30 p.m.-
8:45 p.m. Children ages 4
through sixth grade will
journey into uncharted
territory where they will
SEND US YOUR
CHURCH NEWS
Churches wishing to
ily
maximum. All children
ages 5-12 are welcome.
Participants will learn the
musical, Splash Kingdom:
list upcoming events and
programs in Church News
should send information
to Billy@greercitizen.
com
or
call
877-2076.
A
Lifesaving Musical for
Kids. Each day of camp,
children will experience a
begin to understand that
obedience to God can lead
them beyond the expected.
A light meal will be served
nightly. Vacation bible
school will be held on the
church campus at 2461
Abner Creek Rd in Greer.
Register online at abner-
creekbaptist.com.
Deadlines for submission
are Monday at noon.
a 20 percent interest rate
doesn’t explain why a
car didn’t pay off – espe-
cially a $23,000 car. If this
was a $5,000 car from a
tote-the-note car lot, and
they were ripping her off
charging only interest –
and that’s all anyone was
paying, and she gave up
and punted – that’s fine.
You’re just looking for
fun-filled schedule of ac-
tivities including crafts,
snacks, playtime, musical
rehearsals and more. The
children’s drama perfor-
mance of Splash King-
dom will be held Sunday,
August 9 at 6 p.m. in the
worship center. To regis-
ter your child for Drama
Camp visit abnercreekbap-
tist.com and pay online.
GRACE UNITED METHODIST
COMMUNITY FUN DAY
a little understanding of
the situation. But $23,000
cars don’t generally have
$ 1,700
20 percent interest. That’s
Camp is expected to fill up
fast. Drama Camp will be
held on the church cam-
pus at 2461 Abner Creek
Grace United Methodist
Church, 627 Taylor Road,
Greer, will host a “Moun-
tains of Fun” community
fun day on Saturday, June
a pretty freaky deal, and
Rd in Greer, 877-6604.
13, from 10 a.m.-noon.
I’d want to know where
the money went.
From a bank’s perspec-
tive, I don’t see how
anyone would think
something like this would
work out. The car was
going down in value the
entire time, so it just
doesn’t make sense to me.
Of course, if you have the
cash lying around and it
wouldn’t damage your
finances, you could just
take care of things and
call it Stupid Tax.
Cosigning on a loan,
especially with family, is
never a good idea.
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A10 THE GREER CITIZEN

NEWS

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2015

PLAN: Addresses issues on Wade Hampton, Main Street and in downtown Greer

FROM PAGE ONE

could come back and real- ize that the plan you all created came to fruition.” City officials say the community has demon- strated the ability to think ahead and plan for the fu- ture.

‘We’ve proven over

the first 15 years that we will do what we’ve said we’ll do. We’ve invested wisely and we’ve been successful in what we’ve done. I think that speaks volumes both for the community and for the partnership.’

Larry Wilson

Former Partnership for Tomorrow Chairman

“The decisions that we make have long-term im- pacts,” Greer Mayor Rick Danner said. “We have to be cognizant of that. While we’re the ones that were participating in this process, we were plan- ning for our children and our grandchildren. This is the kind of thing that has driven this community over the past 15 years to be who we are, see what

community over the past 15 years to be who we are, see what PRESTON BURCH |

PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN

Former Partnership for Tomorrow chairman Larry Wilson announced the group had exceeded its fundraising goal.

we can become and to set the tone for where we’re going from here.” Former Partnership for Tomorrow Chairman Lar- ry Wilson said he feels the community has the drive to accomplish many of the set goals by 2030. “We’ve proven over the first 15 years that we will do what we’ve said we’ll do,” Wilson said. “We’ve invested wisely and we’ve been successful in what we’ve done. I think that speaks volumes both for the community and for the partnership. We want

to continue to keep grow- ing Greer, but we still have miles and miles to go. “I think you’ll see an ex- pansion of our downtown core area, which will great- ly enhance our city and attract commercial and residential folks,” Wilson added. “This will continue

to be a great place to live,

work and play.” Developers say the Greer

area is estimated to have

a population of around

100,000 by 2030, making the need to act now more urgent. “This gives us a great

road map to look at how

we grow, why we grow and

where we grow,” said Reno

Deaton, executive director

of the Greer Development

Corporation. “It’s setting the stage for the next 10- 15 years. The fact that

Greer is willing to plan comprehensibly is great

for businesses. If you add

to that the other amenities

that we already have in place, it really provides an

important trajectory for Greer. It’s a place I want to be for a long, long time, and I think others feel the same way.”

a long, long time, and I think others feel the same way.” GRAPHIC | COURTESY OF
a long, long time, and I think others feel the same way.” GRAPHIC | COURTESY OF

GRAPHIC | COURTESY OF PARTNERSHIP FOR TOMORROW

Greer Station and Victor Mill are among areas addressed in the Greer Community Master Plan.

