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ANNUAL REPORT

2013-14

GOVERNMENT OF INDIA
MINISTRY OF DRINKING WATER & SANITATION
www.mdws.gov.in

CONTENTS
S. No.
Chapter Page No.
1.0 ABOUT THE MINISTRY
2.0 RURAL DRINKING WATER PROGRAMME

2.1 National Rural Drinking Water Programme (NRDWP)

2.1.1 New initiatives in the 12th Five Year Plan

1-11
14
15
16

2.1.2
Components of the NRDWP

17

2.1.3
Criteria of fund allocation
2.1.4
Financial Perfornance under NRDWP

18
18

2.1.5
Physical Performance under NRDWP

20

2.1.6
Strategic Plan- 2012-22 : Rural Drinking Water Programme

21

2.1.7 Planning for 2012-13: Annual Action Plan (AAPs)

22

2.1.8 Planning for Scheduled Castes Sub-Plan (SCSP);

22

Tribal Sub Plan (TSP) Left Wing Extremist (LWE) and


Minority Concentrated Districts (MCDs)

2.1.9 Solar dual pumps in Integrated Action Plan (IAP) districts

24

2.1.10 Progress of NRDWP in North Eastern Status

24

2.2 WATER QUALITY PROGRAMME (W.Q.)

25

2.2.1
Setting up of International Centre for
Drinking Water Quality (ICDWQ)

25


2.2.2 Scheme of safe drinking water supply through
community water purification plants

26

26

2.2.3 Technologies for treatment of water quality contaminants

2.2.4
Water Quality Monitoring & Surveillance

27

2.2.5
Water Quality Testing Laboratories

28

30

2.2.6 National Programme on Prevention and Control of JE/AES

2.2.7
Hydro-geo-morphological maps (HGM)

31

32

2.2.8 Visit of Central Team in water-quality affected areas

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iii

2.3 INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM (IMIS)

34

2.4
SUPPORT ACTIVITIES 36

2.4.1
Research and Development Projects 36
2.4.2
Information, Education and Communication (IEC) 36
2.4.3
Key Resource Centres KRCs) 37
2.4.4
International Training Programmes 38

2.4.5 Rajiv Gandhi National Professors Chair on WATSAN Studies

38

2.4.6
Important Conferences/Exhibitions and Visits 38

3.0 Rural Sanitation Programme (RSP) 42


3.1
Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan (NBA) 47

3.2
Provision under Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan (NBA) 47
3.3
Sanitation Coverage 50
3.4
Physical progress 50
3.5
Financial progress 52

3.6 Activities of importance undertaken during 2013-14 53

3.7
Publications 56
3.8
Nirmal Gram Puraskar (NGP) 56
3.9
Activities of NBA in North Eastern States 58

3.10 Scheduled Caste Sub-Plan (SCSP) and Tribal Sub Plan (TSP)

60

3.11
Information, Education and Communication (IEC) 61
3.12
Convergence of NBA with other schemes 63
3.13
Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Under NBA. 68
3.14
Human Resource Development (HRD) 70
3.15
Research and Development (R&D) 72
3.16
Representing India in the International Fora 76

4.0
Administration 81

4.1
Organisation 83

4.2
O&M activities 83
4.3
Vigilance and Grievance Redressal Machinery 83
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4.4
Activities relating to Official Language Hindi
83
4.5
Public Procurement Policy
84

Organisation Chart 85
ANNEXURES
87
NRDWP (Annexure -I to III)
89-92
NBA (Annexure -IV to X)
93-99

Representation of SCs/STs OBCs (Annexure - XI) 100

Representation of Disabled Persons (Annexure - XII)

Citizens / Clients Charter (Annexure - XIII)


103-114

Results Framework Document (RFD) (Annexure - XIV)


115-144

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101

ACRONYMS
AAP

Annual Action Plan

APL

Above Poverty Line

ARWSP

Accelerated Rural Water Supply Programme.

ADB.

Asian Development Bank.

ASHA

Accredited Social Health Activist

AES

Acute Encephalitis Syndrome

BP

Block Panchayat

BPL

Below Poverty Line

BRC

Block Resource Centre

CCDU

Communication and Capacity Development Unit

CGWB

Central Ground Water Board

CSIR

Council for Scientific and Industrial Research

CRSP

Central Rural Sanitation Programme

CBO

Community Based Organization

C PGRAMS

Centralized Public Grievances Redressal and Monitoring System

DDP

Desert Development Programme

DDWS

Department of Drinking Water & Sanitation

DPAP

Drought Prone Areas Programme

DRDA

District Rural Development Agency

DWSM

District Water and Sanitation Mission

ECBI

External Capacity Building Initiatives.

EPC

Engineering, Procurement &Construction .

FTK

Field Test Kits

GP

Gram Panchayat

GSDA

Groundwater Surveys and Development Agency

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HADP

Hill Areas Development Programme

HGM Hydro-geo-morphological Maps


HRD

Human Resource Development

HH

Hearing Handicapped.

IAP

Integrated Action Plan

IRC

International Resource Centre

ICDWQ

International Centre for Drinking Water Quality.

IITF

India International Trade Fair

IEC

Information, Education & Communication

IHHL

Individual Household Latrine

IMIS

Integrated Management Information System

IWMP

Integrated Watershed Management Programme

JE

Japanese Encephalitis

KRC

Key Resource Centre

lpcd

litres per capita per day .

LWE

Left Wing Extremism

LSK Lump-sum Turn Key


M & E

Monitoring and Evaluation

MGNREGS

Mahatama Gandhi National Rural Employment Generation Scheme

MPR

Monthly Progress Report

MNRE.

Ministry of New & Renewable Energy.

MDG

Millennium Development Goal

MCD

Minority Concentrated Districts

MVS

Multi Village Scheme

NEERI

National Environment Engineering Research Institute

NGO Non-Governmental Organization


NGP

Nirmal Gram Puraskar


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vii

NIC

National Informatics Centre

NRDWP

National Rural Drinking Water Programme

NRDWQM & SP

National Rural Drinking Water Quality Monitoring and Surveillance


Programme.

NRSC

National Remote Sensing Centre

NWP

National Water Policy

NES

North Eastern States.

O & M

Operation & Maintenance

OLIC

Official Language Implementation Committee

OH

Orthopedically Handicapped

PHED

Public Health Engineering Department

PRI

Panchayati Raj Institution

R & D

Research & Development

R & DAC

Research & Development Advisory Committee

RGNDWM

Rajiv Gandhi National Drinking Water Mission

SCSP

Scheduled Caste Sub-Plan

SWSM

State Water & Sanitation Mission

TNA

Training Needs Assessment

TSC

Total Sanitation Campaign

TSP

Tribal Sub Plan

VH

Visually Handicapped

WQM & S

Water Quality Monitoring and Surveillance

WATSAN

Water & Sanitation

WSP

Water & Sanitation Programme

WSSO

Water and Sanitation Support Organisation

ZP

Zila Panchayat /Parishad.

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ABOUT THE MINISTRY

ABOUT THE MINISTRY

HISTORY
The Government of Indias first major intervention in the rural drinking water sector, started in 1972-73,
through the Accelerated Rural Water Supply Programme (ARWS). A Technology Mission on Drinking Water
was started in 1986, which in 1991-92, was renamed the Rajiv Gandhi National Drinking Water Mission.
Upgrading the Mission, the Department of Drinking water Supply (DDWS) was created in the Ministry
of Rural Development in 1999, which was subsequently renamed as the Department of Drinking Water
and Sanitation in 2010. Keeping in view the significance of rural water supply and sanitation, the
Government of India created and notified the Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation as a separate
Ministry on 13th July, 2011.

Vision
Safe and adequate drinking water for all, at all times in rural India and to transform rural India into
Nirmal Bharat by adopting community saturation approach.

Goal
To provide every rural person with adequate safe water for drinking, cooking and other domestic basic
needs on a sustainable basis. This basic requirement should meet water quality standards and be readily
and conveniently accessible at all times and in all situations. Similary, the goal under Nirman Bharat
Abhiyan is to achieve safe sanitation for 50% rural households by 2017 and to all rural households by
2022.

Objectives
a) Enable all households to have access to and use safe & adequate drinking water and within a
reasonable distance.
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b) Enable communities to monitor and keep surveillance on their drinking water sources.
c) Ensure potability, reliability, sustainability, convenience, equality and consumers preference with
regard to drinking water supply. These are to be the guiding principles while planning for a
community based water supply system.
d) Provide drinking water facility, especially piped water supply, to Gram Panchayats that have
achieved open-defecation-free status on priority basis.
e) Ensure all government schools and anganwadis to have access to safe drinking water.
f) Provide support and environment for panchayat raj institutions and local communities to manage
their own drinking water sources and systems in their villages.
g) Provide access to information through an online reporting mechanism with information placed
in public domain to bring transparency and informed decision making.
h) Cover SC/ST, Physically handicapped, small and marginal farmers and women headed households
with sanitation facilities in each habitation.
i) Follow Conjoint approach of Sanitation and water supply which would progressively lead to
Nirmal Blocks, Nirmal Districts and eventually Nirmal States and ensure running water availability
to all Government School toilets.
j) Develop child friendly toilets in Anganwadis.
k) Massive training campaign to ensure use and Operation & Maintenance of toilets.
l) Take up Solid and Liquid waste management in Nirmal Grams.

Strategic Plan
The Strategic Plans for drinking water supply and sanitation in rural areas have the following timeline:

By Year 2017
(a) Drinking Water Facilities

To ensure that
at least 50% of rural households are provided with piped water supply;
at least 35% of rural households have piped water supply with a household connection; less
than 20% use public taps and less than 45% use hand pumps or other safe and adequate private
water sources.
all services meet set standards in terms of quality and number of hours of supply every day.

(b) Rural Sanitation facilities


To ensure that 50% of the Gram Panchayats attain the Status of Nirmal Gram (i.e. ODF status).

By Year 2022
(a) Drinking water Facilities

To ensure that
at least 90% of rural households are provided with piped water supply;
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at least 80% of r ural households have piped water supply with a household connection; less
than 10% use public taps and less than 10% use hand pumps or other safe and adequate private
water sources.
(a) Rural sanitation facilities

Provide 100% access to sanitation for all rural households.

Paradigm Shifts in Rural Drinking Water Sector


Programme & Policies at a Glance Drinking Water Supply
Year

Event

1949

The Environment Hygiene Committee (1949) (Bhor Committee) recommends the provision of safe
water supply to cover 90 per cent of Indias population in a timeframe of 40 years.

1950

The Constitution of India specifies water as a state subject.

1969

National Rural Drinking Water Supply program launched with technical support from UNICEF and
Rs.254.90 crore is spent during this phase, with 1.2 million bore wells being dug and 17,000 piped
water supply schemes being provided.

1 9 7 2 - Introduction of the Accelerated Rural Water Supply Programme (ARWSP) by the Government of
73
India to assist States and Union Territories to accelerate the pace of coverage of drinking water supply.
1981

India as a party to the International Drinking Water Supply and Sanitation Decade (1981-1990)
declaration sets up a national level Apex Committee to define policies to achieve the goal of providing
safe water to all villages.

1986

The National Drinking Water Mission (NDWM) launched to accelerate the process of coverage of the
country with drinking water.

1987

First National Water Policy drafted by Ministry of Water Resources giving first priority for drinking
water supply.

1991

The National Drinking Water Mission (NDWM) renamed as Rajiv Gandhi National Drinking Water
Mission (RGNDWM).

1994

The 73rd Constitution Amendment makes proviWsion for assigning the responsibility of providing
drinking water to the Panchayat Raj Institutions.

1999

Formation of separate Department of Drinking Water Supply in the Ministry of Rural Development,
Govt. of India.
For ensuring sustainability of the systems, steps are initiated to institutionalize community participation in
the implementation of rural drinking water supply schemes through sector reform. Sector Reform ushers in
a paradigm shift from the Government-oriented supply-driven approach to the People-oriented demand
driven approach. The role of the government reoriented from that of service provider to facilitator.
Total Sanitation Campaign (TSC) as a part of reform principles initiated in 1999 to ensure sanitation
facilities in rural areas with the specific goal of eradicating the practice of open defecation. TSC gives
strong emphasis on Information, Education and Communication, Capacity Building and Hygiene
Education for effective behavioral change with involvement of PRIs, CBOs, and NGOs
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2002

Scaling up of sector reform initiated in the form of Swajaldhara programme.


The National Water Policy revised; priority given to serving villages that did not have adequate sources
of safe water and to improve the level of service for villages classified as only partially covered.
India commits to the Millennium Development Goals to halve the proportion of people without
sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation by 2015, from 1990 levels.

2005

The Government of India launches the Bharat Nirman Program, with emphasis on providing drinking
water within a period of five years to 55,069 uncovered habitations, habitations affected by poor water
quality and slipped back habitations based on 2003 survey. Revised sub Mission launched as component
of ARWSP for focused funding of quality affected habitations.

2007

Pattern of funding under Swajaldhara changed: 50:50 Centre-State shares.

2009

National Rural Drinking Water Programme launched from 1/4/2009 by modifying the earlier
Accelerated Rural Water Supply Programme and subsuming earlier sub Missions, Miscellaneous
Schemes and mainstreaming Swajaldhara principles.

2010

Department of Drinking Water Supply renamed as Department of Drinking Water and Sanitation

2011

Department of Drinking Water and Sanitation upgraded as separate Ministry of Drinking Water and
Sanitation

2012

Twelfth five year plan focusing on piped water supply with 55 lpcd, earmarking of 5% funds for
coverage of quality affected as well as 60 JE/AES affected districts,

2013

Launching of special programme to address the rural water supply and sanitation issues of four low
income States with collaboration of World Bank.

Current Status
The Ministry of Drinking Water & Sanitation is the nodal Ministry for the overall policy, planning,
funding and coordination of the flagship programmes of the Government for rural drinking water viz.
the National Rural Drinking Water Programme and for Sanitation, the Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan in the
country. There are three programme divisions namely Water, Water Quality and Sanitation to carry out
the functions of the Ministry.
For the Eleventh Five Year Plan, it had been decided that the major issues which need tackling during
this period are problems of sustainability, water availability and supply, poor water quality, centralized
versus decentralized approaches and financing of O&M, cost on equitable basis with full consideration
to ensure equality in regard to gender, socially and economically weaker sections of the society, school
children, socially vulnerable groups such as pregnant and lactating mothers, specially disabled and senior
citizens etc. For the Twelfth Plan period the Working Group on Domestic Water and Sanitation has
recommended amongst others the following initiatives (i) the need to increase drinking water supply
service levels in rural areas from 40 lpcd (litres per capita per day) to 55 lpcd; (ii) focus on piped water
supply and (iii) conjoint approach on drinking water supply and sanitation.

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Funding in rural water supply


The allocation of funds by the Central and State Governments for Rural Drinking Water Supply since
the First Five Year plan is shown in the following table and graph
.

Coverage of Habitations in Terms of Drinking Water Supply


The current status of provision of drinking water in rural areas as measured by the percentage of rural
habitations where the population is fully covered with adequate (40 lpcd) and safe drinking water, as per
information entered by States on the online Integrated Monitoring Information System (IMIS) of the
Ministry, is about 69% of total rural habitations. The rest are either partially covered or have drinking
water sources contaminated with chemical contamination.

Fully Covered
Habitations,
1161018

Partially
Covered
Habitations,
448439

Arsenic, 1917
Fluoride, 15565
Iron, 43662
Salinity, 18589

Nitrate, 3061

\As on 01.04.2013, the status of coverage of habitations was:


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(No. of habitations)
Date

Total Rural
Habitations

As on
1.4.2013

16,92,251

Fully
covered

11,61,018

Partially
Covered

4,48,439

Quality Affected
Arsenic

Fluoride

1,917

15,565

Iron

Salinity Nitrate

43,662 18,589

3,061

Total
82,794

As per the IMIS, as on 31.12.2013, about 42.78% of the rural population has access to piped water supply.

Data of Census 2011


a) Type of sources
The status of provision as reported by the Census 2011 shows that about 85% of rural households
obtain their drinking water from improved sources, namely, hand pumps, tap water and covered
wells.

STATUS OF PROVISION AS PER THE


CENSUS 2011
Unimproved
Sources 4%

Tap water
31%
Hand
Pump/Tube well
52%
Well water
13%

b) State-wise percentage of households having access to tap water.


There are large inter-State variations in the coverage of households with piped water supply. As
per the above chart, the percentage of piped water supply varies from 2.6% in Bihar to 95.20% in
Chandigarh. There are 6 States, viz. Bihar, Jharkhand, Assam, Odisha, Chhattisgarh and Madhya
Pradesh that have less than 10% coverage of households with piped water supply. Special efforts are
being initiated during the 12th Five Year plan to raise their coverage with piped water supply.

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as per 2011 census

NSSO 69th Round Reports (July 2012 December 2012) - NSS KI (69/1.2)

88.5% of the households have access to improved source of drinking water.

85.8% of the households have access to sufficient drinking water throughout the year.

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46.1% of rural households have drinking water within the premises, 40.9% have to travel up to 200
metres to fetch drinking water and around 9.3% have to travel 200 to 500 metres to reach principal
source of drinking water.

87.7% of rural households are getting good quality of drinking water.

86.0% of the households are getting sufficient water throughout the year for all household activities.

Physical performance in 12th Five Year Plan


As against the target of 4,34,664 rural
habitations for coverage during the 12th
Five Year Plan, the coverage achieved is
2,84,055. However, due to slippage of fully
covered habitations to partially covered
habitations in the year 2012-13, the target
of habitations to be covered has increased as
well as new habitations have been marked on
the online IMIS by the States. Some States
have exceeded their targets, whereas Sikkim,
Punjab and Mizoram have reported low
achievement (less than 50%) against targets.
State wise details are at Annexure-I & II.

(Number of habitations)
Target

Year
Partially
Covered/
Slipped back

Quality
Affected

Total

Balance as on
01.04.2012

3,30,504

1,04,160

4,34,664

2012-13

1,15,139

26,521

1,41,660

2013-14

1,16,493

25,345

Total Covered

2,31,632

51,866

* As on 31.03.2014

10

Achievements

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

Partially
Covered/
Slipped back

Quality
Affected

Total

1,36,304

19,402

1,55,706

1,41,838

1,14,423

1,3926

1,28,349

2,83,498

2,50,727

33,328

2,84,055*

Financial performance in 12th Five Year Plan


Against the planned outlay of Rs 68,786 crore for Rural Drinking Water Supply in the 12th Five Year
Plan, utilization during 2012-13 and 2013-14 is as under:
(in Rs. Crore)
Year

BE

RE

Expenditure of
all Components

%age of RE

2012-13

10,500

10,500

10,489.05

99.90

2013-14

11,000

9,700

9,697.27

99.97

Total

21,500

20,200

20,186.32

* As on 31.03.2014

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11

RURAL DRINKING
WATER PROGRAMME

RURAL DRINKING WATER PROGRAMME

Rural drinking water supply is a State subject and is also included in the Eleventh Schedule of the
Constitution amongst the subjects that may be entrusted to Panchayats by the States. Thus the participation
of the Panchayat Raj Institutions in the rural drinking water supply sector is an important area of focus.
Government of Indias major intervention in water sector started in 1972-73 through the Accelerated Rural
Water Supply Programme (ARWSP) for assisting States/UTs to accelerate the coverage of drinking water
supply in problem villages. A Technology Mission with stress on water quality, appropriate technology
intervention, human resource development support and other related activities was introduced in 1986
which was subsequently renamed as the Rajiv Gandhi National Drinking Water Mission (RGNDWM) in 1991.
In 1999-2000, Sector Reform Projects was started to involve the community in planning, implementation
and management of drinking water schemes which was in 2002 scaled up as the Swajaldhara Programme.
The programme was revised from 01.04.2009 and named the National Rural Drinking Water Programme
(NRDWP).

2.1 NATIONAL RURAL DRINKING WATER PROGRAMME (NRDWP)


The National Rural Drinking Water Programme (NRDWP) is a Centrally Sponsored Scheme aimed
at providing adequate and safe drinking water to the rural population of the country. The NRDWP is
a component of Bharat Nirman which focuses on the creation of rural infrastructure. This has resulted
in the provision of significant additional resources to the sector and for creating an environment for
the development of infrastructure and capacities for the successful operation of drinking water supply
schemes in rural areas.

Bharat Nirman
Bharat Nirman was launched by the Government of India in 2005 as a programme to build rural
infrastructure. While Phase-I of the programme was implemented in the period 2005-06 to 2008-09, the
Phase-II was implemented from 2009-10 to 2011-12. Rural drinking water is one of the six components
of Bharat Nirman. Funds provided under the NRDWP are counted towards the Bharat Nirman also and
no additional funds are provided under Bharat Nirman.
At the beginning of the Bharat Nirman Phase-I period, 55,067 uncovered habitations and about 3.31
lakh slipped back habitations were to be covered with provision of drinking water facilities and 2.17
lakh quality affected habitations were to be addressed for water quality problem. While prioritizing the
coverage of the water quality problem, arsenic and fluoride affected habitations have been accorded priority
followed by iron, salinity, nitrate and other contaminants. To ensure that habitations once provided with
drinking water supply infrastructure do not slip back and face drinking water problem, sustainability of
drinking water sources and systems has been accorded high priority. To achieve drinking water security
at village/ habitation level, conjunctive use of water i.e. judicious use of rainwater, surface water and
ground water has been promoted.

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15

Physical Progress in Bharat Nirman (Phase-I and II)


Bharat Nirman (Phase-I) (2005-06 to 2008-09)
Target (Rural Habitations)

Achievement (Rural Habitations)

Uncovere

Partially
Covered /
Slipped Back

Quality
Affected

Total

Uncovered

Partially
Covered /
Slipped Back

Quality
Affected

Total

55,067

3,31,000

2,17,000

6,03,067

54,440

3,58,362

50,168

4,62,970

Bharat Nirman (Phase-II) (2009-10 to 2011-12)


Balance (Rural habitations)

Achievement (Rural habitations) up to 31/03/2012

Uncovered

Quality Affected

Total

Uncovered

Quality Affected

Total

627

1,79,999

1,80,626

627

81,357

81,984

i)

Uncovered Habitations: Against 55,067 uncovered habitations to be covered during the Bharat
Nirman period, 54,440 habitations were covered during Phase-I. During Bharat Nirman Phase-II,
627 habitations have been reported as covered up to 31.03.2011. Thus all uncovered habitations
that existed in the beginning of 2005 are now covered.

ii)

Slipped Back/Partially Covered Habitations: In Phase I (2005-06 to 2008-09), 3.58 lakh slipped
back habitations were reported as covered by the States.

iii) Quality-Affected Habitations:


As reported by the States, 2,17,000 quality affected habitations were addressed by sanctioned projects
and out of these 50,168 habitations have been fully covered with completed projects to provide safe
water supply during Phase-I. As on 1.4.2009, at the beginning of Bharat Nirman phase-II, States
reported that 1,79,999 quality affected habitations were remaining to be covered. Of these, during
Bharat Nirman (phase-II), 81,357 habitations have been reported as covered. Thus, in all during
Bharat Nirman (Phases-I and II), 1,31,525 quality affected habitations have been fully covered
with completed schemes. In the 12th Five year plan period beginning from 2012-13 onwards, as on
31.03.2014, 33328 quality affected habitations have been covered.

2.1.1 New Initiatives in the 12th Five Year Plan


A project for the installation of Solar powered dual pump based piped water supply schemes in
10,000 habitations of 82 Integrated Action Plan (IAP) districts with funding from NRDWP and
the National Clean Energy Fund is under implementation.

