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The International STRESS AND BEHAVIOR Society (ISBS)

ZENEREI Institute, USA

Program and
Proceedings
6th International Regional (Asia)
ISBS Neuroscience Conference

Stress and Behavior

Kobe, Japan
July 26-27, 2015
6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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IN PARTNERSHIP WITH:
The Japan Society for Neuroscience (Japan)
Satellite Symposium of JSN
ZENEREI Institute (USA)
KOBE UNIVERITY (Japan)
KOBE UNIVERITY HOSPITAL (Japan)
KANEKA Corporation (Japan)

ISBS COMMITTEES:
Conference Co-Chairs:
Prof. Allan V. Kalueff, PhD (New Orleans, USA), ISBS President and Fellow
Prof. Shun Nakamura, PhD (Tokyo, Japan), LOC Chair, ISBS Fellow
International Program Committee:
Prof. Shun Nakamura, PhD (Tokyo, Japan), Co-Chair , ISBS Fellow
Prof. Allan V. Kalueff, PhD (New Orleans, USA), Co-Chair, ISBS Fellow
Prof. Mitsuhiro Yoshioka, PhD (Hokkaido, Japan)
Prof. Mamiko Koshiba, PhD (Tokyo, Japan), ISBS Fellow
Prof. Elliot A. Beaton, PhD (New Orleans, USA), ISBS Fellow
Prof. Viktor M. Klimenko, PhD, MD (St. Petersburg, Russia), ISBS VP and Fellow
Local Organizing Committee:
Prof. Shun Nakamura, PhD (Tokyo, Japan), Chair
Prof. Mitsuhiro Yoshioka, PhD (Hokkaido, Japan)
Prof. Mamiko Koshiba, PhD (Saitama, Japan)
Prof. Ichiro Sora, MD, PhD (Kobe, Japan)

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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CONFERENCE PROGRAM
Day 1. Sun, July 26, 2015
Shinryoku-Kaikan (Alumnus Hall), School of Medicine, University of Kobe, Kusunokicho, Chuo-ku, Kobe,
Japan

09.00-17.00

REGISTRATION

Morning session: Chairs: S Nakamura, M Yoshioka (Japan), AV Kalueff (USA)


09.30-09.45

ISBS OPENING CEREMONY AND WELCOMING ADDRESSES

09.45-10.45

OPENING PLENARY LECTURE: ADVERSE SENSORY INPUT OF THE ABUSE


MODIFIED BY EARLY EXPERIENCE. A Tomoda, Research Center for Child Mental
Development, University of Fukui, Fukui, Japan

10.45-11.30

ISBS PRESIDENTIAL LECTURE: MODELING AFFECTIVE DISORDERS IN


ZEBRAFISH. AV Kalueff, ISBS Fellow, S Li, Y Liu, P Chen, L Yang, JJ Wang, A
Kaluyeva, AM Stewart, ISBS Fellow, C Song, Guangdong Ocean University,
Zhanjiang, China; ZENEREI Institute and the International Zebrafish Neuroscience
Research Consortium (ZNRC), New Orleans, USA; Institute for Translational
Biomedicine, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia

11.30-12.00

ISBS SPECIAL LECTURE: STRESS RESPONSES AND MU OPIOID RECEPTOR


EXPRESSION, I Sora, Department of Psychiatry, Kobe University Graduate School of
Medicine, Kobe, Japan

12.00-12.25

ISBS SPECIAL LECTURE: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF NEONATAL STRESS ON


BRAIN OF HIGH RISK NEWBORN. H Yamanouchi, M Koshiba, ISBS Fellow,
Department of Pediatrics and Biochemistry, Saitama Medical University School of
Medicine, Saitama, Japan

12.25-12.45

POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER-LIKE BEHAVIORS IN FABP3 NULL MICE.


K Fukunaga, Y Yabuki, I Takahata, Y Owada, N Shioda, Tohoku University Graduate
School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine,
Sendai, Japan

12.45-13.50

LUNCH BREAK (FREE TIME)

Afternoon session:
13.50-18.20

SYMPOSIUM 1. ZUKOWSKA SYMPOSIUM ON STRESS NEUROSCIENCE


Chairs: AV Kalueff (USA) and S Nakamura (Japan)

13.50-14.00

INTRODUCTION: PROFESSOR ZOFIA M ZUKOWSKA

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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14.00-14.15

ACTIVATION OF CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING FACTOR RECEPTOR 1 IS


NECESSARY FOR RESTRAINT-INDUCED CONDITIONED PLACE PREFERENCE.
YY Mei, JS Li, Department of Psychology, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi,
Taiwan

14.15-14.30

EFFECTS OF AGING AND EARLY LIFE STRESS ON SEXUAL MOTIVATION IN


MALE RATS. TG Amstislavskaya, AS Dolodoev, MA Tikhonova, Scientific Research
Institute of Physiology and Basic Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia

14.30-14.45

ROLE OF CENTRAL MUSCARINIC CHOLINERGIC MECHANISMS IN SEX


BEHAVIOR REALIZATION UNDER THE CONDITION OF STRESS. NS Sapronov,
AA Bairamov, NN Petrova, EV Petrova, Institute of Experimental Medicine RAS, II
Mechnikov Northwestern State Medical University, St. Petersburg, Russia

14.45-15.00

MENTAL DISORDERS IN OFFSPRING OF PARENTS WITH BIPOLAR DISORDER


IN SOUTH KOREA. SH Shim, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Cheoan, South
Korea

15.00-15.15

OREXIN OX(1) RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST SB-408124 POTENTIATES THE


INHIBITORY ACTION OF SULPIRIDE ON AMPHETAMINE-ACTIVATED BUT NOT
SPONTANEOUS SELF-STIMULATION. PD Shabanov, AA Lebedev, RO Roik, VI
Morozov, Military Medical Academy, Institute of Experimental Medicine RAS, St.
Petersburg, Russia

15.15-15.30

IS VIDEO SCENERY AS APPEALING AS REAL LANDSCAPE? AN EEG STUDY.


NC Chiang, SCL Huang, Department of Social Psychology, Department of Tourism,
Shih Hsin University, Taipei, Taiwan

15.30-15.45

MELATONIN, CORTISOL AND DAYTIME SLEEPINESS AFTER NIGHTTIME


EXPOSURE OF LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED) WITH AND WITHOUT BLUE
LIGHT: A RANDOMIZED, DOUBLE-BLINDED, CROSS-OVER, PLACEBOCONTROLLED COMPARISON. HJ Jeon, Department of Psychiatry, Samsung
Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea

15.45-16.00

COFFEE BREAK AND EXHIBITION

16.00-16.25

SPECIAL FOCUS TALK: MECHANISM OF ANXIOLYTIC EFFECT OF SSRI. T


Izumi, M Yoshioka, ISBS Fellow, Department of Neuropharmacology, Hokkaido
University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Japan

16.25-16.45

EXERCISE
ENHANCES
STRESS
COPING
DESPITE
INCREASING
CORTICOSTERONE, LIKELY BY UPREGULATING THE DOPAMINE LEVEL IN
THE MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX. C Chen, S Nakagawa, Y Kitaichi, Y An, Y
Omiya, N Song, M Koga, T Inoue, I Kusumi, Department of Psychiatry, Hokkaido
University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan

16.50-17.05 ABNORMAL INTRA-GROUP VOCAL COMMUNICATION WITHIN PRIMATE


FAMILY INCLUDING A KID OF MODEL OF AUTISM. K Mimura, N Ichinohe,
Department of Ultrastructural Research, National Institute of Neuroscience, National
Center of Neurology and Psychiatry (NCNP), Tokyo, Japan

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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17.05-17.20

COMMON MARMOSETS DEVELOP GENERATION-SPECIFIC PEER SOCIAL


EXPERIENCES THAT MAY AFFECT THEIR ADULT BODY WEIGHT ADAPTATION
TO CLIMATE.G Karino, M Shukuya, S Nakamura, ISBS Fellow, T Kunikata, H
Yamanouchi, M Koshiba, ISBS Fellow. Department of Pediatrics, Saitama Medical
University, Saitama, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo, Tokyo
City University, Kanagawa, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry (NCNP), The
Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo, Japan

17.20-17.40

INCLUSIVE INTERVENTION FOR PSYCHO-DEVELOPMENT WITH BEHAVIOR


ANALYSIS USING QUANTITATIVE EMOTIONAL STATE TRANSLATION
(BOUQUET). M Koshiba, ISBS Fellow, G Karino, K Mimura, H Tokuno, S Usui, I
Tanaka, Y Honda, T Kodama, K Sato, H Kishino, M Shukuya, T Kunikata, S
Nakamura, ISBS Fellow, H Yamanouchi, Saitama Medical University, Saitama, Tokyo
University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo, TMIM, National Center of Neurology
and Psychiatry (NCNP), University of Tokyo, Tokyo City University, Tokyo, Japan

17.40-17.50

AN ATTIDUDE SURVEY OF IMPORTANCE OF LEARNING NEONATAL CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION (NCPR) IN MIDWIFERY COURSE STUDENT. M
Yoda, Y Inai, Saitama Medical University College, Saitama, Japan

17.50-18.10

REDUCING FATIGUE OF OPERATORS BY PERIPHERAL VISUAL INSPECTION


METHODS. A Ishii, A Sasaki, M Koshiba, ISBS Fellow, Kagawa University, Kagawa,
Peripheral Visual Inspection Lab, Kanagawa, Saitama Medical University, Saitama,
Japan

18.10-18.20

GENDER DIFFERENCES IN THE DEMAND CONTROL MODEL OF WORK


STRESS: AN EXAMINATION OF DATA FROM SONGKHLA PROVINCE,
THAILAND. K Janyam, Faculty of Liberal Arts, Prince of Songkla University,
Songkhla, Thailand

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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Day 2. Mon, July 27, 2015


Shinryoku-Kaikan (Alumnus Hall), School of Medicine, University of Kobe, Kusunokicho, Chuo-ku, Kobe,
Japan

09.00-14.00

REGISTRATION

Morning session:
9.00-10.50

SYMPOSIUM 2. NATURAL AND SOCIAL DISASTERS


Chairs: K Niwa and M Maeda (Japan)

9.00-9.30

CURRENT SITUATION OF THE INETERNAL RADIATION EXPOSURE


SCREENING PROGRAM IN MINAMISOMA, FUKUSHIMA, AND THE FUTURE
TASKS. M Tsubokura, University of Tokyo, Minamisoma Municipal General Hospital,
Japan.

9.30-10.00

HOW IS THE FEAR OF LOW-DOSE RADIATION EXPOSURE ALTERING


BEHAVIORS AND APPERCEPTION OF FUKUSHIMA RESIDENTS? A Hori,
Hibarigaoka-Hospital, NPO Minano-Tonari-Gumi, Department of Disaster and
Comprehensive Medicine, Fukushima Medical University, Fukushima, Japan

10.00-10.30

MULTIDIMENSIONAL PSYCHOSOCIAL ISSUES IN FUKUSHIMA: HOW SHOULD


WE OVERCOME THEM? M Maeda, Department of Disaster Psychiatry, School of
Medicine, Fukushima Medical School, Fukushima, Japan

10.30-10.50

EFFECTS OF SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC STATUS ON THE NEUROCOGNITIVE


CORRELATES OF POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS RELATED TO THE GREAT EAST
JAPAN EARTHQUAKE: DESIGN, OVERVIEW AND PERSPECTIVE. L Landr, B
Thyreau, A Sekiguchi, Y Taki, Tohoku University, Tohoku Medical Megabank,
Tohoku, Japan

10.50-11.20

COFFEE BREAK

11.20-13.05

SYMPOSIUM 3. LAPIN SYMPOSIUM ON BIOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY


Chairs: M Koshiba (Japan), AV Kalueff (USA)

11.20-11.35

INTRODUCTION: PROFESSOR IZYASLAV (SLAVA) LAPIN

11.35-11.50

A STUDY OF SATISFACTION AND E-HEALTH LITERACY AMONG USERS WHEN


USING TWITTER TO SEEK PSYCHIATRIC CONSULTATION: A RECENT TREND
IN SAUDI ARABIA. N Zakaria, A Jamal, S AlDossari, R Barri, K AlMufawez, College
of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

11.50-12.05

NON-INVASIVE CRANIAL ELECTROSTIMULATION (CES) OF ENDORPHINERGIC


AND SEROTONINERGIC STRUCTURES OF THE BRAIN VIA NEWLY
ELABORATED CES DEVICE FOR TREATMENT OF MILD TO MODERATE
DEPRESSION. Y Katsnelson, H Beckhoff, E Berk, Yu Palkin, N Lisyanskaya, A
Tereo, N Baranova, Premier Annecto Technologies, PA, USA; 7 Pavlov St.

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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Petersburg Psychiatric Hospital, St. Petersburg, Tver Railroad Clinical Center, Tver,
Russia
12.05-12.20

ON THE ENGINEERED PSYCHOLOGICAL EDUCATION OF


ECONOMIES. I Nasr, NLP Centers Canada, Burlington, ON, Canada

GROWING

12.20-12.35

EFFECTS OF PET INSECTS ON PSYCHOLOGICAL HEALTH AMONG


COMMUNITY-DWELLING ELDERLY: A RANDOMIZED-CONTROLLED TRIAL. HJ
Ko, CH Youn, SH Kim, SY Kim, Department of Family Medicine, Kyungpook National
University School of Medicine, Daegu, South Korea

12.35-12.50

AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY TO ASSESS THE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL


EXERCISES ON ANGER MANAGEMENT AMONG SUBSTANCE DEPENDENCE
SUBJECTS ADMITTED IN DRUG DE-ADDICTION AND TREATMENT CENTRE
(DDTC) OF PGIMER, CHANDIGARH. K Das, P Malhotra, S Sharma, National
Institute of Nursing Education, D Basu Department of Psychiatry, PGlMER,
Chandigarh, India

12.50-13.05

SOURCES AND LEVEL OF STRESS AMONG SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT


STUDENTS, FACULTY OF LIBERAL ARTS, UBON RATCHATHANI UNIVERSITY,
THAILAND. T Panchana, Ubon Ratchathani University, Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand

13.05-14.30 LUNCH BREAK (FREE TIME)

Afternoon session
14.30-17.40

SYMPOSIUM 4. INTERACTIVE MODERATED POSTER SESSION


Chairs: M Koshiba, S Nakamura (Japan), AV Kalueff (USA)

THE ROLE OF GLUTAREDOXIN IN AGING AND PARKINSONS DISEASE. SG Chen, WM


Johnson, P Curran, PS Krishnan, K Choe, B Shivakumar, AL Wilson-Delfosse, JJ Mieyal,
Departments of Pathology and Pharmacology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH,
USA
ELECTROACUPUNCTURE ATTENUATES THE MICROGLIA ACTIVATION INDUCED BY A
PRURITOGEN IN THE MOUSE SPINAL CORD. YH Chen, CH Tseng, Graduate Institute of
Acupuncture Science, China Medical University, Taiwan
A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF STRESS AND LIFE QUALITY ON CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE
AMONG PATIENTS WITH FAMILIAL HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIA. NT Chang, PY Kang, SF Tsai,
School of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University and Cardiovascular Center,
National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, Departments of Nursing, Mackay Medical
College, New Taipei, Taiwan
THE INVESTIGATIONOF ELDERLY DEPRESSION TENDENCY, FALL AND QUALITY OF LIFE
OF SANZHI AREA IN TAIWAN. S-F Tsai, H-Y Yang, Y-H Chen, TC Hung, T-H Huang, Department
of Nursing, Mackay Medical College, Tamsui Community Health Center, Mackay Memorial Hospital,
New Taipei, Taiwan
RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CARDIO-RESPIRATORY FUNCTION AND HEART RATE
VARIABILITY PARAMETERS IN PATIENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA. S-L Cheng, C-Y Chiu,

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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Nursing Department, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei, Department of Cosmetric Science and
Application, Lan Yang Institute of Technology, Toucheng Township, Taiwan
PERFORMANCE AND COGNITIVE STRATEGIES OF RATS IN THE PLACE AVOIDANCE TASK:
EFFECT OF NON-COMPETITIVE NMDA RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS. T Nekovarova, E Antosova,
K Englerova, D Klement, K Vales, National Institute of Mental Health, Klecany, Department of
Normal, Pathological and Clinical Physiology, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Institute
of Physiology AS, Prague, Czech Republic
OLFACTORY DISTURBANCES, CYTOKINES AND PAIN SENSITIVITY IN ADDICTION. T
Nevidimova, ISBS Fellow, E Batukhtina, D Savochkina, N Bokhan, Mental Health Research Institute,
Tomsk, Russia
AN ANIMAL MODEL OF PSTD IS ASSOCIATED WITH A LONG-LASTING DECREASE IN
SYNAPTIC SPINES AND INCREASED MICROGLIA WITHIN FRONTO-HIPPOCAMPAL
NETWORKS. KL Smith, MS Kassem, D Clarke, S Todd, D Brown, M Bennett, J Lagopoulos, J
Arnold, Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
PARTICIPATION OF THE EXTENDED AMYGDALA SYSTEM OF THE BRAIN IN MECHANISMS
OF REINSTATEMENT OF PLACE PREFERENCE OF AMPHETAMINE IN RATS. AA Lebedev, VI
Morozov, PD Shabanov, Institute of Experimental Medicine, St. Petersburg, Russia
ASSOCIATIONS OF SOCIAL FUNCTIONING ASSESSMENT AND NEEDS OF CARE IN THE
LONG-TERM PSYCHIATRIC UNIT. LC Huang, WT Chen, Zuoying Branch of Kaohsiung Armed
Forces General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
MONTITORING ANXIETY OF TAIWANESE STUDENTS UNDER THE STRESS OF AN ENGLISH
PRESETATION VIA PHOTOPLETHYSMOGRAPHY. JR Yeh, JS Shieh, SZ Fan, Research Center
for Adaptive Data Analysis, National Central University, Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Yuan Ze University, Department of Anesthesia, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
PP14 FUNCTIONS AS A REPRESSOR INVOLVED IN THE TRANSLATION INHIBITION
MEDIATED BY THE INHIBITORY UPSTREAM OPEN READING FRAME OF HUMAN CHOP
GENE. CC Hsieh, HC Lee, HC Nien, JC Sheu, HJ Tsai, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology,
National Taiwan University, Liver Disease Prevention and Treatment Research Foundation, Taipei,
Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei City, Graduate Institute of
Clinical Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
USING ZEBRAFISH TO IDENTIFY THE NOVEL GENE INVOLVED IN REGULATING THE
HUORFCHOP-MEDIATED TRANSLATIONAL INHIBITION DURING ER STRESS. HC Lee, HJ
Tsai, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei City, Taiwan
THE EFFECT OF FOUR-AGENTS-DECOCTION ON MODULATION OF EXCITATORY AMINO
ACID IN MORPHINE TOLERANT RATS. S-L Lin, C-H Cherng, C-C Yeh, C-S Wong, Department of
Anesthesiology, Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MEASURES OF METACOGNITION AND OBSESSIVE
COMPULSIVE DISORDER. SY Sohn, JI Kang, K Namkoong, SJ Kim, Department of Psychiatry and
Institute of Behavioral Science in Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South
Korea