Deaton said it is impor- tant to continue to focus on downtown during the

next stages of the pro- cess. “Downtown has provid- ed us with a central growth point,” Deaton said. “When you think about what the next step might be, you have to include downtown

residential areas and the arts. The fact that those items are really addressed in this plan gives us great opportunities in the future to continue to develop downtown.”

billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

COUNCIL: Reappoints Greer Trust Board

FROM PAGE ONE

During a five-hour meet-

ing, Driggers reported the proposed general fund budget is $20,605,900, which is approximately $805,000 higher than last year’s budget. “You will note that there

is a change in the net ef-

fect of the budget this year proposed, $20,605,900, as compared to last years budget of $19,769,005,

that is a 4.23 percent in- crease in revenue and cor- responding expenditures,” Drigger said. “The mileage rate would remain at 97.8 mills, 12.63 mills of which would be for debt service and 85.17 for general oper- ations. Our accessed value citywide continues to in- crease… but the accessed value and the equivalent value of 1 mil estimated at

$103,446.

“I do make a note here that $4,783,548 account- ing for 23.21 percent of

our total budget is relative

to business licenses and

franchise fees collected by

us and the Municipal As-

sociation on our behalf,”

he said.

The budget includes funds to hire one fire- fighter and one police of-

ficer, as well as changing

a part-time position in

Building and Development Standards to a full-time position, increasing hours for a part-time position in the Parks and Recreation Department as well. “Building permits is where we’re starting to see an associated revenue stream relevant to devel- opment where we’re see- ing the largest percentage growth. Certainly not the largest in the amount of dollars, but as a percent- age we’re participating a

growth of 43.58 percent with an increase revenues of $193,500 anticipated for next year,” he said. Council unanimously passed the budget on first reading, but the budget is preliminary and subject to change prior to second reading. A public hearing

for the budget will be held at the next council meet- ing.

APPOINTMENTS

Council reappointed all members of the Greer Trust Board of Trustees. Micky Montgomery was reappointed to the Greer Planning Commission Dis- trict 4 seat, Keving Dun-

can, District 4, and T.D. Campbell, District 5, were reappointed to the Board of Zoning Appeals and William Burleigh was reap- pointed to the Greenville- Spartanburg International Airport Environs Planning Commission. The Planning Commis- sion District 5 seat, the Board of Zoning Appeals At-Large seat and two Board of Architectural Re- view seats still need to be appointed. The next regularly sched- uled Greer City Council meeting is at 6:30 p.m. on June 9 at Greer City Hall.

airwin@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

9 at Greer City Hall. airwin@greercitizen.com | 877-2076 Annual Water Report Notice Now Available : You

Annual Water Report Notice

Now Available : You are now able to view the

Greer Commission of Public Works Annual Drinking Water Quality Report on-line at :

www. greercpw. com/ 2015 waterreport . pdf

This report contains important information about

the source and quality of your drinking water. Please call ( 864) 848 -5500 if you would like a paper report mailed to your home .

if you would like a paper report mailed to your home . Aviso de Informe Anual
if you would like a paper report mailed to your home . Aviso de Informe Anual

Aviso de Informe Anual de Agua

Ahora Disponible: Ahora puede ver el Informe Anual de Calidad de Agua Potable de la Comisión de Greer de Obras Públicas. Conecta a

www.greercpw.com/2015waterreport.pdf

Este informe contiene información importante sobre el origen y la calidad

de su agua potable. Llame al (864) 848-5500 si desea un informe por correo a su casa.

OBITS: For the week of June 3

FROM A6

por correo a su casa. OBITS: For the week of June 3 FROM A6 Charles W.
por correo a su casa. OBITS: For the week of June 3 FROM A6 Charles W.

Charles W. Tapp

Veteran

Beloved husband, father, grandfather, brother, uncle and friend Charles Tapp left this world on May 24, 2015, after a lengthy ill- ness.

A native of Greer, he was born August 27, 1928, the first of three children of Broadus Daniel and Nel- lie Bruce Tapp. During the Korean conflict, he served in the army as an instruc- tor and tactical officer in the 47th Division Leader- ship School at Fort Rucker, Alabama. He entered LSU in 1956, receiving undergraduate and master’s degrees in government. During this time he completed his thesis, entitled “LONGS,” which was cited in a num- ber of published histories of the Longs. As a student he worked for the Louisi- ana Legislative Council, researching, preparing and tracking legislation. He was awarded a Univer- sity Fellowship from Duke University to continue his graduate studies in politi- cal science. After a year of study he joined the faculty of Millsaps College in Jack- son, Mississippi. Returning to Baton Rouge, he spent consider- able years in public ser- vice, first as a research an- alyst for the Public Affairs Research Council and later as the head of Community Advancement, Inc., where he drove the development of the anti-poverty pro- gram. During his tenure he was instrumental in estab- lishing Head Start and oth- er economic development programs in the greater Baton Rouge area. Furthering his public ser- vice, he became Director of the Office of Consumer Protection for the State of Louisiana under Governor Edwin W. Edwards. He also served the Department of Education as Director of Policy Analysis and Coor-