16

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

In order to raise coverage of piped water supply, toilet coverage and strengthening of institutions
and systems in rural drinking water and rural sanitation sectors, the Ministry has proposed a
Rural Water Supply and Sanitation Project for Low Income States of Assam, Bihar, Jharkhand
and Uttar Pradesh at an estimated cost of more than Rs. 5400 crore for World Bank assistance
of 50% of the project cost.
A Pilot project on taking up Drinking Water Security Planning through Integrated Water Resource
Management and source sustainability measures on a participative basis has been taken up in
15 over-exploited Blocks of the country.
Focus on piped water supply rather than on hand pumps, so as to decrease the pressure on
ground water extraction and also ensure potability of water;
Enhancement of service levels for rural water supply from the norm of 40 lpcd to 55 lpcd for
designing of systems;
Greater thrust on coverage of water quality affected habitations with earmarked funding for
chemical contamination and Japanese Encephalitis / Acute Encephalitis Syndrome (JE / AES)
affected areas;
Moving towards the target that, by 2017, at least 50 per cent of rural population in the country
have access to 55 lpcd within their household premises or within 100 metres radius, with at
least 30 per cent having individual household connections, as against 13 per cent today;
Incentivize substantive devolution of functions, funds and functionaries to the Gram Panchayats
with respect to rural water supply schemes, through a Management Devolution Index (MDI)
with clear and specific indicators on the basis of which distribution amongst States of 10% of
National allocation would be decided;
All new drinking water supply schemes to be designed, estimated and implemented to take into
account life cycle costs and not just per capita costs;
Waste water treatment and recycling to be an integral part of every water supply plan or project;
bringing the concept of Renovation and Modernization (R & M) into the planning process;
Participative planning and implementation of integrated water resource management practices
through water budgeting and both supply side and demand side planning;
Earmarking of funds for coverage of SC and ST population concentrated habitations;
Incentive to ASHA workers for encouraging households to take household connections;

2.1.2 Components of the NRDWP


a) The allocation criteria, funding and distribution of allocation under different components at
the Central level is as under :

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17

Components

NRDWP Central Allocation

Centre-State sharing pattern

NE States and J&K

10 %

90:10

Other States

73 %

50:50

DDP Area States

10 %

100 % Central share

Water Quality (Earmarked)

5%

50:50*, 90 :10**

Natural Calamities

2%

100 % Central share

Total

100 %

* - All Other States / UTs ** - North East States and Jammu & Kashmir,

b) Component, Purpose, Distribution and Centre-State Sharing pattern of the NRDWP at the
State level.
Component

Purpose

Distribution of
State NRDWP
allocation

Center-State Sharing
pattern

Coverage

For providing safe and adequate drinking


water supply to un-served, partially served
and slipped back habitations

47%

90:10

Quality

To provide safe drinking water to water quality


affected habitations.

20%

Operation and
Maintenance (O
& M)

For expenditure on running, repair and


replacement costs of drinking water supply
projects.

15% (Maximum)

50:50 (for other


States / UT)

Sustainability

To encourage States to achieve drinking water


security at the local level through sustainability
of sources and systems.

10% (Maximum)

100 % Central share

Support

Support activities like awareness generation,


training etc.

5%

100 % Central share

Water Quality
Monitoring and
Surveillance

For monitoring and surveillance of water


quality in habitations

3%

100 % Central share

Total

18

(for NE States and


J&K)

100 %

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

2.1.3 Criteria for Fund Allocation


While allocating the NRDWP funds for coverage, quality, sustainability, O&M, support and WQM&S
component to the States the criteria followed is:
Criteria

Weightage (in %)

i)

Rural population as per census

40

ii)

Rural SC and ST population as per census

10

iii)

States under DDP, DPAP, HADP and special category hill States in
terms of rural areas

40

iv)

Rural population managing rural drinking water supply schemes


weighted by a Management Devolution Index

10

Total
The DDP component of 10% of the NRDWP budget is allocated to States with DDP areas on the same
criteria. The Natural Calamities component is allocated on the basis of recommendations of Central
teams that visit the States in the wake of natural calamities. The 5% Earmarked Water Quality component
is allocated to the States on the basis of distribution of quality affected habitations (with 75% weightage)
and high priority districts affected with cases of JE / AES (25%).

2.1.4 Financial Performance under NRDWP


The financial allocations and expenditure under NRDWP have been increased substantially since the
launch of Bharat Nirman in 2005-06.

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19

Financial performance at the national level is in terms of the releases made under the programme. The
budget estimates, revised estimates and releases under the 11thand 12thFive Year Plan are as under:
NRDWP
Year

Budget Estimates

Revised Estimates

Expenditure

Expenditure in
Percentage of RE

2005-06

4,050

4,060

4098.00

100.93

2006-07

5,200

4,560

4560.00

100.00

2007-08

6,500

6,400

6442.76

100.00

2008-09

7,300

7,300

7298.79

99.98

2009-10

8,000

8,000

7989.72

99.87

2010-11

9,000

9,000

8986.74

99.85

2011-12

9,350

8,500

8493.15

99.91

2012-13

10,500

10,500

10,489.05

99.90

2013-14

11,000

9,700

9,697.27

99.97

During 2012-3, an amount of Rs. 10,500 crore was allocated under NRDWP, out of which Rs. 10,489
crore was released to States and utilized at the national level. State-wise allocation and release is given
at Annexure-III-A. Similarly during 2013-14, a revised allocation of Rs. 9,700 crore was allocated out
of which Rs. 9,697.27 crore was utilized. State-wise allocation and release is given at Annexure-III-B.
To provide support to the States in the focus areas of Support Activities and in Water Quality Monitoring
and Surveillance, an amount of Rs. 482.50 cr. has been allocated under the Support Fund of which Rs.
272.57 crore has been released, while under WQM&S Rs. 289.50 cr. has been allocated and Rs. 127.15
crore released and under Water Quality earmarked funds, Rs. 482.50 crore has been allocated and Rs.
109.65 crore has been released till 31.03.2014.

2.1.5 Physical Performance under NRDWP


Target

Coverage

Partially
covered

Quality
Affected

Total

Partially
covered

Quality
Affected

Total

2012-13

75,000

25,000

1,00,000

1,36,304

19,402

1,55,706

2013-14

1,22,259

21,771

1,44,030

1,14,404

13,925

1,28,329

* Achievement as on 31.03.2014
For the year 2012-13, against the target of coverage of 75,000 partially covered and 25,000 quality affected
habitations, the achievement was coverage of 1,36,304 partially covered and 19,402 quality affected
habitations. The State-wise details are at Annexure-II.
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ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

2.1.6 Strategic Plan 2011-2022: Rural Drinking Water Supply


The Strategic Plan 2011-2022 has the following goals:
By 2017:
Ensure that
at least 55% of rural households are provided with piped water supply;
at least 35% of rural households have piped water supply with a household connection; less
than 20% use public taps and less than 45% use hand pumps or other safe and adequate
private water sources.
All services meet set standards in terms of quality and number of hours of supply every day.
all households, schools and anganwadis in rural India have access to and use adequate
quantity of safe drinking water.
Provide enabling support and environment for Pancwhayat Raj Institutions and local communities
to manage at least 60% of rural drinking water sources and systems.
By 2022:
Ensure that
at least 90% of rural households are provided with piped water supply;
at least 80% of rural households have piped water supply with a household connection; less
than 10% use public taps and less than 10% use hand pumps or other safe and adequate
private water sources.
Provide enabling support and environment for all Panchayat Raj Institutions and local
communities to manage 100% of rural drinking water sources and systems.
The Ministrys goal is to assist the States in meeting the rising expectations of the rural people for better
service delivery standards in rural drinking water supply as shown in the Water Ladder below.

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

21

2.1.7 Annual Action Plans (AAPs): Planning for 2014-15


From the year 2010-11, the State-wise discussions on the Annual Action Plan (AAP) with each State were
carried out. In this process, States prepared their AAPs, detailing the activities in the rural drinking water
sector that they proposed to take up during the year, and the financial costs that these proposals would
entail. Detailed discussions on the State AAPs for 2013-14 were held in the months of March and April
2013 between representatives of the Ministry of Drinking Water & Sanitation, Government of India and
the State government officials. From the year 2012-13 onwards, the Online formats for Annual Action
Plan got full flourished and was widely accepted by the States/UTs. This has resulted in decentralized
outlook to the Annual Plans from the States. Subsequent to the discussions, modifications were suggested
in the AAPs and action points identified. States were released funds under NRDWP, after their AAP
was finally prepared and the target habitations marked on the online IMIS. It was on the basis of this
AAP that the States carried out the activities under NRDWP during the year. The entire procedure of
preparing, discussing and implementation of the AAPs for the NRDWP, provided a framework for proper
targeting and monitoring of the funds being provided by the Government of India. The AAP along with
online reporting of works carried out by the States in the Integrated Management Information System
of the Ministry, has significantly strengthened the effectiveness of the NRDWP in achieving the goal of
providing safe drinking water for all the rural areas of the country.

2.1.8 Planning for Scheduled Caste Sub-Plan (SCSP), Tribal Sub Plan (TSP), Left Wing
Extremist (LWE) Affected and Minority Concentrated Districts (MCDs)
Provision for SCs and STs
The NRDWP has special provisions to ensure
coverage of the Scheduled Caste and Scheduled
Tribe population with potable water supply. In
the criteria for fund allocation to States under
the NRDWP, the rural SC and ST population
of the State has a weightage of 10%. Thus States
with higher SC and ST population get a higher
allocation of NRDWP funds.
To ensure that adequate funds are utilized by
the States in SC and ST concentrated areas, for
the year 2013-14, Rs. 2134 crore (22% of total
allocation of Rs. 9700 crore) is earmarked for
expenditure for SCs and Rs. 970 crore (10% of
total allocation of Rs. 9700 crore) is earmarked for expenditure for STs. Out of this, as on 12.02.2014,
Rs. 2523.44 crore have been released to States for coverage of SC and ST populations.
The progress in the coverage of SC and ST concentrated habitations is being monitored through the
Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) of the Ministry. Improvements have been made for
this in the Ministrys website and in the online monitoring system for capturing of achievement data in
this respect.
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ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

As on 1.4.2013, out of the total 2, 84,898 SC


concentrated habitations in the country, 2,
01,572 habitations are Fully Covered, 72,352 are
Partially Covered and 10,974 are Quality affected.
In 2013-14, 22,053 SC concentrated habitations
were targeted for coverage and as on 31.03.2014,
16,925 habitations were covered with potable
drinking water supply.

Out of the total 3, 66,485 ST concentrated habitations, 12,227 are Fully Covered, 1, 04,709 are Partially
Covered and 16,197 are quality affected. In 2013-14, 29709 ST concentrated habitations were targeted
for coverage and as on 31.03.2014, 30,627 habitations have been covered.

Provision for Minorities


While there is no earmarking of NRDWP funds for expenditure in minority concentrated districts,
attention is given to coverage of such habitations in the planning process.
Out of the total 2, 28,129 habitations in the Minority Concentrated Districts (MCDs) identified by the
Ministry of Minority Affairs, as on 1.4.2013, a total of 146525 habitations are Fully Covered, 71,131 are
Partially Covered and 10,473 are Quality affected. In 2013-14, 20180 habitations have been targeted for
coverage and 7,911 habitations covered with potable drinking water supply till 12.02.2014.

Progress of NRDWP in LWE Affected Districts


There are 82 districts which are now categorized as LWE affected districts and identied for the
Integrated Action Plan (IAP). Funds are provided under the IAP to the District Administration of these
districts for taking up developmental schemes including water supply projects.
In addition, under the NRDWP, State Governments
have in their Annual Action Plans prioritised taking
up rural water supply projects in these districts.
As on 01.04.2013, out of the 16.92 lakh rural habitations
in the country, there are 3, 40,718 habitations in IAP
districts. Out of these, 2, 15,839 habitations are fully
covered (63.34%). 1, 13,125habitations (33.20%) are
partiallycovered. Further 11,754habitations (3.44%)are
quality affected.
In 2013-14, under the NRDWP, Rs. 760.46 crores
have been released by State governments to IAP
districts, targeting 29,175 habitations for coverage. As
on 31.03.2014, 31,340 habitations have been covered
ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

23

2.1.9 Solar dual Pumps in Integrated Action Plan (IAP) Districts


The Ministry decided in convergence with the National Clean Energy Fund of Ministry of New and
Renewable Energy (MNRE) to install 10,000 solar dual pumps in 82 Integrated Action Plan (IAP)
districts of the country. The cost of the total unit is about Rs 5.2 lakh. The fund sharing pattern between
MDWS, MNRE and States is 40:30:30. Under the Solar Powered dual pump scheme, a 900 Watt Solar
energy based submersible pump is installed in the bore well which is also fitted with a hand pump. The
pumped water is stored in a 5000 litre tank which is then used to provide piped water supply to each
house through taps. This scheme suffices requirement of drinking water needs of 250 persons. Hand
pump is kept as a standby in the same bore well to ensure availability of uninterrupted water supply to
the population in case of any problems with the solar powered pump. In the year 2013-14, States were
given a target of 2500 habitations against which 729 has been covered as on 28/02/2014.

Solar Dual Pump Installed in Maharashtra

2.1.10 Progress of NRDWP in North Eastern States


Under the NRDWP, focus is placed on the development of infrastructure in the North Eastern States by
providing 10% of national budget allocation to these States. In 2013-14, an amount of Rs. 970 crore has
been provided for rural drinking water supply in the North Eastern States.
24

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

Physical Status
State

Status of Coverage

Target 2013-14

Achievement as on
31.03.2014

Total rural
Habitation

Fully
Covered
Habitation

Partially
Covered
Habitation

Quality
Affected
Habitation

Partially
covered
Habitation

Quality
affected
Habitation

Partially
covered
Habitation

Quality
affected
Habitation

Arunachal
Pradesh

5612

690

4808

114

285

19

129

Assam

87888

38372

36637

12879

4050

3125

3666

1766

Manipur

2870

1627

1243

250

172

Meghalaya

9326

1821

7415

90

691

64

413

38

Mizoram

777

472

305

46

26

Nagaland

1500

392

1035

73

34

51

120

29

Sikkim

2084

502

1582

200

68

Tripura

8132

2458

671

5003

270

845

436

684

Total

118189

46334

53696

18159

5826

4104

5030

2521

2.2 WATER QUALITY PROGRAMME (WQP)


2.2.1 Setting up of International Centre for Drinking Water Quality (ICDWQ)
The Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation, Government of India, is setting up an State of the
art Research & Development centre International Centre for Drinking Water Quality (ICDWQ) at
Joka, Diamond Harbour Road, Kolkata, the proposal has been approved by Government of India and
ICDWQ has been registered as a Society under the Societies Registration Act, 1860. The ICDWQ would
be fully funded and administered under the overall guidance of the Ministry of Drinking Water and
Sanitation, Government of India.
The basic aim of the Society is to work in the area of identification, mitigation and management of
drinking water quality related problems in India and abroad with a focus on arsenic, fluoride and other
emerging contaminants to provide inputs for policy level decision making under the National Rural
Drinking Water Programme and in the rural drinking water sector in general. The Centre will focus
mainly on research and development activities, assessment of various treatment technologies, training,
networking with all related organizations, promoting doctoral and post-doctoral studies on drinking
water quality issues etc. It will cater to both- rural as well as urban areas in India. The Centre will also
assist other countries on demand.
The ICDWQ campus will have modern facilities following GRIHA green building norms for its
Administrative building, full-fledged R&D centre, library, auditorium, training centre and other ancillary
buildings along with guest house, staff quarters, etc. The total covered area is envisaged to be in the
range of approximately 17,000 sqm, which will be constructed at a tentative estimated cost of approx.
Rs. 66 crores, including all essential external services & land development etc.
ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

25

Decision has been taken and a Project Management Consultant has been selected for planning, designing,
estimating, commissioning the ICDWQ units right from concept to commissioning.

2.2.2 Scheme of Safe Drinking Water Supply through Community Water Purification
Plants in Fluoride, Arsenic, Uranium and other Heavy/Toxic Metals and Pesticide/
Fertilizer Affected Rural Habitations in the Country
The National Rural Drinking Water Programme (NRDWP) funds for supplying safe water in
contaminated areas are being utilized by the States as a policy mostly for alternate safe Piped Water
Supply (PWS) schemes including Multi-village schemes (MVS) (i. e., from far away safe sources) the
gestation period of such MVS projects is about 4-5 years. Since the rural people cannot be put to risk
due to consumption of unsafe drinking water in the interim period as also whereas all such Multi-Village
Schemes carrying safe water from far away sources cannot be planned and completed in the span of 4-5
years due to huge funds involved, hence, the Ministry of Drinking Water & Sanitation has submitted an
EFC proposal to provide community water purification plants in fluoride, arsenic, uranium and other
heavy/toxic metals and pesticide/fertilizer affected rural habitations in the country for providing safe
drinking water immediately with an anticipated expenditure of total capital cost of Rs 3,600 crore with
fund sharing pattern of 75:25 (90:10 in case of NE, J&K) between Centre and State in approx 20,000
habitations during the period 2014-15 to 2016-17. The proposal has been appraised by EFC (Economic
Finance Committee), approved by Honble MOS(IC), MDWS and the Finance Minister. The proposal
is currently pending for consideration by the CCEA.
The proposal would be implemented for tackling of water quality affected habitations in a time-bound
manner through provision of safe drinking water @ 8-10 lpcd (meant for drinking and cooking purposes
only) through installation of community drinking water purification plants, with provision for a 7 year
Operation & Maintenance (O & M) built into the project cost through a two year performance guarantee
(bank guarantee), followed by 5-year AMC through the contractor setting up the plant, thereafter after 7
years, O&M will become the responsibility of Panchayat/State Government. This extended O&M period
of 7 years by the contractor will give ample time for Panchayats to gather experience and undertake
O&M later on themselves.

2.2.3 Technologies for Treatment of Water Quality Contaminants


States use a number of technology options to provide potable drinking water in the quality affected
habitations.
In order to assist the States in selecting appropriate contaminant removal technology, a Handbook
on Drinking Water Treatment Technologies was released in November, 2011 and was made available
to all States. This was further revised by adding comparative statement of technologies and treatment
technologies for emerging contaminants like uranium and the Revised Edition released in February, 2013.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

2.2.4 Water Quality Monitoring & Surveillance


In order to develop the understanding and appreciation of safe and clean drinking water amongst rural
communities and to enable them to carry out tests to determine the quality of drinking water, the National
Rural Drinking Water Quality Monitoring and Surveillance Programme (NRDWQM&SP) was launched
in February, 2006. The programme aimed at empowering rural communities by:
i) Bringing awareness through Information, Education & Communication (IEC) activities to address
ownership of the systems, health hazards due to poor drinking water quality, hygiene, sanitary
survey, importance of environmental sanitation, etc.
ii) Training 5 grass root workers in each Gram Panchayat, which may be ASHA worker, Anganwadi
worker, science teacher, high school girl child, panchayat member, retired army officials, etc.
iii) In addition to 5 Gram Panchayat workers, 2 persons at the State level, 4 persons at the District
and 5 persons at the Block level are also to be trained.
iv) Provision of water testing kit for each Gram Panchayat.

Awareness Generation for School Children on Drinking Water Quality in Kerala


ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

27

For all these purposes, 100% financial assistance has been provided to the States. Since inception of
the programme till 30.3.2014, 3.838 lakh chemical kits, 1121.13 lakh bacteriological vials have been
purchased / supplied, 98.11 lakh water samples were tested in laboratories by using these kits and
23.35 lakh persons ( including
Grassroot workers in GPs, block &
district officials) have been trained
in different States to carry out the
water quality tests as per on-line
data reported by the States on IMIS.
This helps in keeping surveillance
on the quality aspects of drinking
water sources. With effect from
1.4.2009, NRDWQM&SP has been
subsumed in the NRDWP. From
2011-12 a separate component
of Water Quality Monitoring
Surveillance has been created for
which 3% of NRDWP funds are
allocated. During 2013-14, the
following achievements have been
made (till 30/03/2014):Village Women Using Field Test Kits to Test Drinking Water Quality in
Jharkhand

No. of FTKs chemical distributed

72,053

No. of bacteriological vials distributed/


processed

1.57 crore

No. of grass root workers trained

4.27 lakh

No. of sanitary surveys conducted

79,139

No. of sources tested using FTKs

14.74 lakh

2.2.5 Water Quality Testing Laboratories


The Ministry also supports in setting up and strengthening district level and sub-divisional laboratories
in the States. As on 30/03/2014, 720 district laboratories have been established by the States/ UTs
using funds from the Centre, from their own resources and from other sources. In addition, 1413 subdivisional / block level laboratories have also been set up in various States. States have carried out testing
of 26.74 lakh water samples during 2013-14.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

Sophisticated instrumentation in State Water Quality Testing Laboratory (Andhra Pradesh)

Gas Chromatography Inductively Coupled Plasma Spectrophotometer

Guidelines received from BARC, Mumbai on testing of radio-nuclides, alpha and beta emitters have
been sent to all States. The uniform protocol suggests for sophisticated instrumentation for the State
labs while instrumentation required for the regular analysis at district/ sub-divisional labs are also of
high quality but the pace of water quality testing could be improved.

Ultra-Violet (Visible) Spectrophotometer in District/ Sub-Divisional Laboratories (A P)

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

29

Instrumentation Facilities for Bacteriological Testing of Drinking Water, Punjab: View of Laminar Air Flow
Chamber and Autoclave.

2.2.6 National Programme on Prevention and Control of JE / AES


The National programme on prevention and control of Japanese Encephalitis / Acute Encephalitis
Syndrome (JE / AES) has been started by the Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India.
The Health Ministry has identified 60 high priority JE / AES districts and has proposed an integrated
approach in partnership with Ministries of Drinking Water & Sanitation, Social Justice, Housing and
Urban Poverty Alleviation and Women and Child Development.
The major thrust areas under the drinking water component of the programme include:
1) Provision of safe drinking water and proper sanitation facilities
2) Strengthening measures / mechanism for water quality monitoring
3) Replacement of public shallow hand pumps with IM-II hand pumps
4) Proper disinfection facilities
5) Rising hand pump platforms in water logged / high water table areas
6) Mini-water supply scheme with stand posts for provision of safe drinking water.
States can incur expenditure on th.is from the 3% provision made by Government of India under
WQM&SP.
The Ministry has taken up the issue of JE/AES in States very seriously and has reviewed the progress
on prevention and control of Japanese Encephalitis / Acute Encephalitis Syndrome (JE / AES) regularly
during NRDWP Review meeting and on online IMIS.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

As reported by the States, under Central share funds, about 1700 rural habitations have been covered
under this programme during the year 2013-14 as on 28/4/2014.

2.2.7 Hydro-Geo-Morphological Maps


The Ministry has prioritized the preparation of hydro-geo-morphological maps to assist the States through
National Remote Sensing Centre, Hyderabad. With the use of these maps, States can identify sites for
groundwater sources for water supply systems and locations for constructing recharge structures to improve
sustainability of existing water supply sources.
Groundwater prospect maps in terms of Hydro-Geo-Morphological (HGM) maps have been completed
for the entire country except few islands and UTs. These have been handed over to States to help them
in identifying correct sites for production wells and sustainability structures for artificial groundwater
recharge. Use of these maps, along with geo-physical studies, are likely to cut down the failure of bore
wells/ tube wells drastically and also help in in-situ dilution of certain chemical contaminants. Rest of
the HGM prospect maps will be completed and handed over to States/ UTs by June 2014. Updating of
HGM maps that were provided long back, will also be updated during 2014-15, using latest satellite data
and sent to States. States have been advised to generate water quality data on a random but uniform
basis in each district during pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons and send the same along with
their GPS coordinates and depth of tubewell so that ground water quality GIS layer could be inserted
into the HGM maps.