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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EFFECTS OF EARLY-LIFE STRESS ON COGNITIVE FUNCTION AND NEUROMORPHOLOGY


IN ADULT RATS WITH NORMAL OR ACCELERATED SENESCENCE. MA Tikhonova, TG
Amstislavskaya, AV Shevchenko, YJ Ho, Scientific Research Institute of Physiology and Basic
Medicine, Novosibirsk State Medical University, Novosibirsk, Russia; School of Psychology, Chung
Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
ESTROGEN STRESS-RELATED PHENOTYPE DIFFERENCE IN MIGRAINEURS BY HAPLOGENOTYPES. H-J Park, M Kim, Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital,
Protein Metabolism Medical Research Center, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul,
South Korea
EARLY-LIFE STRESS ATTENUATES THE CAPACITY OF ADULT NEURAL PRECURSOR
CELLS TO DIFFERENTIATE INTO NEURONS VIA METHYLATION OF RETINOIC ACID
RECEPTOR GENE PROMOTER. S Boku, Department of Psychiatry, Kobe University Graduate
School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan
A QUALITATIVE APPROACH TO EXPLORING PSYCHIATRIC PATIENTS PRIVACY ISSUES
RELATING TO NEW TECHNOLOGY: PRACTICAL STEPS. N Zakaria, R Ramli, Medical
Informatics and e-learning Unit, Medical Education Department, College of Medicine, King Saud
University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; School of Computer Sciences, University Sains Malaysia, George
Town, Malaysia
MEASUREMENT OF ANTICIPATORY ANHEDONIA USING A NOVEL CONFLICT TEST IN THE
MOUSE. D Jeon, BS Kim, S Jeong, Y Jeong, S Kim, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and
Technology, Daejeon, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul,
Republic of Korea
FEMALE INFERTILITY: A PSYCHOLOGICAL PROFILE. D Pavlova, I Grechenliev, H
Pamukchiiski, Medical University of Sofia, Sofia, Bulgaria
AN EXPLORATORY STUDY ON THE EFFECT OF ACTIVITY SCHEDULING ON THE
NEGATIVE SYMPTOMS OF PATIENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA IN PSYCHIATRY WARD,
NEHRU HOSPITAL, PGIMER, CHANDIGARH. AK Kaur, M Dogra, K Das, A Avasthi, NINE,
PGIMER, Chandigarh, India
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PERSONALITY, SENSE OF EFFICACY AND STRESS IN
KOREAN TEACHERS. S Park, Y Kim, Seoul National Hospital, Seoul, South Korea
A NOVEL 3D METHOD OF LOCOMOTOR ANALYSIS IN ADULT ZEBRAFISH: IMPLICATIONS
FOR AUTOMATED DETECTION OF CNS DRUG-EVOKED PHENOTYPES. AM Stewart, ISBS
Fellow, F Grieco, RAJ Tegelenbosch, A Kaluyeva, LPJJ Noldus and AV Kalueff, ISBS Fellow,
ZENEREI Research Center and the International Zebrafish Neuroscience Research Consortium,
(ZNRC), Slidell, USA; Noldus Information Technology BV, Wageningen, Netherlands; Research
Institute for Marine Nutrition and Drugs (RIMND) and College of Food Science and Technology,
Guangdong Ocean University, Zhanjiang, China; Institute of Translational Biomedicine, St.
Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia
17.40-18.00

CLOSING CEREMONY
ANNOUNCING FORTHCOMING ISBS CONFERENCES

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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CONFERENCE
ABSTRACTS

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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Day 1. Sun, July 26, 2015


Shinryoku-Kaikan (Alumnus Hall), School of Medicine, University of Kobe, Kusunokicho, Chuo-ku, Kobe,
Japan

Morning session
OPENING PLENARY LECTURE: ADVERSE SENSORY INPUT OF THE ABUSE MODIFIED BY
EARLY EXPERIENCE. A Tomoda, Research Center for Child Mental Development, University of
Fukui, Fukui, Japan
INTRODUCTION: Childhood maltreatment markedly increases the risk for psychopathology and is
associated with structural and functional brain differences. For example, exposure to parental verbal
abuse (PVA) and/or interparental violence during childhood is associated with negative outcomes,
such as depression, PTSD and reduced cognitive abilities. Other forms of childhood abuse have
been found to be associated with alterations in brain structure. METHODS: Optimized voxel based
morphometry was performed on unmedicated, right-handed subjects (18-25 years) with histories of
PVA or witnessing interparental violence (WDV) during childhood, and psychiatrically healthy
controls of comparable age and gender. Group differences in gray matter volume (GMV) covaried
by age, gender, parental education, financial stress, and total GMV were assessed using highresolution, T1-weighted, volumetric MRI data sets. The information presented is based on a
collaborative study with the Psychiatry Department at Harvard Medical School on the relationship
between brain functions and the human mind. RESULTS: GMV was increased by 14.1% in the left
superior temporal gyrus (STG, BA 22) (P = 0.004, corrected cluster level). GMV in this cluster was
associated most strongly with levels of maternal ( = 0.544, P < 0.0001) and paternal ( = 0.300, P <
0.02) verbal aggression and inversely associated with parental education ( = 0.577, P < 0.0001).
Conversely, WDV subjects had a 6.1% GMV reduction in the right lingual gyrus (BA18) (P = 0.029,
False Discovery Rate corrected peak level). DISCUSSION: Brain regions that process and convey
the adverse sensory input of the abuse may be specifically modified by these experiences,
particularly in subjects exposed to a single type of maltreatment. Exposure to multiple types of
maltreatment is more commonly associated with morphological alterations in corticolimbic regions.
These findings fit with preclinical studies showing that sensory cortices are highly plastic structure.
RESEARCH SUPPORT: This work was supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B) and
Challenging Exploratory Research (Houga) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science
and Technology (MEXT) of Japan (KAKENHI grants 24300149 and 25560386).
ISBS PRESIDENTIAL LECTURE: MODELING AFFECTIVE DISORDERS IN ZEBRAFISH. AV
Kalueff, ISBS Fellow, S Li, Y Liu, P Chen, L Yang, JJ Wang, A Kaluyeva, AM Stewart, ISBS Fellow,
C Song, Guangdong Ocean University, Zhanjiang, China; ZENEREI Institute and the International
Zebrafish Neuroscience Research Consortium (ZNRC), New Orleans, USA; Institute for
Translational Biomedicine, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia
The zebrafish (Danio rerio) is rapidly emerging as a new important species for studying mechanisms
of brain function and dysfunction. Focusing on selected central nervous system (CNS) disorders
(anxiety, depression, PTSD, and drug abuse), we will discuss the high value of zebrafish aquatic
models in translational neuroscience, with a particular focus on emotionality/affective deficits. I will
also evaluate the contribution of zebrafish to neuroimaging, circuit level, and drug discovery research.
Outlining the role of zebrafish in modeling a wide range of human brain disorders, this talk will
discuss recent applications and existing challenges in this field, as well as outline the potential of

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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zebrafish models in behavioral phenomics and high-throughput genetic/small molecule screening for
CNS drug discovery.
ISBS SPECIAL LECTURE: STRESS RESPONSES AND MU OPIOID RECEPTOR EXPRESSION, I
Sora, Department of Psychiatry, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan
Opioid systems have been well studied with regard to mechanisms of reward and analgesia, both of
which are affected by stressful experiences. In addition, differences in opioid function can modify
acute stress responses, and stress-related neurochemical and behavioral changes have been
documented. The use of mu opioid receptor (MOR) knockout (KO) mice has provided novel insights
into molecular mechanisms underlying stress-induced emotional responses. MOR-KO mice
displayed significantly decreased immobility time in both the tail-suspension and repeated forced
swim tests and significantly reduced stress-induced increases in plasma corticosterone
concentrations compared with wild-type mice. MOR-KO mice also entered more, and spent more
time in, the open arms of the elevated plus maze. Moreover, aversion to social contact was induced
by chronic social defeat stress in wild-type mice but was reduced in MOR-KO mice. MOR-KO mice
were resistant to stress exposure and exhibit fewer stress-induced emotional responses (i.e.,
anxiety- and depression-like behaviors) compared with wild-type mice. These results suggest that
mu opioid receptor play an important role in stress sensitivity and/or stress-induced emotional
responses, including anxiety- and depression-like responses.
ISBS SPECIAL LECTURE: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF NEONATAL STRESS ON BRAIN OF
HIGH RISK NEWBORN. H Yamanouchi, M Koshiba, ISBS Fellow, Department of Pediatrics and
Biochemistry, Saitama Medical University School of Medicine, Saitama, Japan
POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER-LIKE BEHAVIORS IN FABP3 NULL MICE. K Fukunaga,
Y Yabuki, I Takahata, Y Owada, N Shioda, Tohoku University Graduate School of Pharmaceutical
Sciences, Yamaguchi University School of Medicine, Sendai, Japan
INTRODUCTION: We have recently reported that fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3, H-FABP)
binds to the intracellular loop of dopamine D2L receptor and that FABP3 null mouse reveals
dysfunction of dopamine-regulated motor coordination (Shioda and Fukunaga, 2010). We here
document that FABP3 null mouse shows an enhancement of anxiety and locomotor behaviors.
METHODS: Wild type mice (C57BL6) and FABP3 null mice underwent fear conditioning once day
with consecutive 5 days and measured the fear acquisition and extinction for 35 days. When mice
were given melatonin receptor agonist, the drug was orally adminisered once a day before given
conditional stimuli. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: FABP3 null mice had deficits in extinction of
conditional fear memory. The acquisition of conditional fear memory in FABP3 null was not
distinguished from those in wild type mice. In one month after exposure to conditional stimulation,
wild type mice significantly reduced the elapsed time form the chamber given foot shock. However,
the elapsed time remained elevated in FABP3 null mice. Likewise, the c-Fos expression after
exposure to conditional stimulation remained elevated in FABP3 mice but declined in the wild type
mice. More importantly, the PTSD-like behaviors in FABP3 null mice ameliorated by treatment with
melatonin receptor agonist. Taken together, FABP3 null mice are a novel model of PTSD, useful for
drug development to improve the PTSD-like behaviors. RESEARCH SUPPORT: This work is
supported by Kakenhi 25460090 (to NS).

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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Afternoon session
SYMPOSIUM 1. ZUKOWSKA SYMPOSIUM ON STRESS NEUROSCIENCE
Chairs: AV Kalueff (USA) and S Nakamura (Japan)
INTRODUCTION: PROFESSOR ZOFIA M ZUKOWSKA
This regular ISBS symposium is dedicated to Professor Zofia
Zukowska (1949-2012). Professor Zukowska received her M.D.
and Ph.D., trained in cardiovascular medicine at the Warsaw
Medical Academy (Poland). She pursued post-doctoral training at
the NIH, working with such renowned scientists as Irwin I. Kopin,
Scientific Director of NINDS, and Julie Axelrod, Nobel Laureate. It
was during this research period when her interest in stress and
neuropeptides became galvanized. For the last 25 years, she was
a professor (and, later, Chair) of the Department of Physiology and
Biophysics at Georgetown University, before moving to the
University of Minnesota as a new Stress Physiology Center
Director. She assessed how stress affects cardiovascular and
metabolic health and diseases, and the role of peptides, in
particular neuropeptide Y (NPY), a sympathetic neurotransmitter
and a stress mediator. She was the first to determine that NPY mediates stress-induced prolonged
vasoconstriction and vascular mitogenic and pro-atherosclerotic effects (via Y1 receptors) and potent
angiogenic actions (via Y2 receptors), establishing the role of NPY in ischemia, retinopathy, tumors
and obesity. Professor Zukowska was a strong supporter of ISBS and our conferences. Her scientific
vision, extraordinary creativity, kindness to colleagues, and the talent to be daring, continue to
inspire her ISBS colleagues and their research.
ACTIVATION OF CORTICOTROPIN-RELEASING FACTOR RECEPTOR 1 IS NECESSARY FOR
RESTRAINT-INDUCED CONDITIONED PLACE PREFERENCE. YY Mei, JS Li, Department of
Psychology, National Chung Cheng University, Chia-Yi, Taiwan
During a stress experience, glucocorticoid (GC) and corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) are 2 wellknown hormones released from the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In recent years, acute mild
stress, such as restraint, and intra-accumbens injection of CRF, have been found to be able to
induce conditioned place preference (CPP) in rats and mice respectively, suggesting that stress
could have a direct role in the reinforcement mechanism. Here we hypothesized that: (a) GC and/or
CRF might possess rewarding properties; (b) GC and/or CRF might mediate restraint-induced CPP
in rats by way of nucleus accumbens core. In Experiment 1, the peripheral applications of
corticosterone (1, 3, 5 and 10 mg/kg) did not induce CPP. Furthermore, a GC antagonist
mifepristone (10, 40, and 100 mg/kg) also failed to block restraint-induced CPP. In Experiment 2,
both intracerebroventricular and intra-accumbens administrations of a selective CRFR1 antagonist
antalarmin (1 and 0.125 g, respectively) completely blocked restraint-induced CPP. However,
contrary to the study in mice, intra-accumbens injection of CRF (5, 50 and 500 ng) failed to induce
CPP in Wistar rats. In summary, activation of intra-accumbens CRFR1, but not glucocorticoid, is
essential for restraint-induced CPP in rats. Further studies are necessary to clarify the discrepancy
between mice and rats reaction to the intra-accumbens injection of CRF. RESEARCH SUPPORT:
The study was partially supported by a grant of National Science Council, Taiwan (NSC 102-2410-H194-023-MY2).

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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EFFECTS OF AGING AND EARLY-LIFE STRESS ON SEXUAL MOTIVATION IN MALE RATS.


TG Amstislavskaya, AS Dolodoev, MA Tikhonova, Scientific Research Institute of Physiology and
Basic Medicine, Novosibirsk, Russia
INTRODUCTION: Both aging and stress affect reproductive function in males. However, the effects
of their combination remain unclear. OXYS rat strain with hereditary defined accelerated senescence
(Kolosova et al., 2014) is a promising model for studying the interaction of early life stress effects
and the development of genetically defined aging-related deficits. We studied the effects of maternal
separation (MS), aging, and their interaction on sexual motivation and hormonal response during
sexual arousal in male rats of Wistar and OXYS strains. The role of ERK/MAPK signal transduction
pathway in the dysfunctions of male sexual motivation was also examined. METHODS: MS
procedure was performed daily for 15 or 180 min from the 1st to 21st postnatal days. At the age of 4
months, males of the experimental groups underwent the test for sexual arousal. The dynamics of
the parameters of behavioral and hormonal response in male rats at different duration of exposure to
a receptive female was also registered in 12-month old Wistar and OXYS rats. Sexual motivation
was estimated by its behavioral correlate, a time spent by a male at the transparent perforated
partition separating it from a receptive female. Plasma testosterone levels and the levels of
ERK/pERK were measured using specific ELISA kits. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Time spent by
12-month old Wistar males at the partition gradually decreased during 1-h exposure to a receptive
female, and the peak of interest was observed during the first 10 min of the exposure. In 12-month
old OXYS males, the parameters did not differ significantly between all time-points, and were
significantly reduced compared to Wistar males. Similar dynamics was observed in 4-month old rat
males. In MS-subjected Wistar males, the expression of sexual motivation was dramatically
decreased in comparison with control Wistar males. This effect was found both in males separated
daily for 15 and 180 min. Thus, we first demonstrated that even short-term chronic stress at early
post-natal stage of development could cause the attenuation of sexual motivation in adult males.
OXYS males subjected to the MS procedure did not differ from the control OXYS males with the
reduced sexual motivation. Wistar males were characterized by the peak of testosterone at the 30th
min of the test and the following decrease of the hormone level. OXYS males had a gradual increase
of the testosterone level in plasma that became significant at min 40, and was further maintained till
at least min 60. We suggest that the differences in dynamics of testosterone level were associated
with the disturbances in OXYS male related to an increased frequency and number of Leidig cell
adenomas in their testes. The involvement of ERK/MAPK signal transduction pathway in the
regulation of the initial phase of sexual behavior (sexual arousal) was examined.
ROLE OF CENTRAL MUSCARINIC CHOLINERGIC MECHANISMS IN SEX BEHAVIOR
REALIZATION UNDER THE CONDITION OF STRESS. NS Sapronov, AA Bairamov, NN Petrova,
EV Petrova, Institute of Experimental Medicine RAS, II Mechnikov Northwestern State Medical
University, St. Petersburg, Russia
INTRODUCTION: Physiological stress is the mechanism of active adaptation to changeable
environment factors. Under the influence of different pathogenic factors and stressor actions, the
reproductive function and sex behavior (SB) also change. Detailed investigation of different stressor
actions (e.g., immobilization, electric shock, could water, noise exposure) on sex behavior of malerats showed that it depends on character and duration of stressor action. METHODS: In order to
activate the central M-cholinergic mechanisms, half of animals were treated with anticholinesterase
drug Galanthaminum (1 mg/kg) and N-cholinoblocker Gangleronum (5 mg/kg) 30 min before
stressor. One hour after stressor action there were registered the parameters of SB (a number of
attempts ATT; intromissions IMS; ejaculations EJA; latency of EJA; interval between EJA; renewal
period RP), as well as the content of neuromediators (DA, NE, 5-HT) in various brain formations
(dorsal hippocampus, hypothalamus, n. caudatus, amygdala, substance nigra). RESULTS AND