dination under Superin- tendent J. Kelly Nix and finished his career as a legislative representative for various entities. In the community, he served on the boards of directors of Capital Area Transit System (CATS), Catholic Social Services for the Diocese of Baton Rouge, LACAP Federal Credit Union and the Mid- Louisiana Health Systems Agency. He also served on the Consumer Advisory Council of the Federal En- ergy Administration, the Louisiana Highway Safety Commission, and was a member of the United States Army Reserves. Throughout his life, he was a student of history, both local and internation- al. He will be remembered for his intelligence, wit, loyalty, integrity and abil- ity to see and fight for the needs of the total commu- nity. He served as mentor to many, in line with his philosophy that “ lead- ership requires clarity of thought that ensures the talents of the best people are involved to carry out duties.” He was fortunate in his selection of those he mentored, as he was in the people who served as his mentors. He is survived by his spouse, Joan Vogel-Tapp; three sons, Daniel Hunter Tapp of Phoenix, Arizona, Quai Carter Tapp (Fabiola) of Florence, Texas, and Jonathan Michael Tapp (Sarah) of Tokyo, Japan; three grandchildren, Mea- gan Fairchild, Patrick Tapp and Esperanza Tapp; two great-grandchildren Anna- Kathleen Fairchild and Jerry Fairchild III; sister Rebecca Daniels (Aubrey) of Tucker, Georgia; aunt

Edith Tapp; nieces Laura- Lee Glass, Joanna Daniels Senter and Debra Tapp Cronin, and nephew Dean Tapp. He was preceded in death by a son, Charles Brian Tapp; grandson Ryan Joseph Tapp; parents B.D. and Nellie Tapp; brother Harold Dean Tapp; many beloved uncles and aunts, especially Sam Tapp and Dolores Bruce Tapp; and

a treasured (spoiled) cat,

Dash. Services were held on Monday, June 1, 2015, at Rabenhorst Funeral Home, 825 Government St., Baton Rouge, Louisiana with visi- tation from 4 p.m. until 6 pm, followed by a memo- rial service at 6 p.m. A re- ception followed. Interment will be in Greer, South Carolina at a later date. The family would like to extend special thanks to physicians Roy Kadair, David Hanson and Charles Eberly as well as the staffs of Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center, Sage Rehabilitation Hospi- tal and Ollie Steele Burden Manor. In lieu of flowers, me- morial donations may be made to St. Jude Chil- dren’s Research Hospital (PO Box 3704, Memphis, TN 38173), East Baton Rouge Parish Head Start Program (4523 Plank Rd., Baton Rouge, LA 70805) or Capital Area Animal Wel- fare Society (CAAWS, 6357 Quinn Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70817). We hope Charlie’s next life will bring him as much joy as he brought to us in this life.

Annual Annual Drinking Drinking Water Quality Report Water Quality Report January 1 – December 31,
Annual Annual Drinking Drinking
Water Quality Report
Water Quality Report
January 1 – December 31, 2014
January 1 – December 31, 2014

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2015

Golfing for relief

The ninth annual Greer CPW Golf for Relief event is set to tee off Monday, June 15 at Willow Creek Golf Club in Greer. The tournament benefits Greer Relief, a nonprofit organization that serves the Greer community. Sign-in and lunch are at

11:45 a.m. with play begin- ning at 1 p.m. Registration costs are $100 for an individual or $400 for a team of four. Team PLUS registration is $500, which includes

a four-player team and a

hole sponsorship. To en- sure participation, regis-

tration is required by June

8.

Registration includes a barbecue lunch, access to complimentary beer carts, greens fees, cart fees, and player gifts. Lunch will be catered by local favor- ite Smoke on the Water. Prizes will be awarded to first, second, and third place teams. Special priz- es will be awarded for the closest-to-the-pin, the lon- gest drive, and hole-in-one shots on specified holes. This year’s hole-in-one sponsor is D&D Motors. Participants should bring extra cash for mulligans, raffle tickets and the put- ting string. “This tournament is shaping up to be great, and we are really excited to be at Willow Creek again this year,” said Car- oline Robertson, Greer Relief’s executive direc- tor. “We have some great sponsors who always step up to the plate for us and for our community. We can’t thank them enough.” Available sponsorships include a $1,000 loca- tion sponsorship, $2,000 awards sponsorship and a $2,000 shirt sponsorship. Potential sponsors should call Greer Relief at 848- 5356 for opportunities. In 2014 the tournament raised more than $18,000.

SPORTS

The Greer Citizen

raised more than $18,000. S PORTS The Greer Citizen MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN Citadel

MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN

Citadel graduate Justin Woodberry was named the new boys’ basketball coach at Riverside High Monday afternoon.

Riverside names new coach

For boys’ basketball

BY BILLY CANNADA SPORTS EDITOR

Next year will feel a lot like starting from scratch for the Riverside boys’ basketball team, but the Warriors believe they’ve hired the right man to take on the challenge. Justin Woodberry was introduced as Riverside’s new head coach on Mon- day, taking over for Greg Miller, who left the school earlier this spring. Woodberry, a graduate of The Citadel and former assistant coach at Mullins High School, said he is ex- cited for the new start. “It’s a great opportunity

to be in the biggest confer- ence in the state,” he said. “I’m really excited. I’ve been talking to (Riverside Athletic Director Murray Long) over the phone over the past couple of weeks, and I’m still trying to be- lieve this is really happen- ing. It is such a big stage and this is such a great opportunity. The school has a rich tradition and I’m honored to be able to coach here.” Long said the 31-year- old was the right fit for the job. “Although there are a lot of good candidates out there, we really look for that fit that works in our building both academi- cally and athletically,” he said. “We wanted to find the most high quality guy we could find for the job, and I think we did that.

