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Cambridge Primary Ready to Go Lessons for

English Stage 4
Answers to photocopiable pages

Unit 1A: Historical fiction

Page 15: Finding facts in fiction

Page 9: Reading a historical story

Personal response; see page 14 bottom left for


questions to prompt the learners.

The learners complete the table as described on


page 8 under Main activities.

Page 17: Looking at settings

Page 11: Verbs and adverbs


1. a) went
b) walked

Personal response; look for the learners


creating mood in the same way as the example
extracts.

Page 19: My own historical


character

c) asked
d) ran
e) ate
2. Answers will vary, for example:
a) I drove quickly to the beach.

The learners complete the boxes as described on


page 18 under Main activities.

Page 21: My story plan

c) The children begged mercilessly for sweets.

The learners complete the table as described on


page 20 under Main activities.

d) We sprinted excitedly to the road.

Page 23: Stages in a story

b) The man rushed worriedly to the shop.

e) John miserably tasted his lunch.


3. Answers will vary, for example:
a) Ralph skipped excitedly to football practice,
whereas his brother Peter ambled there
miserably.
b) She spoke French enthusiastically;
however, no one could understand her.

Page 13: Escape from Pompeii


Answers will vary, for example:
Information Information
given clearly we can work
in the text
out from
clues in the
text
Pompeii
Pompeii is a
overlooks
bustling city
Naples
Pompeii is an

Questions
we have
about the
text

Pompeii is a
Roman city

Is Tranio
really safe?

attractive city

The bars,
taverns and
The city is noisy shops are busy
It is sunny

Pompeii is
surrounded by
walls

What does
Tranio do in
Pompeii?

Whats going
to happen
next?

Section

Information to
include in this
section

The introduction

Introduce Bob and his


mum

Find out about


characters and setting.
The problem /
build-up
Something happens
that starts the rest of
the events in the
story.
The climax /
conflict
This is the most
exciting part! This is
what the story is all
about.
The resolution
This is where the
conflict is resolved and
the story starts to wind
down to the end.

Explain the setting:


a cottage in the woods
Bob is sent to sell
firewood to bring back
money so that they can
both eat to survive.

Bob meets a lady


wheeling a barrow full
of little trees.
She convinces Bob to
swap his firewood for
one of the trees.
Bobs mum is furious
and makes him plant
the tree in the garden
and go to bed without
any tea.

Cambridge Primary Ready to Go Lessons for English Stage 4: Answers to photocopiable pages
Section

The conclusion
This brings the story to
an end, or adds a twist
or even suggests a
sequel!

Information to
include in this
section
In the morning, the
tree has grown double
its size and has gold
coins hanging from
every branch.

Page 35: The alphabet

Bob and his mum


harvest the coins and
more grow back. They
are never hungry again.

See also page 34 under Starter for other ways the


learners organise the letters.

Page 25: Historical fiction


Success criteria to help the learners write their
story.

Page 27: Editing a short story


Answers will vary, for example:
One day, a boy called Fred went for a walk in the
park. He was happy to play on the swings for a
while, but then he glanced up and gleefully noticed
the see-saw. He really wanted to play on this but
knew that he couldnt on his own. He desperately
needed someone to play with. A see-saw only works
if there are two people on it. What could he do?
After a while of perching miserably on one end
of it, he suddenly spotted a boy ambling slowly
along the pavement towards the park. When
the boy finally entered the park, Fred demanded
to know if hed like to play on the see-saw. The
boy replied gratefully that he did, so clambered
clumsily on the other end. However, before he was
ready, Fred pushed down heavily on his legs and
sent the boys end of the see-saw up to the sky.
The boy fell off awkwardly and cried loudly. Fred
rushed to help him because he had bumped his
elbow badly and it was bleeding slightly. Fred put
a tissue on it as it was only a small cut, and then
suggested shyly they play gently on the swings
instead. The spent the rest of the time enjoying the
swings and had a delightful afternoon.

Page 29: Reading styles


The learners read their stories, as explained on
page 28 under Starter.

Page 31: Story settings


The learners do the activities as described on page
30, under Picture it! and Written assessment.