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

31

Use of HGM Maps for Siting Correct Location for Check Dam in Chhattisgarh

2.2.8 Visit of Central Team in Water-Quality Affected Areas


i) As per the decision taken in the meeting of the Parliamentary Standing Committee for Demands
For Grants (2013-14) held on April 02, 2013, the Ministry of Drinking Water & Sanitation
deputed a Central Team to review and inspect the status of Sea Water Reverse Osmosis
Plants installed in Andaman & Nicobar islands. The team was headed by Shri D. Rajasekhar,
Dy. Advisor-WQ,
Ministry of Drinking
Water & Sanitation.
The team visited
various areas in
Andaman & Nicobar
islands in April
2013 and reviewed
the functioning and
performance of RO
plants and its report
was submitted by the
Ministry to the Lok
Sabha Secretariat.
A View of the Fully Functional RO Plant set up by PWD at Tugapur,
A & N Islands

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ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

ii) Shri Pankaj Jain, Secretary, DWS along with Shri Satyabrata Sahu, JS(W) and Shri D. Rajasekhar,
DA(WQ) of the Ministry visited the Phailin affected areas in Ganjam and Puri districts in Odisha
in February 2014.
iii) Shri Satyabrata Sahu, Joint Secretary (Water), Ministry of Drinking Water & Sanitation along
with Shri D. Rajasekhar, Dy. Advisor (WQ) and Dr. Brajesh Shrivastava, Consultant (WQ &
Sustainability) visited Chhattisgarh State. JS visited Rakhee village (District-Dhamtari), Usarawara
village (District-Durg) Onakana village (District- Balod), Kotni Village (District-Raipur) and
Lohardih village (District-Mahasamund) in Chhattisgarh State during 29th - 30th August 2013
and interacted with the rural people to review the Status of NRDWP. A review meeting of State
PHED officials was also undertaken in the evening of 29th August 2013 which was attended
by Engineer-in-Chief, Chief Engineer, Superintending Engineers, Executive Engineers and staff
of WSSO apart from Secretary-PHE, Govt. of Chhattisgarh, to review the implementation of
NRDWP in Chhattisgarh State.

Electrolytic Defluoridation
Plant at Usarwara Village in
Durg District (Chhattisgarh)

Solar Energy Based Dual Pump at


Onakona Village in Balod District
(Chhattisgarh)

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

33

iv) Shri Satyabrata Sahu, JS and Shri D. Rajasekhar, Deputy Advisor (WQ), MDWS also visited
fluoride affected Nuapada district in Odisha State on 30th Aug 2013 and gave suggestions for
improvements to the local RWSS engineers.

2.3 INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM (IMIS)


The Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) of the Ministry, developed and managed with
the help of the National Informatics Center (NIC) has in the past 5 years become a repository of all data
with respect to implementation of rural drinking water supply schemes, water quality data from villages
as well as of laboratory testing. The data is entered by the States online at the district and state levels.
Facility has been provided to the states to enter data at division levels also, from this year. States enter
their Monthly Progress Reports (MPRs) regarding physical and financial progress with respect to the
implementation of rural water supply schemes, for each month by the 15th of the subsequent month.
No paper reports are received from the states. Data regarding water supply for over 16.64 lakh rural
habitations across the country is available on the IMIS which is freely accessible from the Ministrys
website. The process of monitoring the targeted habitation online has been systematized from 2009-10
onwards through IMIS. The existing monitoring system can assess the impact of these programmes on
the coverage status of habitations. The Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) is accessible
in the online monitoring page of the Ministry website (http://www.ddws.gov.in).

The Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) is a comprehensive web based information
system, which enables the States and the Centre, to monitor the progress of coverage of habitations and
rural schools and anganwadis, through a common monitoring format. In addition to this, progress of
schemes for water supply and sustainability can also be monitored. The IMIS enables one to view the
extent of coverage with safe drinking water. This system also gives the list of quality-affected habitations
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ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

and the list of partially covered habitations. The list of Government and Local Body aided schools and
anganwadis in all villages of the country is captured along with facility (drinking water & sanitation)
available. Data on coverage of habitations with potable water and the link ofsuch data with the census
village code has been achieved for bringing in increased accuracy in the monitoring of the programme.
All States are providing progress data on the online IMIS system. Using the IMIS system, the Ministry
monitors the progress of all States in the implementation of the NRDWP. Feedback and advice is given
to the States on the basis of data submitted by them on the IMIS. The IMIS is developing into a robust
database, providing information of the status of rural drinking water situation covering every habitation
in the country, and has become a crucial tool for planning.
IMIS has won the SKOCH SMART Governance Award as one of indias best 100 projects of 2013.
IMIS also won the award of recognition from various organisations during 2013-14

From CSINihilent e-Governance award 2012-13.

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

35

IMIS among "India's best Projects in 2013" at the SKOTCH SMART Governance Awards
on 2nd September 2013, at Le Meridien, New Delhi

2.4 SUPPORT ACTIVITIES


2.4.1 Research and Development Projects
In order to promote research and development in the area of water quality, this Ministry funds R&D
projects in premier R & D institutions, Universities, Colleges, autonomous organizations including
NGOs/ voluntary agencies. So far 149 R & D projects have been sanctioned, out of which127 have
been completed. The Ministry has brought out two compendia on the completed projects and it has
also been widely disseminated to States/ PHEDs for their use. To consider R&D proposals and provide
guidance, the Ministry has constituted a Research & Development Advisory Committee (R&DAC).
During the year 2013-14, consideration of new R & D
Projects is in process.

2.4.2 Information, Education and Communication (IEC)


Based on issues and challenges faced in the implementation
of the National Rural Drinking Water Programme (NRDWP),
the Ministry released advertisements in the All India Radio.
Further awareness campaign on different aspects of safe
drinking water in rural areas through broadcast of audio
spots on All India Radio on Vividh Bharati, primary/ local
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ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

channels, national news, regional news bulletin has also been undertaken. Telecast of advertisements in
Doordarshan, both national and regional networks, towards the same goal has been undertaken during
this year.
It has also formulated IEC guidelines to help
the States to take IEC activities for different
stakeholders at different levels. As part of IEC
campaign, the Ministry during last year participated
in India International Trade Fair along with many
State Governments / NGOs and other private
organizations dealing with water and exhibited
their products for providing safe drinking water.

2.4.3 Key Resource Centres (KRCs)


Ministry has identified institutions/ organizations
having domain knowledge and expertise in water
and selected them as National Key Resource
Centres (NKRCs). National Key Resources Centres
(NKRC) are key institutions engaged in capacity
building, reorientation of different stakeholders,
in dissemination of knowledge and information,
documentation of best practices etc. to achieve
the sectoral goal of drinking water security in
rural areas. KRCs provide technical guidance
to State Water & Sanitation Mission (SWSM),
Communication & Capacity Development Unit
(CCDU), Public Health Engineering Departments
(PHEDs), Panchayati Raj Institutions (PRIs),
Non-governmental Organizations (NGOs) and
community organizations on issues and challenges
of NRDW Programme. Key Resource Centres
are identified by Ministry of Drinking Water &
Sanitation based on the track record of national
standing, experience, previous work and involvement
of the concerned institutions/ organizations in
rural drinking water sector.
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37

In total, there are 56 Key Resource Centres recognized by Ministry of Drinking Water & Sanit tion. Out
of these, 38 KRCs work for drinking water and 8 for sanitation exclusively for capacity building and 10
work for both drinking water and sanitation.
The details of activities undertaken by KRCs during 2013-14 are given below.
Training Programmes

40

National/ Regional Workshops

2.4.4 International Training Programmes


The Ministry and UNICEF have jointly funded two international training programmes on External Capacity
Building Initiatives on Water and Sanitation in IRC, Netherlands. In these two weeks programmes held
from 25th June to 06th July, 2012 and 19th November to 30th November, 2012 a total of 37 officers
from the Ministry and State Departments in-charge of rural water supply and sanitation participated.

2.4.5 Rajiv Gandhi National Professors Chair on WATSAN Studies


The Ministry has set up Rajiv Gandhi National Professor Chair on WATSAN Studies in 2012-13 in four
Universities / Institutions. The details of the Universities / Institutions and the area of specialization
given to them are given below.
S. No. Name of the Institute

Area of Specialization

Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore

Tata Institute of Social Sciences, Mumbai Governance and Service Delivery issues in
Rural Domestic Water and Sanitation

Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati Rural Drinking Water Quality Technology


options

Depar tment of hydrology, Indian Sustainability of sources


Institute of Technology, Roorkee.

Rural Sanitation and Waste Management

2.4.6 Important Conferences/Exhibitions and Visits


Water-Tech 2013
The Ministry of Drinking Water & Sanitation, Government of India, supported a National level
Exhibition cum Conference on Drinking Water &Industrial Waste Water Treatment & Management, organized by Messe Frankfurt Trade Fair from 26th to 28th September 2013 in Mahatma
Mandir, Gandhi Nagar (Gujarat).The Exhibition commenced on 26th September 2013 and ran
along with a Conference which was held from 27th -28th September 2013. The event was inaugurated by Shri Bharatsinh Solanki, Honble Minister of Drinking Water & Sanitation.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

Shri Bharatsinh Solanki, Minister of State (I/C), Ministry of Drinking Water & Sanitation inaugurating Water
tech 2013 accompanied by Shri Pankaj Jain, Secretary-MDWS

Participation in IITF, New Delhi


Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation participated in the India International Trade Fair (IITF)
during 14-27 November 2013. Shri Pankaj Jain, Secretary-MDWS inaugurated the exhibition of the
Ministry at IITF.

Representatives of States, research institutions, NGOs, international companies dealing with water
treatment showcased their achievements in the area of drinking water and sanitation through high

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

39

quality posters, models, equipments


and instruments. This was the first
participation of the Ministry in IITF after
creation of a separate Ministry. The event
was orgnaised in an exhibition area of 246
sqm in Hall No. 18 in the IITF, Pragati
Maidan, New Delhi.

Shri Pankaj Jain, Secretary (MDWS), Inaugurating Exhibition at


IITF, Pragati Maidan, New Delhi

Deputation of Senior Officers as members of Inter-Ministerial Central Teams Constituted by the


Ministry of Home Affairs / Ministry of Agriculture for Assessment of Impact of Natural Calamities
The Ministry had deputed Senior Officers as members to various Central teams for assessment of
impact of natural disasters like drought, flood, earthquake, landslides, etc. The States of Andhra
Pradesh, Arunachal Pradesh, Bihar, Gujarat, Himachal Pradesh, Jammu & Kashmir, Karnataka, Kerala,
Maharashtra, Nagaland, Odisha Tamil Nadu Uttarakhand etc. were visited by the officers of the Ministry
and the Central teams have submitted their recommendations on emergency drinking water supply
measures to the Inter Ministerial Group.
Review Meetings During 2013-14

Ministry organised National


Level Sectoral discussions
under the Chairmanship of
Shri Pankaj Jain, Secretary
( DWS ) w i t h S t a t e s o n
11th April, 2013. State
Secretaries/ Principal
Secretar ys in charge of
RWS attended the meeting
where Secretar y (DWS)
highlighted to focus on
providing quality water in
quality affected and partially
National Level Annual Sectoral Discussions held with States/UTs Governments
covered habitations.
on 11th April, 2013 at Vigyan Bhawan, New Delhi.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

Periodic reviews were taken up by Joint Secretary (Water) with States to set up dual solar pump
based water supply projects in the naxal affected States under the Integrated Action Plan by
organising video-conference with 9 States during June and September, 2013. Except the State of
Chhattisgarh, the remaining States have made very low progress and they were asked to improve
their performance.

Field Visit & Review by Shri Satyabrata Sahu, Jt Secretary (Water) in the Village
Usarwara of District Balod (Chhattisgarh) on Solar Dual Pump based Water Supply

Training Need Assessment (TNA) workshop was organised at Hotel Leela Palace, New Delhi
on 19th November, 2013 with States.
State Secretaries/ Principal Secretaries in charge of
RWS & Sanitation to review the progress under IEC activities, training modules of KRCs and
framework document on drinking water advocacy prepared by UNICEF.

Release of Drinking Water Advocacy and Communication Strategy Framework


(DWACS, 2013-2022) during WASH-TNA Workshop jointly organised by MDWS and UNICEF.
ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

41

A review meeting was held under the Chairmanship of Secretary (DWS) with States on 20th
November, 2013. State Secretaries/ Principal Secretaries incharge of RWS to review the progress
under NRDWP. In the meeting Secretary gave emphasis on providing safe water in water quality
affected habitations. He also stressed on the need for setting up water quality testing laboratories
in the States. He requested the States to provide minimum 40 lpcd of water in all PC habitations
by the end of 2013-14.

Senior Officials of the Ministry taking review meeting on NRDWP with States/
UTs Governments on 20th November, 2013 at Hotel Leela, New Delhi

Regional Review meeting with Eastern Zone States under the Chairmanship of Secretary, DWS
was held on 27th January, 2014 at Bhubaneswar. Focus was given on coverage of habitations
with piped water supply which is very low in the Eastern States of the country. Secretary also
impressed upon the States for adequate water quality testing in laboratories.

Regional Review Meeting with Eastern Region States held on 27th


January, 2014 at Bhubaneswar, Odisha.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

On 29th January, 2014 Regional Workshop was held to discuss CSR guidelines prepared by the
Ministry with officials of the Eastern States of the country where Joint Director (Stat) along
with Joint Secretary (Water) was present. Leading PSUs of the areas also attended.

Joint Secretary (Water) address during regional workshop on Best Practices cum
Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) held on 29th January, 2014 at Bhubaneswar

A workshop was organised by Principal Investigators/ scientists of State Remote Sensing Centres
on preparation of HGM maps for Ground Water Quality data availability, issues, mapping status
and completion report of ground water prospects maps, at Hyderabad on 30.1.2014.

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

43

Visit of Senior Officers to Foreign Countries

44

Shri Pankaj Jain, Secretary, MDWS had visited Sweden, Spain, Israel, Bhutan, Nepal and
Indonesia to study water and sanitation related activities being taken up and special focus being
provided on drinking water quality.

Shri Satyabrata Sahu, JS(W) visited Indonesia leading an officials delegation in September, 2013
to see the water supply & sanitation projects.

The study tour to Brazil was organised by World Bank and it was represented by the Senior
officials from Sectoral line Ministry of GoI (i.e. MoDWS), the Planning Commission and Senior
officials from each of the four participating states of Low Income States(LIS) RWSS Projects.

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

RURAL SANITATION
PROGRAMME (RSP)

RURAL SANITATION PROGRAMME (RSP)

Safe sanitation is an essential requirement for the well being of every society. Though India has come
a long way in improving its sanitation coverage status, it is still well short of desired levels. The Nirmal
Bharat Abhiyan (NBA) launched in 2012, by modifying the erstwhile Total Sanitation Campaign (TSC),
is a community-led and people-oriented programme aimed at universalizing safe sanitation.

3.1 Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan (NBA)


In 2012, a paradigm shift was made in the Total Sanitation Campaign (TSC), by launching the Nirmal
Bharat Abhiyan (NBA), in the XII Five Year Plan. The objective of NBA is to achieve sustainable behavioral
change with provision of sanitary facilities in entire communities in a phased, saturation mode with
Nirmal Grams as outcomes.
The Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan (NBA) lays strong emphasis on Information, Education and Communication
(IEC), capacity building and hygiene education for effective behavioural change covering the entire
community for saturated outcomes with a view to create Nirmal Gram Panchayats with the involvement
of PRIs, Community Based Organizations (CBOs), Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs), etc.
The new strategy is to transform rural India into Nirmal Bharat by adopting community saturation
approach. The goal under NBA is to achieve safe sanitation for 50% rural households by 2017 and to
all rural households by 2022.

3.2 Provision under Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan (NBA)


Under the NBA, the provision of incentive for Individual Household Latrine units is available
to all BPL households.
Incentives are also available to APL households belonging to the following categories
i)

SCs,

ii)

STs,

iii)

small and marginal farmers,

iv)

landless labourers with homesteads,

v)

physically challenged

vi)

women headed households along-with all BPL households.

The provision of incentives to Individual Household Latrines are the following:


Incentive of Rs. 3200/- and 1400/- for each toilet (Rs. 3700/- and Rs. 1400/- in case of hilly
and difficult areas) is given by Central and State Government respectively, to the BPL households
and identified Above Poverty Line (APL) households w.e.f.01.4.2012.
In addition to the incentives under the NBA, upto Rs. 5400 is available under Mahatma Gandhi
National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme for construction of IHHLs.
ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

47

Under the NBA, assistance of Rs. 35000/- (Rs. 38500/- for hilly and difficult areas) is available
for the construction of a toilet unit in schools.
Assistance of Rs. 8000/- (Rs. 10000/- for hilly and difficult areas) is available for Anganwadi
toilets with the cost shared by Central and State Government in the ratio of 70:30.
Provision of upto Rs. 2,00,000/- is available for construction of Community Sanitary Complexes
with cost sharing between Centre, State and Community in the ratio of 60:30:10.
Under NBA, assistance is available to setup Production Centres of sanitary materials and Rural
Sanitary Marts.
Support exists for Solid and Liquid Waste Management (SLWM) in project mode for each Gram
Panchayat (GP) with financial assistance capped for a GP on number of household basis, to
enable all panchayats to implement sustainable SLWM projects. Rs. 7/12/15/20 lakh is available
for Gram Panchayats having up to 150/300/500/ more than 500 households, on a Centre
and State/GP sharing ratio of 70:30. Projects to be prioritized in identified GPs targeted for
nirmal status and those that have already been awarded the Nirmal Gram Puraskar (NGP). Any
additional cost requirement is to be met from the State/GP.
Funds for capacity building of all stakeholders including Panchayati Raj Institutions(PRIs) and
field level implementers have been earmarked under the revised strategy.
Implementation of a Sanitation and Hygiene Communication Strategy with focus on InterPersonal Communication.

Best Practice 1.
Strategy for Achieving Open Defecation Free Villages in Jharkhand
Based on the experience of Gadri village in Ranchi
The Drinking Water and Sanitation Department, Jharkhand, has adopted a new strategy, which
was demonstrated with UNICEF support in Ranchi district of Jharkhand. UNICEF engaged the
NGO ACE (Action for Community Empowerment) to demonstrate the strategy. Gadri village of
Nehalu Kapadia Panchayat was taken up as the first village for the demonstration of this strategy.
The concept of targeting the community as a whole, as against the earlier approach to focus on
individual households, was a critical shift. This challenging task was led by the Panchayats. Evidently,
the role of the facilitating NGO became critical in supporting the PaWnchayats first to mobilize
the community and thereafter mobilizing funds to achieve total sanitation coverage and use. At this
juncture, the provision of accessing the Revolving Fund was the key innovation of the demonstration
process. The Village Water and Sanitation Committee (VWSC), a statutory body constituted under
the provisions of the Panchayati Raj Act, is the village-level executing agency of the Nirmal Bharat
Abhiyan. The Mukhiya of the Gram Panchayat is the President of the VWSC and the Jal Sahiya (the
female grassroots worker), as prescribed by the national guideline of the Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan, was
deputed as the treasurer of the VWSC.
The task of the facilitating NGO was to strengthen the capacity of the VWSC, vis--vis the Mukhiya
of the Gram Panchayat, to foster community mobilization on one hand and liaison with the District
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ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

Water and Sanitation Committee (DWSC), on the other. The Mukhiya, after ascertaining the
commitment of the entire village, that is, 100 percent households to strive towards achieving ODF
status and simultaneously the construction of sanitary toilets in each household, worked out the
total cost of the project. Subsequently, the VWSC submitted a proposal to the DWSC for a loan
to initiate the project. Individual households thereafter contributed to meet the total project cost.
This included labor cost, though in many cases the labor component was contributed directly by the
beneficiary households.
Implementation of the Strategy - The process of toilet construction was preceded by extensive community
mobilization activities led by the Panchayats. While implementing the sanitation program, it was
perceived that households have a natural attraction towards high quality construction. As toilets were
coming up in the village with robust superstructures, there was an immense demand for improving
the design of the superstructure and the beneficiary households were willing to invest on their
assets. ACE, the NGO involved in facilitation, made several innovations in toilet construction; for
instance, having a common wall for adjacent toilets belonging to siblings who belonged to separate
households. In this manner the unit cost of the toilets was reduced. Cost optimization was primarily
based on restricting wastage, planning for construction in scale, and avoiding over-designing of basic
components (such as the platform of the toilet, cover of the leech pit, doors, and roofs. Once the
construction phase was completed and the village was declared ODF, the VWSC prepared a list of
households in the village who were eligible for NBA subsidy and submitted a proposal to the DWSC,
requesting for the subsidy fund.
Eventually, on 13 May 2013, Gadri was declared ODF. A celebration was held in the village, organized
by the VWSC. During this celebration, the Additional Chief Secretary of the Drinking Water and
Sanitation Department handed over the NBA subsidy amount, adjusted with the loan provided
through the revolving funds. The Jal Sahiya also received the incentive amount.

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

49

3.3 Sanitation Coverage


Census 2011 has reported that sanitation coverage
in rural India has reached 32.70% taking into
consideration the increased population.
Census 2011 has also reported an increase in
2.96 crore households in rural areas as compared
to census 2001.
The NSSO-2012 report has estimated that
40.6% of rural households have sanitation
facilities.

3.4 Physical Progress Cumulative


Against a cumulative Project objective under TSC/NBA, of 12.57 crore Individual Household Latrines
(IHHL), States have reported on the Online Monitoring System that, sanitation facilities for 9.45 crore
individual households has been achieved as on December 2013. The state-wise % achievement as reported
by the States on the online Management Information System of the Ministry is given below:-

BPL :- Below Poverty Line


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ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

APL :- Above Poverty Line


In addition to the above 27,151 Community Sanitary Complexes have been constructed in the country
so far.
In addition to individual household toilets, NBA also lays emphasis on school sanitation. Since inception
of the sanitation programme, a total of 13.25 lakh school toilet units have been reported to be constructed
as of December 2013. 96% of the cumulative project objectives have been achieved.
School toilet

Anganwadi toilet

Samilarly, provision of sanitary facilities in Anganwadis is also an important component of the NBA.
A total of 4,63,057 Anganwadi toilets have been reported to be constructed as of December 2013. 87%
of the original cu mulative project objectives have been achieved. The state-wise % achievement is given
below:-

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51

Annual Physical Progress


The annual physical progress of construction of IHHLs, School Toilets, Anganwadi Toilets and Community
Sanitary complexes under the TSC/NBA in the years 2012-13 and 2013-14 (upto Dec, 2013) is as below :
Year

IHHLs

School toilets

Anganwadi toilets

Community
Sanitary Complex

2012-13

4,559,162

76,396

36,677

1,995

2013-14
(Upto Dec, 2013)

29,08,463

24,658

14,816

958

State-wise details are at Annexure-IV and V.

3.5 Financial Progress


Under the TSC/NBA, districts prepare Project Implementation Plans (PIPs). The total value of the 607
approved District Projects is Rs. 22,672.36 crore. Central, State and beneficiary shares of the projects are
Rs. 14,888.92 crore, Rs. 5,549.20 crore and Rs. 2,234.24 crore respectively. An amount of Rs.11,638.59
crore has already been released by the Government of India for implementation of these projects, out
of which Rs. 9,600.76 crore has been utilized as reported by the States.
State/UT-wise details is at Annexure-VI.
Annual Financial Progress
The availability and utilization of funds under the NBA in 2012-13 and 2013-14(Upto December 2013)
is as below.
(Amount in Rs. Cr.)
Year

Opening
Balance
available
with
States

Funds
available
under the
NBA

By
MDWS

Funds
Released
to the
States

2012-13

1278.82

2500.00

34.83

2013-14
(Upto Dec,
2013)

2338.80

2300.00

44.22

Funds Utilised

Statewise details are at Annexure - VII & VIII.

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ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

Total
Funds
Available
with States

Funds
Utilised
by States

Balance
funds
available
with States
at end of
the year

2438.46

3717.28

1524.19

2193.09

1403.77

3742.57

1183.13

2559.44

3.6 Activities of Importance Undertaken During 2013-14


i) National Conference on Sociology of Sanitation
O n 2 8 t h J a n u a r y 2 013 , S u l a b h
International organized the National
Conference on Sociology of Sanitation.
Addressing the Conference, Shri
Bharat Sinh Solanki, Hon. MoS(i/c)
Ministr y of Drinking Water and
Sanitation highlighted the policy of
the Government of India in tackling
the sanitation problems of rural India.
He highlighted the action taken by
the Ministry under the NBA and
the successes achieved under the
programme.
ii) Annual Sectoral discussions on Rural Drinking Water & Sanitation on 11th April,2013 at
Vigyan Bhawan, New Delhi
Ministr y organized official level
annual sectoral discussions on rural
drinking water & sanitation under
the Chairmanship of Shri Pankaj Jain,
Secretary, Ministry of Drinking Water
and Sanitation on 11th April, 2013 at
Vigyan Bhawan, New Delhi.

