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IPINASA NINA:

ABELLANA, RIA
LEONARDO, CRISANTA
RAMOS, ELBERT JOHN
MAP

Bamboo Crafts
Ludo

CAPITAL
PROVINCE

CAPITAL

Apayao

Kabugao

Abra

Bangued

Kalinga

Tabuk

Mountain
Province

Bontoc

Regional Center: Baguio


NARRATIVE
INFORMATION

Cordillera
Administrative
Region (CAR) is
located in the northIfugao
Lagawe
central part of Luzon
Benguet
La Trinidad
and
encompasses
most of the areas
within
the
Cordillera
Central
mountain range of Luzon. It is
bounded by Ilocos Norte and
Cagayan
in
the
north,
Pangasinan and Nueva Viscaya in
the south, Cagayan Valley in the east, and the Ilocos region in the
west. The region is dubbed as the Watershed Cradle of North Luzon
because it hosts 9 major rivers that provide continuous water for irrigation
and energy for northern Luzon.
Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR) is rich in ancient culture.
It is the home of the indigenous tribe called Igorot. The way of life of
the people in this region existed way back to ancient Filipinos before the
Spanish colonization. Cordillera also has various festivals, these includes
the Panagbenga or Baguio Flower Festival celebrated every February. The
festival highlights are the flower exhibits, garden tours, floral competition
and parade of floats. Other festivals in the region include the Ulalim
Festival in Kalinga, Lang-ay Festival in Mountain Province, Banaue
Imbayah Festival and the Tabuk Matagoan Festival.
Cordillera is one of the prime tourist destinations in the
Philippines. It has many spectacular scenic views and enchanting cool
places. Baguio City is the summer capital of the Philippines. The worldfamous Banaue Rice Terraces in the province of Ifugao is considered as
the Eighth Wonder of the World. This structure of about 2000 to 6000
years old is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Other tourists attractions of
the region include the Sumaguing Cave in Sagada and the mummy caves
in Benguet and Mt. Province. There are four National Parks in the region:
Cassamata Hill, Mount Pulag which is the highest mountain in Luzon,
Mount Data and Balbalasang-Balbalan.
BACKGROUND
During the Spanish occupation of the Philippines,
Christianization and eventual subjugation of the mountain region proved
difficult for the Spanish colonial government. Several comandancias were
established by the Spanish colonial government in strategic areas of the
mountain region. Among them were Amburayan, Cabugaoan, Kayapa,
Quiangan, Itaves, Apayaos, Lepanto, Benguet, Bontoc, Banaue, and
Tiagan.
On August 18, 1908 during the American regime, Mountain
Province was established by the Philippine Commission with the
enactment of Act No. 1876. Ifugao, which was part of Nueva Vizcaya
province and the former Spanish comandancias of Amburayan, Apayao,
Benguet, Bontoc, Kalinga and Lepanto, were annexed to the newly
created province as sub-provinces. Amburayan was later abolished in
1920 and its corresponding territories were transferred to the provinces of
Ilocos Sur and La Union. Lepanto was also reduced in size and its towns
were integrated into the sub-provinces of Bontoc and Benguet, and to the
province of Ilocos Sur.
On June 18, 1966, Republic Act No. 4695 was enacted to split
Mountain Province and create four separate and independent provinces
namely Benguet, Ifugao, Kalinga-Apayao, and Mountain Province. Ifugao
and Kalinga-Apayao were placed under the jurisdiction of the Cagayan
Valley region, with Benguet and Mountain Province placed under the Ilocos
Region.
On July 15, 1987, President Corazon C. Aquino issued
Executive Order 220 which created the Cordillera Administrative Region.
The provinces of Abra, Benguet and Mountain Province (of the Ilocos
Region), and Ifugao and Kalinga-Apayao (of the Cagayan Valley) were
annexed as part of the newly created region.
On February 14, 1995, Kalinga-Apayao, one of the five
provinces of the region was split into two separate and independent
provinces of Apayao and Kalinga with the enactment of Republic Act No.
7878.
Several attempts at legalizing autonomy in the Cordillera region
have failed in two separate plebiscites. An affirmative vote for the law on
regional autonomy is a precondition by the 1987 Philippine Constitution to
give the region autonomy in self-governance much like the Autonomous
Region of Muslim Mindanao in southern Philippines. The first law Republic
Act No. 6766, took effect on October 23, 1989 but failed to muster a
majority vote in the plebiscite on January 30, 1990.The second law,
Republic Act No. 8438 passed by Congress of the Philippines on
December 22, 1997, also failed to pass the approval of the Cordillera
peoples in a region-wide referendum on March 7, 1998.
MGA PRODUKTO