Unit 1B: Non-chronological


reports

The learners put the letters into alphabetical


order:
a
h
o
v

ant
egg
jog
nip
van

b
i
p
w

ball
fun
kit
owl
won

c
j
q
x

bat
gap
lap
pop
yes

d
k
r
y

bit
hat
lip
pup
zip

e
l
s
z

cat
hit
man
rip

f
m
t

cup
hut
mum
sit

dip
ink
nap
tut

Page 37: KWWL chart


The learners complete the chart as they do their
research, as explained on page 36 under Main
activities.

Page 39: Choosing a research


question
The learners write a research question, as
explained on page 38 under Main activities.

Page 41: Past, present and future


1. a) was

past

am

present

will be

future

b) were

past

are

present

will be

future

c) will have

future

d) had

past

have
e) had

present
past

has

present

will have

future

2. a) past
b) future
c) present
d) present
e) past

Page 43: Adverbs and adjectives


Answers will vary, for example:
1. a) reluctantly

blue

b) silently

forbidden

Page 33: Tigers

c) Wearily

muddy

The learners work through the report, as explained


on page 32 under Main activities.

d) enthusiastically

new

e) happily

delicious

g
n
u

Cambridge Primary Ready to Go Lessons for English Stage 4: Answers to photocopiable pages
2. Answers will vary, for example:
Adverbs of
manner

Adverbs
of time

Adverbs of
place

These tell you


HOW
something was
done, for
example:
softly

These tell
you WHEN
something
was done,
for
example:
later

These tell
you WHERE
something
was done, for
example:
outside

accidentally
beautifully
bravely
elegantly
enthusiastically
gracefully
lazily
mysteriously
sleepily
wisely

tomorrow
tonight
yesterday
daily
never
often
sometimes
finally
first
recently

above
abroad
behind
below
downstairs
east
near
towards
under
upstairs

Page 45: Ships


Page 46: Comparing reports
The learners compare reports, as explained on
page 44 under Main activities.

Page 48: Complex sentences


b) C

c) E

2. a) Verbs:

d) S

ran

e) Q

f) C

buy

Adverb:

quickly

Connective:

so that

Comma:

Imran ran quickly to the


shops, so that he could buy
the tasty fruit for dinner.

b) Verbs:

had to move

would have
stood

quickly

Connective:

otherwise

Comma:

I had to move out of the


way quickly, otherwise the
elephant would have stood
on me!
was
smiling

The boys were hiding


silently behind the large
building, so that their
mum did not see them.

e) Verbs:

was watching stir knew


would have to cook

Adverbs:

Connective:

as

Comma:

Nita was watching her


mum stir the food, as she
knew that she would have
to cook for her own family
one day.

3. Answers will vary, for example:


a) Charlie and Arash crawled silently along
the tunnel, as they did not want to be
caught by the nasty thieves.
b) Nikita was in the way, so she moved on to
the next market stall.

The learners use the mind map to plan their


report, as explained on page 50 under Main
activities.

Page 53: Non-chronological


report checklist
Success criteria to help the learners write a
report.

Page 55: What is a star?

Adverb:

c) Verbs:

so that

Comma:

Page 51: Mind map

Report to read with the learners.

1. a) Q

Connective:

knew

had
married

1. Astronomers
2. The Sun
3. Because the stars are so far away
4. A big ball of plasma held together by gravity
5. Personal response.

Unit 1C: Poems and playscripts on common themes


Page 57: Comparing two poems
The learners compare two poems, as explained on
page 56 under Main activities.

Page 59: Winter poems

Adverb:

broadly

Connective:

because

Comma:

William was smiling


broadly, because he knew
that he had married the
girl of his dreams.

Page 61: Poem on a theme

were hiding

Page 63: The play-script

d) Verbs:
Adverb:

silently

Poems to read with the learners.

see

The learners use the table to plan their poem, as


explained on page 60 under Main activities.

Play-script to read with the learners.


3

Cambridge Primary Ready to Go Lessons for English Stage 4: Answers to photocopiable pages

Page 65: The Hare and the Tortoise


Tale to read with the learners.

Page 67: Acrostic poems


The learners write acrostic poems, as explained on
page 66 under Written assessment.