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DISCUSSION: The results of the experiments showed that the activation of M-cholinergic
mechanisms under the stress conditions provided the protected effect on the manifestations of SB
and moreover leaded to the activation of its components. At the same time there was restored the
balance of neuromediators in brain formations studied up to the level registered in intact animals.
The introduction of cholinotropic drugs also significantly restored the content of testosterone and
tropic adenohypophyseal hormones (LH, FSH) in peripheral blood. CONCLUSION: The mechanism
of activating action of cholinotropic drugs on SB under stress is determined by direct influence on the
central M-cholinergic mechanisms of brain as well as by the regulation of neuroendocrine and
neuromediatory systems regulating SB.
MENTAL DISORDERS IN OFFSPRING OF PARENTS WITH BIPOLAR DISORDER IN SOUTH
KOREA. SH Shim, Soonchunhyang University Hospital, Cheoan, South Korea
BACKGROUND: A meta-analysis and more recent studies report rates of bipolar disorder between
4-15% in the offspring of parents with bipolar disorder, and between 0-2% in the offspring of healthy
parents. Whether offspring of parents with bipolar disorder are at specifically high risk to develop
bipolar disorder and other psychiatric disorders has not been adequately studied. Furthermore, in
South Korea, there have been no studies of lifetime prevalence and specificity of psychiatric
disorders in offspring of parents with bipolar disorder. The aim of this study was to examine the
prevalence of mental disorders in the offspring of individuals with BP. METHODS: The sample
consisted of 100 child and adolescent offspring (aged 6.018.9 years; mean S.D. = 13.63.9
years) from 65 nuclear families having at least one parent with bipolar disorder (36 with bipolar
disorder type I and 29 with bipolar disorder type II). Probands and biological co-parents were
interviewed by psychologists using a semi-structured diagnostic interview and the offspring were
evaluated using the Korean version of the Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorders and
Schizophrenia-Present and Lifetime Version (K-SADS-PL). Tools for the evaluation of the offspring
were Korean version of Mood Disorder Questionnaire, Korean ADHD Rating Scales for Parents,
Childrens Depression Inventory(CDI), and Revised Childrens Manifest Anxiety Scale(RCMAS).
RESULTS: For depression, 100 child and adolescent offspring were an average CDI scores of
15.75.6. 31.2% of them exceeded the clinical cut-off for depression. For anxiety, 100 child and
adolescent offspring were an average RCMAS scores of 17.57.6, who exceeded the clinical cut-offs
for anxiety. Sixty one of the 100 participants met the criteria for at least one mental disorder. Of
these, 35 participants had a mood disorder, 35 had an anxiety disorder, and 29 had attention-deficit
hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Thirty nine of the offspring just had no psychiatric diagnosis. Of the
35 with a mood disorder, 22 were diagnosed with bipolar disorder, 16 children received a diagnosis
of any depressive disorder, 16 (45.7%) had comorbid ADHD and 18 (51.4%) had comorbid anxiety
disorders. The mean age at onset of mood symptoms among the subjects with bipolar and major
depressive disorder was 11.82.3 years. However, the child with bipolar disorder type 1 (n = 1)
developed her first mood symptoms at eight years of age. Moreover, the child with bipolar disorder
type I had episodic courses, exhibiting irritable or elated moods during manic episodes, and had a
prior history of psychiatric hospitalization. CONCLUSION: Offspring of parents with bipolar disorder
are at high risk for depression, anxiety and any mental disorders. The study of offspring of bipolar
parents who are at high risk for developing bipolar disorder themselves is essential to identify
potential prodromal manifestations of the disorder and to eventually establish targeted early
intervention strategies. Longitudinal studies are needed to confirm the prodromal manifestations of
bipolar disorder and risk factors associated with the development of specific diagnoses in children
and adolescent.
OREXIN OX(1) RECEPTOR ANTAGONIST SB-408124 POTENTIATES THE INHIBITORY ACTION
OF SULPIRIDE ON AMPHETAMINE-ACTIVATED BUT NOT SPONTANEOUS SELF-

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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STIMULATION. PD Shabanov, AA Lebedev, RO Roik, VI Morozov, Military Medical Academy,


Institute of Experimental Medicine RAS, St. Petersburg, Russia
BACKGROUND: The orexin (hypocretin) family of hypothalamic neuropeptides has been
participated in reinforcement mechanisms relevant to both food and drug reward. There are dense
concentrations of orexin receptors in the extended amygdala and mesocoricolimbic structures
implicated in drug reinforcement processes. Behavioral studies with antagonists at the orexin Aselective receptor OX(1) have demonstrated its involvement in behavioral sensitization, conditioned
place-preference, self-administration and reinstatement of drugs abuse. Because of suggestion, that
OX1 and D2 dopamine receptors could form heteromeric complex, for example, orexin A + quinpirol,
a D2 dopamine agonist, or SB-408124, an antagonist of OX1 receptors, with sulpiride, we used both
latter drugs in our experiments to prove or disprove this admission. The possible interaction between
orexin OX1 and dopamine D2 receptors in alcohol abuse has recently shown in the experiment on
rodents. Here, we attempt to clarify whether SB-408124, an antagonist of the orexin A-selective
receptors OX(1) injected into the central amygdale, can interact with antagonist D2 receptor sulpiride
on inhibition of reinforcing effects of amphetamine on self-stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus in
rats. METHODS: The 51 Wistar male rats were implanted bipolar electrodes into the lateral
hypothalamus to study self-stimulation reaction in the Skinner box. Simultaneously, the
microcannules were implanted into the central nucleus of amygdala (CA) to inject the drugs studied
(1 g in 1 l in volume for each injection). Antagonist of the orexin A-selective receptors OX(1) SB408124 was administered intrastructurally (into CA) and antagonist of D2 receptor sulpiride was
injected intraperitoneally followed by pharmacological analysis. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: SB408124 injected into the extended amygdala region (CA) alone had no effect on self-stimulation of
the lateral hypothalamus. Sulpiride in low dose (5 mg/kg) did not affect both the spontaneous and
amphetamine-activated self-stimulation (1 mg/kg). Amphetamine as a rule increased self-stimulation
measured as lowering the threshold and enhancing the frequency. Amphetamine-induced
stimulatory effects on intracranial self-stimulation were reduced by injections of SB-408124 into the
CA up to the background level. Simultaneous administration of SB-408124, an antagonist of
the orexin A-selective receptors OX(1), and sulpiride i.p. (5 mg/kg) inhibited amphetamine-induced
self-stimulation in more degree than background level, that was sulpiride potentiated the inhibitory
effect of SB-408124. These data demonstrate that OX(1) receptors play an important role in
regulating the reinforcing and reward-enhancing properties of amphetamine and suggest that orexin
transmission (neuromodulation) is likely essential for establishing and maintaining the amphetamine
habit in human addicts. However, the observations that OX1 antagonism reduces brain reward and
blocks stress- and cue-induced reinstatement of drug-seeking suggesting that class of compounds
may be useful additions to stress-reduction and other behavioral therapies in the treatment of
substance abuse disorders. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that the combined use of low
doses of D2 antagonists (e.g., sulpiride) and antagonists of the orexin A-selective receptors OX(1)
(e.g., SB-408124) is necessary to reorganize the central mechanisms underlying the addiction, in
order to correct drug abuse. RESEARCH SUPPORT: Supported by the RFBR grant 13-04-00186.
IS VIDEO SCENERY AS APPEALING AS REAL LANDSCAPE? AN EEG STUDY. NC Chiang,
SCL Huang, Department of Social Psychology, Department of Tourism, Shih Hsin University, Taipei,
Taiwan
INTRODUCTION: The use of videos for environmental representation is common in modern society.
In fact, video images have been adopted in perceptual research more often than before. However,
studies devoted to examining whether people responses to real landscape are the same as those to
video scenery, are limited. This study adopted objective EEG measurements, alpha and beta
brainwaves, to examine the brainwave patterns to real landscape, and those to simulated video
scenery. METHODS: Twenty participants were recruited from different colleges in Taiwan. The study

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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setting was a man-made lake located in a university campus. Ten participants personally
experienced the lake landscape, while other ten watched the simulated lake scenery on the video. A
portable EEG headset was used to measure the participants brainwave responses. RESULTS AND
DISCUSSION: Our results indicate that the participants low-alpha rhythms in the on-site condition
fluctuated more often, and reached more extreme peaks than those in the video condition. Whereas,
their high-beta rhythms were in the opposite patterns, which showed higher peaks in the video
condition than in the on-site condition. The results suggested that the participants in the on-site
condition might unconsciously be more alert to the on-site stimuli than the video participants.
However, they might need to devote more cognitive processing to understand the environmental
content on the video than the real environment. Furthermore, the brainwave responses for the video
condition were matched with what the participants saw on the video, and thus, the physical features
in the environment that caused the bursts or peaks of brain rhythms across time were identified.
Based on the findings, the implications of brainwave patterns in environmental psychology, as well
as the application of videos as visual surrogates, are discussed.
MELATONIN, CORTISOL AND DAYTIME SLEEPINESS AFTER NIGHTTIME EXPOSURE OF
LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED) WITH AND WITHOUT BLUE LIGHT: A RANDOMIZED, DOUBLEBLINDED, CROSS-OVER, PLACEBO-CONTROLLED COMPARISON. HJ Jeon, Department of
Psychiatry, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, South
Korea
INTRODUCTION: Light is the primary stimulus for regulating circadian rhythms. The short
wavelengths (446-477nm) are the most potent wavelengths providing circadian input for regulating
melatonin secretion. Exposure to light from smart-phone display may be linked to increased risk for
sleep disorders because these devices emit optical radiation at short wavelengths, close to the peak
sensitivity of melatonin suppression. The purpose of the present study was to test the melatonin
suppression and to test circadian phase delay effects of a smart-phone display comprising in healthy
adult male volunteers. METHODS: This study was prospective, double-blind, randomized crossover
study. A total of 22 healthy male subjects with a mean age of 30.95 years (SD 4.15) were finally
recruited to participate in the study by advertisement, 21 complete the study. RESULTS AND
DISCUSSION: Participants with standard smart-phone display had lower levels and later onset of
melatonin secretion than the adjusted group. The 150-min exposure to light from standard smartphone display induced a 14.4-min phase delay of DLMO50% (Dim light melatonin onset 50%)
compared with adjusted smart-phone display. RESEARCH SUPPORT: Samsung Display.
SPECIAL FOCUS TALK: MECHANISM OF ANXIOLYTIC EFFECT OF SSRI. T Izumi, M Yoshioka,
ISBS Fellow, Department of Neuropharmacology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine,
Sapporo, Japan
INTRODUCTION: The amygdala is a crucial brain structure for anxiety, and it is speculated that the
serotonergic neural system in this structure plays an important role in regulating anxiety. In our
previous study, we indicated that systemic administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor
(SSRI) had anxiolytic effect in fear-conditioned rats, and conditioned fear-induced c-Fos expression
in the basolateral nucleus of amygdala (BLA) was blocked by SSRI. In the present study, we
investigated the effect of local injection of SSRI and 5-HT1A antagonist into BLA on animal models
of anxiety. METHODS: Male Wistar/ST rats (9-14 W) were used. All animal protocols were approved
by the Hokkaido University Animal Care and Use Committee. Guide cannula were implanted 2 mm
above BLA (3.0 mm, 5.7 mm, 6.6 mm from dura). Eight days after the surgery, contextual fear
conditioning and elevated plus-maze were performed. Ten minutes before tests, citalopram (SSRI,
0.3, 1 and 3 g/side) and WAY-100635 (5-HT1A antagonist, 0.005, 0.05 and 0.5 g/side) were

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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bilaterally injected to BLA. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Local injection of citalopram into the
bilateral BLA dose-dependently attenuated conditioned fear-induced freezing behavior in rat, and
this effect was dose-dependently blocked by local co-administration of WAY100635. Elevated plus
maze test was no change with citalopram and/or WAY100635 injection. From these results, it is
speculated that SSRI exerts anxiolytic effect on memory-dependent fear via 5-HT1A receptors in
BLA. RESEARCH SUPPORT: This study was supported by a Grant from the Japanese Ministry of
Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology 06770740 (TI).
EXERCISE ENHANCES STRESS COPING DESPITE INCREASING CORTICOSTERONE, LIKELY
BY UPREGULATING THE DOPAMINE LEVEL IN THE MEDIAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX. C Chen,
S Nakagawa, Y Kitaichi, Y An, Y Omiya, N Song, M Koga, T Inoue, I Kusumi, Department of
Psychiatry, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan
INTRODUCTION: Although exercise can improve stress coping, the underlying neurotransmitter
mechanisms of this effect remain largely unknown. Furthermore, exercise activates the
hypothalamicpituitaryadrenal HPA axis and increases glucocorticoid (CORT), the stress hormone,
which impairs stress coping. Thus, exercise should, through some mechanism, override the
detrimental effects of elevated CORT. The purpose of the present study is to investigate by what
neurotransmitter(s) exercise can override the detrimental effect of elevated CORT within the medial
prefrontal cortex (mPFC), the brain center of stress coping. METHODS: Exercise rats were raised
with three weeks of free access to wheels, while control rats were raised in same cages but without
wheels. The forced swim test was performed at 19:00, the time at which lights are switched off, and
around which the (circadian) CORT levels peak. A separate group of rats were raised the same way,
and mPFC microdialysis sampling was performed before and after the forced swim test. We used
the high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system to detect neurotransmitters, and an
ELISA kit to measure CORT. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Three weeks of voluntary wheel
running reduced immobility time in the forced swim test, suggesting stress coping effect. Basal level
of extracellular CORT (17:00-19:00, around circadian peak) in the mPFC was higher in exercise than
control rats. When subjected to forced swim, both exercise and control rats showed increased CORT.
However, CORT in exercise rats decreased to basal level earlier than in control rats. Extracellular
dopamine level in the mPFC was increased in exercise rats, both at the basal level and after forced
swim. Basal level of extracellular glutamate level in the mPFC tended to be reduced in exercise rats.
There was no group difference with regard to serotonin, noradrenaline, glutamine, glycine, taurine, or
alanine. These results suggest that elevated dopamine level in the mPFC may be a mechanism by
which exercise improves stress coping, and overrides the effect of increased basal CORT. This
interpretation is in line with evidence that dopamine promotes stress coping, and antidepressants
also achieve therapeutic effects through dopamine neurotransmission in rodents. RESEARCH
SUPPORT: Hokkaido University Clark Memorial Foundation.
ABNORMAL INTRA-GROUP VOCAL COMMUNICATION WITHIN PRIMATE FAMILY INCLUDING
A KID OF MODEL OF AUTISM. K Mimura, N Ichinohe, Department of Ultrastructural Research,
National Institute of Neuroscience, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry (NCNP), Tokyo,
Japan
INTRODUCTION: Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is one of the most common developmental
disorders. Children with ASD have trouble of communication (DMS-V, 2013) also with family, and
thus, probably, communication style of parents should be changed. In rodents, exposure embryos to
valproic acid (VPA), known as the risk factor of ASD in human (Christensen, 2013), are widely used
as an animal model (Crawley, 2012). Here we show that common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus)
families with a juvenile with exposure to VPA show vocalization abnormality. METHODS: The

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experiment was conducted using 4 families (2 families with a mother exposed by VPA during
pregnant: VPA family and 2 families with un-exposed by VPA: UE family) of marmosets. In
experimental situation, each family consists of one or two juveniles (ranging from 3 to 4 months of
age) and their respective parents. VAP mother received seven oral administrations of sodium
valproate at 200mg/kg/day from day 60 to 66 after conception. To evaluate the familial social
communication, family (one juvenile and its parents) vocalizations were recorded for 30 minutes in
their home cage carried at shield room. Vocal spectrogram was used to define and count 7 call
types. All procedures were approved by the Animal Research Committee at the National Institute of
Neuroscience in Tokyo, Japan. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: There were significant differences of
call-uses between VPA and UE families. In VPA families, the phee call aiming distant other
marmosets was more frequent than in UE, on the other hand, the trill call, which is supposed to
related to feeling affinity, was less frequent. VPA family member might feel farther mental distance
among each other (e.g., less empathy and sympathy) than UE family. Further analysis and
experiments could lead us to understand communication problem of ASD model primates, which
have less repertoire of languages. RESEARCH SUPPORT: This research was supported by the
JSPS Research Fellowship.
COMMON MARMOSETS DEVELOP GENERATION-SPECIFIC PEER SOCIAL EXPERIENCES
THAT MAY AFFECT THEIR ADULT BODY WEIGHT ADAPTATION TO CLIMATE.G Karino, M
Shukuya, S Nakamura, ISBS Fellow, T Kunikata, H Yamanouchi, M Koshiba, ISBS Fellow.
Department of Pediatrics, Saitama Medical University, Saitama, Tokyo University of Agriculture and
Technology, Tokyo, Tokyo City University, Kanagawa, National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry
(NCNP), The Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Tokyo, Japan
INTRODUCTION: Peer social interaction plays a pivotal role in psychological development. From
birth, parent-infant interaction modulate fundamental brain processes (Bolhuis and Honey, 1998;
Weaver, et al., 2004; Law, et al., 2009), whereas more complex psychological development occurs
in socializing with peers (Laible, et al., 2000; van Geel, et al., 2014). We have hypothesized that
critical learning period, based on social interaction with peers, is one of possible causes of
communicational and emotional disabilities, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Here, we
attempted to test the hypothesis of susceptible period learning with peers by investigating the effects
on acclimatization in adulthood of common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus). METHODS: Two
experimental groups were set as a primate developmental model. The animals experienced
interactions with the same aged peer monkey, either early in an infant (group Early) or late in a
juvenile period (group Late). To assess developmental differences in adulthood between these two
groups, their bodyweight changes, one of well-validated markers of physiological and psychological
health, were traced with indoor/outdoor temperature and humidity. To further explore differences in
the monkeys physical adaptability in metabolic modulation depending on the environmental
modifiers, their blood glucose concentrations were measured. To globally evaluate the correlation
between bodyweight and environmental factors, a multivariate analysis based on principal
component analysis (PCA) by correlation matrix, BOUQUET (Koshiba, et al., 2013), was performed.
After acquiring suggestive parameters correlated with bodyweights, the differences in bodyweights
between the Early and Late groups were compared. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The analyses
performed reveal that bodyweight changes in group Early decreased at lower outdoor humidity,
while group Late was unaltered or increased. In addition, this characterized bodyweights negatively
correlated with blood glucose concentrations. This pilot report of our ongoing longitudinal monitoring
of marmoset development suggests a potential susceptible period for peer-social learning, and the
effect on the development of their autonomic nervous systems adjusting function as climatic
adapting responses. RESEARCH SUPPORT: This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grants
25282221, 21200017, 25119509, 15J06978 and JST-ALCA, JST-a-step in Japan.