‘Being a Citadel graduate and a National Guard member, he knows a lot about commitment and work ethic.’

“He’s so well-round-

ed,” Long added. “Being

a Citadel graduate and a

National Guard member, he knows a lot about com- mitment and work ethic. I think that’s really what pushed him over the top.” Woodberry joins the Warriors during a time of rebuilding. Riverside will lose eight seniors to grad- uation, returning an inex- perienced group in 2015. “It’s going to be diffi- cult,” he said. “We gradu- ated eight kids that were

Murray Long

Riverside Athletic director

really strong for us, so there’s going to be some

drop off from that. We’ve got new kids filling posi- tions, but that’s part of the process. Competition at the (Class) AAAA level is tough, regardless of where you go. This team will grow, and I fully expect us to be competitive.” Woodberry said he is ready for the challenge. “It’s going to be very tough,” he said. “We’re talking years down the SEE COACH | B3

said. “We’re talking years down the SEE COACH | B3 PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN
said. “We’re talking years down the SEE COACH | B3 PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN

PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN

The Rebels made strides this spring, reloading for another Upper State title apperance in 2015.

Rebels show progress

BY BILLY CANNADA SPORTS EDITOR

After back-to-back trips to the Upper State cham- pionship game, Byrnes is hoping a reloaded, experi- enced roster will hold the key to success in 2015. The Rebel football team recently wrapped up spring practice sessions, and head coach Brian Lane said he was pleased with his team’s progress. “On defense, we’ve got some key guys coming back,” Lane said. “Devin Dexter anchors that de- fensive line and is a very strong player for us. We’re continuing to look for big things out of him. Right now, we’re in need of some linebackers. We graduated

eight linebackers, so that’s

a spot we’ve tried to con-

centrate on in the spring. We’re just trying to get guys ready to come in and step up.” Jaylan Foster and Kobe

Lyles will assume primary duties in the Byrnes sec- ondary. Hayden Mitchem will lead the effort on the defensive front, while D.J. Crosby heads up the line- backing core. On offense, Byrnes re- turns quarterback Micah Young, along with stand- out wide receivers Chavis Dawkins and Ray Miller. Young is looking to build on his stellar 2014 season, which saw 3,300 passing yards and 36 touchdowns. “We need him to contin- ue to get us in good plays,” Lane said. “At the quarter- back position, when you’re new to it, you rely on the coach a lot to tell you the play. When you really evolve into a good quar- terback, you take the play and see if you can run it,

and if you can’t, you get a play that you can run. You have to be able to adjust to the defense and Micah is doing a great job with that this spring.”

Lane expects Dawkins to draw plenty of attention from opposing defenses as one of Young’s go-to targets. “Chavis is very fast, very strong and has good hands,” he said. “He’s one of my top-notch receivers, but we’ve also got Jaylan Foster, Ray Miller, Bouvier Howard, Demarcus Greg- ory—these are receivers that played well for us last year.” Tyler Jenkins, John Gutherie and Latrey Gist return to anchor the of- fensive line, while Re’jon Scott, Steadman Rogers and Quez Mayes will carry the brunt of the load from the backfield. “The key is the offsea- son work that we do,” Lane said. “We just get in here and grind it out. It’s really no secret. Our guys just take the time to put in the work.”

billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

Filling the void

Warriors hoping to build

BY BILLY CANNADA SPORTS EDITOR

Coming off one of the school’s best seasons in recent memory, the River- side football team is put- ting the pieces in place to try to make another strong run this fall. The Warriors, who were knocked out of the play- offs by Spartanburg last

October, will lose some se- nior leadership to gradu- ation, leaving several key jobs up for grabs. Aaron Odom is in line to replace Ryan Cerino at quarterback, and head coach Phil Smith said he has been developing nicely this spring. “He’s been working real-

ly hard doing some things

to get his arm stronger,” Smith said. “He was much improved from the begin- ning of spring practice un- til the end. I was pleased with what he did with the offense.” Dondre’ Thompson and Robert Wang will try to fill the void left by Emanuel Jackson at running back. Jackson saw a number of touches from the backfield and slot last season. Other key returning players include Corey Bridges, Jeremiah Bogan and Stephan Garber. “We need (Bogan) on of- fense and defense,” Smith said. “He had a good spring and he has a natu- ral ability to lead.” The Warriors have also benefitted from several transfers. “Defensively, we’ve got- ten after it a little bit more than I had anticipated,” Smith said. “I think we’re

than I had anticipated,” Smith said. “I think we’re ‘This group we’ve got coming in seems

‘This group we’ve

got coming in seems to love to play the game and they’re excited to go out there and work.’

Phil Smith

Coach

doing some good things up front offensively. We’re just trying to keep it sim-

ple and let them play so we could evaluate.” Smith knows he will be relying on younger players to get it done this fall. “We’ve got some young- er guys that got a lot of experience last year on the JV that will really help us,” Smith said. “We’re hoping to really bring them along quickly and have them step right in. We’re just really, really young and in- experienced on the varsity level.” Over the next several weeks, workouts are going to be critical. “This summer is going to be crucial for a lot of our guys to get stronger and bigger,” Smith said. “Right now, we’ve got a lot of work to do. This group we’ve got coming in seems to love to play the game and they’re excited to go out there and work. It’s always good to have that kind of mentality.”