Abacca

PHILIPPINE HISTORY
MWF 12-1 PM
G. REYMAR YSON

CAR - Cordillera Administrative Region

Dipterocarp

Ginto

Palay

HISTORIKAL NA
LUGAR
Kape

Strawberry

Banig

Walis

The Batarangan Airstrip, located at Kibungan, Benguet, was used as a


landing site by the U.S. Airforce
during the World War II in liberating
the
Philippines.
John Hay Air Base, more commonly
known as Camp John Hay to many
Filipinos, was a major hill station
used for rest and recreation for
personnel and dependents of the
United States Copper
Armed Forces in the
Peanut Brittle
Philippines as well as Department of
Defense employees and their

dependents. Tabacco
Last used by the United States AirGulay
Force,atthe
"camp" is now a
Prutas
popular tourist destination in the northern part of the country.
History

IPINASA NINA:
ABELLANA, RIA
LEONARDO, CRISANTA
RAMOS, ELBERT JOHN
When World War II erupted, the camp was used by the Americans as a
concentration camp for Japanese civilians who were rounded up
inBaguio and nearby provinces on the suspicion that they were spies of
the Imperial Japanese Army.

PHILIPPINE HISTORY
MWF 12-1 PM
G. REYMAR YSON

The Million Dollar Hill is named from the last war when the allied armies
spent million of dollars worth of bombs and ammunitions to annihilate the
enemies in the area. It is overlooking the Poblacion of Kiangan.

After the bombing of Pearl Harbor, eighteen Japanese planes, 17 of them


in formation, came over Camp John Hay on the 8 December 1941. This
force dropped 128 bombs, many of which did not explode. The first
Japanese bomb to be dropped on the the Philippines hit the Main Gate
and the succeeding bombs hit the Half Way House, the Mile High Club, the
left wing of the Main Club and portions of the Scout Hill area, which
housed the stockade and barracks of the Philippine Scouts.
The Japanese set up their first internment camp in the Philippines at Camp
John Hay. A group of more than 500 men, women and children was
crowded into one building. The group consisted of missionaries, miners
and two Army nurses. The missionaries had been evacuated
fromChina the preceding year and had established a language school in
the Philippines while awaiting the opportunity to return to China. The
miners, some of whom were actually lumbermen, had been living and
working near Baguio. The Army nurses were those first captured after their
unsuccessful attempt to escape to Manila via the logging trail out of
Baguio.

The Mt. Nagchayan is located at Banaue, Ifugao, was where the


Japanese troops fought fierce battles during WWII. At the site one can find
several grottos, stone walled trenches, and fox holes and rusty shells on
this old battle ground.

Many of the original buildings, which were used as prisons still stand, such
as the building now occupied by the Lonestar Steakhouse, the Base
Chapel and the adjoining rows of cottages.

The Mansion
Located on the eastern part of the city along the Leonard Wood Road and
right across from Wright Park. It was built in 1908 for U.S. governorgenerals and was destroyed in 1945 during the battle for the liberation of
the Philippines.

Kennon Road and its Builder


Named after Col. Lyman W. Kennon, who was the final builder of the
famous Benguet road, with the help of the industrious Cordillerans and
foreign workers.
Kennon road is the shortest and the most scenic highway linking Baguio
and the lowlands. The lions head can be found along the way.
Final construction of this road was finished in 1903. Col. L. Kennon first
ascended to Baguio in 1905.
Of the original workers, the Igorots and Japanese were admired for their
trustworthiness and willingness to work.
Kennon was closed to traffic after the July 16, 1990 earthquake. It is now
open to light vehicles only.

The Philippine government later rebuilt and improved the structure in 1947
and since then it has been used by various Philippine presidents whenever
they come up to Baguio for their official visits and engagements. The
Mansion served as the seat of the Second Session of Economic
Commission of Asia and the Far East in 1947. It has also been the site of
first meeting of the South East Asia Union which was popularly known as
the Baguio Conference of 1950 which was conceived and convened by
President Elpidio Quirino

Easter Weaving Room


This school was built in 1905 under Samuel Drury with funds donated by
Bishop Brent of the Episcopalian Church of the Philippines. It opened in
1906 as a church school. Dr. Benjamin Platt introduced the Easter School
Weaving Room as an industrial work in the curriculum. By 1924 there were
five buildings and in 1928 they inaugurated the Chapel of the Holy
Innocents. Before World War II, the Easter School Compound, which had
nine buildings, were raised to the ground by the American Liberation
Forces. With only the Headquarters and the Nurses' Cottage standing
then, rehabilitation started to complete the compound as it is now. It is the
right place to visit for those who are interested in native fabrics and other
handicrafts. Here one can witness the actual process of cloth weaving as
practiced by the natives of the Mountain Provinces for ages.