Secretary, MDWS highlighted the increased allocation for rural sanitation under the 12th Plan
and said that sufficient funds are now available with the States for implementation of NBA. The
States must accordingly fix higher targets under the Annual Implementation Plan being planned
by States. The AIP targets should include District-wise targets provided by the States. Apart from
AIP targets, States should prepare long term strategic Action plan on Sanitation in their States.
Gujarat has already prepared Strategic Plan for 15 years. States were urged to deliberate on the
new challenges in NBA implementation. These are issues of dysfunctional toilets, problem of
convergence of NBA with MGNREGS, inclusion of bathing space with toilets, completion of
targets for construction of school and Anganwadi toilets, quality of school toilet units, slip-back
villages questioning the sustainability of NGP, selection of NGP awardees by States, increased
focus by States on IEC activities.
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53

iii) Review meeting with State Principal Secretaries/Secretaries In-charge of Rural Sanitation on
12th April, 2013 at Vigyan Bhawan, New Delhi
Review meeting with State Principal Secretaries/Secretaries In-charge of Rural Sanitation was
held at Vigyan Bhawan, New Delhi
on 12th April, 2013 with the multiple
aims of reviewing the progress of
implementation of the NBA including
school sanitation targets, progress of
survey and conversion of insanitary
latrines into sanitary latrines, progress
of Baseline Survey and preparation
of revised Project Implementation
Plans(PIPs). The Joint Secretary gave
a presentation on the status of the
Baseline survey and the initial findings
reflected in them.
Regarding identification of dysfunctional toilets under the baseline survey, the States elaborated
on how they were going ahead and the checking each and every toilet in the GP.
The Ministry reiterated that open defecation was a national shame and said that the States have
to streamline their interventions and give due importance in tackling this issue. The Government
of India is committed to making the Country ODF free and there was no lack of resources or
intention from the side of the central government.
iv) Practitioners Workshop for developing a National Policy Frame Work on Solid and Liquid
Waste Management in Rural India on 20 21 May 2013
A National Practitioners Workshop for developing a National Policy Frame Work on Solid and
Liquid Waste Management in Rural India was organized on 20 21 May 2013 in Park Hotel,
New Delhi with collaboration of Asian Development Bank (ADB). The workshop was attended
by more than 20 experts and 15 practitioners including the elected representatives from different
parts of the Country. In his inaugural address, Secretary, Government of India focussed on
the issues and challenges in the field of sanitation especially the issues of SLWM in India. He
initiated the address by saying that SLWM is a challenging subject in India due to its diverse
nature like different terrain, varying climatic conditions and different existing culture and customs
among the community. Earlier, managing solid and liquid waste was considered a major issue in
urban areas, but now it has emerged as an issue in rural areas also. People dump both kitchen
waste and toilet waste in sewerage system, which makes it difficult to properly manage or treat.
He also stated that the coverage of sewerage system is only 15-20% even in cities despite the
continuous effort for almost a decade. Managing waste water itself is a big challenge. Under
NBA programme, Ministry focuses on make our country Nirmal by 2022 through sustainable
sanitation programmes in rural India. Each and every person has a role and responsibility in
achieving this, he stressed. He also pointed out need for a compendium on best practices on
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ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

SLWM in India. He also emphasized the need of developing some techno-economic models in
rural areas.
v) Review meeting with State NBA-Coordinators on 17th July, 2013 at India Habitat Centre,
New Delhi
A review meeting with State NBA-Coordinators was held under the Chairmanship of Shri
Saraswati Prasad, Joint Secretary (Sanitation), on 17th July, 2013 at India Habitat Centre, New
Delhi, with the aim of reviewing the progress of NBA including school sanitation targets, progress
of survey and conversion of insanitary latrines into sanitary latrines, progress of Baseline survey
and preparation of revised Project Implementation Plans(PIPs).
Shri Saraswati Prasad, Joint Secretary (Sanitation) stated that States need to focus on achieving
the physical and financial objectives set under AIP-2013-14. He further said that the survey
of insanitary latrines should be completed on priority basis and insanitary latrines should be
converted into sanitary latrines on priority basis. Director (NBA) made a presentation on the
programme.
vi) Review meeting with State Principal Secretaries/Secretaries In-charge of Rural Sanitation on
19th November, 2013 at Hotel Leela Palace, New Delhi
A review meeting with State Secretaries in-charge of
Rural Sanitation was held under the Chairmanship
of Shri Pankaj Jain, Secretary(DWS), on 29 th
November, 2013 at Hotel- Leela Palace, New Delhi
with the aim of reviewing the progress of NBA
including school sanitation targets, progress of
survey and conversion of insanitary latrines into
sanitary latrines, progress of baseline survey and
preparation of revised Project Implementation
Plans(PIPs).
Shri Saraswati Prasad, Joint Secretary (Sanitation) made a presentation. In which he stated that
States must focus on achieving the physical and financial objectives set under AIP-2013-14.
Achievements are pretty low in some States. He focused on the survey of insanitary latrines
which should be completed on priority basis and insanitary latrines should be converted into
sanitary latrines on priority basis. Construction of Schools and Anganwadi toilets should be
completed by March, 2014. He also said that NGP awards money in future will not be released
if the pending UCs are not submitted.
In his opening remarks, the Secretary (MDWS) stated that open defecation is a national shame
and 600 million people in India defecate in the open while only 32.7% have sanitation facilities
as per Census-2011 figures. He said that culture of practicing open defecation should change.
Community involvement should be increased. The Secretary also expressed doubts about the
sanitation coverage figures indicated by States as programme achievement stating that there were
a lot of dysfunctional toilets in the Country. States should make special efforts to complete the
ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

55

Project objectives of 2013-14 with particular emphasis to complete school and anganwadi toilets
by March 2014. State should take immediate steps to minimize the unspent balance. He asked
the States about convergence of NBA with MGNREGS. Convergence is good in the States of
Bihar, Andhra Pradesh, Jharkhand, Maharashtra, Haryana, West Bengal, Madhya Pradesh and
Karnataka.

3.7 Publications
Pathway to Success Compendium of Be st
Practices in Rural Sanitation in India
The Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation
with the assistance of Water and Sanitation Program
(WSP), published a second volume of Compendium
of Best Practices on Rural Sanitation titled Pathway
to Success. This is in continuation with the first
volume, titled From Dreams to Reality, released
in 2010. The 16 success stories documented in the
Compendium are lessons of great inspiration and
can serve as models for various Gram Panchayats,
Districts, and States across India in overcoming
hurdles and obstacles in various fields as diverse
as Community Participation, Sustainability,
Resource Mobilization, Solid and Liquid Waste
Management, Program Implementation, IEC
Practices, and Institutional Reforms.

3.8 Nirmal Gram Puraskar (NGP)


In October 2003, GOI launched an award based Incentive Scheme, as a component of its flagship scheme
Total Sanitation Campaign (TSC), for achieving fully sanitized and open defecation free Gram Panchayats,
Blocks, Districts and States called the Nirmal Gram Puraskar (NGP). The first awards were given in
2005. NGP seeks to recognise the efforts made by Panchayati Raj Institutions (PRIs) and organisations
which have contributed significantly towards ensuring full sanitation coverage in their areas of operation.
Nirmal Gram Puraskar awarded till 2011 was given by Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation
(MoDWS), Government of India at all levels of PRIs that is Gram Panchayat, Block Panchayat and
District Panchayat.
It has now been decided that with the transition to NBA, involvement of the States in the selection of
Gram Panchayats to award Nirmal Gram Puraskar from the year 2012 shall be increased, while selection
of the Blocks and District Panchayats shall continue to be with the Centre. The selection of NGPs for
the year 2013 is under process.

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Objectives of Nirmal Gram Puraskar (NGP)


The main objectives of Nirmal Gram Puraskar (NGP) are:
To promote safe sanitation and clean environment as a way of life in rural India.
To incentivise Panchayati Raj Institutions (PRIs) to make the villages Open Defecation Free
(ODF) and to adopt Solid and Liquid Waste Management (SLWM).
To sustain the initiative of clean environment.
To encourage organizations to play a catalytic role in social mobilization in the implementation
of NBA.

Eligibility criteria for NGP


(a) Eligibility for Gram Panchayats:
A Gram Panchayat will be eligible to apply for the NGP on the following grounds:
Gram Panchayat has adopted a resolution to ban open defecation within its entire area inclusive
of all habitations and villages. .
All habitations within the Gram Panchayat jurisdiction have access to water for drinking and
sanitation purposes.
The Gram Panchayat has achieved objectives for all components as approved in the District
Project and entered it in the IMIS of the Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation.
(b) Eligibility for Block and Panchayats:
Application for the award for Block and District level may be sent to the MoDWS if all GPs in the
Block / Districts have been selected for NGP, after short-listing of GPs by the State NGP Selection
Committee.

Award Money
(a) Award Money for Gram Panchayats
Under the NGP, Award Money to successful GPs is offered based on population criterion, which
is given in the table below.
Criteria/ Amount

Gram Panchayat

Population as per
Census 2011

Less
than
1000

1000 to
1999

2000 to
4999

5000 to
9999

10,000 and
above

Award Money
(Rs in Lakh)

1.0

2.0

4.0

8.0

10.0

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Award Money is offered only to PRIs while Officials and Organisations are given citations and
mementos in recognition of their efforts.
(b) Award Money for the Block/ District Panchayats
Award money to Block/ District Panchayats is offered based on population criterion, which is given
in the table below.
Criteria/ Amount

Block Panchayat

Population as per Census Up to 50,000


2011
Award Money

15.0

District Panchayat

More than
50,000

Up to
10,00,000

More than
10,00,000

20.0

30.0

50.0

(Rs in Lakh)

NGP awards given so far


Under NGP, the following number of PRIs and other institutions has received the award in the last 7
years:
2005 : 38 Gram Panchayats and 2 Block Panchayats.
2006 : 760 Gram Panchayats and 9 Block Panchayats, 4 Institutions.
2007 : 4945 Gram Panchayats, 14 Block panchayats, 9 Institutions.
2008 :- 12038 Gram Panchayats, 112 Block panchayats, 8 Zilla Panchayats, 10 Institutions.
2009 :- 4556 GPs, 28 BPs and 2 ZPs
2010 :- 2808 GPs, 1 BP
2011 :- 2857 GPs, 15 BPs and 3 ZPs
Sikkim has become first Nirmal State of the country
State-wise details are at Annexure-IX.

3.9 Activities of the NBA in North Eastern States


Performance in North Eastern region
Under Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan(NBA), provision of
toilets has been made for rural population in all parts
of the Country. However, adequate priority is given for
construction of Individual household latrines in North
Eastern States. Under NBA, additional provision of Rs
500 from central share has been made for IHHLs built
in NE States, in view of the hilly and difficult terrain in
these States.
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For the year 2013-14, Rs. 426 crore (10% of total allocation of Rs. 4260 crore) is reserved for NE States.
The financial and physical progress during 2013-14 (December, 2013) in North Eastern region is as given
below:

Financial
(a) Cumulative Funds released to NE States : As against the project objectives, an amount of Rs.
971.40 crore have been released to the NE States upto December 2013, under the TSC/NBA.
(b) Funds Released during 2012-13 and 2013-14 (till Dec. 2013)
The funds released to the States in 2012-23 1nd 2013-14 is as below:
(Rs. in lakhs)
S.N.

Name of State

2012-13

ARUNACHAL PRADESH

ASSAM

2013-14 (till Dec. 2013)


986.92

0.00

11943.31

2571.26

MANIPUR

3509.18

0.00

MEGHALAYA

2540.01

5151.82

MIZORAM

497.48

402.94

NAGALAND

2302.68

0.00

SIKKIM

159.47

825.06

TRIPURA

430.47

1401.41

22369.52

10352.49

Total

(a) Cumulative Physical progress in NE States


S.N.

State Name

ARUNACHAL
PRADESH

ASSAM

IHHL
(BPL)

IHHL
(APL)

IHHL
Total

Sanitary
Comp

School
Toilets

Anganwadi
Toilets

82112

16573

98685

178

3918

1896

1754173

525021

2279194

63

34202

11125

MANIPUR

144560

54337

198897

320

3919

1201

MEGHALAYA

171813

68730

240543

205

10218

1843

MIZORAM

84079

18778

102857

566

3806

1395

NAGALAND

142717

27255

169972

232

2693

1263

SIKKIM

61493

36550

98043

1105

1772

516

TRIPURA

455057

159365

614422

293

6650

7527

2896004

906609

3802613

2962

67178

26766

Total

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(b) Physical Progress : 2012-13


S.N.

State Name

ARUNACHAL
PRADESH

ASSAM

IHHL
(BPL)

IHHL
(APL)

IHHL
Total

Sanitary
Comp

School
Toilets

Anganwadi
Toilets

4775

985

5760

35

177008

96232

273240

11

77

76

MANIPUR

32208

11709

43917

11

53

MEGHALAYA

11955

2451

14406

36

1603

130

MIZORAM

4655

312

4967

12

106

219

NAGALAND

18630

3519

22149

28

20

SIKKIM

TRIPURA

4569

2466

7035

412

253800

117674

371474

112

2226

508

School
Toilets

Anganwadi
Toilets

Total

(c) Physical Progress : 2013-14 (Upto December 2013 in Numbers)


S.N.

State Name

ARUNACHAL
PRADESH

IHHL
(BPL)

IHHL
(APL)

IHHL Total

Sanitary
Comp

7924

497

8421

26

30

110

ASSAM

71066

17991

89057

436

113

MANIPUR

15685

8684

24369

12

MEGHALAYA

7166

773

7939

635

103

MIZORAM

3529

584

4113

13

481

28

NAGALAND

19868

19868

12

508

258

SIKKIM

3389

54

3443

192

166

100

TRIPURA

4985

43

5028

44

65

871

133612

28626

162238

305

2321

1583

Total

3.10 Scheduled Caste Sub-Plan (SCSP) and Tribal Sub Plan (TSP)
Provision for SCs and STs
The goal of Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan (NBA) is to achieve universal sanitation coverage in the entire
rural India by the year 2022. This includes provision of toilets for entire rural population. It is however,
reiterated that provisioning of sanitation facilities for Schedule Castes/Schedule Tribes is an important
priority of the NBA. Thus adequate priority is given for constru ction of Individual household latrines
for SCs/STs. Due attention is also given to agglomerations inhabited by SCs/STs neglected in any region.
Due attention is also given for demand generation for construction of community toilets so that SCs/
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STs are able to get necessary benefits. Under the revised guidelines of NBA, provision of incentives has
been widened including APLs belonging to SC and ST categories w.e.1.4.2012.
Since 2011, under the NBA, 22% of total allocation is earmarked for Schedule Caste Sub Plan(SCSP)
and 10% of total allocation for Tribal Sub Plan(TSP). In the year 2012-13, Rs. 550 crore was earmarked
for SCSP, while Rs. 250 crore for TSP.
For the year 2013-14, Rs. 937.20 crore (22% of total allocation of Rs. 4260 crore) is earmarked for SCs
and Rs. 426 crore (10% of total allocation of Rs.4260 crore) is earmarked for STs. Out of this, under
SCSP Rs.343.99 crore have already been released to States, while Rs.113.63 crore have already been
released to States under TSP upto December, 2013.
The progress achieved under NBA for SCs/STs is also being monitored through the online monitoring
system. Upto December, 2013, out of the total of 510.36 lakh Individual Household Latrines constructed
by BPL households, 118.30 lakh (23.18%) IHHLs are from SCs families and 64.50 lakh (12.64%) IHHLs
are from STs families. State-wise details are at Annexure-X.
The annual physical progress under TSC/NBA in 2012-13 and 2013-14 (Upto Dec. 2013) in construction
of Individual Household Latrine for SC/ST is as below:
Year

IHHL-SC

IHHL-ST

2012-13

8,87,831

4,44,075

2013-14 (Upto Dec. 2013)

4,81,795

2,77,989

3.11 Information, Education and Communication (IEC)


Information, Education and Communication (IEC) is an extremely important component of Rural
Sanitation programme that lays the basis for successful implementation of the programme. It serves as a
platform for informing, educating and persuading people to realize their roles, responsibilities and benefits
accruing from investing in right sanitation practices. IEC plays a very critical role in bringing behavioral
change on various aspects of safe sanitation, creating effective demand, usage and links to health and
hygiene. The role of IEC in demand generation for sanitary facilities is well recognized. The Sanitation
programme for its success and sustainability requires empowered, well aware and skilled stakeholders
capable of planning, implementation, operation, maintenance and management of sanitation schemes.
Conventional IEC approaches like posters, pamphlets, wall writing, etc. may be undertaken but they have
limited appeal and impact. The best way to create impact has been to follow a holistic approach that
empowers communities through participatory methodologies, which trigger the minds of the community
members to take informed decisions regarding their sanitation status. The communication at community
level can be supplemented by a mass media Behavior Change Communication (BCC) initiative, which
focuses on changing social and cultural norms regarding open defecation and maintaining a clean
environment, which will not only change behaviors, but most importantly, support sustainability of the
behavioral change.
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Therefore Ministry has come up with a Sanitation


Hygiene and Communication Strategy (SHACS)
in order to provide a broad framework to the
States for the implementation of IEC activities
to increase awareness among rural people,
generation of demand for sanitation facilities
and creation of clean environment. 15% of each
district project outlay including 2% for capacity
building can be utilized for IEC activities aimed
at generating effective demand and spreading
hygiene education. The focus of SHACS on Inter
Personal Communication (IPC) on which 60%
of the IEC is proposed to be spent.
Most of the States have prepared State wise and Districtwise IEC Action Plans based on the above
principles.
The Advocacy and Communication Strategy focuses on four critical sanitation and hygiene behaviours:
1. Building and use of toilets.
2. The safe disposal of child faeces.
3. Handwashing with soap after defecation, before food and after handling child faeces.
4. Safe storage and handling of drinking water
The IEC Campaign across the Country focus on these behaviors in addition to which individual
States can decide on additional messages.

Swachchhata Doot
From 2012, the Ministry is focussing on creating an army of field motivators working on sanitation at
the village level. The engagement of motivators at the village level is for demand creation and taking up
behaviour change communication. They are to address all sections of rural population to bring about
the relevant behavioural changes for improved sanitation and hygiene practices and meet their sanitary
hardware requirements in an affordable and accessible manner. The motivator can be provided with
suitable incentive from the funds earmarked for IEC.
The motivator will work on Interpersonal Communication through door to door contacts which are
recognized as the most significant tools for attaining the programme goals. The Ministry has issued
guidelines for the engagement of village level motivators (Swachchhata Doot / Sanitation Messengers) in
order to strengthen communication machinery at the village level with participatory social mobilization
in accordance with the guidelines issued by MDWS.
A Swacchata Doot should be a resident of the GP in which he is being engaged, have access to toilet,
and should not be practicing open defecation and should possess a good command over local language/
dialect. In addition, the individual should have good communication skills, should hold a good reputation
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in the GP, should be apolitical and should possess leadership qualities and community mobilization skills.
The Swachchhata Doot may be engaged by the DWSM in all the Gram Panchayats on the terms and
conditions specified in the guidelines. He should also be projected to be the key representative for
sanitation in the GP for every beneficiary and their voice for reaching to relevant officials. Adequate
training and skills should be provided to the Swachchhata Doots, including induction trainings and
orientation programmes by SWSM/DWSM.
The position of Swachchhata Doot is normally an honorary position with high visibility with motive of
social service than a post of profit. Provision of awards for exemplary work done by the Swachchhata
Doot will be made at District and State level to be distributed on special occasions like Republic Day,
Independence Day, Gandhi Jayanti, International/National/State Sanitation Day, or during sanitation,
health and education related special events. The states may also introduce suitable awards with citation
for Swachchhata Doots for making a village open defecation free, on being awarded NGP.
Monitoring of the performance of Swachchhata Doot should be incorporated in the system of programme
monitoring in respect of GPs as per suggested common developed criteria mentioned in the guidelines
used by the Ministry. 55,571 Swachchata Doots are currently engaged across the country spreading the
message of sanitation.

3.12 Convergence of NBA with other Schemes


Under NBA it has now envisaged that the
sanitation programme would be implemented
in a campaign approach to cover the entire
community for saturated outcomes with a view
to create Nirmal Grams. This new approach
recognizes that provision of sanitation facilities
has multifaceted dimensions ranging from
creating sanitation infrastructure with a variety
of technology options to software activities like
motivating communities for demand generation
for toilets through intensive IEC and capacity
building programmes.
Convergence and coordination between the
various schemes being implemented by various Ministries and the active involvement by field level
functionaries like PRI members, ASHA, Anganwadi Workers (AWWs), Village Water and Sanitation
Committees (VWSCs), Teachers, Swachata Doots in promoting sanitation issues and practices is
essential for its success. As major initiative for convergence of NBA with MGNREGA implemented by
Department of Rural Development has been taken up. Though this had initially resulted in the slowing
of the programme, it is expected that with time as coordination mechanisms are set up across States,
the overall impact on the sanitation problem will be positive.
Inter-sectoral convergence amongst various schemes is currently underway.
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63

Some of the schemes where convergence has been initiated are:


3.12.1 Integrated Child Development Scheme (ICDS) of Ministry of Women and Child Development
Considering the close linkages between provision of safe drinking water, good sanitation and child
health, the Ministry of Women and Child Development and Ministry of Drinking Water and
Sanitation are making efforts at the Central and State level for greater inter-sectoral convergence
of the programmes of MW&CD and MDWS.
To ensure that all Anganwadis in Government buildings in the rural areas are provided with baby
friendly toilet facilities, the Ministry has enhanced the financial assistance for toilets to Rs. 8,000
(Rs. 10,000 in case of hilly and difficult areas). The NBA programme focuses on making available
toilet facilities in Anganwadis across the Country. Anganwadi Worker being a member of Village
Water Sanitation and Health Committee has an important role to play in health and sanitation
awareness generation. Anganwadi workers should be involved in promoting health and hygiene
education programmes like safe disposal of child faeces, proper washing of hands and other related
behavioural change in AWCs.
Recently under the NBA guidelines, instructions have been issued for incentivizing AWW (Anganwadi
Worker) and Anganwadi Helper (AWH) from IEC funds earmarked under NBA for their role in
motivating village communities to construct and use toilets. AWW training guidelines now define
their roles and responsibilities with respect to sanitation promotion. To address the problem of
malnutrition caused by poor sanitation toilet provision in 200 high focused malnutrition Districts
has been prioritized in NBA.
The campaign of the MoWCD on improving the Child Sex Ratio(CSR) is also supported by this
Ministry by engaging the Swachchata Doots to convey messages regarding the need to improve the
CSR.
3.12.2 Areas of Convergence with Ministry of Rural Development (MRD)
MDWS has undertaken convergence initiatives with schemes of Mahatma Gandhi Rural Employment
Guaruntee Scheme (MGNREGS) and the Indira Awas Yojana (IAY) implemented by the Ministry
of Rural Development.
Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS) :
The components of NBA include construction of toilet units for individual households, Schools and
Anganwadis, and Solid and Liquid Waste Management in convergence with the Mahatma Gandhi
National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS), wherever feasible. These construction works
require engagement of unskilled labour for their earthwork component. To give an impetus to the NBA,
particularly in augmenting incentive funds for the aforesaid components, convergence has been initiated
with the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme (MGNREGS) implemented
by Ministry of Rural Development.
Accordingly the MGNREGS guidelines were amended to include works relating to sanitation facilities
in MGNREGS schedule of works. (New Gazette No. 18761 dated 30th September, 2011 giving detailed
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ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

guidelines) which was further amended vide notifications J- 11017/41/2011 dated 07/06/2012, 11-9-2012
and J-11017/41/2013-MGNREGA(UN) dated 6-1-2014.
The basic tenets of the convergence are as under:
a) In addition to the Incentive Grant to the beneficiaries for construction of Individual Household
Latrine (IHHL) under NBA, i.e. Rs.3200/- (Rs. 3700/- for hilly and difficult areas) as Central
share, Rs. 1400/- as State share (with freedom to enhance the share), and Rs. 900/- as beneficiary
share, a financial assistance of maximum up to Rs 4500/- per IHHL (now revised to Rs 5400/)
has been made available from MGNREGS, to take the total unit cost to Rs. 10,000/- for
construction and usage of IHHL.
b) The assistance under MGNREGS can be extended only to those households that are in possession
of the MGNREGS job card. In the case of others, if they are eligible under NBA, they have to
apply and obta in a job card in order to avail the benefits of MGNREGS and NBA converged
toilet facilities.
c) Incentive from MGNREGS may also be utilized for construction of Anganwadi toilet units,
School Toilet Units and SLWM as Institutional Projects. The work will be completed as per
prevailing Schedule of Rates.
d) A Mate may be deployed for every 15-25 IHHLs depending upon its geographical spread in a
gram panchayat at one time, in addition to institutional toilets falling in the area.