B

BLAME CANNADA BILLY CANNADA
BLAME
CANNADA
BILLY
CANNADA

Not exactly an

underdog

L eBron James is a lot of things, but he isn’t an underdog.

Make sure you remem- ber that when this NBA Finals matchup is more competitive than you think. The Warriors have certainly been the better team all year long. There’s no denying Steph Curry is deserving of the MVP. Steve Kerr has done a fantastic job with that young roster and Golden State is scary good. They can score in a hurry, and Oracle Arena is one of the toughest places to play, making them a difficult playoff draw. But you can’t ignore LeBron James. Just think about this. Since leaving for Miami and returning to Cleve- land, the man has been in the NBA Finals EVERY. SINGLE. YEAR. He’s won four MVP awards, two Fi- nals MVPs and two rings. When he busted up the big three in Miami last year to head back home, everyone assumed he had given up on winning championships to accom- plish the ultimate goal in Cleveland somewhere down the line. He’s about to do it in year ONE! Teaming up with Kyrie Irving and Kevin Love hasn’t hurt the effort, but you could argue it hasn’t helped either. With Love

out for the year and Irving nursing a boo boo during the most crucial point of the season, LeBron put the team on his back and did what he knows how to do — make the NBA Finals.

I understand the East

is terrible. Beating the Hawks, Celetics and Bulls can’t exactly rank up there with the most difficult things LeBron has accomplished in his career. But it doesn’t matter. He’s in the finals and that’s where he is most dangerous. LeBron has been unfair- ly criticized throughout his career. You’ve heard:

he’s not clutch; he’s no Michael Jordan; he needs help to win; he’s only a stat sheet stuffer. The world refuses to accept the fact that this is one of the greatest basketball players we will ever see, and it makes no sense. This year, hilariously, LeBron somehow slipped into the roll of underdog. Sure he’s doesn’t have

as great of a team as he’s had in the past, but any team with LeBron James on it is probably better than most other teams out there.

I know we just watched

the Warriors win 67 games, and they looked good doing it, but now they have to knock off the one guy who wants it more than any other player. Everyone says LeBron isn’t like Michael, but I would argue he’s exactly like Michael. Maybe he’s not as seri- ous in the way he carries himself, but I think LeB- ron focuses on his legacy more than anybody — like Mike. He’s got gold medals, MVPs, championships, All- Star appearances, but he wants/needs more. He wants to leave no doubt that he’s the best player to ever play the game. One reporter asked LeB- ron how he plans to slow down the league’s most valuable player. “The same way you slow me down,” he said. “You can’t.” He’s right. You can’t.

B2 the greer citizen

sports

wednesday, june 3, 2015

Jimmie Johnson takes overtime victory at Dover

With his overtime vic- tory in Sunday’s FedEx 400 benefiting Autism Speaks at Dover Interna- tional Speedway, Johnson became the fifth driver to win 10 NASCAR Sprint Cup Series races at a sin- gle track, joining Richard Petty, David Pearson, Dar- rell Waltrip and Dale Earn- hardt Sr. in sharing that distinction. Johnson’s triumph was his series-best fourth of the season and the 74th of his career, eighth most all- time and two behind NAS- CAR Hall of Famer Earn- hardt in seventh place. Unlike many of the six- time champion’s past vic-

tories at the Monster Mile, this was not a dominating performance by the No. 48 Hendrick Motorsports Chevrolet. Johnson led but 23 laps, and didn’t take the top spot until he beat race runner-up Kevin Harvick to the stripe for a restart on Lap 383. Johnson quickly cleared Harvick and led the rest of the way, but not before a caution for a wreck involv- ing Clint Bowyer, Denny Hamlin and Kurt Busch slowed the field on Lap 386. At that point, John- son and Harvick were the only two drivers to stay out on old tires, but John- son was able to maintain

control of the race on the subsequent restart on Lap

391.

He repeated the perfor- mance during a green- white-checkered-flag fin- ish that took the event five laps past its posted distance of 400, after a wreck involving Greg Bif- fle, Casey Mears and AJ Allmendinger produced the seventh caution on Lap 398 and forced the overtime. After the final restart on Lap 404, Johnson crossed the finish line .435 sec- onds ahead of Harvick, who posted his ninth top- 2 finish in 13 races this season and extended his

series lead to 44 points over sixth-place finisher Martin Truex Jr. Johnson said he was able to maintain the lead on old tires “just driving hard and working that track bar adjuster as much as I could. “I was trying to be smart with my line and I guess guys on two tires weren’t all that fast. (Crew chief) Chad (Knaus) said some- thing to me about that on the radio, and they never really came, you know? The No. 4 (Harvick) and I did just fine on old tires and held those guys off.” Harvick, on the other hand, had no track bar to

work with, because the in- car adjuster had broken during the race. “Yeah, we just struggled

at the end of the race on

restarts, really all day on the restarts,” said Harvick, who led 91 laps but failed to get his first victory at the high-banked concrete track. “Once the track bar broke, we were pretty much in a box and just kind of had to hold on for

the first 25 laps (of a run), and if we weren’t in the front, then we struggled

to just maintain what we

had. “All in all, everybody did

a great job, and I think

when you look at Dover, it’s been a good race track for us. We’ve led laps and just haven’t quite finished

it yet, but a good, solid day.” Kyle Larson ran third, followed by Kasey Kahne and Aric Almirola. Start- ing on the outside of the front row next to Coors Lights Polesitter Denny Hamlin, Truex led a race- high 131 laps—racking up most laps led in his third straight Sprint Cup points race without winning. Hamlin led 118 laps but

was waylaid by the Lap 386 wreck and came home 21st, three laps down.

