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Jamaica's shoreline may be attributed to several factors.

The degradation of coral reefs


and mangrove forests have exposed the sandy beaches to increased wave action, and the
illegal but common practice of mining sand from beaches has exacerbated the problem.
Both recreational and fishing beaches have been fouled by the pileup of refuse, debris
and fish offal, as well as by occasional offshore and nearshore oil spills. The quality of
the water around several recreational beaches is deteriorating due to pollution,
particularly from human waste, which makes sea bathing unpleasant.

The importance of sea grass beds in the growth cycles of fish, lobsters and other
commercially important species is recognized by scientists but has not been fully
explored. Indeed there is very little information available on the extent and location of
sea grass beds on Jamaica's coastal shelves and (inshore and offshore) banks.

Jamaica's marine environment is notoriously overfished; indeed the CARICOM Fisheries


Resource Assessment and Management Programme (CFRAMP) has declared Jamaican
(1975) does not set minimum mesh sizes for fishtraps, and there are several large
loopholes in its provisions.

Wild stocks of a few species of invertebrates have been traditionally exploited by


artisanal fishers. Lobster, shrimp and crabs (crustaceans), conch and oysters (mollusc)
were generally lightly harvested, but in recent years, increases in demand have led to
Jamaica possesses a varied and irregular coastline which gives rise to a unique ecosystem
formed by the integration of coastal features that include harbours, bays, beaches, rocky
shores, estuaries, mangrove swamps, cays, and coral reefs. These natural features provide
a coastal resource base that contributes significantly to the economic well-being of the
country through tourism. More significantly, most of the Jamaican people live in coastal
plains and ipso facto the majority of the economic activities within the country occur
there, making coastal zone management very important for the country.

large increases in fishing pressure. A lucrative export

expanding the area fished to include the almost unexploited inshore and offshore banks,
which would require motorization. Since then, developments in fishing technology
(including motorization and the introduction of SCUBA gear) have resulted in
overfishing on the inshore and offshore banks. Government initiatives have led to
substantial increases in fishing effort while there is inadequate institutional capacity to
plan for, manage and monitor the fishing industry. Jamaica's catch of marine fish has
declined from 10.89 million kg (24 million lbs) in 1964 to 7.71 million kg (17 Jamaica
possesses a varied and irregular coastline which gives rise to a unique ecosystem formed
by the integration of coastal features that include harbours, bays, beaches, rocky shores,
estuaries, mangrove swamps, cays, and coral reefs. These natural features provide a

coastal resource base that contributes significantly to the economic well-being of the
country through tourism. More significantly, most of the Jamaican people live in coastal
plains and ipso facto the majority of the economic activities within the country occur
there, making coastal zone management very important for the country.
and trammel nets. Other nets are destructive of fish (e.g. gill nets) and the mesh in most nets is
quite small. The laws of Jamaica which address fisheries management are deficient. The Wildlife
Protection Act (1945) states that juvenile fish are to be protected, and that the definition of
juvenile fish will be provided in accompanying regulations; those regulations were never issued.
The Fishing Industry Act

Numerous sandy beaches around Jamaica's coastline and on several inshore cays are
invaluable to the tourism industry for the enjoyment of local and foreign visitors. This
resource is under threat from pollution, erosion and illegal sand mining. The erosion of
Jamaica's shoreline may be attributed to several factors. The degradation of coral reefs
and mangrove forests have exposed the sandy beaches to increased wave action, and the
illegal but common practice of mining sand from beaches has exacerbated the problem.
Both recreational and fishing beaches have been fouled by the pileup of refuse, debris
and fish offal, as well as by occasional offshore and nearshore oil spills. The quality of
the water around several recreational beaches is deteriorating due to pollution,
particularly from human waste, which makes sea bathing unpleasant.