Best Practice 2.
Effective TSC/NBA implementation through Self Help Groups : A mission mode approach in
Medak district by utilizing SHGs acknowledged as a model for Andhra Pradesh
Under the Total Sanitation Campaign (TSC), 99 villages of Medak district of Andhra Pradesh achieved
Open Defecation Free (ODF) status and bagged Nirmal Gram Puraskars (NGPs) till 2011. The district
administration reached out to the community with the slogan Intinta Paarishudhyam (sanitation in
every household). A mammoth program of constructing one lakh toilets in 100 days in the identified
502 villages was launched to achieve 100 percent toilet construction and usage in all 1,059 villages in
a phased manner. The district administration developed a strategy to reach out to the communities
with various communication activities, and mission mode interventions in collaboration with
UNICEF. Factors that led to the success of the program included minimizing the role of departmental
officers/engineers, making Self Help Group (SHG) women the prime stakeholders, and reducing the
intermediary bottlenecks.
Process of Implementation - A core team was constituted at the district level to lead the sanitation
campaign under the leadership of the District Collector. Senior officers were made special officers
for each constituency (four to five Mandals) relocated to constituency level. One district officer was
in charge of each of the 46 Mandals and 502 adoption officers were engaged, one for every village;
1,285 focal persons (one per 100 toilets) were deployed for all 502 villages.
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65

Weekly Monitoring - The District Collector held a wireless set conference every Monday on the
progress of toilet construction. Weekly reports were collected every Friday by the District Water and
Sanitation Committee (DWSC) and wireless set conferences were held by the Superintending Engineer,
Rural Water Supply and Sanitation (RWSS), on every Saturday based on the reports collected and
consolidated on the previous day. The adoption officer/focal persons reported daily on progress to
the special officers. Mandal-level weekly review meetings, constituency-level monthly review meetings,
and district- level convergence meetings are organized regularly.
Fund Flow- An important lesson learnt was that the government incentive was not reaching
beneciaries on time. A new administrative and nancial system was put in place for the selection
of beneciaries, sanctions, construction of Individual Sanitary Latrine (ISL), documentation, and
payment to the beneciaries through SHG women. The State Water and Sanitation Mission (SWSM)
released funds to DWSC. A joint account was opened by the Mandal Mahila Samakya (MMS) and
Mandal Parishad Development Ofcer (MPDO). Funds were transferred from DWSC to the joint
account as advance. MMS opened a Rural Sanitary Mart (RSM) and placed indents for material
kit supply to the beneciaries. MPDO released funds to the RSM at the rate of Rs.1, 247 and the
balance to the Village Organisation (VO) at the rate of Rs. 1, 953 per kit. The VO received the
subsidy and disbursed it to the beneciaries after conrming the construction of the toilets. The VO
extended loans of Rs. 2,000 to 2,500 to the needy beneciaries to reduce their nancial burden.
Incentive under MGNREGS and TSC/NBA - Every beneficiary got an amount of Rs. 4,500 as
incentive from the government. Of this, Rs. 3,200 from TSC was paid to the beneficiary through
SHGs, and Rs. 1,300 from the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme
(MGNREGS) was paid directly to the beneficiary. Now, according to the revised guidelines of Nirmal
Bharat Abhiyan (NBA), the government incentive has been increased to Rs. 10,000, including the
beneficiary contribution of Rs. 900, of which an amount of Rs. 4,500 was paid from MGNREGS
and the remaining Rs. 4,600 paid from NBA.
Incentive for Motivation - To motivate and encourage village-level stakeholders, an amount of Rs. 50
was given per ISL to the VO, Rs. 25 per ISL to the Mandal Coordinator of the RWSS Department,
and Rs. 25 per ISL to the focal person.
Delivery of Toilet Material - With the governments incentive amount of Rs. 3,200, the district
administration initiated a plan to provide the material kit (water closet, asbestos sheet, a standard
door, and a P-trap) at a cost of Rs. 1,247 at the doorstep of the beneficiaries, through RSMs run by
MMSs. The beneficiary, thus, got standardized material at reasonable rates. The logistical problems
of procuring the material and transportation charges were reduced. However, beneficiaries had the
option of purchasing materials of their choice.
Behavior Change Communication (BCC) and Information, Education, and Communication (IEC)The district administration developed a District Communication Plan and carried out Sanitation
Mapping for all the targeted villages. IEC material was developed with the support of UNICEF.
BCC activities such as Community-Led Total Sanitation (CLTS) training for SHGs, capacity building
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to the Mandal Resource Coordinators, district officers, Mandal-level functionaries, and communitybased organizations (CBOs) were organized to promote sanitation in an effective way.
Achievements During Intinta Paarishudhyam At the end of 100 days, work on constructing 88,101 toilets began, of which 53,510 were
completed.
VO loan linkages for 3,616 members on an average of Rs. 2,500 were sanctioned for a total
of Rs. 90,32,500.
As villages became ODF, a total of 215 villages were proposed for NGP 2011-12.

3.12.3 Indira Awas Yojana (IAY)


NBA is also being converged with the Indira Awas Yojana (IAY) scheme implemented by MRD which
aims at provision of housing for the poor. Under NBA, all houses constructed by the beneficiaries
under IAY or any other State rural housing scheme which do not have toilets shall also be eligible for
the incentive for creation of sanitation facilities for targeted groups under NBA. To ensure that all IAY
houses are provided with sanitation facilities and for dovetailing of funds under NBA/TSC with IAY for
construction of toilets, a Joint letter under the signature of Joint Secretaries from both Ministries was
issued to all State Secretaries incharge of sanitation to strengthen the convergence of IAY with NBA as
under:
All houses constructed by the beneficiaries under Indira Awas Yojana(IAY) or any other State rural
housing scheme which did not have toilets shall also be eligible for the incentive for creation of
sanitation facilities for targeted groups under NBA. Implementing agency for IAY in the District
will provide the list of identified IAY houses to be constructed during the year so that it could
be taken as NBA target of the District in Annual Implementation Plan(AIP)
The District Implementing Agency of NBA shall transfer the funds in respect of targeted IAY
houses during the year after receipt of request from IAY Implementing Agency in two installments,
the first installment being 50% of the required funds as per the target approved for toilets in IAY
houses. The second installment will however, be released on utilization of 60% of the available
funds with the IAY implementing agencies and on submission of required UCs/ASAs as per
NBA guidelines
Joint IEC so as to have effective demand generation.
On line monitoring of toilet facility available in houses constructed under IAY.
3.12.4 Convergence with NRDWP
It is clear that availability of water is required to keep the toilets clean and usable. Provisioning of
assured and sustainable water supply not only facilitates toilet construction and usage, but also
goes a long way in incentivising and motivating people to adopt good sanitation practices including
hand washing before and after meals, post defecation, as also maintaining cleanliness and proper
hygiene within and outside houses.
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67

Thus, availability of enough water for


sanitation purposes needs to be taken into
account on priority. A conjoint approach
to water and sanitation are being adopted
through convergence with the National Rural
Drinking Water Programme (NRDWP) and
the NBA. Gram Panchayats having adequate
water availability are to be prioritized for
creation of sanitation infrastructure while
those with higher toilet coverage are to
be taken up for provision of water supply
(specially piped water supply) under the
scheme National Rural Drinking Water
Programme.
Under the NBA, there are specific instructions that no sanitary structures are to be built near drinking
water sources. Further water supply to Schools, Anganwadis and Community Sanitary Complexes
are to be set-up under the NRDWP programme component.
3.12.5 Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment to address Manual Scavenging
With the promulgation of the Employment of Manual Scavengers and Construction of Dry latrines
(Prohibition) Act, 1993, the construction and maintenance of dry latrines and employing someone
as a manual scavenger has been prohibited. The Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment is a
nodal Ministry monitoring the implementation of the Act. The Census 2011 has reported existence
of 12.76 lakh insanitary latrines in the country, out of which 5.86 lakh dry latrines reportedly cleaned
manually in the rural areas of the country.
As per revised NBA guidelines any existing bucket latrines, if any, has to be converted to sanitary
latrines. The incentive available to the beneficiary for this is identical to that of the construction of
individual house hold latrines. States have been requested to take steps for conversion of existing
bucket or dry latrines into sanitary latrines on a priority basis in all the villages where insanitary
latrines exist and manual scavenging has been reported in Census 2011.
States have carried out a survey on this and they have reported conversion of 84,986 insanitary
latrines to sanitary latrines upto 31.12.2013.

3.13 Monitoring and Evaluation (M & E) under NBA


To strengthen the monitoring mechanism of the programme, an online monitoring system exists whereby
State Governments have to report the physical and financial progress in the implementation of the NBA
online on a monthly basis panchayat wise. The system of on-line data entry has is in place and State
officials are responsible for online data entry.
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Comprehensive web-based online monitoring systems for NBA and NGP separately are now in place
with GP level data on targets and achievements. The data is being updated at district level and state
level. The system has been upgraded with a facility to upload the names and card number for BPL
beneficiaries and identified APL beneficiaries for authentication of data. The system now also captures
the number of APL households who belong to SCs, STs, small and marginal farmers, landless laborers
with homesteads, physically challenged and women headed households along-with all BPL households
covered with sanitation facilities.
Further to keep pace with the modern IT tools, provision is now available to send automatic reminders
on identified dates to State Secretaries and NBA Coordinators of each district to report physical and
financial progress by the due dates. Provision has also been made to issue SMSs to field functionaries
and State Secretaries on group messages to be sent through online monitoring system.
The Ministry is in the process of bringing in further innovations in the MIS with new and practical
reports which shall be of use for better management of the programme.

Snapshot of Online Monitoring System

Periodic review meetings are conducted to review the physical and financial progress in the implementation
of the NBA in all the States. Besides review meetings, regular video conferencing also organized to review
progress of NBA and suggest corrective measures wherever required to achieve physical and financial
objectives.

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Field visits are also made by the officers of the Ministry to see the implementation of Sanitation
programme. Third party evaluation studies are also carried out for real impact assessment.
Special reports on progress of the programme on Left Wing Extremist districts, minority concentrated
districts; SC/ST dominated districts are available. GIS based reports are available for Country, State,
District and Panchayat level.
The States have been advised to adopt a five-pronged strategy to promote transparency consisting of
i) creation of awareness about the schemes,
ii) transparency,
iii) peoples participation,
iv) accountability/social audit
v) strict vigilance and monitoring at all levels.
These measures are to help in maximum utilization of funds under the rural development schemes.

3.14

Human Resource Development (HRD)

The current institutional arrangements under NBA demonstrate a holistic approach to sanitation service
delivery and involve all administrative levels of the implementation chain, from a policy decision making
body at the Central level to a programme delivery one at State level and the primary stakeholders- the
community at the village level.
At the policy level, the State Water and Sanitation
Mission and the District Water and Sanitation
Missions (DWSM) take broad decisions regarding
the policies (within the overall letter and spirit
of the NBA guidelines) and implementation
approaches to be adopted in the District related
to sanitation activities.
The Block Resource Centres (BRC) are the new
institutional set up at the block level to provide
continuous support in terms of awareness
generation, motivation, mobilisation, training
and handholding to Gram Sabhas and GPs.
They serve as an extended delivery arm in terms of software support from the districts and act as a link
between the District Water & Sanitation Mission and Gram Panchayats /Gram Sabhas.
The Village Water and Sanitation Committees (VWSC) have been set up at the lowest level as a grassroot level village Institutions mandated with the task of bringing about total sanitation, improving health
& hygiene, O & M and sanitation in their respective villages.
While the above are mainly implementation institutions, the Water and Sanitation Support Organizations
(WSSOs) have also been set up at the State level to provide capacity building support to various levels for
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the implementation of the programme. The Communication and Capacity Development Unit (CCDU)
which shall function under Water and Sanitation Support Organization shall develop communication
campaigns for the State, and Districts focusing on critical messages to change the behaviour of
communities.
At the national level, with a view to undertake continuous professional development of project
implementers and to equip them to handle various issues and emerging challenges in the sector such as
sustainability of sanitation facilities and its use, developing sustainable technology options in sanitation
etc., the Ministry has created a National Resource Centre (NRC). This Centre engages Consultants to
provide technical expertise in the area of sanitation as a support to the Ministry.
The Ministry also has identified several organizations of high repute with expertise in imparting training
on sanitation as Key Resource Centres (KRCs) to build capacities of different stakeholders at various levels.
With a view to bring about inter-sectoral convergence and coordination between Ministries/Department
at the Centre and the States and to get inputs from persons with recognized expertise in the drinking
water and sanitation sector, a High Level Inter Ministerial Committee namely National Drinking Water
& Sanitation Council (NDWSC) has also been set up in Ministry.

Best Practice 3.
ODF Status Achieved in
Mandi Gram Panchayats
Villagers work towards improving the environment
Bungrail Chouk, the village known as the Switzerland of Himachal Pradesh, is about 85 km from
Mandi, the district HQ of Mandi district and situated at a height of around 6,500 ft. Even during
the hot summer months, the lush green environment of the village helps to cool visitors. The village
is an ODF village and has received the NGP award as well. Sustainability in sanitation and drinking
water has been achieved through effective IEC by the Rural Development Department.
The IEC fund was utilized for achieving sustainable sanitation by the engagement of an NGO to
generate awareness and also bring about behavioral change.
Under the chairmanship of the District Magistrate, all departments were involved in mobilizing the
community in a participatory manner for collectively making the GP Open Defecation Free. The most
significant aspect of the strategy was that no message regarding any incentive money was ever discussed,
so that along with BPL, all APL families could be simultaneously motivated. The cohesive spirit imbibed
among the villagers created magic. Every household of the GP joined hands in collecting materials such
as stone and sand, helping dig pits, laying stones to wall the pits, and constructing superstructures. With
door-to-door campaigns, meetings, group discussions, street theater, wall paintings, and so on, every
household felt the need for toilets and understood the health impact of open-defecation and social
issues pertaining to the dignity of women and comfort of the aged. With the endeavor of the entire
community, every household constructed toilets and thus the age old practice of open defecation was
eradicated. The villagers were not aware about the incentive permissible under TSC and the amount.
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Even after achieving ODF, no incentive was paid to individual entitled beneficiaries. The GP applied
for NGP and in the third attempt the GP was recognized and awarded the NGP. It was only after
getting the recognition of the NGP award, the entitled BPL families were paid an incentive. The GP
also received a State award for ODF status before the NGP award was issued.
As far as drinking water is concerned, a multi-village water supply scheme has been introduced by
the Irrigation Department, which handles the drinking water supply in HP. The households have the
advantage of piped water supply at the household level.
The village is an ideal example to exhibit how effective convergence of schemes of various departments
can usher in sustainable prosperity. By utilizing the MGNREGS fund, four ponds have been dug for
meeting the need for domestic water supply. Under the National Horticulture Mission (NHM), drip
irrigation system, vermin compost, protective net for apple plants,and so on, have been facilitated.

3.15

Research and Development (R &D)

To further Research & Development in the field of Sanitation, 100% funding to research organizations
including NGOs is given by the Central Government. A Research Advisory Committee under the
Chairpersonship of Secretary (DWS) has been constituted primarily to promote research and development
activities for the Sanitation.
The major areas for Research & Development in sanitation include:
Technology related, which is sanitation technologies particularly in the product/design, evacuation,
decomposition and maintenance and construction with regard to leach pit technology or any
improvement in existing installed septic tank technology, solid and liquid waste management,
Eco San etc.
Program related: Innovations in planning, communication, monitoring, financing sanitation
program to ensure faster and sustainable implementation of the sanitation program.
Studies, which include impact assessment studies, initiation of impact studies of sanitation,
studies on MHM, including technologies like incinerators,
Design & implementation of environment friendly self-sustaining sanitation system this may
include design of improved leach pits, other technical options for Individual Household Latrine
(IHHL), hygienic rural toilets, ecological sanitation etc.,
Improved / Economical toilet design for children, differently able persons, emergency situations
with suggested cost implications
Improved/ Economical community/Institutional sanitation system including waste management.
Effectiveness of models of sanitation in various hydro-geological and geo-physical conditions,
like water table, rocky, flood prone, water scarce and extreme low temperature areas.
Methods of bringing about behavioural changes and information and dissemination of sustainable
sanitation technologies.
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Zero discharge/waste management system involving communities.


Sustainable technology and methodology for the management of liquid wastes in rural villages.
Sustainable technologies having potential of resource recovery and safe reuse of wastes and
employment avenues for the community will be preferred.
Establishing linkages with water, health, nutrition, agriculture, bio-gas generation and movement
of bacteria and other pollutants in soil through pit toilets.
To strengthen the R&D facilities in the concerned Departments in various States, State Governments
are encouraged to establish R&D cells with adequate manpower and infrastructure. R&D Cells are
required to remain in touch with premier Technical Institutions within the State. The network of
Technical Institutions may follow the guidelines issued by the Ministry from time to time for effective
implementation of the rural sanitation programme. R&D Cells are also required to be in constant
touch with the Monitoring & Investigation divisions and the Monitoring & Evaluation Study Reports
for initiating appropriate follow up action.
The list of recently completed and on-going R&D projects on Sanitation under the NBA are as under :
Sl.
No..

Name of the Project

Name of the P.I. and address

Complete/ ongoing

Field testing and design development Mr. Abdul Hameed, Integrated C o m p l e t e d


of lever operated pan for improved Rural Technology Centre, Kerala. November 2013
dry compost latrines for water logged
areas

Management of solid wastes Prof. Satyawati Sharma, Centre Completed


(kitchen wastes) by employing for Rural Development, IIT 19.9.2013
rapid composting technique
Delhi

Techno-economic adaptability of Mr. S. Suburaman,


ecological sanitation
Trichy, Tamil Nadu

SCOPE , Completed
2013

4.

D e v e l o p m e n t o f e f f e c t i v e Dr. A.A. Kazmi , Department of Complete final


decentralized sewage treatment Civil Engineering , IIT Roorkee r e p o r t n o t
system for rural communities.
submitted

5.

Design and Development of Prof. K. Munshi, Industrial On going


Hygienic Toilet for Rural India. Design Centre, IIT Mumbai

6.

Pote n t i a l o f a e ro b i c d i g e st i o n Dr. Ajay Kalmkhad, Department of Ongoing


(composting) and anaerobic digestion Civil Engineering, IIT, Guwahati
of kitchen wastes

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Best Practice 4
Eco-friendly solution to Human Waste Management: DRDO develops and installs bio-toilets
The Directorate of Life Sciences, Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO), has
developed an eco-friendly solution to human waste management. DRDOs bio-toilet technology
consists of growing an anaerobic microbial consortium by acclimatization/enrichment of microbes
at low temperatures and bio-augmentation with a critical group of bacteria. The PVC-based
immobilization matrix provides a larger quantity of bacteria andresists wash out of bacteria and adverse
situations. The bio-digester is a fermentation container made of steel/SS/FRP/bricks.Features of the
bio-digester include:

FRP tank of minimum thickness of 8 millimeter (mm).

FRP diagonal self-constrained separating wall with thickness of 8 mm (adequately stiffened by


ribs).

The tank is buried 600 mm deep, and anchored by 300 mm-long stainless (SS316) anchor
bolts at its corners.

There are also provisions for water-sealed outlet from the tank.

The steps in anaerobic digestion


consist of the conversion of large
polymers into simpler monomers,
which, in turn, are converted into
volatile fatty acid; volatile fatty acids
are then converted into acetic acid,
CH4 and CO2. In the last stage,
acetate and H2 are converted into
CH4 and CO2. DRDO reports
that no aeration is required in the
anaerobic biodegradation; complete
anaerobic conditions prevail with
more than 99 percent pathogen
inactivation. Anaerobes can even
degrade detergents/phenyl, sludge
generation Is slow, one-time bacterial
inoculation is adequate, and there is
minimal maintenance cost and no
recurring cost. DRDO had installed
about 21 bio-digester toilets in
Lakshadweep on pilot bases and
12,000 more are currently being
installed.

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Best practice 5
Dealing with Emergencies : Portable toilets have helped provide sanitation facilities to disaster affected
people in Assam
Since sanitation and hygiene are important for the health and safety of thousands of affected families
sheltered in camps, the provision of safe drinking water and sanitation facilities assumes significance.
Floods are a recurring problem in States such as Assam and Bihar, owing to the overflowing of the
Brahmaputra, the Koshi, and other rivers. It is the usual practice families from rural areas to riverbanks
or schools. Since sanitation and hygiene are important for the health and safety of hundredsand
thousands of affected families sheltered in camps, the provision of safe drinking water and sanitation
facilities assumes significance. During the recent flooding of the Brahmaputra in upper Assam,
OXFAM, a non-governmental organisation (NGO), introduced portable toilets made entirely of
synthetic material. These toilets have a wall on three sides, a curtain, a platform with two footrests,
and pipes emerging from the pan to an underground pit, with a bamboo platform covered with soil.
Each toilet costs Rs.7,000 to Rs. 8,000. After use and normalization of the situation, the toilets
are removed, cleaned with disinfectants, and stored for future use. After dismantling the toilets and
pipes, the pits are covered and left undisturbed for decomposition. Similarly, during recent social
unrest in the districts of Kokrajhar,
Dhubri, and Bongaigaon in Assam,
a large number of affected people
left home and took refuge in schools
or temporary shelters. The Public
Health and Engineering Department
(PHED), Assam, arranged for hand
pumps to ensure safe drinking
water and installed portable plastic
platforms with plastic pans.
The plastic toilets are approximately
4x4 feet and are placed on pits and
covered by a temporary superstructure
made of plastic wrapped around
four bamboo poles. After use and
dismantling, the pits are covered
with soil. These innovations require
further research and development
to be institutionalized as standard
practices in case of emergencies.

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3.16 Representing India in the International Fora


5th South Asian Conference on Sanitation (SACOSAN-V)
The 5th South Asian Conference on Sanitation (SACOSAN-V) was organised from 22nd to 24th
October, 2013 at Kathmandu, Nepal. This conference was a platform for the Governments, practitioners,
professional agencies and Civil Societies to engage in constructive dialogue for collective effort to foster
regional collaboration in pursuit of meeting the sanitation challenges in the region.
The conference was attended by Honble MoS(I/C), Secretary(DWS), Joint Secretary(Sanitation),
Director(NBA), Director(Fin) and other Govt. of India and State Officials. Shri Bharat Sinh Solanki,
Honble MoS(I/C) addressed the Conference on 24th October, 2013 in which he highlighted the
achievements of the Country in Sanitation and enumerated the challenges ahead. He also reiterated that
India is fully committed to concrete action to fulfill the goals of better sanitation.
Secretary (DWS) chaired a session Reaching the Un-reached. He pointed out that poor, marginalised,
vulnerable communities have very limited access to WASH services in South Asian Countries. In the
spirit of the UN General Assembly resolution, South Asian governments must facilitate sanitation services
that are accessible, affordable, appropriate, acceptable and safe.
A presentation was made by Ms. Pratima Gupta, Director on Reaching the Unreached; India Context.
She highlighted the provisions made by GoI for marginalised group under Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan(NBA).