Effective words and


phrases

abandoned

(words and phrases you


might want to include in
your own stories)

liberate

overthrown

captivity

Unit 2A: Fantasy stories

the wind
carried this
news

Pages 6970: The Lake Princesses

scupper

Story to read with the learners.

imprisoned

Page 72: Comparing story


openings

and so it was

Title of Action
Dia- Character- Settingbook
openlogue
focus
focus
ing opening opening opening
Doodle
day
The
Small
est
Dragonboy
Ully the

Piper
Wheel
barrow
Castle

initiative
2. a) falling snow
b) a deer
c) an aeroplane
3. Personal response.

Page 76: Apostrophes


well we will cant cannot isnt is not
theyre they are shes she is shell she will
wasnt was not Ill I will theyll they will
hes he is its it is shant shall not

Page 78: Setting descriptions


Answers will vary, for example:
Extract

Page 74: Identifying language


features in a text
1.

Answers will vary, for example:


1.

Specific nouns

lake

(nouns that are used for the


setting, for example forest)

island

Adjectives
(words that describe settings
or characters)

depths
beautiful

What are we
NOT told about
the setting but
can work out
(implicit)?

it is a lime
avenue

it is in England

it is a mile long

it is not raining

it is sunny

there are ferns


the trees are tall

hostile

it is an urban
setting

forgotten

it is in a hot country

2.

it is night

it is a big hall

it is set in the past

wicked

it is musty

it is threatening

brave

it is lit by oil
lamps

terrifying

sweeter

3.

terrible

Page 80: Character description

clever

The learners create descriptions, as explained on


page 79 under Main activities.

scary
enormous
slim
smiling
intelligent
4

What are we
told about
the setting
(explicit)?

Page 82: Dragons!


Answers will vary, and may include the following
words:
fire-breathing carnivorous spiked terrifying
wings
baby
fun
playful
spotty
hatch

Cambridge Primary Ready to Go Lessons for English Stage 4: Answers to photocopiable pages

Page 83: Story-mapping


Answers will vary, depending on the story chosen.

Page 97: How are newspapers


written?

Page 85: Story-planning

The learners do the activity as described on the


photocopiable page.

The learners use the frame to plan their story, as


explained on page 84 under Main activities.

Page 87: Writing a fantasy story


Success criteria to help the learners write a
fantasy story.

Page 89: Drama ideas


The learners do the activity, as explained on page
88 under Main activities.

Page 91: A Colourful Head


1. That he should be happy with what he has
and not envious.
2. Because it was different from everyone elses.
3. Because they were envious of the hair that
had come out.
4. Personal response; ensure the learners justify
their opinion with examples from the text.

Unit 2B: Newspaper-style


reports
Page 93: Changing tenses
Answers will vary, for example:
1. The girls are tiptoeing quietly down the stairs.
(present tense)
The girls will be jumping happily down the
stairs. (future tense)
2. The boy is reluctantly ambling home.
(present tense)
The boy rushed worriedly home.
(future tense)
3. He accidentally knocks his head on the wall.
(present tense)
He will foolishly bang his head on the wall.
(future tense)
4. The aeroplane cruised gently in the sky.
(past tense)
The aeroplane will glide noiselessly in the sky.
(future tense)
5. She is generously hosting a birthday party.
(present tense)
She will wearily hold a birthday party.
(future tense)

Page 95: My favourite thing


The learners do the activity as described on the
photocopiable page.

Page 99: Exciting sentences


Answers will vary, for example:
1. The pretty girls played quietly in the green
park, while the naughty boys flew round
madly on their bikes like Superman.
2. He defiantly rode his new bike, even though
his big brother begged like a puppy for
his turn.
3. They ate their delicious lunch messily and
rapidly, so that they could return to singing
like birds.
4. Cycling joyously on healthy bikes is better
than riding around in dirty cars, which
pollute the environment through their
exhaust pipes like smoke from a dragon.
5. Younger children are happy when they
are playing independently, whereas older
children prefer to play together like kittens in
a basket.

Page 101: Facts or opinions?


Facts

Opinions

Spain is Europes fourth Spain is a great place to


largest country.
go on holiday.
Spain has a border with Spain is a pretty
France.
country.
Spain has a flag with
yellow and red on it.

It is best to travel to
Spain in the winter.

The capital city of


Spain is Madrid.

I like going to Spain


because it is warm.

Bull fighting is a
traditional event in
Spain.

There are interesting


animals to see in Spain.