by the Lap 386 wreck and came home 21st, three laps down. www.g ree r f
www.g ree r f loo r ing.com Kevin Harvick vs. Martin Truex Jr
www.g ree r f loo r ing.com
Kevin Harvick vs. Martin Truex Jr
Greer Storage LLC & McCullough Properties 14372 E. Wade Hampton Blvd. Greer, SC 29651 Phone
Greer Storage LLC & McCullough Properties 14372 E. Wade Hampton Blvd. Greer, SC 29651 Phone

Greer Storage LLC & McCullough Properties

14372 E. Wade Hampton Blvd. Greer, SC 29651 Phone (864) 879-2117 Fax (864) 877-0286

Dale Earnhardt Jr vs. Brad Keselowski

Restau Rant 603 W. Poinsett St. • Greer • 877-5768 e xp Ress 1328 Wade
Restau Rant
603 W. Poinsett St. • Greer • 877-5768
e
xp Ress
1328 Wade Hampton Blvd. • Greer
968-0420
Jeff Gordon vs. Aric Almirola

Q F

Greer

UALITY

OODS

508 North Main Street

(across from Greer State Bank)

877-4043

Mon.-Thurs. 7 a.m.-9 p.m. Fri. & Sat. 7 a.m.-10 p.m.

Kurt Busch vs. Carl Edwards

ConteSt RuLeS

Pick the driver from each group that you think will finish in the higher position and place the name beside the business on the entry form. Entries must be received in person by Friday at noon or postmarked by Saturday at noon. Judges decision is final. One winner per month, per household.

decision is final. One winner per month, per household. 2015 raciNg coNTesT 2015 Season Contest Winners

2015

decision is final. One winner per month, per household. 2015 raciNg coNTesT 2015 Season Contest Winners

raciNg

coNTesT

2015 Season Contest Winners Publication date Race date Location Feb. 18 Feb. 22, Daytona Intl.
2015 Season Contest Winners
Publication date
Race date
Location
Feb. 18
Feb. 22, Daytona Intl. Speedway
Winner: Fred Bramlett, Duncan
Feb. 25
March 1, Atlanta Motor Speedway
Winner: Roger Thompson, Landrum
March 4
March 8, Las Vegas Motor Speedway
Winner: Larry Carter, Greer
March 25
March 29, Martinsville Speedway
Winner: Steve Gosnell, Inman
April 15
April 19, bristol Motor Speedway
Winner: Allen Batson, Greer
Apr. 29
May 3, talladega Superspeedway
Winner: Bruce C. Moore, Greer
May 6
May 9, Kansas Speedway
Winner: Scott McCallister, Greer
May 20
May 24, Charlotte Motor Speedway
Winner: Donald Dickerson, Boiling Springs
June 3
June 7, pocono raceway
June 10
June 14, Michigan Intl. Speedway
July 1
July 5, Daytona Intl. Speedway
July 22
July 26, Indianapolis Motor Speedway
Aug. 12
Aug. 16, Michigan Intl. Speedway
Aug. 19
Aug. 22, bristol Motor Speedway
Matt Kenseth vs. Paul Menard

This Week’s Race:

Pocono Raceway - Sunday, June 7th

Your Picks:

greer Flooring & Lighting center

sanders Heating & air

mccullough Properties

greer awning & siding,

The clock

race contest schedule

kelly’s karpet

connection

Quality Foods

servicemaster

Tie Breaker Guess the number of caution LAPS in the race.

Tie Breaker Guess the number of caution LAPS in the race.

Name

address

Guess the number of caution LAPS in the race. Name address Sanders Heating & Air Conditioning

Sanders

Heating & Air Conditioning

621 Keith Drive Greenville, SC 29607

864-501-2005

www.SandersHeatCool.com

Jimmie Johnson vs. Joey Logano

Protect the look of your car Heavy-Duty Carports Attached or Freestanding Spans Available up to
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610 South Main Street - Greer, S.C.
www.greerawningandsiding.com
Jamie McMurray vs. Kasey Kahne
Ryan Newman vs. Denny Hamlin
Ryan Newman vs. Denny Hamlin
Clint Bowyer vs. Danica Patrick
Clint Bowyer vs. Danica Patrick

the GReeR Citizen

317 Trade Street, Greer, SC 29651

PO Box 70, Greer, SC 29652

864-877-2076

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3, 2015

A SPORTING VIEW

|

RV survival guide

BY MARK VASTO FOR THE GREER CITIZEN

S o you’ve bought an RV and you’re ready to take to the open

road in 3 mpg increments. Due to the RV’s sheer size and the amount of money invested in it, you’re go- ing to have a lot of ques- tions and concerns your first couple of times out. That’s why most people recommend you do a “dry run” in your driveway or local RV park. Here, are some more suggestions.