The India Country presentation was made by Shri Saraswati Prasad, Joint Secretary (Sanitation). He
mentioned the key achievements made by India and issues related to Sanitation. The Joint Declaration
issued at the end of the Conference, signed by all member States highlighted the action to be taken to
achieve the targets of sanitation in the SAARC region in the coming years to move towards universal
sanitation coverage.
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The South Asian Conference on Sanitation (SACOSAN), a government-led biennial convention held
on a rotational basis in each SAARC member country, provides an interactive platform for improving
sanitation in South Asia. The first conference was held in Bangladesh in 2003, the second in Pakistan in
2006, the third in India in 2008 and the fourth in Sri Lanka in 2011. The fifth South Asian Conference
on Sanitation, SACOSAN-V was organized by the Government of Nepal, Ministry of Urban Development
with the theme Sanitation for All: All for Sanitation.
SACOSAN V brought together high level policy makers from every country in South Asia with
representatives of community leaders to discuss regional, national and local sanitation andhygiene actions,
set future actions and share ideas. Three hundred and fifty country delegates and fifty experts from
regional and global agencies participated in this conference.
To informally kick off the conference, a public opening was held at Bhaktapur which was also declared
an Open Defecation Free District on the same day. About 200 conference delegates attended the Public
Opening Ceremony.
Over a period of three days, the SACOSAN-V conference programme offered an impressive list of
presenters in various sessions. All countries presented on a different topic, based on a country paper
prepared and shared in advance. Eight technical focus sessions helped foster a regional perspective and
agenda on sanitation in South Asia.

The conference became a valuable, enriching and unique event and an excellent opportunity to meet and
socialize with colleagues from different parts of the globe. For the first time in the history of SACOSAN,
participants who could not be in the conference venue could participate through the virtual conference.
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77

Similarly, a separate session for grass root voices added value and eight people got a chance to express
their innovative ideas. Ministers and heads of delegates attended an informal meeting with experts and
expressed their views, in this way getting involved in the declaration process.
Delegates were also given the opportunity to attend field visits across three sites around Nepal. Thirty seven
delegates visited Kavre (Sarada Batase), twenty six visited Kavre (Nala) and thirty three visited Pokhara
where local people displayed great hospitality and showed their works. Country exhibiters, partners and
internal agencies, side event organizers and the media team also added much value to the conference.
The conference was completed successfully, aided greatly by the efforts of member countries and all
stakeholders. The conference concluded with a declaration signed by all the head ofdelegations with call
for ODF South Asia and sustainable sanitation. The next SACOSAN (VI) will be organized and hosted
by the Peoples Republic of Bangladesh in November 2015.
Visit of Indian delegation to the World Water Week at Stockholm, Sweden
The delegation from the Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation, Government of India, led by Shri
Pankaj Jain, Secretary, MDWS and consisting of Shri Sujoy Mojumdar, Director, MDWS, participated
in the World Water Week in Sweden from 1-9-2013 to 4-9-2013.
Shri Pankaj Jain Secretary, MDWS Govt. of India spoke at the Session on the subject Making Evidence
Count in WASH. The issue under discussion in the Seminar was the fact that the WASH Evidence
base is complex and offers few easy answers to the issue of What Actually works in the field.
Shri Pankaj Jain, Secretary, MDWS, Govt. of
India gave a detailed talk on The challenge of
Behavioral Change. He stressed on the need to
remember that water supply and sanitation are
parts of social sector. He said we cannot simply
use mathematical formulae to achieve something
in social sector like WASH and it requires
much more feedback results. When peoples
social behavior is involved which needs to be
changed, this requires delicate handling. Shri
Jain explained the historical social perspective
of a particular type of behavior in India. He
explained that changing mindsets with respect to sanitation practices required a specific focused approach
and would take time. Sh. Jain explained that the 2011 census has shown that only 32.7% of rural
households have individual household toilets and India was the country with the most open defecation
in the world. He stressed on the need for a lot of continuous advocacy and hand holding to convince
people to construct and use toilets and stop open defecation. Shri Jain gave examples of innovations in
hardware, software, soft skills and advocacy that have been successful in India like designing of low cost
latrines. Another example of successful research and transfer of technology in the sanitation sector was
where the design of the toilet pan has been modified in such way to decrease the amount of water needed
to flush the system. Further the development of the design of the p-trap in rural toilets in India has
made such toilets more acceptable and user friendly. He also spoke of the various efforts at addressing
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the problems of chemical contamination in ground water based drinking water supply schemes in India,
mainly arsenic and fluoride through treatment, and said that we have finally come to a stage where the
focus has now shifted to providing piped water supply from safe sources.
He spoke of the endeavor to learn from both
domestic and international best practices in
Water and Sanitation sectors to develop systems
that allow free flow of information from the
field to the policy maker. He spoke of important
Technological and Research Institutions in India,
like the Government run National Environmental
Engineering Research Institute (NEERI), which
is working on a wide range of issues on drinking
water quality, and the privately owned Sulabh
International, working on household and public
toilets, which are providing information useful
to Government and policy makers. Finally, Shri
Jain urged for close collaboration between researchers, policy makers and implementers so that the best
of knowledge can be leveraged for the betterment of the population.
The speech of Shri Jain, Secretary MDWS was reported in the World Water Week Daily Report, issued
on Monday, 2nd September, 2013.
The delegation met with representatives of multilateral institutions like WSP and UNICEF and various
stakeholders working on water and sanitation like the International Water Management Institute (IWMI)
and the Sanitation and Water For All (SWA).
Visit of Indian delegation to Spain
An Indian delegation led by Shri Pankaj Jain, Secretary, Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation,
(MDWS), Government of India, visited Spain on an official visit from 5-9-2013 to 6-9-2013. The
delegation met a Spanish Government Delegation headed by Mr. Federico Ramos de Armas, Director
General Secretary of State for Environment, Government of Spain.
During the meetings, Mr. Pankaj Jain, Secretary,
MDWS explained the officials from Spain in
detail, the status of drinking water supply and
sanitation in rural areas of India. He mentioned
that over 800 million people have access to
40 lpcd drinking water supply in rural India.
He stated that issues of drinking water quality
especially chemical contamination with arsenic,
fluoride and heavy metals still remain and there
was much to do to improve water quality in India
even in areas where over 40 lpcd is supplied. The
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present role of Private Sector in extending the rural infrastructure for drinking water supply in India was
also explained. It was informed that both the water sector is essentially funded from Govt. resources in
India and most of the schemes are implemented through Lump-sum Turn Key (LSK) contracts using the
Engineering, Procurement & Construction(EPC) gateway through private contractors after open tendering.
The D.G. (Secretary of State) of Spain explained
in detail the capacity that exists in Spain, with
regard to drinking water supply and sanitation
services. He informed that Spain has expertise
in de-salination technology. Spain like India
has a federal setup but drinking water supply
infrastructure is managed on the river basin
concept with River Basin Authorities with
authority over geographical areas covering more
than 1 regional government. He also stated that
advanced waste water treatment expertise was
also available from which India could gain as, as
per his information, India is still infant in this sector. Regarding, Sanitation he informed that household
sanitation was not a problem in Spain. However, large scale drainage systems were still not available in all
rural areas in the country. This was now one of the key focal points of activities of his department. He
also indicated that water quality monitoring, testing and control is highly advanced in Spain and suggested
that Secretary DWS should visit Barcelona where one of the best testing laboratories is located, which
could also help India in setting up its new International Centre of Drinking Water Quality at Kolkata.
The Indian Delegation made a field visit and studied the Viveros de la Villa WWTP (Wastewater
Treatment Plant and Reuse Facility in Madrid) Facility owned by Canal De Isabel II Gestion (integral
water Cycle Management Company, Region of Madrid.).

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ADMINISTRATION

ADMINISTRATION

4.1 Organisation
Shri Bharatsinh Solanki assumed charge as the Minister of State (I/C) of the Ministry of Drinking Water
& Sanitation on 29.10.2012 and continues to function as such.
Shri Pankaj Jain, IAS (JK: 78) took over the charge of the post of Secretary, Ministry of Drinking Water
& Sanitation w.e.f. 01.10.2012 and continues as such.
Shri T.M. Vijay Bhasker, IAS (KN: 83) continued in the charge of the post of Joint Secretary in the
Ministry of Drinking Water & Sanitation till 14.05.2013.
Shri Saraswati Prasad, IAS (AM: 85) Stook over the charge of the post of Joint Secretary in the Ministry
of Drinking Water & Sanitation w.e.f. 10.12.2012 and continues as such.
Shri Satyabrata Sahu, IAS (ODISHA-91) took over the charge of the post of Joint Secretary in the Ministry
of Drinking Water & Sanitation w.e.f. 20.05.2013 and continues as such.

4.2 O & M Activities


There is no separate O & M Unit formed in the Ministry of Drinking Water & Sanitation so far.
However, emphasis was laid on sound Records Management to ensure optimum utilization of scarce
space available and quick retrieval of information.

4.3 Vigilance and Grievances Redressal Machinery


The work of vigilance is being handled by Vigilance Cell. This cell is also entrusted with the work
relating to suspension cases, vigilance cases and disciplinary cases of officials in the Ministry.
Vigilance Cell also furnishes vigilance clearance and NOCs for passports etc., PARs and APARs, in respect
of staff members of the Ministry. Monitoring and maintenance of APARs, Annual Immovable Property
Returns are also entrusted to Vigilance Cell. APAR dossiers in respect of officials in the Ministry are
being regularly updated and kept in safe custody.
Petitions received through CPGRAMS programme, are being taken care of online. As per the CPGRAMS
portal of the Government of India, 385 grievances have been received out of which 275 have been
disposed of during the year 2013-2014 (up to 31.12.2013) indicating 71% disposal of the grievances
received under CPGRAMS.

4.4 Activities relating to Official Language Hindi


1. Official Language Implementation Committee (OLIC) was constituted in the year 2013 with
a view to accelerate the pace of use of official language Hindi in the Ministry. Joint Secretary

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(Admn.) is the chairman of this Committee. Two meetings were organized on 2nd July 2013 and
30th October 2013 under the Chairmanship of JS(Admn).

2. Parliamentary committee on Official Language inspected the Ministry on 13th January 2014 on
the basis of progress of implementation of official language Hindi in the Ministry. To overcome
the shortcomings observed during the course of the inspection, a meeting was held under the
chairmanship of JS(Admn.) wherein it was emphasized to take up effective and concrete steps
by all officers and staff of the Ministry.
3. Hindi fortnight was organized in the Ministry from 16th September 2013 to 30th September
2013 wherein Hindi competitions were held. Officers and subordinate staff participated in these
competitions enthusiastically. During the fortnight eight competitions Hindi noting, drafting,
script writing, Hindi essay, easy translation, dictation, Hindi typing, Hindi elocution, Hindi
quiz and Hindi poem recitation - were held. The winners of these competitions were given cash
prizes and certificates by Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation.

4.5 Public Procurement Policy


Under this Ministry at least 20% of the total annual procurement of goods and services are being
taken from the Micro and Small Enterprises (MSEs) and within this mandated percentage, sub-target
of 4% procurement is to be made from MSEs owned by SC/ST entrepreneurs is also being taken into
consideration.

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ANNEXURES

Annexure-I
Target and Achievement of habitations and rural Schools under National Rural Drinking Water
Programme during 2012-13
Target

Sl.

State/UT

No

Achievements

Partially

Quality

covered

Affected

Total

Partially

Quality

covered

affected

Total

No of Rural
Schools

Andhra Pradesh

5096

170

5266

5520

179

5699

5967

Bihar

8915

6100

15015

7165

3795

10960

3319

Chattisgarh

5973

4589

10562

7222

1889

9111

2906

Goa

Gujarat

795

225

1020

1627

229

1856

603

Haryana

940

10

950

889

895

103

Himachal Pradesh

2530

2530

2650

2650

245

Jammu and Kashmir

1042

25

1067

1130

23

1153

1779

Jharkhand

16157

389

16546

17046

289

17335

672

10

Karnataka

6027

2218

8245

11261

2023

13284

3134

11

Kerala

635

61

696

640

28

668

12

Madhya Pradesh

16150

835

16985

16534

949

17483

5124

13

Maharashtra

4980

774

5754

4058

579

4637

114

14

Orissa

6709

2407

9116

17347

2137

19484

2419

15

Punjab

1440

33

1473

611

617

14

16

Rajasthan

1069

1500

2569

2453

1490

3943

1719

17

Tamil Nadu

6396

64

6460

7130

73

7203

3102

18

Uttar Pradesh

23150

850

24000

23299

428

23727

19

Uttarakhand

1075

1075

981

983

291

20

West Bengal

846

1623

2469

3395

841

4236

1123

21

Arunachal Pradesh

292

292

358

358

796

22

Assam

3693

3537

7230

3775

3335

7110

1276

23

Manipur

250

250

197

197

291

24

Meghalaya

540

40

580

497

13

510

895

25

Mizoram

57

57

26

Nagaland

71

30

101

128

50

178

1360

27

Sikkim

270

270

101

101

15

28

Tripura

18

1034

1052

285

1038

1323

600

29

Andaman and Nicobar

30

Chandigarh

31

Dadra and Nagar Haveli

32

Daman and Diu

33

Delhi

34

Lakshadweep

35

Puducherry

23

30

115139

26521

141660

136304

19402

155706

37875

TOTAL

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

89

Annexure -II
Target and Achievement of habitations and rural Schools under NRDWP during 2013-14
Sl.
No.

Target
State / UT

Andhra Pradesh

Arunachal Pradesh

Partially

Quality

Covered

affected

Achievements
Total

Partially

Quality

Covered

affected

Number of
Total

Rural Schools

5581

217

5798

5615

326

5941

4815

285

19

304

129

133

351

Assam

4050

3125

7175

3666

1766

5432

675

Bihar

9000

4832

13832

6774

3481

10255

3286

Chhattisgarh

8100

2600

10700

10113

1603

11716

466

Goa

Gujarat

875

175

1050

3512

159

3671

322

Haryana

807

11

818

592

596

160

Himachal Pradesh

2500

2500

2578

2578

10

Jammu & Kashmir

948

955

653

653

1961

11

Jharkhand

12024

108

12132

12518

28

12546

536

12

Karnataka

7700

2678

10378

14730

1916

16646

5286

13

Kerala

774

150

924

321

35

356

14

M.P.

11300

1750

13050

12092

768

12860

6171

15

Maharashtra

4136

577

4713

3680

365

4045

156

16

Manipur

250

250

172

172

236

17

Meghalaya

559

57

616

413

451

346

18

Mizoram

45

45

26

26

19

Nagaland

34

51

85

120

29

149

20

Orissa

10873

2627

13500

13398

1264

14662

757

21

Punjab

1529

410

1939

925

23

948

33

22

Rajasthan

1590

1400

2990

2402

596

2998

270

23

Sikkim

200

200

68

68

43

24

Tamilnadu

5460

540

6000

5539

184

5723

12

25

Tripura

28

1150

1178

436

684

1120

141

26

Uttar Pradesh

24000

1000

25000

10417

160

10577

27

Uttarakhand

1073

10

1083

978

10

988

14

28

West Bengal

2755

1845

4600

2556

483

3039

1145

29

A & N Islands

30

Dadra Nagar Haveli

31

Daman & Diu

32

Delhi

33

Lakshadweep

34

Puducherry

17

23

35

Chandigarh

116493

25345

141838

114423

13926

128349

27186

Total

90

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

38

Annexure-III-A
State / UT wise financial progress under National Rural Drinking Water Programme for the year 2012-13
Opening Balance, Allocation, Release and Expenditure (towards coverge only)
S. No

State/UT

ANDHRA PR

BIHAR

CHHATTISGARH

GOA

O. B.

Allocation

Release

Expenditure

301.3

563.39

485.14

672.82

285.65

484.24

224.3

293.09

80.82

168.89

148.64

162.85

5.91

6.07

0.03

GUJARAT

327.59

578.29

717.47

797.93

HARYANA

43.98

250.24

313.41

275.54

HIMACHAL PR

61.94

153.59

129.9

124.06

J&K

147.04

510.76

474.5

488.09

JHARKHAND

74.31

191.86

243.43

204.87

10

KARNATAKA

213.14

922.67

869.24

874.78

11

KERALA

16.08

193.59

249.04

193.62

12

MADHYA PR

35.82

447.33

539.56

426.56

13

MAHARASHTRA

320.1

897.96

846.48

614.32

14

ORISSA

84.34

243.91

210.58

249.39

15

PUNJAB

101.9

144.27

121.22

16

RAJASTHAN

319.68

1352.54

1411.36

1314.18

17

TAMILNADU

240.27

394.82

570.17

625

18

UTTAR PR

159.9

1060.87

980.06

600.77

19

UTTARAKHAND

141.74

159.74

74.28

139.62

20

WEST BENGAL

265.96

523.53

502.36

574.54

21

ARUNACHAL PR

9.21

145.32

223.22

220.98

22

ASSAM

127.51

525.71

659.21

594.02

23

MANIPUR

9.29

69.99

66.21

59.11

24

MEGHALAYA

36.83

73.96

97.61

101.44

25

MIZORAM

9.74

48.35

47.92

32.87

26

NAGALAND

1.1

110.25

110.2

108.56

27

SIKKIM

49.71

36.69

32.36

38.89

28

TRIPURA

4.03

70.66

100.59

99.36

29

A&N ISLANDS

1.15

0.78

30

CHANDIGARH

31

D&N HAVELI

32

DAMAN & DIU

33

DELHI

34

LAKSHADWEEP

35

PONDICHERRY

1.75

0.88

3375.99

10290.02

10473.2

10008.48

Total

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

91

Annexure-III-B
State/UT financial progress under NRDWP for the year 2013-14 *
Opening Balance, Allocation, Release, Expenditure
S.N.

STATE/UT

Opening Balance

Allocation **

Release***

ANDHRA PRADESH

113.62

635.44

631.52

BIHAR

217.82

432.38

338.95

CHATTISGARH

67.61

136.13

135.20

GOA

5.95

5.50

GUJARAT

247.13

533.73

515.07

HARYANA

85.59

229.46

229.52

HIMACHAL PRADESH

67.78

138.51

130.81

JAMMU AND KASHMIR

141.95

462.43

414.82

JHARKHAND

122.36

172.85

243.29

10

KARNATAKA

256.64

868.75

897.29

11

KERALA

93.31

155.58

212.04

12

MADHYA PRADESH

148.82

404.80

474.95

13

MAHARASHTRA

553.97

788.47

690.27

14

ORISSA

67.61

227.35

317.07

15

PUNJAB

26.04

96.89

147.95

16

RAJASTHAN

416.86

1,231.05

1,332.49

17

TAMIL NADU

185.44

273.63

387.11

18

UTTAR PRADESH

539.18

923.19

794.93

19

UTTARAKHAND

76.41

145.58

87.61

20

WEST BENGAL

475.03

490.63

485.83

21

ARUNACHAL PRADESH

11.46

201.23

237.32

22

ASSAM

199.82

470.00

514.98

23

MANIPUR

16.38

58.76

55.30

24

MEGHALAYA

34.12

92.18

103.40

25

MIZORAM

24.78

38.42

44.89

26

NAGALAND

3.69

56.66

61.07

27

SIKKIM

44.95

16.88

26.56

28

TRIPURA

6.27

59.29

89.93

29

ANDAMAN and NICOBAR

0.78

1.04

0.09

30

PUDUCHERRY

0.88

1.59

0.06

Total
4,252.25
9,348.40
* Data as on 31.03.2014
* *Allocation including MDI of Rs 886.59 Crore
*** Release includes MDI release and additional funds released to States
# Expenditure reporting under progress from States
## Total utilisation was Rs. 9697.27 crore including expenditure at the HQ

9,600.32

92

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

Annexure-IV
NIRMAL BHARAT ABHIYAN (NBA)
PHYSICAL PROGRESS UNDER NBA DURING 2012-13
S.N.

State Name

ANDHRA PRADESH

ARUNACHAL PRADESH

IHHL
(BPL)

IHHL
(APL)

IHHL
Total

324735

59544

384279

Sanitary
Comp

School
Toilets

Anganwadi
Toilets

12

4199

1574

4775

985

5760

35

ASSAM

177008

96232

273240

11

77

76

BIHAR

560678

236021

796699

214

17009

4822

CHHATTISGARH

30222

21823

52045

24

1387

220

D & N HAVELI

GOA

GUJARAT

34927

137050

171977

4666

451

HARYANA

17435

45514

62949

11

148

315

10

HIMACHAL PRADES H

1275

3908

5183

163

1215

1066

11

JAMMU & KASHMIR

50589

21311

71900

127

2011

76

12

JHARKHAND

39702

8798

48500

43

613

684

13

KARNATAKA

203399

93030

296429

131

1758

687

14

KERALA

5674

5674

49

34

322

15

MADHYA PRADESH

339282

218907

558189

88

1033

804

16

MAHARASHTRA

92103

97203

189306

728

159

5800

17

MANIPUR

32208

11709

43917

11

53

18

MEGHALAYA

11955

2451

14406

36

1603

130

19

MIZORAM

4655

312

4967

12

106

219

20

NAGALAND

18630

3519

22149

28

20

21

ORISSA

85870

32448

118318

1138

956

22

PUDUCHERRY

23

PUNJAB

43101

14320

57421

34

345

620

24

RAJASTHAN

81700

171100

252800

70

15511

3421

25

SIKKIM

26

TAMIL NADU

243966

80250

324216

27

3095

2076

27

TRIPURA

4569

2466

7035

412

28

UTTAR PRADESH

45359

89514

134873

34

30

80

29

UTTARAKHAND

37554

60261

97815

14

344

19

30

WEST BENGAL

428448

130667

559115

99

19475

12176

2919819

1639343

4559162

1995

76396

36677

Total

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

93

Annexure-V
NIRMAL BHARAT ABHIYAN (NBA)
PHYSICAL PROGRESS UNDER NBA DURING 2013-2014(Upto Dec, 2013)
S.N.

State Name

ANDHRA PRADESH

ARUNACHAL PRADESH

IHHL
(BPL)

IHHL
(APL)

IHHL
Total

Sanitary
Comp

School
Toilets

Anganwadi
Toilets

194944

5401

200345

13

3377

1930

7924

497

8421

26

30

110

ASSAM

71066

17991

89057

436

113

BIHAR

80805

47428

128233

21

4274

1243

CHHATTISGARH

21764

14684

36448

18

D & N HAVELI

GOA

GUJARAT

16126

81490

97616

812

321

HARYANA

27485

57088

84573

206

124

10

HIMACHAL PRADESH

1499

5719

7218

57

206

16

11

JAMMU & KASHMIR

30859

8948

39807

16

258

12

JHARKHAND

27142

15591

42733

11

290

71

13

KARNATAKA

204714

75180

279894

35

341

455

14

KERALA

13455

300

13755

18

172

32

15

MADHYA PRADESH

137594

117248

254842

65

58

351

16

MAHARASHTRA

94811

177426

272237

161

20

307

17

MANIPUR

15685

8684

24369

12

18

MEGHALAYA

7166

773

7939

635

103

19

MIZORAM

3529

584

4113

13

481

28

20

NAGALAND

19868

19868

12

508

258

21

ORISSA

17002

3989

20991

18

303

26

22

PUDUCHERRY

23

PUNJAB

1597

2315

3912

24

RAJASTHAN

55530

92590

148120

62

6175

4396

25

SIKKIM

3389

54

3443

192

166

100

26

TAMIL NADU

94939

34116

129055

46

448

430

27

TRIPURA

4985

43

5028

44

65

871

28

UTTAR PRADESH

144897

379320

524217

30

17

29

UTTARAKHAND

18431

40858

59289

121

13

30

WEST BENGAL

228292

174648

402940

110

5246

3483

1545498

1362965

2908463

958

24658

14816

Total
94

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

Annexure-VI
NIRMAL BHARAT ABHIYAN (NBA)
State-wise, Cumulative Financial progress
(Rs. in crore)
State

ANDHRA PRADESH

ApprovedCentre share

Centre-Release

Centre-Exp

% Exp. against
released

1147.67

783.54

633.87

80.90

46.62

38.81

34.75

89.53

ASSAM

652.48

556.20

485.10

87.22

BIHAR

1978.41

1131.28

864.56

76.42

455.97

340.80

281.61

82.63

D & N HAVELI

0.81

0.03

0.02

53.02

GOA

6.35

1.72

1.50

87.01

GUJARAT

439.25

374.34

336.73

89.95

HARYANA

139.23

236.96

125.09

52.79

HIMACHAL PRADESH

131.18

112.42

88.10

78.37

JAMMU & KASHMIR

283.74

150.61

125.73

83.48

JHARKHAND

604.85

343.62

236.36

68.78

KARNATAKA

700.77

479.25

397.81

83.01

KERALA

118.74

116.45

113.48

97.45

1130.87

1229.25

999.24

81.29

977.72

686.60

631.17

91.93

MANIPUR

79.09

69.46

53.41

76.90

MEGHALAYA

95.63

132.35

94.67

71.53

MIZORAM

43.32

34.44

32.06

93.09

NAGALAND

56.07

54.19

53.06

97.92

1045.09

516.77

368.57

71.32

4.82

0.95

0.79

83.37

PUNJAB

151.40

29.22

18.95

64.86

RAJASTHAN

690.97

428.57

316.59

73.87

13.39

15.15

14.93

98.53

693.66

762.88

676.08

88.62

61.20

70.81

56.70

80.08

1921.72

2042.07

1758.04

86.09

99.93

83.12

75.61

90.96

1118.00

816.74

726.20

88.91

14888.92

11638.59

9600.76

82.49

ARUNACHAL PRADESH

CHHATTISGARH

MADHYA PRADESH
MAHARASHTRA

ORISSA
PUDUCHERRY

SIKKIM
TAMIL NADU
TRIPURA
UTTAR PRADESH
UTTARAKHAND
WEST BENGAL
TOTAL :-

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

95

Annexure-VII
Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan (NBA)
State-wise release position during the year 2012-13
As on 31.03.2013
S.No.