In Spain, the King of


Spain nominates a
candidate for
presidency.
Spain has a border with
Portugal.

Page 103: Analysing newspapers


The learners complete the table as described on
page 102 under Main activities; see also the
Main activities for definitions of the terms on the
photocopiable page.

Page 105: Headline fun


Personal response.

Cambridge Primary Ready to Go Lessons for English Stage 4: Answers to photocopiable pages

Page 107: Caption fun


The learners do the activity as explained on page
106 under Main activities.

Page 109: Who, what, where,


when and why
The learners use the table to plan their report, as
explained on page 108 under Main activities.

Page 111: Reviewing my


newspaper report

After that? Who knows? Maybe one day Ill be


a famous chef thats something Id really like
to do!

Page 115: Persuasive ideas


1. Advertisement.
2. To tell the readers about the company or product
available, and to make the newspaper money
(as companies pay to have the adverts included).
3. Newspaper readers, especially homeowners.
4. Well at Darch blinds it takes three days.

Success criteria to help the learners write a


newspaper report.

Weve got blinds to fit every window

Page 113: Be an editor for a day!

Dont delay

Answers will vary, for example:


The Cookie Kid
By Holly Caplin
Robin Worth (11) of Middleton, Illinois, USA has
been amazing his classmates with his new-found
skills in the kitchen. Robin has been making a
huge success of a new cookie business he has
set up.
It all started earlier this year, says the plucky
youngster, when we had to make cookies for a
school project.
The young boy loved cooking them so much
that he decided to do it again when he got home
from school.
Word of mouth
After his early experiences in the classroom, Robin
began to sell his cookies at a local caf nearby to
where he lives.
The cookies this boy makes are AMAZING, says
local caf owner Ang Li. Customers couldnt get
enough!
Robins cookies sold out in one day, causing Ang
to ask the boy to make him another batch.
Soon word of Robins cookies spread across
Middleton, and other caf owners wanted to sell
them too.
Charity
Robin decided early on that half of the money he
made would go to charity. I support a different
charity each month, says Robin. That way
everyone gets a share.
Robin at work in his family kitchen
He has now donated money to seven different
charities, ranging from the African Well Fund, to
a local homelessness charity in Illinois.
Robin will never stop looking to the future
though. He plans to expand his range of cookies
and is thinking about moving his work space out
of the family home, where he has been baking.
6

A range to suit every pocket


5. To try to prove that the rest of the advert is
true and accurate.

Unit 2C: Poems from


different times and cultures
Page 117: Star songs
Poems to read with the learners.

Page 118: Comparing poems


Answers will vary; for example, for Evening star!:
Name of poet:
Words and phrases
that are particularly
effective
Patterns, including
rhyme, rhythm,
alliteration, verse
structure
Pictures: what picture
does the poem paint
in your mind?

Sappho (translated by
Beram Saklatvala)
scattered

Repetition of the letter


b

The countryside at
sunset, and a mother
cuddling her child before
bedtime.
Effects: how does the Calm a gentle lilting
poem make you feel? rhythm makes the reader
How is this achieved? read slowly.
Likes and dislikes:
I like the theme and the
parts of the poem
imagery the idea that
that you like or
at sunrise families and
dislike. Explain why. communities scatter to
different occupations
and gather together
again in the evening.
Any other thoughts
It is interesting to read a
about the poem
poem in translation
because it is a translators
interpretation of the
original, and probably
the content is kept while
the rhythm and rhyme of
the original may be lost.

Cambridge Primary Ready to Go Lessons for English Stage 4: Answers to photocopiable pages

Page 120: Shakespeare and


Marlowe
Poems to read with the learners.

Action
The boy told a lie
about Bobby
Charlton.

Page 122: A Jamaican childhood


Poem to read with the learners.

Page 123: Poems from other


cultures
The learners do the activity as described on
page 121 under Main activities.

Page 125: My favourite poem


The learners do the activity as described on
page 124 under Main activities.

Page 127: Reviewing my poem


Success criteria to help the learners write their poem.

Page 129: Poems on a common


theme
Answers will vary, for example:
1. time
2. alliteration / simile
3. I think that the poem called Passing of time
is older than the poem called Time because
it has more old-fashioned imagery (Hands of
time) and word order (can we re-enact).
4. The poem that I like best out of these two is
Time because it has clear imagery in the first
three couplets and a surprising ending, which
is different from the rest of the poem as it is
an opinion, which suddenly addresses the
reader directly.