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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INCLUSIVE INTERVENTION FOR PSYCHO-DEVELOPMENT WITH BEHAVIOR ANALYSIS


USING QUANTITATIVE EMOTIONAL STATE TRANSLATION (BOUQUET). M Koshiba, ISBS
Fellow, G Karino, K Mimura, H Tokuno, S Usui, I Tanaka, Y Honda, T Kodama, K Sato, H Kishino, M
Shukuya, T Kunikata, S Nakamura, ISBS Fellow, H Yamanouchi, Saitama Medical University,
Saitama, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo, TMIM, National Center of
Neurology and Psychiatry (NCNP), University of Tokyo, Tokyo City University, Tokyo, Japan
INTRODUCTION: Psychological functions of vertebrates, including humans, develop during
longitudinal interaction between genes and environments. To consider any treatments of
psychological disorders per individual differently, some information processing methods based on
quantitative observation and analyses on the vertebrates life-long development must be used. Here,
we outline factors of the interplay between animals and environments, and assess them using
multivariate correlation, to generate adequate inclusive intervention programs with currently
advanced sensing systems. METHODS: As the model of human development, we observed
behavioral, physiological and psychological development of domestic chicks and common
marmosets under simultaneous monitoring of environmental indices. We further attempted to apply
these processes to comprehend infant development in the environments of our neonatal intensive
care unit (NICU). This work was approved by the institutional review board in Saitama Medical
University (13-092). RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: In the analytic space constructed by multiple
dimensions of behavioral, physiological, psychological and environmental data, we identified
arbitrary aspects integrated with their mutual affects. Within the information, the acquired agespecific transition seemed to indicate some qualitative changes with various linear regressions. This
approach is expected to empower the development of future therapeutic interventions. RESEARCH
SUPPORT: This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grants 25282221, 21200017, 25119509,
15K15404 and JST-ALCA, JST-a-step in Japan.
AN ATTIDUDE SURVEY OF IMPORTANCE OF LEARNING NEONATAL CARDIO-PULMONARY
RESUSCITATION (NCPR) IN MIDWIFERY COURSE STUDENT. M Yoda, Y Inai, Saitama Medical
University College, Saitama, Japan
BACKGROUND: Midwife usually assists normal delivery, but recently has an increasing chance of
aiding high-risk deliveries. Thus, it is important for a midwife to be skilled in resuscitation.
Resuscitation training, necessary for student in midwifery course, was started in our neonatal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (NCPR) program. RESEARCH OBJECTIVES: Motivating students for
learning resuscitation, we surveyed factors influencing their motivated attitude of learning the
program before the NCPR training. RESEARCH METHOD: We asked questions described below
before the NCPR training program and obtained 19 answers from 20 students. The protocol of this
research was approved by the ethical committee in Saitama Medical University College. The
questions included educational background of the students, how and when they knew about the
program, their school year, recognition of necessity of learning resuscitation, and expectation of
learning NCPR program. As more detailed question about the expectation, we asked the expected
usefulness in passing the state examination for the license as midwife, experience in midwifery
course, incentive of job opportunity, skill-up, and being self-confident. RESULT AND DISCUSSION:
Many of students did not know the program is open. However, they recognize the necessity of the
NCPR training. This attitude was more clear in the graduate students than in undergraduates. The
main outcomes of the survey was that we need to emphasize the clinical importance of NCPR skills,
which can result in a significant decline in neonatal morbidity and mortality under burden related to
caring for a high-risk infant.

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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REDUCING FATIGUE OF OPERATORS BY PERIPHERAL VISUAL INSPECTION METHODS. A


Ishii, A Sasaki, M Koshiba, ISBS Fellow, Kagawa University, Kagawa, Peripheral Visual Inspection
Lab, Kanagawa, Saitama Medical University, Saitama, Japan
INTRODUCTION: The industrial products are made by manufacturers and shipped to the customers.
In each manufacturing process, inspections are performed on whether or not a product is made by
the standards. Products or semi-manufactured products which did not meet the inspection standards
are removed as defective, as only quality goods proceed to the next level. One of the inspections
includes a visual appearance inspection. For many appearance inspections, automation of the
inspection by machine vision is performed. However, for complex objects difficult to assess in an
automated manner, the visual inspection by a person is performed. Humans greatly differ from
machine vision in several ways. (1) Required specifications: Machine vision can be designed to fit
required specifications, but you cannot design the inspector to fit the specifications. (2) Ability for
inspection: Inspection ability among operators varies, and the operators may not maintain stable
ability for the whole day. (3) Recognition and judgment: It is difficult to understand how the operator
judges the product visually from the in-work motions. The presented peripheral visual inspection
method was introduced by A Sasaki, one of our authors, during his work on productivity
improvement of visual inspection. The significant points of the method are how to use eyes, handling
of the work, and the usage of illumination. How to use eyes in particular is important. If you master
how to use eyes, you will be able to inspect with high speed and without missing defective items. It
can reduce the fatigue of eyes dramatically. Introduction of Peripheral Visual Inspection: The
following three basic matters on understanding the peripheral visual inspection method have been
explained. (1) Inappropriate instruction for operators. (2) Why the difference (defective) can be found
instantly. (3) Perception of light and shade. Then, points of the introduction of the method into the
actual site are presented. EXPERIMENT AND RESULTS: The method has been applied to the
visual inspection site and investigated for 1.5 years. As a result, two major improvements were
obtained. For work efficiency, the inspection time was reduced by 1/3. For health conditions, pain in
the eyes, neck and shoulders (resulting from fatigue of the eyes) has been alleviated. DISCUSSION:
Why was the inappropriate instruction of operators performed for a long time? Why is the high-speed
inspection for a long time for skillful operators possible? We will discuss these questions from the
viewpoint of cranial nerve science.
GENDER DIFFERENCES IN THE DEMAND CONTROL MODEL OF WORK STRESS: AN
EXAMINATION OF DATA FROM SONGKHLA PROVINCE, THAILAND. K Janyam, Faculty of
Liberal Arts, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla, Thailand
Occupational stress related to work environment is receiving an increasing attention. There have
been many test of Karaseks demand-control model of work stress. However, there is limited
research of how the model may differentially apply to male and female workers. Therefore, the
current study aims to investigate work stress among male and female workers according to the
demand-control model. The subjects of the study, 1,094 workers of seven occupations, included
53.1% males. The subjects mean age was 36.3 years (SD=10.5), and 59.2% of them were holders
of bachelors degree or equivalent. The data were collected using a Thai version of the Job Content
Questionnaire (JCQ), and analyzed using mean, SD and t-test. The results revealed significant
differences between male and female job stressors in the demand control model. Male workers
mean score of decision latitude, physical demand, social support, and work hazards was higher than
that in females. Due to the demand control model, these results may indicate that male workers had
higher work control than female workers. Focusing on the decision latitude, male workers may likely
have more opportunities to do the work that improve their skills development (e.g., learning new
skills, creativity, skill varieties, work advancement, self-development and decision-making) than
female workers. Adjusting to the work demand, male workers also experience higher work demand

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21

than female workers. In addition, male workers had higher social support than their female
counterparts. Accordingly, male workers may contribute to the active group more than female
workers, and are likely to have lower level of stress than female workers. According to the results of
our study, female workers may likely have more stress than male workers. Hence, the organization
should consider the appropriateness of the female workers workload and tasks to the level of control
they have over them. Increasing the level of work control (e.g., by encouraging the female workers to
adapt their work behavior) will eventually lead to proactive learning, motivation in self-improvement
and work advancement.

Day 2. Mon, July 27, 2015


Shinryoku-Kaikan (Alumnus Hall), School of Medicine, University of Kobe, Kusunokicho, Chuo-ku, Kobe,
Japan

Morning session
SYMPOSIUM 2. NATURAL AND SOCIAL DISASTERS
Chairs: K Niwa and M Maeda (Japan)
CURRENT SITUATION OF THE INETERNAL RADIATION EXPOSURE SCREENING PROGRAM
IN MINAMISOMA, FUKUSHIMA, AND THE FUTURE TASKS. M Tsubokura, University of Tokyo,
Minamisoma Municipal General Hospital, Japan
INTRODUCTION: Since the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant disaster on 11.03.2011, a
regular internal radiation exposure screening program has been in place in Fukushima. From the
results, we know that the level of chronic internal exposure among residents has been kept at a very
low level. The results from the food inspection programmes and a whole body counter examination
for infants (Babyscan) also showed the similar results. MATERIALS, METHODS AND RESULTS:
However, the level of awareness and the feeling of anxiety that the residents have experienced
about the current situation vary by individuals. When the number of residents who are no longer
interested in radiation and avoid discussing about it is increasing, people who avoid to consume
locally grown produce also exist, especially among the young generation. Within Minamisoma city,
approximately 75 % of parents with small children have answered that they intentionally avoid eating
locally grown produce, and many of them are also worried about water safety. When the number of
individuals who attend information seminars or study session is decreasing, there is a strong
opposition against using locally produced rice. Furthermore, many students are continuing to feel
worried about their future especially about their health, pregnancy and delivery. DISCUSSION:
There are various possible causes to the current trend such as the distrust relationship between
farmers and consumers, issues associated with compensations and radiation-contamination levels,
and the cultural differences. While education and risk communication could be one of the solutions to
the current complexity in Fukushima, it is in the process of trial and error. The education on radiation
and health is not merely about radiation protection, but it is also a part of the public education aiming
for children to regain their self-esteem and to avoid isolation. Similarly, the interventions in place
after the disaster including the internal radiation screening program are not just for measuring and
reducing the levels of exposure. It is also important for maintaining the individuals dignity, and for
protecting the regional culture and history. In this session, I will discuss current local situation in the
context of radiation issues and other public health problems that have arisen after the incident, and
the direction in which we may move forward.

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HOW IS THE FEAR OF LOW-DOSE RADIATION EXPOSURE ALTERING BEHAVIORS AND


APPERCEPTION OF FUKUSHIMA RESIDENTS? A Hori, Hibarigaoka-Hospital, NPO MinanoTonari-Gumi, Department of Disaster and Comprehensive Medicine, Fukushima Medical University,
Fukushima, Japan
INTRODUCTION: Psychiatric practice was severely interrupted after the 11.03.2011 disaster,
especially along the northern part of Fukushimas Pacific coast. Three of four psychiatric hospitals
were located within 20 km of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant and had to be closed. My
own Hibarigaoka Hospital was temporarily closed because it is within 30 km from the atomic power
plant. CASE STUDY: A 61-year-old housewife had been working at a factory since her young days.
Immediately after the earthquake, a close friend asked to be driven to another friends house. The
patient accepted this request. After that, the tsunami came and her friend was among the lost. The
patient started to blame herself for this tragedy. The manufacturing plant where she was working
employed many foreigners who evacuated for fear of radiation. The patient and other employees
were expected to persevere. Still, she was emotionally unstable and found it difficult. Her boss was
more scolding than supportive. Eventually, she was hospitalized in Hibarigaoka Hospital. During her
hospitalization, I talked with the patient about her feelings of guilt and the sense of being detested by
the tsunami victims. After three months hospitalization, she improved but continued care in our
outpatient clinic. One year later, strong fear relapsed without evident cause and she was hospitalized
once more. During the second hospitalization, she recalled that she herself was nearly engulfed by
the tsunami, and that it was really a traumatic event. After she talked about this memory in a
psychotherapeutic setting, she showed great recovery. DISCUSSION: This clinical case suggests
that local residents may show indifference to their own distress and appear to be more concerned
with their community. There is also prejudice against psychiatric care. After the disaster, local
communities in Minamisoma were confronted with population decline and accelerated aging.
Moreover, lots of works have been expected after the disaster for the purpose of reconstruction of
the local district. Some residents have been driven into severely busy situation. Ordinary moral in
Japanese society, by Yoshio Yasumaru, has a strong influence on the disasterstricken area. It
makes people capable of enduring the severe situation. At the same time, residents easily hesitate
to claim their own rights because of this ordinary moral. Some social issues will be discussed in
this presentation.
MULTIDIMENSIONAL PSYCHOSOCIAL ISSUES IN FUKUSHIMA: HOW SHOULD WE
OVERCOME THEM? M Maeda, Department of Disaster Psychiatry, School of Medicine, Fukushima
Medical School, Fukushima, Japan
The Great East Japan Earthquake brought serious effects on the vast area of Fukushima prefecture.
The coastal area in Fukushima was heavily affected by the huge tsunami, and 1,817 people were
presumed dead. However, the most serious and long-term effects on the people in Fukushima were
caused by several explosions of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant after the total electric
power loss. The explosions of the three reactor buildings resulted in radioactive contamination in a
vast area of the Fukushima prefecture. Although the Japanese government declared a cold
shutdown of the plant nine months after the accident, the process to completely decommission the
reactors is estimated to take more than 30 years at least. Over 130,000 people were still evacuated
to various places in or out of Fukushima. Considering the widespread effects caused by the
accident, the psychological problems of the people living in or evacuated from Fukushima should be
noted. Here, I will demonstrate the long-term and complicated psycho-social effects on the residents
in Fukushima. Various mental health problems can be summarized as follows: post-traumatic stress
response, chronic anxiety and guilt, ambiguous loss, separated families and communities, and
stigma. Furthermore, serious burn-out or exhaustion of many workers working in disaster area

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should be noted. I will review them briefly and try to consider the psychological interventions needed
to decrease Fukushima peoples anxieties. We, Japanese, met numerous natural disasters (such as
typhoons, earthquakes and tsunamis) in our long history. However, the Fukushima disaster is a
serious event we have not ever experienced before. We should share these issues with as many
people as possible, and cooperate with them to overcome many difficulties.
EFFECTS OF SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC STATUS ON THE NEUROCOGNITIVE CORRELATES OF
POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS RELATED TO THE GREAT EAST JAPAN EARTHQUAKE:
DESIGN, OVERVIEW AND PERSPECTIVE. L Landr, B Thyreau, A Sekiguchi, Y Taki, Tohoku
University, Tohoku Medical Megabank, Tohoku, Japan
INTRODUCTION: Recent evidence suggests that neurocognitive mechanisms of post-traumatic
stress effect may differ depending on age, gender, and potentially other socio-demographic risk
factors. However, to date, no study has allowed assessing the combined effect of these variables in
a large, heterogeneous cohort of participants exposed to the same trauma type. The present project
aims at identifying the interactions between socio-demographic variables, post-traumatic stress, and
cognitive functioning and the brain in the frame of a cohort of 10,000 residents of the Miyagi region
exposed to the 2011 disaster. METHODS: 10,000 participants of any age from 20 and both gender
are being recruited in the region of Miyagi and included in the study. Neuroimaging assessment
includes the acquisition of high-resolution T1 structural images, from which the cortical thickness and
the volume of subcortical structures will be extracted using semi-automated morphometry
(Freesurfer 5.3.0). Cognitive assessment includes measures of memory, executive functioning,
attention and decision making. Questionnaires further include measures of stress related to the 2011
disaster, mood states, personality inventories, coping strategies and self esteem, as well as an
extensive evaluation of lifestyle variables and psychiatric assessment. Multivariate statistical
analyses will be performed on the resulting datasets. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: As of the end
of March 2015, 1000 participants have been included in the study and had their structural MRI data
processed. We present here an overview of these data and the corresponding analysis workflow. We
plan on having more than 2,000 datasets processed by April 2016, and will proceed to the statistical
analysis from this point. We expect to clarify the moderating role of variables such as age and
gender, lifestyle, personality and emotional regulation strategies, and the mediating role of regional
gray matter volume in the effects of post-traumatic stress on mental health and cognition.
RESEARCH SUPPORT: This work is funded and supported by the Japan Society for the Promotion
of Science.