Name of State

(Rs. in lakhs)

Release

ANDHRA PRADESH

15022.69

BIHAR

47814.57

CHATTISGARH

GOA

GUJARAT

3949.42

HARYANA

0.00

HIMACHAL PRADESH

1666.96

JAMMU & KASHMIR

3511.01

JHARKHAND

4193.31

10

KARNATAKA

15950.81

11

KERALA

12

MADHYA PRADESH

25779.96

13

MAHARASHTRA

12409.22

14

ORISSA

0.00

15

PUNJAB

0.00

16

RAJASTHAN

13770.97

17

TAMILNADU

12811.68

18

UTTAR PRADESH

25684.74

19

UTTARAKHAND

2541.96

20

WEST BENGAL

5731.57
0.00

0.00

30638.14
Sub total

221477.01

21

ARUNACHAL PR.

22

ASSAM

23

MANIPUR

3509.18

24

MEGHALAYA

2540.01

25

MIZORAM

26

NAGALAND

27

SIKKIM

159.47

28

TRIPURA

430.47

986.92
11943.31

497.48
2302.68

Sub total
29

HRD

22369.52
141.78

30

IEC

3300.00

31

MIS

7.85

32

Research

22.52

33

M&E

11.07

34

NGP(Agencies paid)

0.00
Sub total

Grand Total

96

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

3483.22
247329.75

Annexure-VIII
Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan (NBA)
State-wise release position during the year 2013-14
As on 31.12.2013
S.N.

Name of State

(Rs. in lakhs)

Release

Andhra Pradesh

Bihar

0.00

Chhattisgarh

0.00

Goa

0.00

Gujarat

3794.17

Haryana

13117.51

Himachal Pradesh

3049.74

Jammu & Kashmir

3957.20

Jharkhand

0.00

10

Karnataka

0.00

11

Kerala

12

Madhya Pradesh

13

Maharashtra

14

Odisha

0.00

15

Punjab

0.00

16

Rajasthan

0.00

17

Tamil Nadu

23394.23

1175.60

2150.60
33019.44
1149.10

18

Uttar Pradesh

37631.58

19

Uttara Khand

148.07

20

West Bengal

21

Dadra & Haveli

0.00

22

Pondicherry

0.00

23

Arunachal Pr.

24

Assam

25

Manipur

26

Meghalaya

27

Mizoram

28

Nagaland

29

Sikkim

825.06

30

Tripura

1401.41

7397.65

SUB TOTAL

129984.89
0.00
2571.26
0.00
5151.82
402.94
0.00

Sub total

10352.49

31

HRD

32

IEC

4402.42

33

MIS

6.30

34

R&D

0.00

35

M&E

0.00

36

NGP

13.40

0.00

Sub total
Grand Total

4422.12
144759.50

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

97

Annexure-IX
Year-wise NGP awarded PRIs
2005
S.N.

ANDHRA

PRADESH
ARUNACHAL

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

State Name

PRADESH

GP

BP

ZP

GP

BP

ZP

GP

BP

10

143

14

ZP
0

GP
662

BP
1

ZP
0

GP
272

BP
0

ZP
0

GP
44

BP
0

ZP
0

GP
142

BP
0

ZP
0

ASSAM

14

BIHAR

39

155

13

CHHATTISGARH

12

90

300

119

172

124

GUJARAT

576

739

350

189

422

HARYANA

60

798

131

259

330

22

245

253

168

323

12

HIMACHAL

PRADESH
JAMMU &

KASHMIR

10

JHARKHAND

12

142

71

11

KARNATAKA

121

479

245

121

103

12

KERALA

220

600

84

43

15

103

11

190

682

639

344

212

13

MADHYA
PRADESH

14

MAHARASHTRA

13

380

1974

4300

1720

694

442

15

MANIPUR

16

MEGHALAYA

11

52

160

365

17

MIZORAM

20

53

18

NAGALAND

42

23

17

19

ORISSA

33

94

20

81

48

20

PUNJAB

22

74

51

19

21

RAJASTHAN

23

141

43

82

32

22

SIKKIM

27

137

23

TAMIL NADU

12

119

296

1474

196

237

51

24

TRIPURA

36

46

30

25

UTTAR PRADESH

40

488

492

13

41

26

UTTARAKHAND

13

109

160

136

44

63

27

WEST BENGAL

10

126

468

328

17

109

36

38

760

4945

14

12038

112

4556

28

2808

2857

15

Total :-

98

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

Annexure-X
Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan (NBA)
DETAILED IHHL PROGRESS REPORT UPTO 31.12-2013
S.N.

State

Objective

IHHL BPL Achievement

Share in Total BPL


Achievement

BPL

TOTAL

SC

ST

% SC

% ST

6636229

5869371

1024882

343066

17.46

5.85

115560

82112

71109

0.00

86.60

ANDHRA PRADESH

ARUNACHAL PRADESH

ASSAM

2220017

1754173

123042

227354

7.01

12.96

BIHAR

6195779

3533442

665836

24000

18.84

0.68

CHHATTISGARH

1568600

1120282

94493

338157

8.43

30.18

D & N HAVELI

2480

37

37

0.00

100.00

GOA

17935

17031

92

562

0.54

3.30

GUJARAT

2046857

2034325

249880

681518

12.28

33.50

HARYANA

636940

657626

306533

46.61

0.00

10

HIMACHAL PRADESH

218167

251545

83859

33531

33.34

13.33

11

JAMMU & KASHMIR

703071

347044

10957

35560

3.16

10.25

12

JHARKHAND

2327306

1467142

207798

403997

14.16

27.54

13

KARNATAKA

2889224

2404508

474143

253515

19.72

10.54

14

KERALA

961831

996995

123886

19462

12.43

1.95

15

MADHYA PRADESH

3614346

3655817

837412

1106359

22.91

30.26

16

MAHARASHTRA

3623439

2844097

483262

548980

16.99

19.30

17

MANIPUR

194887

144560

637

83603

0.44

57.83

18

MEGHALAYA

216333

171813

161820

0.00

94.18

19

MIZORAM

89903

84079

84029

0.00

99.94

20

NAGALAND

180092

142717

142717

0.00

100.00

21

ORISSA

4485050

2791746

640836

707665

22.95

25.35

22

PUDUCHERRY

18000

2268

657

28.97

0.00

23

PUNJAB

623198

253798

139578

55.00

0.00

24

RAJASTHAN

1960903

1162353

255832

333524

22.01

28.69

25

SIKKIM

51302

61493

11741

23076

19.09

37.53

26

TAMIL NADU

4422133

4255099

1180377

64967

27.74

1.53

27

TRIPURA

454757

455057

87983

179529

19.33

39.45

28

UTTAR PRADESH

8303794

8060135

2751604

25179

34.14

0.31

29

UTTARAKHAND

441631

394723

98052

12634

24.84

3.20

30

WEST BENGAL

6619158

6020669

1977189

544408

32.84

9.04

61838922

51036057

11830561

6450361

23.18

12.64

GRAND TOTAL

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

99

100

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

4
-

40

19

78

Group B

Group C

Group D
(Excluding
Sweepers)

Group D
(Sweepers)

TOTAL

19

Group A

Total number SCs


of employees

Groups

STs

OBCs

SCs

Total

STs

OBCs

By Direct Recruitment

10

Total

11

SCs

By Promotion

12

STs

13

Total

14

SCs

By Deputation

Representation of SCs/STs/OBCs (As on 1-1- Number of appointments made during the calendar year 2013
2014)

MINISTRY OF DRINKING WATER & SANITATION


Representation of SCs/STs/OBCs (As on 1-1-2014)

15

STs

ANNUAL STATEMENT SHOWING THE REPRESENTATION OF SCs, STs AND OBCs AS ON FIRST JANUARY OF THE
YEAR AND NUMBER OF APPOINTMENT MADE DURING THE PRECEDING CALENDAR YEAR 2013

Annexure-XI

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

101

In Identif ied VH
Posts

HH

OH

10

VH

11

HH

12

OH

No. of vacancies
reserved

(iv)

15

16

HH

17

OH

There is no reservation for persons with disabilities in case of promotion to Group A and B posts. However, persons with
disabilities can be promoted to such posts, provided the concerned post is identified suitable for persons with disabilities.

OH stands for Orthopedically Handicapped (persons suffering from locomotors disability or cerebral palsy)

(iii)

14

In Identified VH
Posts

HH stands for Hearing Handicapped (persons suffering from hearing impairment)

13

Total

No. of appointments made

PROMOTION

(ii)

Note: (i)

Total

No. of appointments made

VH stands for Visually Handicapped (persons suffering from blindness or low vision)

Group C

Grand Total

Group A

Group B

OH

HH

GROUP

VH

No. of vacancies
reserved

DIRECT RECRUITMENT

STATEMENT SHOWING THE NUMBER OF PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES APPOINTED DURING THE YEAR 2013
MINISTRY OF DRINKING WATER & SANITATION

Annexure-XII

Annexure-XIII

104

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

105

106

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

107

108

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

109

110

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

111

112

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

113

114

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

Annexure-XIV

Government of India

RFD
(Results-Framework Document)
for
Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation
(2013-2014)

Section 1:
Vision, Mission, Objectives and Functions

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation-(2013-2014)

Vision

Safe drinking water and improved sanitation for all, at all times, in rural India.

Section 1:
Vision, Mission, Objectives and Functions

Mission
Vision

To ensure all rural households have access to and use safe and sustainable drinking water and improved sanitation
Safe drinking water and improved sanitation for all, at all times, in rural India.
facilities by providing support to States in their endeavour to provide these basic facilities and services.

Mission

Objectives

To ensure all rural households have access to and use safe and sustainable drinking water and improved sanitation

facilities by providing support to States in their endeavour to provide these basic facilities and services.

Enable all rural households to have access to and use adequate safe drinking water

Enable all households to have access to and use toilets;

Objectives
Ensure all government schools and anganwadis have functional toilets, urinals and access to safe drinking water;
3

Ensuring Sustainability of Drinking Water Sources and Systems

4
1
5
2

Enable all rural households to have access to and use adequate safe drinking water
Provide enabling environment for Panchayati Raj Institutions, Gram Panchayats/Village Water & Sanitation Commitees, other local

3
6
4

Ensure all government schools and anganwadis have functional toilets, urinals and access to safe drinking water;
Provide access to information through online reporting mechanism with information placed in public domain to bring in transperency and
Ensuring
of Drinking
informed Sustainability
decision making
process.Water Sources and Systems

57

Enable rural
communities
to monitor
and keep
theirPanchayats/Village
drinking water sources;
Provide
enabling
environment
for Panchayati
Rajsurveillance
Institutions,on
Gram
Water & Sanitation Commitees, other local

Enable
all households
toGroups
have access
to and
use toilets;
communities,
Self Help
and other
groups
to manage their own drinking water sources and systems, and sanitation in their villages

communities, Self Help Groups and other groups to manage their own drinking water sources and systems, and sanitation in their villages

6 Provide access to information through online reporting mechanism with information placed in public domain to bring in transperency and
Functions
informed decision making process.

Enable rural communities to monitor and keep surveillance on their drinking water sources;

Planning, providing financial and technical support to the States and monitoring of Centrally sponsored programmes for safe drinking
water & Sanitation in rural areas.

Functions
2 Conduct periodic performance reviews with all States
Supporting R&D initiatives, IEC and HRD activities for all stakeholders in drinking water and sanitation sector;

3
1
4

Planning, providing financial and technical support to the States and monitoring of Centrally sponsored programmes for safe drinking

Conduct periodic performance reviews with all States

5
3

Building partnerships and synergizing efforts with other sector partners, organizations, UN and bilateral agencies, NGOs, R&D
Supporting
and HRD
activities
forinallour
stakeholders
in drinkingto
water
andaccess
sanitation
sector;
institutions,R&D
Key initiatives,
Resource IEC
Centers
and civil
society
common endeavour
ensure
to safe
drinking water and sanitation for

4
6

rural communities
Providing support to States in the wake of natural calamities to mitigate drinking water and sanitation problems in rural areas
Enabling States in resource mobilization from external funding agencies.

Building partnerships and synergizing efforts with other sector partners, organizations, UN and bilateral agencies, NGOs, R&D

water
& Sanitation
areas.
Providing
support in
to rural
States
in the wake of natural calamities to mitigate drinking water and sanitation problems in rural areas

institutions, Key Resource Centers and civil society in our common endeavour to ensure access to safe drinking water and sanitation for
rural communities

Enabling States in resource mobilization from external funding agencies.

Generated on

21/06/2013 5.08 PM

Page : 2 of 30

116

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14


Generated on
Page : 2 of 30

21/06/2013 5.08 PM

Vision, Mission, Objectives and Functions


7

Technical support to States through seminars, interactions, documentation of best practices and innovations

Provide inputs and comments to other Departments / Ministries in EFC/Cabinet Note or in meetings for formulation of their policies.

Formulate and review the Demand for Grant of the Department, respond to Audit observations, VIP references, and administrative

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation-(2013-2014)

Section 1:
Vision, Mission, Objectives and Functions

functions of the Ministry

10 Enabling recognition and award to Panchayats for excellent work in rural drinking water and sanitation.

Technical support to States through seminars, interactions, documentation of best practices and innovations

Provide inputs and comments to other Departments / Ministries in EFC/Cabinet Note or in meetings for formulation of their policies.

Formulate and review the Demand for Grant of the Department, respond to Audit observations, VIP references, and administrative
functions of the Ministry

10 Enabling recognition and award to Panchayats for excellent work in rural drinking water and sanitation.

Generated on

21/06/2013 5.08 PM

Page : 3 of 30

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

117

118

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14


16.50

10.00

[1] Enable all rural households to have access

[2] Enable all households to have access to and

use toilets;

to and use adequate safe drinking water

Weight

Objective

[1.4.1]

[1.4] Coverage of population

[1.7.1]

[1.7] Coverage of Habitations in

toilets

Success
Indicator

No

Unit

Number of toilets
constructed

Page : 4 of 30

No in
Lakhs

No

No in
Lakhs

Nos

Nos. in
crore

2.00

0.50

2.00

1.50

1.50

3.00

4.00

4.00

Weight

21/06/2013 5.08 PM

No of habitations
covered in IAP
districts with Solar
based piped water
supply

Provision of
individual pipe
connections

Rural Habitations
covered with Piped
Water Supply

Rural population
covered with piped
water supply

Number of Quality- No
affected habitations
covered with
adequate safe water
supply

Number of partially
covered habitations
with adequate safe
water supply

Time frame for funds %


released 40% - 30
Sept, 67% - 31 Dec,
85 % - 28 Feb, 99%
- 31 Mar

Generated on

[2.1] Construction of household

IAP districts with Solar


Power based Piped Water
Supply

[2.1.1]

[1.6.1]

with Piped Water Supply

[1.6] Coverage of Households

with Piped Water Supply

[1.5] Coverage of Habitations

with Piped Water Supply

affected habitations

[1.5.1]

[1.3.1]

[1.3] Coverage of Quality-

covered habitations

[1.2.1]

[1.1.1]

[1.2] Coverage of Partially

allocation under NRDWP

[1.1] Release of BE plan

Action

60

2500

3.00

40000

3.25

22000

75000

50

2300

2.75

38000

3.00

19000

68000

90

90%

100%
99

Very Good

Excellent

40

2100

2.50

36000

2.75

18000

61000

80

80%

Good

35

1900

2.25

34000

2.50

16000

54000

70

70%

Fair

Target / Criteria Value

Section 2:
Inter se Priorities among Key Objectives, Success indicators and Targets

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

30

1700

2.00

32000

2.25

14000

47000

60

60%

Poor

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

119

Sources and Systems

[4] Ensuring Sustainability of Drinking Water

anganwadis have functional toilets, urinals


and access to safe drinking water;

[3] Ensure all government schools and

Objective

4.00

5.00

Weight

[2.3.1]

[2.3] Adoption of Community

Page : 5 of 30

Generated on

No

No

No

No

No

No in
Lakh

1.00

1.00

2.00

1.00

2.00

2.00

4.00

2.00

2.00

Weight

21/06/2013 5.08 PM

Number of VWSC
and PRI members
trained

members in managing
drinking

[4.3.1]

[4.3] Training of VWSC and PRI

water supply schemes to


panchayats.

Number of piped
water supply
schemes handed
over to Panchayats

Number of
sustainability
structures
constructed

[4.2] Handing over of rural piped [4.2.1]

sustainability structures.

[4.1] Construction of

with water supply

[4.1.1]

Number of schools
covered

Number of schools
units covered

[3.3] Number of Schools covered [3.3.1]

- No of Anganwadis
covered

No

Time frame for funds %


released 40% -30
Sept, 67% - 31st
Dec, 85% - 28 Feb,
99% - 31 Mar

No of GPs attaining
Nirmal Status

Number of
Anganwadis
covered

[3.1.1]

Unit

No of Sanitary
Nos
complex constructed

[3.2] Construction of toilet blocks [3.2.1]

blocks - No of School units


covered

[3.1] Construction of Toilet

allocation under NGP &


NBA

[2.4] Release of BE plan

Saturation approach for


Nirmal Gram
[2.4.1]

[2.2.1]

complex

[2.2] Construction of Sanitary

Action

Success
Indicator

200000

15000

20000

5000

30000

0.70

99

20000

175000

14000

18000

4500

25000

0.63

90

18000

4500

90%

100%
5000

Very Good

Excellent

150000

13000

16000

4000

20000

0.56

80

16000

4000

80%

Good

125000

12000

14000

3500

15000

0.49

70

14000

3500

70%

Fair

Target / Criteria Value

Section 2:
Inter se Priorities among Key Objectives, Success indicators and Targets

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

Poor

100000

11000

12000

3000

10000

0.42

60

12000

3000

60%

120

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

keep surveillance on their drinking water


sources;

[7] Enable rural communities to monitor and

reporting mechanism with information placed


in public domain to bring in transperency
and informed decision making process.

[6] Provide access to information through online

Panchayati Raj Institutions, Gram


Panchayats/Village Water & Sanitation
Commitees, other local communities, Self
Help Groups and other groups to manage
their own drinking water sources and
systems, and sanitation in their villages

[5] Provide enabling environment for

Objective

6.00

4.00

39.50

Weight

Page : 6 of 30

No

Score

Score

Unit

1.00

1.50

1.50

1.00

20.00

19.50

Weight

21/06/2013 5.08 PM

Number of persons
trained

Generated on

persons for water quality


testing.

[7.1] Training of Village level

[7.1.1]

To be done by 17th
of following month

of progress by 17th of each


month. Percentage of
Districts entering data as
per schedule.

progress by 17th of each


month. Percentage of
Districts entering data as
per schedule.

[6.3] Sanitation - Regular update [6.3.1]

To be done by 31st
May 2013

Aggregate Score as
per Table 3

Aggregate Score as
per Table 2

To be done by 17th
of following month

[6.1.1]

[5.2.1]

[5.1.1]

[6.2.1]

[6.2] RWS - Regular update of

Annual Plan Targets (All


components) by 31st May
2013. Percentage of States
entering data as per
schdule.

[6.1] Online Data entry for

Programme (Table 3)

[5.2] As per Table for Sanitation

Supply Programme (Table


2)

[5.1] As per table for Water

water schemes.

Action

Success
Indicator

100000

80

80

80

96

90000

70

70

70

90

90

90%

100%

96

Very Good

Excellent

80000

60

60

60

80

80

80%

Good

70000

55

55

55

70

70

70%

Fair

Target / Criteria Value

Section 2:
Inter se Priorities among Key Objectives, Success indicators and Targets

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

Poor

60000

50

50

50

60

60

60%

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

121

3.00

6.00

Efficient Functioning of the RFD System

Improving Internal
Efficiency/Responsiveness/
Transparency/Service delivery of
Ministry/Department

* Mandatory Objective(s)

Weight

Objective

[7.5.1]

[7.5] Number of sub-divisional

No in
Lakhs

Unit

Timely updation of the


strategy

Update departmental strategy to


align with 12th Plan priorities

Page : 7 of 30

Generated on

% of implementation

% of implementation

Independent Audit of
implementation of Public
Grievance Redressal System

Independent Audit of
implementation of
Citizens/Clients Charter (CCC)

2.0

2.0

2.0

1.0

2.0

1.00

1.00

2.00

1.00

Weight

21/06/2013 5.08 PM

Date

Date

Timely submission of Results for On-time submission


2012-13

No

No in
Lakhs

Date

Number of labs set


up

Number of quality
tests done

No of Habitations
No in
where source testing Lakh
is done through
labortary testing

Number of quality
tests done

Success
Indicator

Timely submission of Draft RFD On-time submission


2014-15 for Approval

labortaries set up.

tested for quality at


Panchayat / village levels

[7.4.1]

[7.3.1]

[7.2.1]

[7.4] Number of water samples

atleast one source is tested

[7.3] No of Habitations where

tested for quality at district


and sub divisional levels.

[7.2] Number of water samples

Action

10/09/2013

100

100

01/05/2013

05/03/2014

200

15

4.00

150

13

3.50

80%

Good

125

12

3.25

70%

Fair

100

11

3.00

60%

Poor

90

90

85

85

90

80

17/09/2013 24/09/2013 01/10/2013 08/10/2013

95

95

02/05/2013 03/05/2013 06/05/2013 07/05/2013

06/03/2014 07/03/2014 08/03/2014 11/03/2014

175

14

3.75

90%

100%
10

Very Good

Excellent

Target / Criteria Value

Section 2:
Inter se Priorities among Key Objectives, Success indicators and Targets

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

122

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

* Mandatory Objective(s)

Administrative Reforms

Objective
6.00

Weight

% of implementation
% of milestones achieved
Timely submission

Implement ISO 9001 as per the


approved action plan
Implement Innovation Action
Plan (IAP)
Identification of core and noncore activities of the
Ministry/Department as per 2nd
ARC recommendations

Page : 8 of 30

Generated on

% of implementation

Success
Indicator

Implement mitigating strategies


for reducing potential risk of
corruption

Action

1.0

2.0

2.0

1.0

Weight

21/06/2013 5.08 PM

Date

Unit

01/10/2013

100

100

90

90

90

80%

Good

Fair

85

85

85

70%

Poor

80

80

80

60%

15/10/2013 30/10/2013 10/11/2013 20/11/2013

95

95

95

90%

100%
100

Very Good

Excellent

Target / Criteria Value

Section 2:
Inter se Priorities among Key Objectives, Success indicators and Targets

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

123

[2]

[1]

Enable all households to have access


to and use toilets;

Enable all rural households to have


access to and use adequate safe
drinking water

Objective

[1.4.1] Rural population

[1.4] Coverage of population

household toilets

[2.1] Construction of

in IAP districts with Solar


Power based Piped
Water Supply

[1.7] Coverage of Habitations

with Piped Water Supply

[1.6] Coverage of Households

with Piped Water Supply

[1.5] Coverage of Habitations

with Piped Water Supply

Page : 9 of 30

constructed

[2.1.1] Number of toilets

covered in IAP districts


with Solar based piped
water supply

[1.7.1] No of habitations

pipe connections

[1.6.1] Provision of individual

covered with Piped


Water Supply

[1.5.1] Rural Habitations

covered with piped


water supply

affected habitations
covered with adequate
safe water supply

[1.3.1] Number of Quality-

affected habitations

covered habitations
with adequate safe
water supply

[1.3] Coverage of Quality-

covered habitations

[1.2.1] Number of partially

released 40% - 30
Sept, 67% - 31 Dec,
85 % - 28 Feb, 99% 31 Mar

[1.1.1] Time frame for funds

Success Indicator

[1.2] Coverage of Partially

allocation under NRDWP

[1.1] Release of BE plan

Action

4813000

--

--

--

4.83

19397

117399

99.90

21/06/2013 5.09 PM

88.06

--

--

--

--

22122

112898

100

60

2500

3.0

40000

3.25

22000

75000

99

Actual Value Actual Value Target Value


for
for
for
FY 11/12
FY 12/13
FY 13/14

Generated on

No in
Lakhs

No

No in
Lakhs

Nos

Nos. in
crore

No

No

Unit

Section 3:
Trend Values of the Success Indicators

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

60

5000

4.0

45000

3.25

20000

70000

99

Projected
Value for
FY 14/15

60

2500

5.0

50000

3.25

18000

65000

99

Projected
Value for
FY 15/16

124

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

Ensure all government schools and


anganwadis have functional toilets,
urinals and access to safe drinking
water;

Ensuring Sustainability of Drinking


Water Sources and Systems

[3]

[4]

Objective

[2.3.1] No of GPs attaining

[2.3] Adoption of Community

piped water supply


schemes to panchayats.