YOU NEED HELP

This should be self-evi- dent. Most people never have problems with their RV, but when you con- sider what can go wrong with a car or truck, or a vacation home or boat, and combine them into one vehicle, you’ll learn soon enough that stuff happens. And when it does you’ll need special RV insurance, and that insurance should come with roadside assistance or else you’ll have to pay for RV-specific roadside help -- even if you have roadside assistance for your cars. It also helps to have another set of eyes on board. You’ll need some- one to help you back in and out of tight situations and to remind you of all the things you forgot to do before taking off.

MAKE A CHECKLIST

Like any good pilot, you need a checklist of things to do before taking off and landing at your site. There are apps for this and lists on the Internet, and they come in handy when you have about 20 things to shut off, like your water heater and pumps. Also, you don’t

want to forget to lower your TV antenna before leaving the campsite.

HAVE A PLAN

Wanderlust can be a great thing, but you have to understand that you can no longer drive and/or park where you are used to driving and parking. You need to re- search RV-specific routes that take into account things like your propane tank and the size of your vehicle. You don’t want to drive 20 miles down a dirt road only to encounter a small bridge intended for 19th-century mule traffic, with no space to turn around. Also, you might want to check up on the site you plan on visiting. Good Sam is a RV re- source online that offers trip planning and From- mer-like RV-park ratings.

LEARN TO LOVE WALMART AND BASKETS

One of the few places that will welcome an RV with open arms is Walmart, where you can park without hassle and stock up on supplies, as they have a whole row dedicated to RVs. Also they sell baskets, lots of them, which you’ll need to put everything in because, remember, your house on wheels moves and things definitely will have shifted during the ride.

RELAX (OR DON’T DO IT)

Take the slow road, and stop and see the world’s largest ball of twine, have a sandwich at the beach and see the sights with your family and friends. Sure, it gets a little Out- ward Bound at times, but in the end, the memories are what you’re really buying.

CLASSIFIEDS
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RATES

20 words or less: $13.50 rst insertion Discount for additional insertions

DEADLINE

5pm Monday for insertion Wednesday

TERMS

Cash in advance. We accept Visa, MasterCard, American Express, and Discover Card

accept Visa, MasterCard, American Express, and Discover Card NOTICES PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE All real estate ad-

NOTICES

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE All real estate ad- vertised in this newspaper is Subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap,

familial status, national origin

or an intention to make such

preference, limitation or dis- crimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real es- tate which is in violation of the law. Our readers hereby informed that all dwelling advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal op- portunity basis.

6-3,10,17,24-TFN

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC NOTICE

PUBLIC HEARING TO CONSIDER PERMIT FOR EXCLUSION FROM COUNTY NOISE ORDINANACE

A public hearing will be held

June 15, 2015 at 5:30pm by

Spartanburg County Council . Greer Dragway is requesting

to have a drag race on July

11 & 25, 2015. The events will be held at 1792 Dragway Rd. The requested exclusion is to run cars without mufflers and extend curfew to 12am.

5-27,6-3

NOTICE OF APPLICATION

NOTICE OF

APPLICATION

Notice is hereby given that LA BOUTEILLE, LLC. intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for

a license/permit that will al- low the sale and ON prem- ises consumption of BEER AND WINE at 300 RANDALL STREET, SUITE B GREER,

SC 29651. To object to the is- suance of this permit/license, written protest must be post- marked no later than June 12, 2015. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information:

(1) the name, address and telephone number of the per- son filing the protest;

(2) the specific reasons why the application should be de- nied; (3) that the person protest- ing is willing to attend a hear- ing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person pro- testing resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the appli- cant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to:

S. C. Department of Rev- enue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box

125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110.

5-27,6-3, 10

NOTICE OF

APPLICATION

Notice is hereby given that SHELIASPRINGFIELD,LLC. d.ba. THE CHOCOLATE TOAD intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/per- mit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER AND WINE at 224 TRADE STREET, GREER, SC 29651. To object to the issuance of this permit/li-

cense, written protest must be postmarked no later than June 12, 2015. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and

SPORTS

For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and SPORTS MANDY FERGUSON |

MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN

Justin Woodberry plans to sort out his new team over the summer in preparation for a playo push in 2016.

COACH: Ready to take on tough Class AAAA region

FROM B1

road of building. I know that we’ve got 1,600 kids here, where Dorman and the other schools have 3,200. Those are pretty big teams to go up against, but we plan to get in the gym and work really hard. We just want to compete the best we can.” The new head coach said he likes to run an up- tempo style, but plans to evaluate his roster over

should include the following information:

(1) the name, address and telephone number of the per- son filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be de- nied; (3) that the person protest- ing is willing to attend a hear- ing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person pro- testing resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the appli- cant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to:

S. C. Department of Rev- enue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110.

5-27,6-3, 10

NOTICE OF

APPLICATION

Notice is hereby given that SASCO SAFETY, LLC. d.b.a. BAY ONE RESTAURANT in- tends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Rev- enue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE AND LIQUOR at 912 SOUTH BATESVILLE ROAD, GREER, SC 29650. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than June 5, 2015. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information:

(1) the name, address and telephone number of the per- son filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be de- nied; (3) that the person protest- ing is willing to attend a hear- ing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person pro-

the coming months before developing a game plan. “I kind of want to get a feel for the kids and see what we’ve got and we’ll go from there,” he said. “We plan to take advan- tage of the summer. I’m just ready to get the guys in the gym and go to work getting ready for next year.”

billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

testing resides in the same county where the proposed

place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the appli- cant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to:

S. C. Department of Rev-

enue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110.