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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SYMPOSIUM 3. LAPIN SYMPOSIUM ON BIOLOGICAL PSYCHIATRY


Chairs: M Koshiba (Japan), AV Kalueff (USA)
INTRODUCTION: PROFESSOR IZYASLAV (SLAVA) P LAPIN
This regular ISBS symposium is dedicated to Professor Izyaslav
(Slava) P. Lapin (1930-2012), one of the true pioneers of
experimental neuropsychopharmacology. He graduated from
Pavlov Medical School in St. Petersburg, and shortly after
receiving PhD, was invited in 1960 to establish the first
psychopharmacology
laboratory
at
the
Bekhterev
Psychoneurological Institute. The most important scientific
contribution of Prof. Lapin was establishing the link between
serotonin levels and mood-elevating (thymoleptic) action of
antidepressants. He suggested that enhanced central
serotoninergic tone is essential for the mood-elevating effects of
antidepressants. Lapins serotonin hypothesis of antidepressant
action, published in Lancet in 1969, became one the most cited
papers published in this journal in the last 50 years. Lapins
studies have contributed greatly to the development of newest serotonergic antidepressants, such as
SSRIs, currently representing the most prescribed group of psychotropic drugs in the world. Prof.
Lapin was also the first to report the neuroactive effects of kynurenine and its derivatives a
discovery that opened another rapidly expanding area of glutamatergic psychopharmacology. A
talented professional musician, prolific writer, painter, and an enthusiastic athlete, Prof. Lapin was a
strong supporter of ISBS, and generously shared his knowledge at our Stress and Behavior
conferences and ISBS summer schools. His enthusiasm, friendship, generous support of junior
colleagues, and the deep knowledge as both a clinical and experimental neuropharmacologist
(humanists and animalists, as he called them), made a long-lasting impact on his colleagues and
students.
A STUDY OF SATISFACTION AND E-HEALTH LITERACY AMONG USERS WHEN USING
TWITTER TO SEEK PSYCHIATRIC CONSULTATION: A RECENT TREND IN SAUDI ARABIA. N
Zakaria, A Jamal, S AlDossari, R Barri, K AlMufawez, College of Medicine, King Saud University,
Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
INTRODUCTION: The use of microblogging by patients to share experiences and to communicate
with and support each other during illness has become widespread. In Saudi Arabia, microblogging
social media, especially Twitter, have benefited the public health domain. Recent trends show high
Twitter usage in the area of psychiatric consultations. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was
to determine the impact of socioeconomic status, age, gender, and e-health literacy on the use of
Twitter for psychiatric consultations; and to determine the level of satisfaction among those who
used Twitter for psychiatric consultation. METHOD: A quantitative cross-sectional study was
conducted between February 9 and March 23, 2015 in Saudi Arabia. The target population was
Twitter users who sought psychiatric consultation through Twitter. Participants were recruited using
convenience sampling. An online questionnaire was used to collect data. The questionnaire was
posted on the Twitter accounts of several psychiatrists who agreed to participate in the study. The
inclusion criteria were simple: (1) the participant had received at least one psychiatric consultation
via Twitter, and (2) the participant, whether Saudi or non-Saudi living in Saudi Arabia, must speak
and understand Arabic. The measurements of interest were socio-demographic factors, satisfaction,
e-health literacy, Twitter usage for health and psychiatric consultation and how well Twitter solved
their problems. RESULTS: Psychiatric consultation via Twitter is being used in Saudi Arabia.

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Females used Twitter more often use Twitter for psychiatric consultation than male users, but other
demographic factors like age, marital status, education, income and nationality were not significant
when it comes to using Twitter for psychiatric consultation. Most participants had a high level of ehealth literacy and reported that the Twitter-based psychiatric consultation solved their problem.
Participants were satisfied, stating that they were able to get the psychiatric consultation they
needed without being set back financially and that the psychiatrist did not make them feel foolish.
However, the participants did agree that psychiatric consultation via Twitter needs to be improved.
The limitation of this study is the sample size was too small, thus many of the results could not be
generalized for other research. In the future, there is a need to recruit more participants to participate
in this research. RESEARCH SUPPORT: This study was funded by the College of Medicine
Research Center, Deanship of Scientific Research, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
NON-INVASIVE CRANIAL ELECTROSTIMULATION (CES) OF ENDORPHINERGIC AND
SEROTONINERGIC STRUCTURES OF THE BRAIN VIA NEWLY ELABORATED CES DEVICE
FOR TREATMENT OF MILD TO MODERATE DEPRESSION. Y Katsnelson, H Beckhoff, E Berk,
Yu Palkin, N Lisyanskaya, A Tereo, N Baranova, Premier Annecto Technologies, PA, USA; 7th
Pavlov St. Petersburg Psychiatric Hospital, St. Petersburg, Tver Railroad Clinical Center, Tver,
Russia
INTRODUCTION: Low concentrations of serotonin and endorphins in the brain structures play
important roles in the pathogenesis of depression. Our previous research has shown that cranial
electrostimulation with quasi-resonance frequency can effectively activate endorphinergic and
serotoninergic systems of the brain alleviating or ameliorating symptoms of depression. The purpose
of the present study was to evaluate non-invasive CES utilizing a newly elaborated device (TESA) as
a safe and effective treatment for depression. METHODS: In these randomized controlled trials, 30
subjects with depression were treated with a TESA which utilizes a proprietary waveform. Subjects
were diagnosed with depression using the Hamilton depression scale HAM-D21, with scores ranging
between 10 and 17, and were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: (A) TESA device
(4.33 mA RMS) and (B) TESA device (15 mA RMS). This study included a one week wash-out
period, two weeks of CES (2 cycles of 5 CES sessions, each session lasting 50 min/day), and a 12week follow up. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: No significant differences in severity of depression
or anxiety were noted between groups measured at baseline and end of wash-out period. Statistical
analysis revealed a similarly significant (p<0.01) decrease in the severity of depression and anxiety
as measured by HAM-D21, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, and the Beck Scale. Both groups
showed a significant improvement and responded similarly, with no difference between groups, at
each measured interval. Almost all subjects reported no symptoms of depression (75%) or anxiety
(94%) at the completed follow-up intervals which demonstrates a clinically significant effect. There
were no device related adverse events reported during this study and follow up period. Both regimes
of CES using the TESA Device were effective and safe in the treatment of mild to moderate
depression. RESEARCH SUPPORT: Premier Annecto Technologies, PA, USA.
ON THE ENGINEERED PSYCHOLOGICAL EDUCATION OF GROWING ECONOMIES. I Nasr,
NLP Centers Canada, Burlington, ON, Canada
INTRODUCTION: In 1936 Hans Selye, a Canadian scientist, borrowed the word stress from
engineering and used it in medicine. Selye did not define stress the way it is defined and measured
numerically in engineering. METHOD: In this paper, we will define psychological stress similarly to
engineering. We will shed light on the commonalities between materials and humans stress, strain,
strength, yield point, elasticity, plasticity, creep, resilience, fatigue limit, and stiffness. DISCUSSION:
Based on the engineering definition of stress, we can calculate and measure psychological stress,

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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specifically measuring the yield point at which a person cannot take any more psychological stress,
or the straw that broke the camels back. We can also measure strain against stress for humans as
we do in engineering for materials. Human productivity depends on two elements, HDI (Human
Development Index) and ambitiousness; both are mainly connected to psychological stress.
CONCLUSION: Restructuring psychological education by adopting a new concept, engineering
psychology as in engineering management, and by considering the NLP psychological techniques in
different stages of education, will help people achieve high self-control levels, increase productivity,
and ultimately will increase the GDP (Gross Domestic Product) per capita. Far-East cultures have
built high psychological resilience, capacity, strength, and ambitiousness through practicing
meditation and yoga. As such, they have achieved high levels of economic growth as well.
EFFECTS OF PET INSECTS ON PSYCHOLOGICAL HEALTH AMONG COMMUNITY-DWELLING
ELDERLY: A RANDOMIZED-CONTROLLED TRIAL. HJ Ko, CH Youn, SH Kim, SY Kim,
Department of Family Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu, South
Korea
BACKGROUND: There is evidence that animal-assisted therapy has positive effects on mental
health, especially for the elderly. Rearing insects is easy, less expensive, and does not occupy a lot
of space. Thus, this study assessed the effects of pet insects on psychological health among
community-dwelling elderly. METHODS: The elderly aged over 65 years, who enrolled from April to
May 2014, in Daegu, Korea were randomized into an insect group or a control group with a 1:1 ratio
and followed for eight weeks. The insect group received pet insects (crickets) to rear with sufficient
fodder, a cage, and a detailed instruction manual. Psychometric tests, including the Beck Anxiety
Inventory, Geriatric Depression Scale (GDS-15), Mini-Mental Status Examination (MMSE), 36-item
Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), Insomnia Severity Index, Fatigue Severity Scale and Brief
Encounter Psychosocial Instrument, were administered via direct interviewing. Laboratory
inflammatory and oxidative stress markers, including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, high-sensitivity
C-reactive protein, biological antioxidant potential and derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolites,
were analyzed. RESULTS: The baseline characteristics of the insect (n=46) and control (n=48)
groups were similar. In the insect and control groups, the GDS-15 scores were 3.98 and 4.98
(P=0.162), respectively, at baseline, and they changed to 3.20 and 4.90 (P =0.004), respectively, at
Week 8. The least squared means of the differences for the GDS-15 adjusted for baseline scores
were significantly different between the two groups (-1.12 vs. 0.20, P=0.011). The MMSE scores
changed from 26.76 to 27.98 in the insect group, and 27.17 to 27.40 in the control group. The least
squared means of the differences adjusted for baseline MMSE scores showed significant differences
between the two groups (1.13 vs. 0.31, P=0.045). There were no significant differences between the
two groups for other psychometric and laboratory tests. No serious risks or adverse events were
reported. CONCLUSION: Rearing insects is cost-effective and safe, and it has positive effects on
depression and cognitive function among community-dwelling elderly. Further studies with different
age groups and larger samples to investigate the effects of pet insects are warranted. RESEARCH
SUPPORT: This study was supported by the Research Program for Agricultural Science and
Technology Development (PJ009600032014), National Academy of Agricultural Science, Rural
Development Administration, Republic of Korea.
AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY TO ASSESS THE EFFECT OF PHYSICAL EXERCISES ON ANGER
MANAGEMENT AMONG SUBSTANCE DEPENDENCE SUBJECTS ADMITTED IN DRUG DEADDICTION AND TREATMENT CENTRE (DDTC) OF PGIMER, CHANDIGARH. K Das, P
Malhotra, S Sharma, National Institute of Nursing Education, D Basu Department of Psychiatry,
PGlMER, Chandigarh, India

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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INTRODUCTION: Anger is a normal, healthy human emotion. Anger often serves important
functions, such as motivating the individual to take protective action, achieve goal or overcome
obstacles. However, when it gets out of control and turns destructive, anger can lead to various
physiological, psychological and behavioral problems. Substance dependence subjects have a
tendency towards angry temperament, a general propensity to express anger and angry reaction, a
disposition to express anger when criticized or treated unfairly. To control the anger there are
various interventions. Physical exercises are one of the ways to control the anger. OBJECTIVE AND
METHODOLOGY: The main aim of present study was to assess the effect of Physical exercises on
anger management among substance dependence subjects. Experimental design was employed
using purposive sampling technique to allocate 30 subjects each in experimental group and control
group. In the experimental group, Physical exercises were used as a part of intervention for 15 days
where in control group routine care was provided. Baseline characteristics were recorded in
assessment proforma. Subjects anger was assess using State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory2TM (STAXI-2TM). Responses were recorded on day before intervention and after fifteen days of
intervention in experimental group and also without intervention in control group to monitor the anger
management by reduction in angers scoring in both the groups. Both the groups were homogenous
with respects to age, gender, marital status, education status, occupation status, diagnosis.
RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: There was significant difference in the pre and post intervention
anger scores in experimental group (p<0.001). In the control group too there were significant
differences in the anger scores. This could be attributed that control group was not completely
deprived of any intervention except for physical exercises. They received treatment during their stay
in the ward in the form of verbal motivation, medicine and psychotherapy. This could have possibly
brought into manage their anger better. The result showed significant differences in both the groups.
In the socio- demographic profile experimental and control group were not compatible in terms of
religion and income ( p<0.05) and also in the comparison of mean score of anger expression out,
anger-expression-in, anger control-in and anger expression index there was significant difference(
p<0.05) before intervention between both the groups. Because of that ANCOVA (Analysis of covariance) was applied to control the pre anger scores, religion and income between experimental
and control groups. It was found that after controlling the pre anger scores, religion and income there
was significant difference (p<0.05) in the reduction in anger scores in experimental group. However
as regards, state anger in both the groups showed changes after fifteen days but trait anger was
only significantly reduced in experimental group after interventions. The present study reveals that
Physical Exercises are effective and can be used to control the anger among substance
dependence subjects. The study provides an empirical evidence of the effectiveness of physical
exercises on anger management among substance dependence subjects.
SOURCES AND LEVEL OF STRESS AMONG SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT STUDENTS, FACULTY
OF LIBERAL ARTS, UBON RATCHATHANI UNIVERSITY, THAILAND. T Panchana, Ubon
Ratchathani University, Ubon Ratchathani, Thailand
Many undergraduate students in Social Development Program, Faculty of Liberal Arts, Ubon
Ratchathani University encounter stress due to their adaptation to University life. Many of them have
difficulties in studying, living far away from home and family, and adjusting to new friends and
environment. Knowing sources and level of stress among these students will help advisors assist
them to provide appropriate consultation and encourage them to pursue their study until they
graduate from the university. This study investigated sources and level of stress among
undergraduate students. Srithanya Stress Test (ST5) and descriptive statistics were used as
research tools. Srithanya Stress Test was used to survey level of stress. Descriptive statistics were
used to explain their sources of stress. Data were collected from 37 second years students in Social
Development Program, Faculty of Liberal Arts, Ubon Ratchathani University in March 2015. The
sample consisted of 33 females (89%) and 4 males (11%) ranging in age from 19 to 21 years ( M =

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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20.08 years, SD = 0.95). Reseach results find that 2 students (5%) had mild stress, 19 students
(51%) moderate stress, 6 students (16%) high stress, and 10 students (27%) - severe stress.
Sources of stress are various. 25 students (67 %) had study stress. 5 students (13%) had family
stress. 3 students (8%) had love stress. 3 students (8%) had their own personal stress, and 1
student (2%) - health stress. For those students who have study stress, 10 students (40%) worry
about their grading and examination, 9 students (36%) cannot understand the lessons clearly, 2
students (8%) do not like homeworks and assignments, 2 students (8%) think the study lessons are
too much for them, and 2 students (8%) disliked the lecturers. From the research results above, it
can be seen that undergraduate students in Social Development Program, Faculty of Liberal Arts,
Ubon Ratchathani University mainly have moderate stress with special attention to study stress.
Study orientation at the beginning of each semester should be provided to those students to
understand more clearly about the grading systems and university learning style. Advisors should be
aware of the study stress when they provide consultation to those students and encourage them to
move towards their academic success.

Afternoon session
SYMPOSIUM 4. INTERACTIVE MODERATED POSTER SESSION
Chairs: M Koshiba, S Nakamura (Japan), AV Kalueff (USA)
THE ROLE OF GLUTAREDOXIN IN AGING AND PARKINSONS DISEASE. SG Chen, WM
Johnson, P Curran, PS Krishnan, K Choe, B Shivakumar, AL Wilson-Delfosse, JJ Mieyal,
Departments of Pathology and Pharmacology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH,
USA
INTRODUCTION: Parkinsons disease (PD) results from the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the
substantia nigra of the midbrain, and represents the second most common neurodegenerative
disease in the world. Although the etiology of PD is currently unclear, oxidative stress and redox
dysfunction are generally understood to play key roles in PD pathogenesis and progression. Aging
and environmental factors predispose cells to adverse effects of redox changes. In addition to these
factors, genetic mutations linked to PD have been observed to disrupt the redox balance. Mutations
in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are associated with autosomal dominant PD, and several of
these mutations have also been shown to increase the levels of reactive oxygen species in cells.
Increased oxidative stress leads to oxidative modifications of proteins, a prevalent form of which
involves the formation of a mixed disulfide bond between glutathione (GSH) and a reactive cysteine
(glutathionylation). Glutaredoxin (Grx1 and Grx2) is an antioxidant enzyme that removes this
modification and helps to restore redox homeostasis. C. elegans is a widely utilized model organism
for studying aging and neurodegeneration. Our previous study showed that Grx1 is deficient in
midbrains of PD patients and genetic depletion of Grx1 homolog in C. elegans exacerbated
dopaminergic neurodegeneration in worm models of PD. The present study explored the role of Grx2
homolog in aging and in PD pathogenesis. METHODS: There are two isoforms of Grx2 that are
present in the worms, Glrx-21 and Glrx-22. Using C. elegans with the Grx2 homologs genetically
ablated, we examined the effects of Grx2 on life span and on dopaminergic survival in vivo. Age
synchronized wild-type and Glrx-deficient worms were observed and their lifespan was recorded.
Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was performed to compare the differences in life span between wildtype and Glrx-deficient animals. Behavioral and morphological assays for dopaminergic neurons of
C. elegans were performed. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Our studies have found that worms
lacking Grx2 homologs have a shorter life span compared to the corresponding controls. This finding
suggests that deficiency in Grx2 has a negative effect on aging, a prominent risk factor for PD. Our
ongoing experiments will further determine if deficiency in Grx proteins predispose dopaminergic
neurons to oxidative stress induced cell death and PD pathogenesis. We have also found that DJ-1,