Unit 3A: Stories about


problems and issues

Bobby Charlton
invited them in
for tea.
The boys mum did
not believe that he
had tea with Bobby
Charlton.

Reason for action


He was upset that Gordon
bullied and shouted at
him, that Melrose liked
Gordon and that
Gordon was the better
footballer.
He could see that Gordon
was bullying the boy and
wanted to stick up for him.
It was really unlikely, and
she knew hed lied before.

Page 137: Story openings


The learners do the activity as described on page
136 under Main activities.

Page 139: Jumbled-up story 1


One evening, after school, John and Chan were
kicking a football around in the road outside.
They were laughing and joking, and enjoying
themselves.
Pass it over here! shouted Chan as he ran over
towards the fence on the other side of the street.
John kicked the ball hard, and it sailed into the
air. He gasped as the ball went right over the
fence into the garden of the house! He and Chan
stood, rooted to the spot, as the ball disappeared.
Then they turned to stare at each other as the
sound of breaking glass rang in their ears.
What should they do? John wondered. Should
they run? Should they pretend that nothing had
happened? Chan came running over.
What are we going to do? he gasped.
Im not sure, John bit his lip. What should he do?

Page 131: Favourite author

He made up his mind. He would go over and


own up. It was his fault after all, he had kicked
the ball.

The learners do the activity as described on page


130 under Main activities.

Ill go and explain, said John. After all it was


an accident.

Page 133: Stories that raise


issues

Im coming with you then, replied Chan. If


it wasnt for me, you wouldnt have kicked the
ball so hard.

The learners do the activity as described on page


133 under Main activities.

Chan and John crossed the street and knocked


on the door to the house. The door opened and
there was a smiling old man.

Page 135: Why did they do it?


Action
The boy tried to tell
his mum he had
earache.
Norbert attacked
Gordon on the bus.

Reason for action


To try and get out of
football practice.

Im so glad you came over, he said. I have been


watching you. It makes me happy to watch the
children playing in the street. I wondered if you
would come and own up or run away.

To stick up for his friend.

That weekend the two boys went to visit the


old man and helped him tidy his garden. It was
the start of a great friendship.
7

Cambridge Primary Ready to Go Lessons for English Stage 4: Answers to photocopiable pages

Page 140: Jumbled-up story 2


Psst! whispered Hayley, signalling for Nina to
come and join her in the quiet area in the
classroom. Nina smiled and went to sit with her
friend.
Ive got something to tell you, whispered
Hayley. Im moving house. I wont be coming
to this school any more.
Oh no! whispered Nina in reply. Well still be
friends though! Hayley smiled a sad little smile.
Nina and Hayley were walking home after school
that evening, with their best friend Aisha. At the
corner of two roads, Hayley waved goodbye to
her friends and walked slowly off to her house.
Nina looked at Aisha.
Hayley is one of my best friends said Nina
slowly.
Mine too hesitated Aisha.
Nina hesitated. Should she tell Aisha about
Hayley moving house? She felt she should after
all Hayley was Aishas friend too. But what if
Hayley had only told her, because she didnt
want Aisha to know yet? What if Aisha got really
upset with Hayley for not telling her herself?
What should she do?
Nina breathed in slowly. Then she turned to
Aisha and said, Hayley told me she is moving
house. She paused, before continuing, She also
told me she would have to leave our school!

Page 149: Story details


The learners use the table to plan their story, as
explained on page 148 under Main activities.

Page 151: Writing a story with an


issue or problem
Success criteria to help the learners write their
story.

Page 153: Dilemma cards


The learners do the activity as explained on
page 152 under Solving dilemmas.

Unit 3B: Explanations and


persuasion
Page 155: The water cycle
Explanation text to read with the learners.

Page 156: What do explanation


texts tell me?
The learners do the activity as described on page
154; for photocopiable page 155:
How many paragraphs are there and
what are the main ideas in each
paragraph?
Six:
Paragraph 1: the stages of the water cycle
Paragraph 2: evaporation

Aisha breathed a heavy sigh and looked along the


road that Hayley had just walked down. I know,
she replied sadly. She told me that today too.