5-20,27,6-3

NOTICE OF

APPLICATION

Notice is hereby given that GREER FOODMART, LLP intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Rev- enue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consump- tion of BEER AND WINE at 113 BENNETT STREET, GREER, SC 29651. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than June 5, 2015. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information:

(1) the name, address and telephone number of the per- son filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be de- nied; (3) that the person protest-

ing is willing to attend a hear- ing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person pro- testing resides in the same county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the appli- cant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protests must be mailed to:

S. C. Department of Rev-

enue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110.

5-20,27,6-3

SC 29214; or faxed to: (803) 896-0110. 5-20,27,6-3 SPORTS ROUNDUP 2015 REGION II AAAA SOFTBALL ALL-REGION
SPORTS ROUNDUP
SPORTS
ROUNDUP

2015 REGION II AAAA SOFTBALL ALL-REGION

THE GREER CITIZEN

B3

of the awards presented included: Silver Slugger-- Elijah Henderson; King of the Hill--Ethan Few; Rook- ie--Brandon Southern and Most Improved Player-- Melvin Smith. Henderson and Few both made the All-Region team.

Boiling Springs - Miran- da Dills, Webber Roberts,

YELLOW JACKET

Brooke Palmer, McKenna

BASKETBALL CAMP

Quinn, Jordan Smith, Lo- gan Webb Byrnes - Malibu Gaston, Regan Messenger, Tatum Arboleda, Parker Birch, Al- lison Neely, Haven Pesce, Christa Whitesides Dorman - Marissa Stead- man, Haley Houchens, Lath Freeman, Sam Kim- brell, Jana West JL Mann - Destiny Mill- er, Claire Griffth, Brianna McRae Mauldin - Katelyn Wa- gers, Hannah Pulious Wade Hampton - Darby McJunkin Riverside - Olivia Norton

Greer High School will host a Yellow Jacket bas- ketball camp on July 13- 16 (for girls third through sixth) and July 20-23 (for boys grades third through sixth). Both camps will run from 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. The camp, focusing on defensive skills, offensive moves, shooting, passing, lay-ups, rebounding and quickness drills, will be put on by coaches Greg Miller and Mazzie Drum- mond. Early registration cost (by July 1) is $50 and all registration after will be

Spartanburg - Morgan

$65.

Smith Region Player of the Year

For more information, email coach Miller at

- McKenna Quinn - Boiling

gmiller@greenville.k12.

Springs

sc.us.

BYRNES PLAYERS NAMED TO NORTH-SOUTH GAME

The season may be over, but two Byrnes High School softball players are still earning high honors for their work on the field. Rebel pitcher, Regan Messenger, and catcher

BLUE RIDGE

SHOOTING FOR HEAVEN RETURNS IN JULY

“Shooting for Heaven,” a basketball camp hosted by former Greer coach Jeff Neely, returns for its 22nd year this summer, running from July 6-9 and July 13-

Malibu Gaston have been

16.

tapped play in the AAAA North/South game in June. Coach Brandi Aiken has also been named one of two coaches for the game. Messenger, Gaston, and Aiken will all be on the North team. The game will be played at USC Aiken on June 17.

For both sessions, the camp will run from 9-11:30 a.m. and 1-4 p.m. and will be open to boys and girls ages kindergarten through second grade, and third though sixth grade. The camp offers a unique opportunity to combine faith and basketball. The cost for the camp is $75 per week. For more information,

BASEBALL AWARDS

The Blue Ridge High School baseball recently held its annual awards celebration, highlight- ing the accomplishments of several players. Some

email Neely at Jkime- neely@gmail.com or call

787-9663.

AUCTIONS

Absolute Auction - 19.5 +/- Acres & 0.56 +/- Acre Lot, Darlington & Florence, SC - Saturday, June 13, 11 AM - Damon Shortt Auction Group 877-669-4005 SCAL2346 damonshorttproperties.com

ADVERTISE YOUR AUC- TION in 107 S.C. newspa- pers for only $375. Your 25-word classified ad will

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MOBILE HOMES

FOR RENT

MOBILE HOME, SMALL 2 BEDROOM, $450 per month. Deposit and Crimi- nal Background Check. Call

864-877-4989.

MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT

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b4 the greer citizen

CLASSIFIEDS

wednesday, June 3, 2015

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6-3,10,17,24-TFN

VACATION RENTALS

vacation rentals

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HELP WANTED

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Work in our Greer Mainte- nance facility. Requirements:

Knowledge of DOT Regula- tions & Mechanics of heavy

duty tractor. Diesel Mechanic background. CDL. Computer Skills. Resume torogl@gp- truck.com or Lesa: 864-879-

4140

6-3,10

Drivers: Need a Change? More hometime this Sum- mer? 60K+ Per Year. Full

Benefit Package + Bonuses. CDL-A 1 Yr. Exp. 855-454-

0392

5-27, 6-3