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whose loss of function mutations have been attributed to autosomal recessive PD, undergoes
glutathionylation in vitro and in vivo. Therefore, DJ-1 is likely a target for oxidative stress induced
glutathionylation, and is thus potentially regulated by Grx. Our results suggest a molecular link
between Grx and DJ-1 in the regulation of redox homeostasis that is compromised in PD. Taken
together, our findings implicate a protective role of glutaredoxin and provide useful insights regarding
the development of therapeutic strategies for the treatment of age-related disorders including PD.
RESEARCH SUPPORT: This work was supported in part by the grants from the National Institutes
of Health, Parkinsons Disease Foundation and the Department of Veterans Affairs. We thank Dr. A.
Miranda-Vizuete for C. elegans strains used in this study.
ELECTROACUPUNCTURE ATTENUATES THE MICROGLIA ACTIVATION INDUCED BY A
PRURITOGEN IN THE MOUSE SPINAL CORD. YH Chen, CH Tseng, Graduate Institute of
Acupuncture Science, China Medical University, Taiwan
INTRODUCTION: This study aims to test the hypothesis that electroacupuncture (EA) reduces the
repetitive scratching behavior and the consequent activation of microglial cells provoked by a known
pruritogen, 5'-guanidinonaltrindole (GNTI)in the mouse spinal cord. METHODS: Male ICR mice were
used. Under isoflurane anesthesia, a pair of stainless steel acupuncture needles was inserted 2 mm
deep into the mouse equivalent of the human Hegu (LI4) and Quchi (LI11) acupoints. EA stimuli
were delivered by an EA Trio 300 stimulator (Ito, Japan) at an intensity of 2 mA. GNTI (0.3 mg/kg)
was subcutaneously injected to the back of the mouse neck induced to cause scratching behavior.
The number of hind leg scratches directed to the back of the neck was counted.
Immunohistochemistry and Western blot methods were used for protein staining and detecting.
RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Injection of GNTI (0.3 mg/kg) induced a strong and stereotypic
scratching behavior throughout the 40-min observation period. EA (2 Hz) at LI4 and LI11 significantly
reduced the scratching number elicited by GNTI. Immunohistochemical studies revealed that the
number and intensity of microglial marker (Iba1)-stained cell was increased in the spinal cord 30 min
after GNTI injection, while these effects were attenuated by pretreatment of EA. Western blots
showed that phosph-p38 expression levels were significantly increased in spinal cords of mice
injected s.c. with GNTI, and this effect was attenuated by pretreatment of EA. These results
demonstrate that EA attenuates the scratching behavior and microglia activation induced by GNTI in
the mouse spinal cord.
A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW OF STRESS AND LIFE QUALITY ON CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE
AMONG PATIENTS WITH FAMILIAL HYPERCHOLESTEROLEMIA. NT Chang, PY Kang, SF Tsai,
School of Nursing, College of Medicine, National Taiwan University and Cardiovascular Center,
National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan, Departments of Nursing, Mackay Medical
College, New Taipei, Taiwan
INTRODUCTION: Patients with inherited diseases, familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) have more
complex impacts and threats: sudden cardiac death, unexpected loss of family members, dietary and
risk factors control. In addition, evidence supporting an inappropriate interaction for stress and
dyslipidemia in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim of this systematic
literature review is to identify and summarize the effect influences of physical and mental health on
the CVD. METHODS: A systematic literature review was conducted by searching public and charged
databases included PubMed and Embase databases. The search terms included quality of life, life
quality, cardiovascular disease combined with heart infarction, dyslipidemia, hypercholesterolemia,
chronic disease, cerebrovascular accident, coronary heart disease. Inclusion criteria were: 1)
subjects are the adult patients who have been diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. 2) these articles
are related to quality of life. 3) only studies were written in English and adopted the major clinical

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studies were included in this review. RESULT AND DISCUSSION: Ten studies were identified in this
review. CVD was the leading cause of adult deaths in most countries. The risk factors for the
development of CVD were arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, smoking habits,
obesity, unfavorable lipid levels, physical inactive, stress-related factors such as depression, and
family history. Patients who suffered from CVD had low quality of life such as increasing mortality
risk factor levels, increasing rates of depression, anxiety and social isolation. Their mental health
statuses were significant below population norms, but there were no significant predictors of physical
functioning status when patients adhered to treatment. The objectives of medical care were not only
to extend their life but also to enhance their quality of life. It is recommended that patients should put
an effort into comprehensive lifestyle changes, self-management skills, empower with adequate
disease knowledge for minimizing the deterioration of quality of life. RESEARCH SUPPORT: This
study was supported by a 2015 research grant from MOST, Taiwan.
THE INVESTIGATIONOF ELDERLY DEPRESSION TENDENCY, FALL AND QUALITY OF LIFE
OF SANZHI AREA IN TAIWAN. S-F Tsai, H-Y Yang, Y-H Chen, TC Hung, T-H Huang, Department
of Nursing, Mackay Medical College, Tamsui Community Health Center, Mackay Memorial Hospital,
New Taipei, Taiwan
INTRODUCTION: Since 1993, the overall demographic structure has been gradually transformed
into a senior society affected by social and economic transition in Taiwan. The population of the
elderly people in Sanzhi district accounts for 14% which is higher than 11.4% for Taiwan total
population currently. This study aims to explore and screen the depression tendency, the prevalence
and risk factors for falls, and overall quality of life of the elderly people who are living in Sanzhi
district of New Taipei City. METHODS: A cross-sectional design with purposive sampling was used
for this study. The samples of this study were recruited from community health
stations activities in Sanzhi district. A structured questionnaire and direct objective measures have
been used to screen the target group, and the screened high risk group has offered with the followup visits, care, referrals, and health education. RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS: Total contact 489
person-times, 107 people were completed the first screening and 91 elderly adults were recruited.
The incidence of depression and falls of high-risk groups tend to 22% and 66% in screening cases.
Participants who were within falls risk group or within depression risk group got fewer scores of
physical capacity, and participants who were within falls risk group got fewer scores on psychological
well-being also. Participants of depression risk group also had fewer scores among four domains of
Taiwan WHOQOL. Findings of this study may facilitate medical staffs understanding of the relation
between quality of life, higher risk for falls and the depression tendency. The findings also enabled
medical staff to provide different interventions for improving those patients care. RESEARCH
SUPPORT: This study was supported by a 2014 research grant from Mackay Memorial Hospital,
Taiwan.
RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN CARDIO-RESPIRATORY FUNCTION AND HEART RATE
VARIABILITY PARAMETERS IN PATIENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA. S-L Cheng, C-Y Chiu,
Nursing Department, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei, Department of Cosmetric Science and
Application, Lan Yang Institute of Technology, Toucheng Township, Taiwan
INTRODUCTION: Patients with schizophrenia may have a sedentary lifestyle which increased the
risk of cardiovascular disease and premature death. Moreover, findings indicated that fewer than half
of individuals with schizophrenia achieved the minimum amount of weekly physical activity, and 73%
stayed BMI (body mass index) in overweight or obese. The combination of lack of physical activity
and high BMI are recognized a contributor to elevated rates of physical morbidity and premature
mortality seen in people with schizophrenia. Previous studies have shown a relationship between the

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level of physical fitness and autonomic variables. However, these relationships have not been
investigated in patients with schizophrenia. METHODS: This study was aimed to explore the
correlations among age, body weight, BMI, cardio-respiratory function, and heart rate variability
parameters in patients with schizophrenia in Taiwan. 129 patients with chronic schizophrenia were
recruited in this study. Each subject was asked to complete measurements including heart rate
variability (HRV) analysis by hand monitor of heart rate variability and cardio-respiratory function by
3-minute step test. The data were analyzed by Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient.
Statistical significance was accepted at p< 0.05. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Cardio-respiratory
endurance evaluated by 3-min step test was positively correlated with the VLF, LF, HF, TP, LF%,
and LF/HF (r = 0.28; r= 0.28; r = 0.21; r = 0.22; r = 0.23 respectively). Cardio-respiratory endurance
was negatively correlated with the age, heart rate, and BMI (r = -0.41; r= -0.29; r= -0.22
respectively). This study demonstrated that cardio-respiratory function may become a predictive tool
for HRV indexes at rest in patients with schizophrenia. Individuals with better cardio-respiratory
function might have young age, lower heart rate, lower BMI, higher HRV, and better modulation of
autonomic function. Physical health promotion of patients with schizophrenia is required and crucial.
Thus, this study suggests that use exercise to enhance physiological functions in patients with
schizophrenia. RESEARCH SUPPORT: This research was supported by Mackay Medical College.
PERFORMANCE AND COGNITIVE STRATEGIES OF RATS IN THE PLACE AVOIDANCE TASK:
EFFECT OF NON-COMPETITIVE NMDA RECEPTOR ANTAGONISTS. T Nekovarova, E Antosova,
K Englerova, D Klement, K Vales, National Institute of Mental Health, Klecany, Department of
Normal, Pathological and Clinical Physiology, Third Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Institute
of Physiology AS, Prague, Czech Republic
INTRODUCTION: Non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists, such as ketamine and dizocilpine
(MK-801), have psychomimetic effects and they are often used to model schizophrenia-like behavior
in experimental animal model of psychosis. On the other hand, they show strong antidepressant
effects both in patients suffering from depression and in animal models. Nowadays, cognitive deficits
are considered to be among crucial symptoms of the schizophrenia, particularly deficit in cognitive
coordination - process distinguishing irrelevant and relevant stimuli. Active Allothetic Place
Avoidance task (AAPA) in the carousel maze can be a useful tool to study such deficit in animal
model of schizophrenia. In this task rats have to distinguish between two spatial (reference) frames:
relevant and irrelevant. In presented work we have studied: 1) behavioral strategies of rats in AAPA
task 2) effect of non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonists on cognitive efficiency of rats based on
behavioral strategies they had adopted in this task. METHODS: We used 14 adult male Wistar rats,
including Group 1 (n=8) after chronic mild stress (3 weeks social separation) and Group 2 (n=6)
the control group with standard treatment. We test the animals in AAPA for three weeks: (1) Week 1:
Standard training in AAPA; (2) Week 2: Administration of ketamine (IP 15 mg/kg); (3) Administration
of MK-801 (IP 0,12 mg/kg). Finally, we have tested animals in Open Field test and in Elevated Plus
Maze. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: We have showed that animals perform different strategies in
the AAPA task: (1) active avoidance of an aversive sector efficient cognitive strategy with low
number of errors; (2) minimal active movement on the arena (freezing); (3) higher locomotory activity
with higher number of errors (hyperacitivity). Application of NMDA receptor antagonists affected rats
with different behavioral strategies in different ways. We showed that NMDA receptor antagonists
may cause cognitive disturbances in rats in AAPA task. In contrast, they may show antidepressantlike effects on the rats with passive strategy. RESEARCH SUPPORT: This project was supported
by Project Prvouk P34, GAR (P304/12/G069; P303/12/1464, P304/14/20613S), Research project
AV R (67985823), IGA MZ R NT 13403-4/2012, project AVR M200111204 a RVO: 67985823.

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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OLFACTORY DISTURBANCES, CYTOKINES AND PAIN SENSITIVITY IN ADDICTION. T


Nevidimova, ISBS Fellow, E Batukhtina, D Savochkina, N Bokhan, Mental Health Research Institute,
Tomsk, Russia
INTRODUCTION: Assessment of biological susceptibility to substance dependence shows deficits in
neuroimmune cytokines, heightened threshold of psychophysiological response and sensation
seeking. METHODS: 215 persons have been examined with use of flow cytometry, blood culture,
ELISA, pressure algometry, visual analogue scale, olfactory threshold test, smell identification test,
situational and personality anxiety test, aggression test, masculinity-femininity test, and test of need
for sensations. Three groups of comparison have been formed: 108 persons with mental and
behavioral disorders due to use of psychoactive substances (PAS), 52 episodic consumers of PAS
(conventional risk group) and 55 conventionally healthy persons (consuming PAS occasionally or not
using absolutely). RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: In opioid addiction, production of IL-6 and IL-1
reliably exceeded the control level, the tendency to decrease in production of TNF- was noted. For
persons with less aggressive course of opioid dependence, the increase in level of production of IL1, being combined with decrease in pain sensitivity was typical. Sex-age analysis has shown that of
the greatest prognostic significance is existence of olfactory disturbances in males in the early
childhood. Persons with mental and behavioral disorders due to use of PAS showed significantly
major tolerance of odour of isopropanol. Severity of aversive reactions was decreased already at the
pre-nosological stage of development of pathology. Anamnestic olfactory craving and change of
olfactory threshold sensitivity also had various laboratory correlates. The findings testify that in all
three studied groups, lack of the aversion to isopropanol is accompanied by clinical signs of
immunological deficiency and/or laboratory signs of decrease in immunological functions. The
association of lack of aversion to isopropanol with increase of level of anxiety, needs for search for
sensations, signs of obsessive-compulsive behavior has been found. Successful creation of
diagnostic and prognostic models on immunological and sensory basis in the field of biological and
clinical narcology is possible. RESEARCH SUPPORT: The study was supported by the Russian
Science Foundation grant 14-15-00183.
AN ANIMAL MODEL OF PSTD IS ASSOCIATED WITH A LONG-LASTING DECREASE IN
SYNAPTIC SPINES AND INCREASED MICROGLIA WITHIN FRONTO-HIPPOCAMPAL
NETWORKS. KL Smith, MS Kassem, D Clarke, S Todd, D Brown, M Bennett, J Lagopoulos, J
Arnold, Brain and Mind Research Institute, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia
INTRODUCTION: Grey matter loss is observed in the brain of patients with post-traumatic stress
disorder (PTSD), however the neurobiological basis for these reductions has not been explored.
Using a restraint stress (RS) model where animals underwent chronic stress for 6 h per day for 21
days, weve recently reported reduced GMV in cortical and hippocampal structures using high
resolution MRI, which was accounted for by alterations in pyramidal neuron dendritic morphology.
However, RS may not be representative of the stress experienced by humans that present with
PTSD, where the condition is often attributed to a single, severe traumatic event. Subsequently, we
undertook a study employing the administration of a brief, one-off footshock in mice, which may be
more representative of trauma that defines PTSD. METHODS: An experimental protocol of 32 days
was carried out. On day 1 stressed mice were placed in a conditioning chamber and subjected to a
one-off 1.5 mA footshock for a duration of 2 s. The mice were then re-exposed to the shock-paired
context 24 h later in the absence of shock and freezing behavior was measured. Mice were then
tested for the startle response to a loud acoustic stimulus (hyperarousal), anxiety-related behavior in
the light-dark test and sensorimotor gating using the prepulse inhibition of startle (PPI) paradigm.
The mice were then re-tested in the fear conditioning, startle response and PPI test 28 days after the
footshock was applied. 24 hours after behavioral testing mice the brains of the mice were harvested
for analysis of dendritic and microglial morphology. RESULTS: Compared to control mice, shocked

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mice displayed increased freezing to the shock-paired context at days 2 and 28, highlighting an
enduring fear response like that observed in PTSD. The mice also displayed significant anxietyrelated behavior levels and an increased startle response, which tended to become more
pronounced over time. No changes in sensorimotor gating were detected. Significant decreases in
the number of synaptic spines of were found in the CA1 and CA3 regions of the HPC, as well as in
the infralimbic (IFL) and prelimbic (PLB) regions of the medial prefrontal cortex. Further to this,
increased counts of microglia in shocked animals were detected within CA1, CA3, and IFL regions,
with a trend in the PLB region. DISCUSSION: The administration of a brief, one off footshock was
associated with a long lasting fear, anxiety, hyperarousal behaviors mimicking some of the key
symptoms of PTSD. The lasting PTSD-like phenotype was associated with a reduction in the number
of dendritic spines and increased number of microglia in several key structures linked to stress.
RESEARCH SUPPORT: University of Sydney Bridging Grant to JCA.
PARTICIPATION OF THE EXTENDED AMYGDALA SYSTEM OF THE BRAIN IN MECHANISMS
OF REINSTATEMENT OF PLACE PREFERENCE OF AMPHETAMINE IN RATS. AA Lebedev, VI
Morozov, PD Shabanov, Institute of Experimental Medicine, St. Petersburg, Russia
BACKGROUND: The extended amygdala has long been implicated in fear conditioning. The
extended amygdala is composed of the central nucleus of the amygdala, the bed nucleus of the stria
terminalis and a transition zone in the medial (shell) subregion of the nucleus accumbens. The
reactivation of conditioned place preference (CPP) is the model of drug seeking. Following the
extinction of CPP, accomplished by pairings of vehicle rather than drug with the environment, reestablishment, technically termed reactivation (or reinstatement) of CPP, is produced by a drug
injection. CPP reactivation procedures have been successfully applied in conjunction with
abstinence manipulations following which drug injections or stress reactivate CPP. The CPP
reactivation model incorporates all the advantages of the traditional CPP procedure, strengthened by
allowing for extinction and abstinence manipulations important for the validity of the procedure as a
model of craving or relapse. It has been suggested that CPP reactivation data be viewed with
caution in terms of their relevance for understanding relapse processes until better information on
the neurobiological mechanisms mediating this behavior is available. Here, we examined the role of
GABA, dopamine, opioids and Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) systems in mechanisms of
reinstatement of the CPP of amphetamine in rats. METHODS: The Wistar male rats were implanted
the microcannulas into the nucleus accumbens, central nucleus of amygdala and bed nucleus of
stria terminalis (the extended amygdala system) to inject 1 g/1 l of drugs. Lidocaine, a blocker of
Na+ ionic currents, and the antagonists of GABAA receptors bicuculline, D1 dopamine receptors
SCH23390, D2 dopamine receptors sulpiride, opioid receptors naloxone and CRF receptors
astressin administered intrastructurally were used for pharmacological analysis. In 10 days after
operation of microcannulas implantation, the CPP of amphetamine begin forming in two-chamber
apparatus. In the first day, a rat was placed into apparatus for 10 min, the door between chambers
was opened. Beginning the second day, amphetamine (1 mg/kg i.p. on the 2nd, 4th and 6th days) or
physiological saline (on the 3rd, 5th and 7th days) were injected and the rat was placed into the
apparatus for 60 min: into nonpreferable chamber in case of amphetamine administration, and into
preferable chamber after injection of saline. The door between chambers was closed, but was
opened on the 8th day, and the rat was placed into the nonpreferable chamber for 10 min without
drug administration. The time of staying in each chamber and a number of transfers from one
chamber to another one were registered. Then, a procedure of extinction of CPP for 7 days was
carried out in form of everyday testing of CPP without drug administration. RESULTS AND
DISCUSSION: After extinction of CPP, the reaction was not reproduced. At the same time, a single
administration of amphetamine (1 mg/kg) induced reminding the CPP. Pharmacological analysis
included intractructural administrations of receptor antagonists or blockers into the extended
amygdala structures. After administration of bicuculline, SCH23390, sulpiride and naloxone, the CPP