Paragraph 3: transpiration

The next morning, when Hayley met Nina and


Aisha at the corner of the street, the two girls
gave her a hug. Dont worry, Hayley, said Aisha.
We will still be friends, and we will come to see
you in your new house.

Paragraph 5: precipitation

Hayley smiled and together the three friends


walked on to school.

Page 142: The Fallen Angel Cake


Story to read with the learners.

Paragraph 4: condensation

Paragraph 6: conclusion
Explain the order of the paragraphs in
the text.
The first paragraph introduces the topic and
states what the text will cover. It then covers
each of the sub-topics introduced in the first
paragraph in turn, and finishes with a
conclusion, which ties together the points
raised.

Page 143: Story endings

What have you learnt from the text?

Story endings to read with the learners.

What the water cycle is, the stages that make it


up and why it is called the water cycle.

Page 145: Character profile


The learners use the table to create their character
profile, as explained on page 144.

Page 147: Settings


The learners use the table and box to create their
setting, as explained on page 146 under Main
activities.
8

Key words and language features I have


noted about this text:
Key words: stages; water cycle; evaporation;
lakes, rivers, streams, sea; vapour; transpiration;
sweat; condensation; cloud; droplet;
precipitation; sleet, snow, hail, rain
Features: diagram; subheadings; chronological
order; first person

Cambridge Primary Ready to Go Lessons for English Stage 4: Answers to photocopiable pages

Page 158: Non-fiction text types


about a specific subject
Nonchronological
report

Explanation

written in paragraphs, often


under subheadings

Page 168: Dont skip on skipping


Advert to read with the learners.

helps the reader to


understand why something
is the case for example why
rivers flow to the sea

The learners do the activity as described on


page 167 under Main activities.

written in paragraphs that


logically develop

tells the reader what to


do to achieve a particular
outcome
often includes a list of
equipment needed

Page 169: Advert features


Page 171: Advert success criteria
Success criteria to help the learners write their
advert.

Page 173: Planning an


explanation
The learners use the table to plan their
explanation, as explained on page 172 under
Main activities.

Page 171: Explanation success


criteria

is often numbered

Success criteria to help the learners write their


explanation text.

may have a short


introductory paragraph

Page 177: IRIDEX4000

can take many forms,


from scripts to newspaper
advertisements

Persuasive

The learners do the activity, as explained on


page 166 under Main activities.

often includes some technical


vocabulary, which may be
explained in a glossary

some technical vocabulary,


which may be explained in a
glossary

Instruction

Page 166: Comparing adverts

aims to get the reader to do


something, think something
or buy something
aims to convince the reader
to change their point of
view so it is the same as the
writers

Page 160: The universe


a modern view (1639)
See the bottom text to identify, where the
paragraph breaks should be; see the top text to
identify the correct order.

Page 162: Explanation features

Answers will vary; see page 176 under Written


assessment for examples.

Unit 3C: Poems in a variety


of forms
Page 179: Comparing poems
The learners do the activity, as explained on
page 178 under Main activities.

Page 181: My chosen poem


The learners do the activity, as explained on
page 180 under Main activities.

Page 183: Syllabic poems


Poems to read with the learners.

Page 185: Different types of


poem

Answers will vary; see page 161 under Main


activities for an example.

Poems to read with the learners.

Page 164: My chosen object

The learners complete the table as described on


page 186 under Main activities.

The learners use the table to plan their


explanation text, as explained on page 163 under
Main activities.

Page 187: Poetic forms


Page 189: Analysis of my poem
Success criteria to help the learners write their poem.

Cambridge Primary Ready to Go Lessons for English Stage 4: Answers to photocopiable pages

Page 191: Spotting poetry types


1. Haiku
2. There are five syllables in the first line, seven
in the next, and five in the final line.
3. Answers will vary, for example: I can
see a beetle crawling uphill, and people
sitting sadly with empty tea cups, awaiting
refills.
4. Personal response; look for well-justified
answers.

10

5. a) Syllabic poems are made up of specific


numbers of syllables in each line; free-form
poems can be made up of any number of
syllables.
bc) Personal response; look for well-justified
answers.
6. The learners write haikus; look for the correct
number of syllables in each line (575).

Page 192: Calligrams


The learners write calligrams, as explained on
page 190 under Written assessment.