[4.2] Handing over of rural

sustainability structures.

113175

28919

22000

30000

0.80

99

20000

--

21/06/2013 5.09 PM

41091

35860

29605

28409

1.22

100

2857

--

15000

20000

5000

30000

0.70

99

20000

5000

Actual Value Actual Value Target Value


for
for
for
FY 11/12
FY 12/13
FY 13/14

Generated on

No

No

No

No

No in
Lakh

No

Nos

Unit

Page : 10 of 30

water supply schemes


handed over to
Panchayats

[4.2.1] Number of piped

sustainability
structures constructed

[4.1.1] Number of

[4.1] Construction of

covered

[3.3.1] Number of schools

covered with water


supply

[3.3] Number of Schools

Anganwadis covered

[3.2.1] Number of

blocks - No of
Anganwadis covered

units covered

[3.2] Construction of toilet

blocks - No of School
units covered

[3.1.1] Number of schools

released 40% -30


Sept, 67% - 31st Dec,
85% - 28 Feb, 99% 31 Mar

[2.4.1] Time frame for funds

Nirmal Status

[3.1] Construction of Toilet

allocation under NGP &


NBA

[2.4] Release of BE plan

Saturation approach for


Nirmal Gram

constructed

[2.2.1] No of Sanitary complex

[2.2] Construction of Sanitary

complex

Success Indicator

Action

Section 3:
Trend Values of the Success Indicators

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

15000

20000

5000

--

0.80

99

20000

5000

Projected
Value for
FY 14/15

15000

20000

--

--

0.80

99

20000

5000

Projected
Value for
FY 15/16

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

125

Provide enabling environment for


Panchayati Raj Institutions, Gram
Panchayats/Village Water &
Sanitation Commitees, other local
communities, Self Help Groups and
other groups to manage their own
drinking water sources and systems,
and sanitation in their villages

Provide access to information through


online reporting mechanism with
information placed in public domain to
bring in transperency and informed
decision making process.

[5]

[6]

Objective

update of progress by
17th of each month.

80

80

100

89

95

456077

21/06/2013 5.09 PM

100

100

100

100

90

142161

80

80

80

96

96

200000

Actual Value Actual Value Target Value


for
for
for
FY 11/12
FY 12/13
FY 13/14

Generated on

Score

Score

No

Unit

Page : 11 of 30

following month

[6.3.1] To be done by 17th of

[6.3] Sanitation - Regular

progress by 17th of each


month. Percentage of
Districts entering data as
per schedule.

[6.2.1] To be done by 17th of

following month

May 2013

[6.1.1] To be done by 31st

[6.2] RWS - Regular update of

Annual Plan Targets (All


components) by 31st
May 2013. Percentage of
States entering data as
per schdule.

[6.1] Online Data entry for

per Table 3

[5.2.1] Aggregate Score as

Sanitation Programme
(Table 3)

per Table 2

[5.2] As per Table for

Supply Programme
(Table 2)

[5.1.1] Aggregate Score as

PRI members trained

[4.3.1] Number of VWSC and

Success Indicator

[5.1] As per table for Water

PRI members in
managing drinking water
schemes.

[4.3] Training of VWSC and

Action

Section 3:
Trend Values of the Success Indicators

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

80

80

80

96

96

160000

Projected
Value for
FY 14/15

80

80

80

96

96

170000

Projected
Value for
FY 15/16

126

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

Efficient Functioning of the RFD


System

Improving Internal
Efficiency/Responsiveness/

* Mandatory Objective(s)

Enable rural communities to monitor


and keep surveillance on their
drinking water sources;

[7]

Objective

On-time submission

On-time submission
% of implementation

Timely submission of Draft


RFD 2014-15 for Approval
Timely submission of Results
for 2012-13
Independent Audit of
implementation of Citizens

--

01/05/2013

05/03/2012

201

2919188

--

2145214

422882

21/06/2013 5.09 PM

--

01/05/2012

07/03/2011

200

941537

--

1309838

123239

95

02/05/2013

06/03/2014

200

1500000

1000000

100000

Actual Value Actual Value Target Value


for
for
for
FY 11/12
FY 12/13
FY 13/14

Generated on

Date

Date

No

No in
Lakhs

No in
Lakh

No in
Lakhs

No

Unit

Page : 12 of 30

[7.5.1] Number of labs set up

labortaries set up.

[7.5] Number of sub-divisional

done

[7.4.1] Number of quality tests

samples tested for quality


at Panchayat / village
levels

where source testing is


done through labortary
testing

[7.4] Number of water

atleast one source is


tested

[7.3.1] No of Habitations

done

[7.2.1] Number of quality tests

trained

[7.1.1] Number of persons

Success Indicator

[7.3] No of Habitations where

samples tested for quality


at district and sub
divisional levels.

[7.2] Number of water

persons for water quality


testing.

[7.1] Training of Village level

Percentage of Districts
entering data as per
schedule.

Action

Section 3:
Trend Values of the Success Indicators

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

--

--

--

250

1700000

1100000

100000

Projected
Value for
FY 14/15

--

--

--

250

1900000

1200000

100000

Projected
Value for
FY 15/16

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

127

* Mandatory Objective(s)

Administrative Reforms

Transparency/Service delivery of
Ministry/Department

Objective

Timely updation of the


strategy
% of implementation

% of implementation
% of milestones achieved
Timely submission

Update departmental strategy


to align with 12th Plan priorities
Implement mitigating strategies
for reducing potential risk of
corruption
Implement ISO 9001 as per
the approved action plan
Implement Innovation Action
Plan (IAP)
Identification of core and noncore activities of the
Ministry/Department as per
2nd ARC recommendations

--

--

--

--

--

--

21/06/2013 5.09 PM

--

--

--

--

--

--

15/10/2013

95

95

95

17/09/2013

95

Actual Value Actual Value Target Value


for
for
for
FY 11/12
FY 12/13
FY 13/14

Generated on

Date

Date

Unit

Page : 13 of 30

% of implementation

Success Indicator

Independent Audit of
implementation of Public
Grievance Redressal System

/Clients Charter (CCC)

Action

Section 3:
Trend Values of the Success Indicators

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

--

--

--

--

--

--

Projected
Value for
FY 14/15

--

--

--

--

--

--

Projected
Value for
FY 15/16

128

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

SI.No

NBA

IMIS

IEC

IAP

HRD

FTK

Acronym

Page : 14 of 30

Section 4:
Acronym

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

Nirmal Bharat Abhiyan

Integrated Management Information System

Information Education Communication

Integrated Action Plan

Human Resource Development

Field Test Kits

Description

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

129

12

11

10

SI.No

PWS

PRI

PC

O and M

NRDWP

NGP

Acronym

Page : 15 of 30

Section 4:
Acronym

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

Piped Water Supply

Panchayat Raj Institutions

Partially Covered

Operation & Maintenance

National Rural Drinking Water Programme

Nirmal Gram Puraskar

Description

130

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

17

16

15

14

13

SI.No

VWSC

SHG

RWS

R.O

QA

Acronym

Page : 16 of 30

Section 4:
Acronym

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

Village Water and Sanitation Commitee

Self Help Groups

Rural Water Supply

Reverse Osmosis

Quality Affected

Description

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

131

[1.3.1] Number of Quality-affected habitations


covered with adequate safe water supply

Page : 17 of 30

Generated on

Online Reports from the


States/ UTs/ districts.

Online Reports from the


States/ UTs/ districts.

Monitoring the target dates for


the indicator.

Measurement

21/06/2013 5.09 PM

This indicator will measure


the actual numbers of quality
affected (chemically
contaminated sources)
habitations provided with
public infrastructure to

This indicator will measure


the actual numbers of
Partially covered (habitations
where infrastructure is not
working to full capacity and
thus providing less water)
provided with public
infrastructure to deliver safe
drinking water. The target
values are expected to show
a declining trend as more
sustainability measures are
taken up.

null

[1.2.1] Number of partially covered habitations with


adequate safe water supply

Definition

This indicator will measure


the time frame for release of
funds pertaining to NRDWP
by the Ministry of Drinking
Water and Sanitation to the
states under the scheme of
the Ministry.

Description

[1.1.1] Time frame for funds released 40% - 30


Sept, 67% - 31 Dec, 85 % - 28 Feb, 99% - 31 Mar

Success indicator

SI.No

null

The target dates are as


prescribed by Ministry of Finance.

General Comments

Section 4:
Description and Definition of Success Indicators and Proposed Measurement Methodology

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

132

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14


Page : 18 of 30

Online reporting from the


States on IMIS

Online Reports from the


States/ UTs/ districts.

Online Reports from the


States/ UTs/ districts.

Online Reports from the


States/ UTs/ districts.

Measurement

21/06/2013 5.09 PM

This indicator measures the


number of households in
habitations provided with
individual household tap
connections

[1.6.1] Provision of individual pipe connections

Generated on

This indicator measures the


number of rural habitations
which have been covered
with Piped Drinking Water
Supply.

[1.5.1] Rural Habitations covered with Piped Water


Supply

This indicator will measure


the actual population who
have been provided with
safe drinking water through
piped water supply. The
target values are expected to
show a increasing trend as
more States take up piped
water supply schemes.

[1.4.1] Rural population covered with piped water


supply

Definition

deliver safe drinking water.


The target values are
expected to show a declining
trend as more sustainability
measures are taken up.

Description

[1.3.1] Number of Quality-affected habitations


covered with adequate safe water supply

Success indicator

SI.No

General Comments

Section 4:
Description and Definition of Success Indicators and Proposed Measurement Methodology

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

133

10

SI.No

Page : 19 of 30

Nirmal Grams will be identified


on the basis of online reports
submitted by the State

Selection process for Nirmal


Gram leading to identification
of Nirmal Panchayaths through
online reports from the States.

Online Reports from the


States/ UTs/ districts.

Online reporting from the


States on IMIS

Measurement

21/06/2013 5.09 PM

Gram Panchayats with all


households having sanitation
facilities will be included for
computing this indicator

[2.3.1] No of GPs attaining Nirmal Status

Generated on

Number of Complex
constructed will be included
for computing this indication

[2.2.1] No of Sanitary complex constructed

null

Households with toilets will


be included for computing
this indicator.

[2.1.1] Number of toilets constructed

Definition

This indicator measures the


number of habitations
covered with Solar based
Piped water supply in
habitations covered under
the project approved under
the NRDWP and National
Clean Energy Fund

Description

[1.7.1] No of habitations covered in IAP districts


with Solar based piped water supply

Success indicator

null

General Comments

Section 4:
Description and Definition of Success Indicators and Proposed Measurement Methodology

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

134

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

13

12

11

SI.No

Page : 20 of 30

Online Reports from the


States/ UTs/ districts.

Online Reports from the


States/ UTs/ districts.

Monitoring the target dates for


the indicator.

Measurement

21/06/2013 5.09 PM

This indicator will measure


the number of toilet units
constructed in anganwadis.
These targets have been
identified in the approved
projects. As these are
implemented, the balances
will keep reducing; hence the
trend values show a declining

[3.2.1] Number of Anganwadis covered

Generated on

This indicator will measure


the number of toilet units
constructed in anganwadis.
These targets have been
identified in the approved
projects. As these are
implemented, the balances
will keep reducing; hence the
trend values show a declining
trend.

[3.1.1] Number of schools units covered

Definition

This indicator will measure


the time frame for release of
funds pertaining to NBA by
the Ministry of Drinking Water
and Sanitation to the states
under the scheme of the
Ministry.

Description

[2.4.1] Time frame for funds released 40% -30


Sept, 67% - 31st Dec, 85% - 28 Feb, 99% - 31 Mar

Success indicator

The target dates are as


prescribed by Ministry of Finance.

General Comments

Section 4:
Description and Definition of Success Indicators and Proposed Measurement Methodology

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

135

Online Reports from the


States/ UTs/ districts.

Online Reports from the


States/ UTs/ districts.

Online Reports from the


States/ UTs/ districts.

Online Reports from the


States/ UTs/ districts.

Measurement

21/06/2013 5.09 PM

This indicator will measure


the number of rural piped
water supply schemes
handed over to Panchayats
empowering them in the
management of sources and
schemes to ensure
sustainability.

[4.2.1] Number of piped water supply schemes


handed over to Panchayats

16

Generated on

This indicator will measure


the number of sustainability
structures constructed.

14

[4.1.1] Number of sustainability structures


constructed

trend.

Definition

15

Page : 21 of 30

Description

This indicator will measure


the number of schools
provided with water supply
for drinking, use in toilets,
hand washing etc. Due to
coverage of existing schools
the indicator shows a
declining trend.

[3.2.1] Number of Anganwadis covered

Success indicator

[3.3.1] Number of schools covered

13

SI.No

General Comments

Section 4:
Description and Definition of Success Indicators and Proposed Measurement Methodology

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

136

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

19

18

17

SI.No

Page : 22 of 30

Records kept at the divisions


of the NBA division of the
Ministry.

Records kept at the divisions


of the NRDWP division of the
Ministry.

Online Reports from the


States/ UTs/ districts.

Measurement

21/06/2013 5.09 PM

This indicator is the


consolidation of activities
carried out by the Ministry in
Human Resource
Development, Information
Education Communication,
Research and Development,
Monitoring and Evaluation at
the

[5.2.1] Aggregate Score as per Table 3

Generated on

This indicator is the


consolidation of activities
carried out by the Ministry in
Human Resource
Development, Information
Education Communication,
Research and Development,
Monitoring and Evaluation at
the Ministry level to improve
the quality of NRDWP
programme implementation.

[5.1.1] Aggregate Score as per Table 2

Definition

This indicator will measure


the enhancement of the
capabilities of the VWSC and
PRI members in managing
drinking water supply
schemes.

Description

[4.3.1] Number of VWSC and PRI members


trained

Success indicator

General Comments

Section 4:
Description and Definition of Success Indicators and Proposed Measurement Methodology

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

137

23

22

21

20

19

SI.No

This indicator measures the


number of people from
villages, Gram Panchayats
trained to use field test kits
for testing the water quality of
local sources. Five persons
from each of the about

[7.1.1] Number of persons trained

Page : 23 of 30

This indicator measures the


concurrent monthly progress
reporting from States
regarding Physical and
Financial achievement on or
before the 17th of every
month.

[6.3.1] To be done by 17th of following month

Online Reports from the


States/ UTs/ districts.

IMIS Data Entry

Monitoring the % of Districts


entering monthly report by
targeted date in the IMIS.

Monitoring the % of States


entering data on all
components by targeted date
in the IMIS

Records kept at the divisions


of the NBA division of the
Ministry.

Measurement

21/06/2013 5.09 PM

The indicator measures the


date of data entry of progress
by districts.

[6.2.1] To be done by 17th of following month

Generated on

The indicator measures the


date of online data entry by
States of Annual Plan targets
habitation and scheme wise.

[6.1.1] To be done by 31st May 2013

Definition

Ministry level to improve the


quality of NBA programme
implementation.

Description

[5.2.1] Aggregate Score as per Table 3

Success indicator

General Comments

Section 4:
Description and Definition of Success Indicators and Proposed Measurement Methodology

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

138

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

25

24

23

SI.No

Page : 24 of 30

Online Reports from the


States/ UTs/ districts.

Online Reports from the


States/ UTs/ districts.

Online Reports from the


States/ UTs/ districts.

Measurement

21/06/2013 5.09 PM

This indicator the number of


habitations where at least
one drinking water source is
tested in water quality testing
laboratories.

[7.3.1] No of Habitations where source testing is


done through labortary testing

Generated on

This indicator measures the


number of water samples
tested by the district / subdivisional laboratories and at
the village/ Gram Panchayats
through field test Kits.

[7.2.1] Number of quality tests done

Definition

2.5 lakh Panchayats in the


country are to be trained.
Training started in 2006-07.
As reports of more persons
from more panchayats
getting training are entered
by States on IMIS this
indicator will first show an
increasing trend and
thereafter a declining trend till
five persons in all panchayats
throughout the country are
trained.

Description

[7.1.1] Number of persons trained

Success indicator

General Comments

Section 4:
Description and Definition of Success Indicators and Proposed Measurement Methodology

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

139

27

26

SI.No

Page : 25 of 30

This indicator measures the


number of subdivisional/block/sub-district
level laboratories set up by
the States.

[7.5.1] Number of labs set up

Definition

This indicator measures the


number of water samples
tested by the district / subdivisional laboratories and at
the village/ Gram Panchayats
through field test Kits.

Description

[7.4.1] Number of quality tests done

Success indicator

Online Reports from the


States/ UTs/ districts.

Online Reports from the


States/ UTs/ districts.

Measurement

General Comments

Section 4:
Description and Definition of Success Indicators and Proposed Measurement Methodology

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

140

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

Central
Government

Location
Type

State

Departments

Organisation Type

Generated on

[1.3.1] Number of
Quality-affected
habitations covered with
adequate safe

[1.2.1] Number of
partially covered
habitations with
adequate safe water
supply

[1.3.1] Number of
Quality-affected
habitations covered with
adequate safe water
supply

[1.2.1] Number of
partially covered
habitations with
adequate safe water
supply

Relevant Success
Indicator

Page : 26 of 30

Department of Agriculture
and Cooperation

Department of Land
Resources

Organisation Name

To reduce over exploitation of


and leaching of chemicals into
drinking water sources

To help in water conservation


and recharge, thereby
preventing slippage of covered

Justification for this


requirement

21/06/2013 5.09 PM

Coverage of
habitations with
drinking water supply:
Effective
implementation of
agricultural water
productivity measures
like optimizing fertilizer
use, reducing over
irrigation, crop stress
management,
increased drip and
sprinkler irrigation, etc.

Coverage of
habitations with
drinking water supply:
Effective
implementation of
Integrated Watershed
Management
Programme

What is your
requirement from
this organisation

Section 5 :
Specific Performance Requirements from other Departments

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

100

Water availability for


drinking water purposes
will keep decreasing
leading to slipping back of
covered habitations.
Quality affected sources
would keep increasing.

Due to declining water


table, covered habitations
will keep slipping back

Please quantify your What happens if


requirement from your requirement is
this Organisation
not met.

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

141

Location
Type

State

Ministry

Organisation Type

Ministry of Finance

Generated on

[1.7.1] No of habitations
covered in IAP districts
with Solar based piped
water supply

[1.3.1] Number of
Quality-affected
habitations covered with
adequate safe water
supply

[1.2.1] Number of
partially covered
habitations with
adequate safe water
supply

Aggregate Score as per


Table 3

[1.4.1] Rural population


covered with piped
water supply

water supply

Relevant Success
Indicator

Page : 27 of 30

Ministry of Water Resources

Department of Expenditure

Organisation Name

For implementation of the


project and achieving coverage

To ensure availability and


sustainability of ground and
surface water resources for
providing drinking water,
thereby enabling coverage and
preventing slippage of covered
habitations

To finalise Cabinet/EFC/
SFC Notes

Justification for this


requirement

21/06/2013 5.09 PM

Release of funds from


National Clean Energy
Fund

Effective
implementation of
programmes for water
storage, conservation
and recharge
-Technical assistance
and training in activities
for sustainability of
sources

Cabinet Notes, EFC


Notes, SFC Notes :
Comments should be
given in prescribed
timelimit

What is your
requirement from
this organisation

Section 5 :
Specific Performance Requirements from other Departments

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

Habitations will not be


covered with solar pump
based piped water supply

Due to declining availability


of ground and surface
water resources, coverage
of habitations and
sustaining water supply
becomes difficult.

Note for Cabinet /EFC/SFC


cannot be sent

Please quantify your What happens if


requirement from your requirement is
this Organisation
not met.

142

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

Location
Type

State
Organisation Type

Ministry of Rural
Development

Aggregate Score as per


Table 3

Aggregate Score as per


Table 2

Relevant Success
Indicator

Page : 28 of 30

Organisation Name

Review meetings,
Workshops/seminars
organized: Posting of
persons against vacant
posts

What is your
requirement from
this organisation
MoRD and DoPT are cadre
controlling authority

Justification for this


requirement

Section 5 :
Specific Performance Requirements from other Departments

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

Performance gets affected

Please quantify your What happens if


requirement from your requirement is
this Organisation
not met.

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

143

Jointly responsible for


influencing this outcome /
impact with the following
department (s) / ministry(ies)

Page : 29 of 30

Percentage sanitation
coverage in Government
Schools in Rural areas against
project objectives identified

83.80

62.25

35860

96

94.3

38

73

FY 11/12

Generated on

Percentage sanitation
coverage against project
objectives in rural areas.

State Govt. Dept., Dept of Rural


Development(DoRD), Planning
Commission, State Govt. Dept., Min of
Human Resource Development, State
Govt. Dept., Min of Women and Child
Development

Govt. rural schools with


drinking water supply

Enabling all rural household


to achieve total sanitation

Rural habitations with drinking


water sources free of chemical
contamination

No

Rural population with piped


water supply
(As per IMIS)

Ministry of Water Resources,


Number of sustainability
Department of Rural Development, Dept. structures benefiting drinking
of Land Resources, Ministry of
water sources constructed
Environment & Forests

Unit

Rural Population having


access to safe and adequate
drinking water
(Percentage of habitations as
per IMIS)

Success
Indicator

Improved sustainability of
drinking water

Improved access to safe and State Governments


Ministry of Water Resources; CGWB;
sustainable drinking water
Deptt. of Rural Development(DoRD);
Planning Commission; Department of
Expenditure
Department of Land Resources;
Ministry Of Health;
Ministry of Environment & Forests;
Ministry of Agriculture

Outcome/Impact of
Department/Ministry

21/06/2013 5.09 PM

89.01

69.25

20000

98

96.8

41.75

74

FY 12/13

Section 6:
Outcome/Impact of Department/Ministry

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

94.83

74.25

20000

100

97

45.75

76

FY 13/14

100.00

81.97

20000

100

98.5

50

78

FY 14/15

89.93

20000

100

99

54

80

FY 15/16

144

ANNUAL REPORT 2013-14

Outcome/Impact of
Department/Ministry

Jointly responsible for


influencing this outcome /
impact with the following
department (s) / ministry(ies)

Page : 30 of 30

State Govt. Dept., DoRD,


Planning Commission
11.15

75.57

FY 11/12

Generated on

Unit

Percentage sanitation
coverage in Government
Anganwadis in Rural areas
against project objectives
identified

Success
Indicator

21/06/2013 5.09 PM

19.11

76.93

FY 12/13

Section 6:
Outcome/Impact of Department/Ministry

Results-Framework Document (RFD) for Ministry of Drinking Water and Sanitation -(2013-2014)

27.07

82.54

FY 13/14

35.04

100.00

FY 14/15

43.00

FY 15/16