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activated by amphetamine was reproduced in usual form. Lidocaine administered into the nucleus
accumbens and central nucleus of amygdala diminished or significantly decreased the CPP
reinstated by amphetamine. On the other hand, astressin, a nonselective CRF antagonist,
administered into the central nucleus of amygdala or into the bed nucleus of stria terminalis,
antagonized amphetamine effect. CONCLUSION: The extended amygdala structures control the
reinstatement system in paradigm of assessment of the addictive properties of psychostimulants.
The main role in these processes belongs to the stress-dependent system of CRF, which limits the
conditioned positive effects of narcogenic drugs.
ASSOCIATIONS OF SOCIAL FUNCTIONING ASSESSMENT AND NEEDS OF CARE IN THE
LONG-TERM PSYCHIATRIC UNIT. LC Huang, WT Chen, Zuoying Branch of Kaohsiung Armed
Forces General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan
INTRODUCTION: It is well known that schizophrenia is a kind of chronic disorders which influence
cognition and social functions, long term treatments are essential for patients to maintain patients
personal and social functioning. There have been various scales used to evaluate patients
progression of schizophrenia. In the present study, we chose personal and social performance scale
(PSP) as a tool to understand the psychopathological symptoms and personal and social functions in
patients with long term, chronic schizophrenia. METHODS: This study was an observation study. A
total of 68 in-patients with chronic schizophrenia were enrolled and followed up for 2 months. At the
time of enrollment, and every 4 weeks thereafter, PSP was performed to the 68 patients. Higher total
score indicates better function. All analyses were performed using SAS. Demographic and clinical
information were presented using descriptive statistics. The differences between visits were tested
by Paired t-test. Results were presented as meanSD. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The mean
age of the enrolled patients was 47.810.5 years, and about 54.4% were male.Statistically significant
improvements in total score of PSP were observed with p-value less than 0.0001 and for four
subdomains as well, especially in the subdomain of disturbing and aggressive behavior. The mean
total score was improved from 36.411.0 at baseline to 40.512.6 at the 4th week, and further
increased to 42.712.7 at the end of observation (the 8th week). Although there is no statistical
significance between genders, the overall score in male was slightly higher than female. However,
this results seemed to be controversial to previous findings which reported that better outcome was
found in women in the long-term period. Our results showed improvements in social and personal
functioning in schizophrenia patients with long-term treatments indicating that sustained
antipsychotic treatment are required. Furthermore, we also found that psychiatric symptoms of these
hospital patients stabilized gradually, but they still seems to have great needs of nursing care
because this self-care subdomain doesnt progress so much. In future, further research should be
worth my team to examine the relationships between psychiatric symptoms and needs of nursing
care following patients when hospitalized and when living in the community. RESEARCH
SUPPORT: Supported by Zuoying Branch of Kaohsiung Armed Forces General Hospital.
MONTITORING ANXIETY OF TAIWANESE STUDENTS UNDER THE STRESS OF AN ENGLISH
PRESETATION VIA PHOTOPLETHYSMOGRAPHY. JR Yeh, JS Shieh, SZ Fan, Research Center
for Adaptive Data Analysis, National Central University, Department of Mechanical Engineering,
Yuan Ze University, Department of Anesthesia, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
INTRODUCTION: The aim of this study was to assess the psychological stress for Taiwanese
students in an English presentation. Psychological factors are considered to cause changes in
arterial elasticity and boundary condition of a human cardiovascular system. Pulse transit time (PTT)
and the profile characteristics of pulse waveform reflect dynamical changes caused by the
psychological stress as non-invasive and continuous measures. In this study, we found PTT and

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augmentation index derived from ECG and photoplethysmography (PPG) as good indicators for
monitoring the anxiety of subjects under psychological stress. METHODS: A total of 35
undergraduate and master students were recruited to take English presentations to a foreign
advisor. A presentation took about 30 min. All subjects are young non-native English speaker. Both
ECG and PPG signals were recorded simultaneously during three stages of preparation,
presentation, and relaxation. PTT was derived as the time intervals between R-peaks of ECG and
the main peaks of PPG. Augmentation index was calculated by a published method based on
empirical mode decomposition (EMD). Statistical analysis was used to exam the differences among
the outcomes of three stages. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: PTT in presentation stage is
significantly lower than those in the other two stages (p-value < 0.01). The values of augmentation
index in the presentation stage are higher than those in the other two stages (p-value < 0.01). A
positive correlation was found between normalized heartbeat intervals and PTT (Pearson correlation
coefficient is 0.45). A negative correlation was found between normalized heartbeat intervals and
values of augmentation index (Pearson correlation coefficient is -0.42). These findings imply that
psychological stress causes an increase of heart rate (I.e. a decrease of heartbeat interval), and the
changes of arterial elasticity. These indicators derived from PPG are useful for monitoring anxiety of
subject under psychological stress. RESEARCH SUPPORT: The authors acknowledge the National
Science Council (NSC) of Taiwan grant NSC 99-2218-E-155-002, and the Center for Dynamical
Biomarkers and Translational Medicine sponsored by the National Science Council (Grant NSC 992911-I-008-100).
PP14 FUNCTIONS AS A REPRESSOR INVOLVED IN THE TRANSLATION INHIBITION
MEDIATED BY THE INHIBITORY UPSTREAM OPEN READING FRAME OF HUMAN CHOP
GENE. CC Hsieh, HC Lee, HC Nien, JC Sheu, HJ Tsai, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biology,
National Taiwan University, Liver Disease Prevention and Treatment Research Foundation, Taipei,
Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei City, Graduate Institute of
Clinical Medicine, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan
INTRODUCTION: C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), regulated translationally in an uORFdependent manner under ER stress, plays an important role in apoptosis. Zebrafish transgenic line
huORFZ harbors a DNA construct in which GFP reporter is translationally inhibited by human
upstream open reading frame of CHOP (huORFchop). The gfp mRNA was translated in the central
nervous system (CNS) of huORFZ embryos treated with either hypoxia or heat shock. METHODS:
Searching for putative genes that are involved in the huORFchop-mediated translational inhibition,
we performed microarray, and then verified by whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH), qRT-PCR,
overexpression and knockdown assays. A gene encoded PP14 was chosen for further study.
Western blotting was used to detect the protein levels of phosphatase 1 (PP1A) and
phosphorylation of eIF2. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: WISH demonstrated that both pp14 and
chop mRNA were expressed in the brain of embryos. The qRT-PCR data indicated that the mRNA
level of pp14 was greatly decreased in the brain of hypoxia-treated embryos. While GFP was
apparent in the brain and spinal cord of hypoxia-treated huORFZ embryos at 96 hpf, the translation
of gfp mRNA was inhibited in the pp14-overexpressive huORFZ embryos treated with hypoxia. In
contrast, knockdown of pp14 was able to induce GFP expressed in the CNS of huORFZ embryos
without stress. PP1A, which was interacted with PP14, was increased when GFP was expressed in
hypoxia-treated embryos. However, PP1A was decreased and the phosphorylated eIF2 remained
unchanged in the hypoxia-treated embryos injected with pp14 DNA, suggesting that hypoxia led to
the decrease of pp14 but the increase of PP1A, which in turn, caused the translation of downstream
coding region. Therefore, we conclude that PP14 is involved in the translational inhibition mediated
by huORFchop, and its repressive function in the brain of zebrafish embryos is PP1A-dependent.

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USING ZEBRAFISH TO IDENTIFY THE NOVEL GENE INVOLVED IN REGULATING THE


HUORFCHOP-MEDIATED TRANSLATIONAL INHIBITION DURING ER STRESS. HC Lee, HJ
Tsai, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei City, Taiwan
INTRODUCTION: When cells encounter endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, the misfolded proteins
are accumulated in ER. These unfolded protein response (UPR) regulates the expression level of
C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) which plays an important role in cells for either survival or
apoptosis. It has been reported that the upstream open reading frame (uORF) sequence located at
the 5`UTR of human chop gene (huORFchop) inhibits the translation of chop mRNA. However,
underlying molecular mechanism of uORF-mediated translational inhibition is not fully understood.
Additionally, there is still no in vivo animal model available. METHODS: To search genes that might
be involved in the huORFchop-mediated translational inhibition in CNS, we performed microarray
analysis and verified by whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH), qRT-PCR, overexpression and
knockdown assays, we selected gene encoded Dkey for further study. RESULTS AND
DISCUSSION: Whole mount in situ hybridization showed that the pattern of dkey transcript was
upregulated in brain which was similar with that of GFP pattern after stress. In vivo dual luciferase
assay in zebrafish embryos demonstrated that dkey can induce reporter expression in the group
containing huORFchop cassette. Moreover, injection of excessive dkey mRNA in huORFZ embryos
directly induced GFP signal appearance without being treated with heat-shock. The line of evidences
suggested it is highly likely that dkey may be involved in the huORFchop-mediated translational
inhibition. Taken together, we demonstrated that repression of huORFchop mediated translational
inhibition is cell-type-specific response to heat stress, and dkey may play a role in huORFchop
mediated translational control under heat-shock stress.
THE EFFECT OF FOUR-AGENTS-DECOCTION ON MODULATION OF EXCITATORY AMINO
ACID IN MORPHINE TOLERANT RATS. S-L Lin, C-H Cherng, C-C Yeh, C-S Wong, Department of
Anesthesiology, Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, Taiwan
INTRODUCTION: Neuroinflammation plays a critical role in intrathecal analgesia. Combination of
opioid agonist and antagonist administration was demonstrated to inhibit opioid tolerance, however,
the mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of our study was to examine the effect of Four-AgentsDecoction (FAD) on morphine tolerance. METHODS: Male Wistar rats implanted with intrathecal
catheter were used. Morphine tolerance was induced by chronic intrathecal infusion of morphine (15
ug/hr), and the effect of FAD (5 ug/hr) on morphine tolerance was examined by co-infusion with
morphine. The effect of IL-10 was examined by additional intrathecal IL-10 antibody (10 mg once
daily) administration. Behavioral tail-flick test, immunohistochimstry staining, glutamate conc. and
real time PCR for cytokine IL10 expression were examined. RESULTS: FAD co-infusion with
morphine attenuated morphine tolerance, glutamate conc. after morphine challenge, and IL-10
antibody injection reversed this effect. Tail flick latency decreased under IL10 antibody administrated
in an apparent accumulated manner. Immunohistochemistry staining revealed an increasing of IL-10
expression in the rat spinal cord by the FAD co-infusion. CONCLUSIONS: The expression of antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10 contributes to the restoration of morphines antinociceptive effect by
FAD treatment in morphine-tolerant rats and involves immunologically specific cellular alterations.
RESEARCH SUPPORT: Ministry of National Defense (MAB-102-92).
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN MEASURES OF METACOGNITION AND OBSESSIVE
COMPULSIVE DISORDER. SY Sohn, JI Kang, K Namkoong, SJ Kim, Department of Psychiatry and
Institute of Behavioral Science in Medicine, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South
Korea

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
37

INTRODUCTION: Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is a severe and incapacitating psychiatric


disorder that is characterized by recurrent intrusive thoughts (obsession). Maladaptive metacognition
have been found to be associated with anxiety and various psychopathology. Dysfunctional
metacognitive beliefs are increasingly considered in development of obsession. Therefore, this study
aimed to evaluate metacognitive profiles in OCD. METHODS: Subjects includes 55 OCD patients
and 57 healthy controls. All participants completed the metacognition questionnaire (MCQ) as a selfreport measure of trait metacognition. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: OCD patients showed
significantly higher metacognition index measured by MCQ than control group (p = 0.004).
Subscores of MCQ including 'beliefs about uncontrollability and danger' (p < 0.001) and 'negative
beliefs' (p = 0.001) are significantly higher in OCD patients group. Need to control thoughts and
dysfunctional beliefs about the negative thoughts may represent critical prerequisites for
development of OCD.
EFFECTS OF EARLY-LIFE STRESS ON COGNITIVE FUNCTION AND NEUROMORPHOLOGY
IN ADULT RATS WITH NORMAL OR ACCELERATED SENESCENCE. MA Tikhonova, TG
Amstislavskaya, AV Shevchenko, YJ Ho, Scientific Research Institute of Physiology and Basic
Medicine, Novosibirsk State Medical University, Novosibirsk, Russia; School of Psychology, Chung
Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan
INTRODUCTION: Studying the mechanisms of cognitive disorders due to aging, stress effects and
the interaction of these factors is an important task in biology and medicine. The OXYS rat strain
with hereditary defined accelerated senescence (Kolosova et al., 2014) is a promising model for
studying the interaction of early life stress effects and the development of genetically defined agingrelated deficits. The aim of the study was to compare the effects of early life stress (maternal
separation at an early postnatal age) on behavioral, hormonal, and neuromorphological
characteristics of male rats with normal (Wistar) or accelerated (OXYS) senescence. We also
examined the neuroprotective effects of ceftriaxone on cognitive deficits in OXYS rats. METHODS:
Maternal separation procedure was performed daily for 15 or 180 min from the 1st to 21st days of
the rat pups lives. At the age of 4 months, males of the experimental groups underwent the open
field and object recognition tests and their basal plasma corticosterone levels were measured. Nissle
staining was used to evaluate the density of pyramidal neurons in the hippocampal CA1 area in
cryosections of the rat brains. 4-months old OXYS rats were treated with ceftriaxone (50 and 100
mg/kg, i.p., 36 days) and then the same tests and assays were performed. RESULTS AND
DISCUSSION: No significant effects of MS on the general locomotion or exploratory activity were
determined in the open field test. At the same time, disturbances in the performance of the novel
object recognition test were registered in MS-subjected Wistar rats reflecting their episodic memory
deficits. No significant influence of MS on OXYS rats was revealed in this test since the disturbances
in episodic memory were observed even in intact 4-months old OXYS rats. However, the basal
corticosterone levels in MS-subjected Wistar rats did not differ significantly from that of the control
group, while MS caused significant elevation in the basal corticosterone levels in OXYS males.
Marked effects of MS on the density of pyramidal neurons in the hippocampus were found. Hence,
the specific interaction of the effects of MS and predisposition to accelerated aging was first shown.
Chronic administration of ceftriaxone significantly improved cognitive deficits and increased the
density of the hippocampal pyramidal neurons in OXYS rats. RESEARCH SUPPORT: This work
was partially supported by grant 15-04-05593-a from the Russian Foundation for Basic Research.
ESTROGEN STRESS-RELATED PHENOTYPE DIFFERENCE IN MIGRAINEURS BY HAPLOGENOTYPES. H-J Park, M Kim, Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital,
Protein Metabolism Medical Research Center, College of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul,
South Korea

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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BACKGROUND: Migraine is a primary headache more in women than in men. Its frequency is
commonly affected by altered estrogen level such as menstrual cycle, pregnancy, menopause or
hormonal replacement. The aim of this study was to explore whether the phenotypes of migraine can
by associated with estrogen withdrawal stress according to the estrogen receptor genotypes.
METHODS: 314 migraineurs who had been diagnosed according to the criteria International
Headache Society (ICHD2) were analyzed for this study. (men:women = 45:269, mean
age=45.613.8).Subjects were asked to filled out the Migraine Qestionarre which includes pain
nature, associated symptoms or triggering factor as well as disability. Estrogen receptor SNP P325P,
T594T were performed by Snapshot assary, and there haplotypes were compared. RESULTS: The
proportion of mgraineneurs were migraine without aura 137, migraine with aura 14, probable
migraine 160, transformed migraine 3. Estrogen genotypes are classified into haplotype1 and
haplotype 2. Haplotype1 is GG, CG, CA, GA (n=233, 68, 5, 8) and haplotype 2 GG, CG, CA, GA (n =
57, 155, 80, 22). In haplotype 1 , GA was associated with nausea or other GI symptoms, whereas
CG improves migraine symptoms during migraine. With combination of haplotype 2, CG/CA was
appeared to be related to be improvement during middle phase of pregnancy. For the migraine
subtypes, migraine with aura (MA) is higher GG than CG in migrane with aura. CONCLUSIONS:
There findings suggest estrogen stress can affect the certain phenotypes migraine, however,
underlying mechanism and further replication cohort study is needed.
EARLY-LIFE STRESS ATTENUATES THE CAPACITY OF ADULT NEURAL PRECURSOR
CELLS TO DIFFERENTIATE INTO NEURONS VIA METHYLATION OF RETINOIC ACID
RECEPTOR GENE PROMOTER. S Boku, Department of Psychiatry, Kobe University Graduate
School of Medicine, Kobe, Japan
INTRODUCTION: Early life stress contributes to neuropsychiatric disorders, but the precise
mechanisms underlying this link are poorly understood. As early-life stress decreases adult
hippocampal neurogenesis, which in turn functionally contributes to many behavioral phenotypes
relevant to psychiatric disorders, we examined how in vivo early-life stress impacts the capacity of
adult hippocampal neural precursor cells via epigenetic alterations in vitro. METHODS: Maternal
separation (MS) was used as a model of early life stress. Rat pups were separated from their dams
for 3 hours daily from postnatal day (PND) 2 to 14 or were never separated from the dam (as
controls). Adult neural precursor cells from hippocampal dentate gyrus ADP were isolated at PND
56 and evaluated in detail. The effect of DNA methylation at the retinoic acid receptor (RAR)
promoter stemming from MS on ADP was also evaluated. RESULTS: MS attenuated neural
differentiation of ADP. DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitor, 5-aza-dC, reversed a reduction of
neural differentiation of ADP by MS. MS increased DNMT1 and decreased RAR . RAR agonist
increased neural differentiation and its antagonist reduced retinoic acid-induced neural
differentiation. MS increased the methylated portion of RAR promoter, and the DNMT inhibitor
reversed a reduction of RAR by MS. CONCLUSION: Overall, MS attenuates the capacity of ADP to
differentiate into neurons by decreasing expression of RAR through DNMT1-mediated methylation
of its promoter by using the combination of in vivo stress and in vitro cell culture. Such in-vivo/in-vitro
combinational techniques provide novel technical methods to elucidate epigenetic and molecular
mechanisms underlying the impact of environmental factors on adult neurogenesis and behavioral
phenotypes relevant to neuropsychiatric disorders.
A QUALITATIVE APPROACH TO EXPLORING PSYCHIATRIC PATIENTS PRIVACY ISSUES
RELATING TO NEW TECHNOLOGY: PRACTICAL STEPS. N Zakaria, R Ramli, Medical
Informatics and e-learning Unit, Medical Education Department, College of Medicine, King Saud

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; School of Computer Sciences, University Sains Malaysia, George
Town, Malaysia
INTRODUCTION: Qualitative methods in psychiatric research have been discussed in numerous
publications in recent years. This methodology enables us to gain rich in-depth information about a
phenomenon. In this proposal, we share the steps in our qualitative study in which we interviewed
twenty-five psychiatric patients regarding privacy issues. Privacy is how individuals define for
themselves when, how and what type of information is transmitted to others. In our research, we
wanted to learn from patients how they define privacy when a new technology - in this case, a
monitoring system - is placed in their psychiatric ward. Privacy issues can be a major concern in a
psychiatric ward when a patients behavior is constantly being watched without respect for their
privacy. The following steps are discussed in detail. CASE SELECTION: The challenges include
finding an organisation that will permit such research, suitability of new technology and accessibility
to psychiatric wards and psychiatric patients. During the selection process, we visited several
hospitals and one non-profit mental health organisation to find a location suitable for our research.
After a thorough IRB application process, we found only one location that fulfilled our requirements.
Inclusion and exclusion criteria: UN recognises psychiatric patients as having equal rights to privacy,
so our patient selection had to obtain the approval of our universitys IRB committee members. After
some negotiation, we determined we would include patients with neurosis and avoid selecting any
patients wit psychosis. During the interviews we worked closely with the head nurse to determine
which patients would be stable enough to understand interview questions and answer them. We
employed computer assisted qualitative data analysis system (CAQDAS) to organize and analyze
our huge interview dataset. We used N-vivo to extract the themes from this research. RESEARCH
SUPPORT: This study was funded by Research University Grant (1001/PKOMP 817057), University
Sains Malaysia and College of Medicine Research Center, Deanship of Scientific Research, King
Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
MEASUREMENT OF ANTICIPATORY ANHEDONIA USING A NOVEL CONFLICT TEST IN THE
MOUSE. D Jeon, BS Kim, S Jeong, Y Jeong, S Kim, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and
Technology, Daejeon, Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul,
Republic of Korea
INTRODUCTION: Anhedonia can be divided into two dimensions: consummatory and anticipatory.
Recent findings indicated that patients with depression or schizophrenia display a lack of anticipatory
pleasure (anticipatory anhedonia) rather than a lack of consummatory pleasure (consummatory
anhedonia). The sucrose preference test can represent the consummatory component of anhedonia.
However, no established behavioral paradigm exists to measure anticipatory anhedonia in rodents.
Here, we developed a new behavioral paradigm to measure anticipatory pleasure in mice: the foodshock conflict test. METHODS: A food-deprived (22-24 h) mouse was acclimated in a two-chamber
shuttle box for 10 min, and the mouse was confined in one chamber (safe chamber). Next, a food
pellet was placed in the center of the other chamber (food-shock chamber). The food-deprived
mouse was free to explore the chambers. When the mouse found and ate the food, an electric footshock was applied under the grid floor in the food-shock chamber, and the mouse escaped to the
safe chamber. We attempted to apply our newly developed paradigm to a corticosterone (CORT)-,
social isolation (SI)-, or pilocarpine-induced mouse model of depression, schizophrenia, or temporal
lobe epilepsy (TLE), respectively. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: A CORT-, SI-, or TLE models
showed a loss of anticipatory pleasure (i.e., gave up on attaining food) in this conflict test. During the
conflict between food and foot-shock, approaching the food-shock chamber despite being footshocked is hypothesized to be motivated by the anticipation of pleasure from getting food. Our
conflict test between food and foot-shock might provide a way to measure anticipatory anhedonia in
rodents. RESEARCH SUPPORT: This work was supported by Korea Health 21 R&D grants

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
40

(HI12C0035) from the Ministry of Health and Welfare, and by the Basic Science Research Program
grant (NRF-2014R1A2A2A01002608) from the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning.
FEMALE INFERTILITY: A PSYCHOLOGICAL PROFILE. D Pavlova, I Grechenliev, H
Pamukchiiski, Medical University of Sofia, Sofia, Bulgaria
INTRODUCTION: It has become clear in the recent years that infertility is associated not only with
gynecological disorders, but also with individual's psyche. OBJECTIVE: To study the psychological
profiles of females with reproductive health problems. The following present cases are from
gynecological and homeopathic practice. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 17 female patients with
medical history of infertility, 25-41 years old. All of them was treated with in vitro fertilization. 29%
have gone through multiple IVF failures. Well structured psychiatric interview was conducted with
every patient. A common psychological pattern was established. RESULTS: Detail analyses
revealed substantial similarities between the subjects. Existing history of inability to reconcile with
the male figure, exposure to violence as a child or in marriage, sexual abuse, domineering mother
personality, traditionally masculine character traits and/or permanent distress. CONCLUSION:
Despite the small number of cases, we suggest that infertility conditions must be necessary viewed
as deep-rooted psychological conflicts. The main personality type is controlling and independent in
marriage, as well as in career field. The main attitude towards male figure is inability to forgive and
trust.
AN EXPLORATORY STUDY ON THE EFFECT OF ACTIVITY SCHEDULING ON THE
NEGATIVE SYMPTOMS OF PATIENTS WITH SCHIZOPHRENIA IN PSYCHIATRY WARD,
NEHRU HOSPITAL, PGIMER, CHANDIGARH. AK Kaur, M Dogra, K Das, A Avasthi, NINE,
PGIMER, Chandigarh, India
INTRODUCTION: Schizophrenia is among top ten disabling conditions worldwide for young adults.
Its negative symptoms (e.g., reduced emotional responsiveness, motivation, socialization, speech or
movement) are pervasive and persistent, and have a major impact on a patients life. OBJECTIVE
AND METHODOLOGY: The present study asessed the effect of activity scheduling on negative
symptoms of schizophrenic patients. It was conducted between July-August on 6 patients admitted
to Psychiatry ward of Nehru Hospital (PGIMER, Chandigarh), matched with 6 control patients,
previously admitted in the ward. RESULTS: Both groups were homogenous as median score of
case study vs. control group was compared for negative symptoms at three points of time (baseline,
week I and week II; P = 0.05, 0.23, 0.75, respectively, U-test). The non parametric Friedman
repeated measure test was applied to analyze the overall trend in negative symptoms from baseline
to week II, as well as interaction of negative symptoms score trends in two groups. In general, the
negative symptom score (mean SD) significantly dropped from baseline (23.678.26) at week I
(19.086.97) and week II (15.257.01; P-value <0.0001). Further analyzing negative symptom
scores, we found significant interaction between the two groups, which differed statistically in their
reduction of negative symptom score over 3 time periods (P < 0.028). The change in overall negative
symptom score from baseline (23.678.26) to week I (19.086.97; P<0.002), and from week I to
week II (15.257.01), was also highly significant (P<0.0001). However, trends for negative
symptoms scores in the two study groups were similar, with similar decrease in negative symptom
scores from baseline to week I (P = 0.15), and only slightly different fall in negative symptom scores
(P = 0.076). When the significance of fall in negative symptom score was observed between two
successive time points using paired U-test, the result showed that mean fall in negative symptom
scores in experimental group from baseline to week I was 6.33(5.39; P<0.027), and 5.33(2.88;
P<0.027) from week I to week II, the control group showed mean fall in negative symptom scores
form baseline to week I as 2.88(1.17; P<0.027), and 2.33 (2.34; P = 0.078) from week I to week II.

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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The fall in negative symptoms may be slightly higher vs. controls from baseline to I, despite a large
difference (6.33 vs. 2.88 in controls), and is clearly more in the case study group from week I to
week II, as shown by lower SD values of negative symptoms scores (2.88 vs 5.39, respectively).
Overall, these findings provide empirical evidence on the usefulness of the individualized activity
scheduling for the patients with schizophrenia.
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PERSONALITY, SENSE OF EFFICACY AND STRESS IN
KOREAN TEACHERS. S Park, Y Kim, Seoul National Hospital, Seoul, South Korea
INTRODUCTION: We examined the association between personality, sense of efficacy, and
subjective and objective measures of stress in Korean teachers. METHODS: One hundred thirty
seven teachers (25 males and 112 females) were recruited from elementary, middle, and high
schools in Seoul, South Korea. The participants were administered Temperament and Character
Inventory, Teacher\'s Sense of Efficacy Scale and Perceived Stress Scale. In addition, heart rate
variability (HRV) measures were assessed by frequency-domain analyses. RESULTS AND
DSCUSSON: After controlling for age and sex, self-directedness was negatively associated with
perceived stress ( = 0.36, t = 3.23, p = 0.002). Persistence was positively associated with
teacher\'s sense of efficacy ( = 0.24, t = 2.56, p = 0.012), which was negatively associated with
perceived stress ( = 0.24, t = 2.79, p = 0.006) and Low Frequency/High Frequency (LF/HF) ratio
( = 0.18, t = 2.13, p = 0.035). The results of this study suggest that self-directedness,
persistence, and sense of efficacy might act as a protective resource against stress in Korean
teachers. RESEARCH SUPPORT: This research was supported by child and adolescent mental
health service funded by Seoul National Hospital (3731-311-210-13).
A NOVEL 3D METHOD OF LOCOMOTOR ANALYSIS IN ADULT ZEBRAFISH: IMPLICATIONS
FOR AUTOMATED DETECTION OF CNS DRUG-EVOKED PHENOTYPES. AM Stewart, ISBS
Fellow, F Grieco, RAJ Tegelenbosch, A Kaluyeva, LPJJ Noldus and AV Kalueff, ISBS Fellow,
ZENEREI Research Center and the International Zebrafish Neuroscience Research Consortium,
(ZNRC), Slidell, USA; Noldus Information Technology BV, Wageningen, Netherlands; Research
Institute for Marine Nutrition and Drugs (RIMND) and College of Food Science and Technology,
Guangdong Ocean University, Zhanjiang, China; Institute of Translational Biomedicine, St.
Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg, Russia
Expanding the spectrum of organisms to model human brain phenotypes is critical for our improved
understanding of the pathobiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Given clear limitations of the
existing mammalian models, there is an urgent need in low-cost, high-throughput in-vivo
technologies for drug and gene discovery. Here, we introduce a new automated method for
generating 3D (X,Y,Z) swim trajectories in adult zebrafish, Danio rerio. Based on the Track3D
module of EthoVision XT video tracking software (Noldus Information Technology), this tool
enhances the efficient high-throughput 3D analyses of zebrafish behavioral responses. Applied to
adult zebrafish behavior, this 3D method is also highly sensitive to various classes of psychotropic
drugs, including selected psychostimulant and hallucinogenic agents. Our present method offers a
marked advance toward the existing 2D and 3D methods of zebrafish phenotyping, minimizing
research time and recording high-resolution, automatically synchronized videos with high calculated
precision of the object 3D positioning. Our novel approach brings practical simplicity and integrative
capacity to the often complex and error-prone quantification of zebrafish behavioral phenotypes.
Illustrating the value of 3D swim path reconstructions for identifying experimentally-evoked
phenotypic profiles, this method fosters innovative, ethologically relevant and fully automated small
molecule screens using adult zebrafish.

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
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6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
43

THE INTERNATIONAL
STRESS AND BEHAVIOR
SOCIETY (ISBS)
Established in 2007
ISBS is the international society of experts working with a wide range of topics in the field of translational
neuroscience, neurobehavioral sciences, biopsychology and biopsychiatry, with a particular focus on stress,
stress-related neurobehavioral phenotypes, their neural, molecular and genetic mechanisms, as well as stressevoked neuropsychiatric disorders.
Anyone with an interest in stress-related human or animal behaviors, neurobehavioral disorders and their
mechanisms, wishing to join ISBS, can do so by paying dues. Payment can be made following sending the email form and payment request to the ISBS Secretariat at info@stressandbehavior.com. Once the form and
the payment have been received, you will receive a membership confirmation.
Membership:
Regular membership dues are $100.00 for the period of three years, or $60.00 for the period of one year.
Student (undergraduate and graduate) membership dues are $60.00 for the period of three years.

Regular membership benefits include a $50.00 discount for registration for any of the ISBS
Conferences, symposia, workshops and summer schools.
Student members will benefit from a $25.00 discount for registration for any of the ISBS Conferences,
symposia, workshops and summer schools.
Membership cycle starts January 1st. ISBS Members benefit from reduced STRESS, BRAIN &
BEHAVIOR journal subscription fees: $70.00 (regular member), $55.00 (student member).

ISBS Membership application form (please fill in and send by e-mail to the ISBS Secretariat at
info@stressandbehavior.com, with the subject ISBS Membership request)

Name, Family name:


Position/Title: Institute/Company:
Category - please select one:
Regular member, 3-year term ($ 100.00)
Regular member, 1-year term ($ 60.00)
Student member, 3-year term ($ 60.00)
Address (affiliation): City: Postal code: State: Country:
Phone, Fax:
E-mail address: www:

www.stress-and-behavior.com
info@stressandbehavior.com
6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
44

Fellows of ISBS:
The ISBS Fellowship (with Life membership) is the highest honor bestowed by the International Stress
and Behavior Society. It is awarded annually to international scholars, in recognition of their contribution
to clinical or translational neuroscience, biological psychiatry and stress physiology research and/or
education, as well as for their long-standing support of the ISBS mission and its national, regional or
international programs.
Dr. Mikhail Aghajanov (Yerevan Medical University, Armenia), 2015
Dr. Elliott Beaton (University of New Orleans, USA), 2015
Dr. Evgeniy Budygin (Wake Forest Medical Center, USA), 2014
Dr. David Echevarria (University of Southern Mississippi, USA), 2014
Dr. Alexey Egorov (Sechenov Institute, Russia), 2014
Dr. Irina Ekimova (Sechenov Institute, Russia), 2013
Dr. Raul Gainetdinov (Italian Institute of Technology, Italy), 2013
Dr. Allan Kalueff (ZENEREI Institute, USA), 2013
Dr. Victor Klimenko (Institute of Experimental Medicine, Russia), 2013
Dr. Mamiko Koshiba (Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan), 2014
Dr. Shun Nakamura (Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Japan), 2014
Dr. Tatyana Nevidimova (National Mental Health Institute, Russia), 2014
Dr. Yuriy Pastuhov (Sechenov Institute, Russia), 2013
Dr. Mikhail Pletnikov (Johns Hopkins University, USA), 2015
Dr. Tatyana Sollertinskaya (Sechenov Institute, Russia), 2013
Dr. Adam Stewart (ZENEREI Institute, USA), 2015
Dr. Tatyana Strekalova (Maastricht University, Netherlands), 2014
Dr. Gilbertha St. Rose (Eden Herbs, St. Lucia), 2015
Dr. Oleg Syropiatov (UAPO, Ukraine), 2013
Dr. Sergei Tsikunov (Institute of Experimental Medicine, Russia), 2014
Dr. Jason Warnick (Arkansas Tech University, USA), 2014

ISBS Fellow Nominees:


Dr. Louis Newman (Destiny Medical School, St. Lucia), 2016
Dr. Urban Seraphin (Allied Health Council, St. Lucia), 2016
Dr. Dusko Kozic (University of Novi Sad, Serbia), 2016
Dr. David M. Diamond (University of South Florida, USA), 2016

6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
45

THE INTERNATIONAL STRESS AND


BEHAVIOR SOCIETY (ISBS)
Established in 2007

ISBS is the international society of experts working with in the field of clinical and translational neuroscience,
neurobehavioral sciences, biopsychology and biopsychiatry, with a particular focus on stress, stress-related
neurobehavioral phenotypes, their neural, molecular and genetic mechanisms, as well as stress-evoked neuropsychiatric
disorders. Anyone with an interest in stress-related human or animal behaviors, neurobehavioral disorders and their
mechanisms, wishing to join the International Stress and Behavior Society can do so by paying dues of $100.00 regular
member or $60.00 student member for a three-year term. Payment can be made following sending the e-mail form and
payment request to the ISBS Secretariat at info@stressandbehavior.com.

Please join our 2015-2017 ISBS conferences:


International Regional Neuroscience and Biological
Psychiatry Conference "Stress and Behavior" (Asia)
July 26-27, 2016, Kobe, Japan

3rd Caribbean Biomedical Research Days CBRD-2016


January 16-18, 2016, Rodney Bay, St. Lucia

23rd International Neuroscience and Biological


Psychiatry Conference "STRESS AND BEHAVIOR"
May 16-19, 2016, St. Petersburg, Russia

7th International Regional Neuroscience and Biological


Psychiatry Conference "STRESS AND BEHAVIOR"
(North America)
June 22-24, 2016, Miami Beach, FL, USA
ISBS Conference: Neurobiology of Mind and Body: Behavior,
Stress, Brain Diseases, Immunity, Drugs and Nutrition
Oct 27-29, 2016, Zhanjiang, China

www.stress-and-behavior.com
E-mail: info@stressandbehavior.com
6th Regional Stress and Behavior ISBS Conference, Kobe, Japan July 26-27, 2015
46