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PAM@NA PAyapa at MAsaganang PamayaNAn Progress Report As of 30 June 2015 In line with the goal of enabling communities affected by and vulnerable to armed conflict to return to peaceful conditions where they can achieve their desired quality of life, the Government is adopting @ two-pronged approach: (1) Track 2, which aims to achieve negotiated political settlement of all internal armed conflicts, and, (2) Track 2, the Complementary Track, which seeks to address the causes and impacts of all internal armed conflicts and other issues that affect the peace process through security, justice and development interventions focused on conflict-affected and conflict-vulnerable areas. The Complementary Track is primarily pursued through the PAyapa at MAsaganang PamanayaNAn (PAMANA) which is the national government's convergence framework and program for peacebuilding and development in areas affected by and vulnerable to conflict. PAMANA, as embodied in the Philippine Development Plan 2011-2016, was launched in 2011. PAMANA, aims to achieve the following objectives: (1) Improve socio-economic conditions in areas affected by and vulnerable to armed conflict through infrastructure development and focused delivery of goods and services; (2) Improve governance by enhancing institutional capacities of national government agencies and local government units to pursue peace and development in conflict-affected and conflict- vulnerable areas through capacitation on conflict-sensitive and peace-promoting approaches and enhancement of transparency and accountability mechanisms; and, (3) Empower communities and strengthen their capacities to address issues of conflict and peace through activities that promote social cohesion. PAMANA as a Complementary Track PAMANA complements the different peace tables: GPH-Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF). PAMANA, although is not implemented in direct support to the MILF peace process, seeks to contribute to this particular peace table by building the capacities of local governments in Bangsamoro areas to deliver development programs and basic services. GPH-Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF). PAMANA was undertaken as a separate initiative of the Aquino Administration to assist communities with MNLF presence. These communities continue to experience underdevelopment even after the implementation of the development component of the 1996 Final Peace Agreement between the Government and the MNLF. Priority is given to Peace and Development Communities or PDCs (transformed MNLF guerilla bases and positions) which have a higher level of social preparedness. PAMANA Progress Report | 2015 PAMANA provides social protection services on health and education for MNLF members and their families as well as livelihood support and access and production infrastructure to help improve economic development. GPH-Communist Party of the Philippines/New People’s Army/National Democratic Front (CPP/NPA/NDF). PAMANA in CPP-NPA-NDF (CNN) affected areas are meant to ensure that communities benefit from peace dividends despite the stalled Peace Talks. PAMANA Projects bring development interventions that aim to improve the quality of life of communities, as well as improvement in governance to ensure that local government units (LGU) pay attention to conflict triggers and strengthen peace promoting interventions. GPH-Cordillera Bodong Administration/Cordillera People’s Liberation Army (CBA/CPLA). PAMANA contributed to the transformation process of the CPLA from an armed group to an unarmed socio- economic entity, the Cordillera Forum for Peace and Development (CFPD) through socio-economic development interventions. On the ground, the transformation is represented by people's organizations/livelihood associations of former CPLA members. These organizations are also open to the participation and membership of non-CPLA members within their communities. PAMANA highlighted the government's dedication to fulfill its commitments in line with the 2011 Closure ‘Agreement with the CBA-CPLA, PAMANA currently is tasked with the implementation of the socio-economic provisions of the GPH-CBA- CPLA Closure Agreement of July 2011. For the socio-economic integration of individual members of the former CPLA, Article 1 Section 3 of the Closure Agreement states that CPLA members shall be provided assistance in securing employment or other sources of income, including livelihood projects, as a step towards disarmament. The range of options includes integration into the armed forces, employment as forest guards subject to compliance with DENR requirements, skills training and job placement or other forms of income-generating activities. Since 2013, a total of 168 profiled CPLA members (104) and their Next-of-kin (64) have been integrated into the AFP. The 168 who chose the army integration option for socio-economic reintegration are still on active duty as of 30 June 2015, with some detailed in Mindanao as augmentation to AFP battalions. In line with the Forest Protection Activities of the DENR under its National Greening Program (NGP) with PAMANA interventions, a total of 715 former combatants and/or next-of-kin across peace tables were hired as forest guards. Of which, 587 were from the Cordillera Administrative Region. The hired forest guards from 2014 continue to report non-payment of salaries. The DENR has submitted its PAMANA- DENR Work and Financial Plan for 2015 to the DBM for processing. A total of 81 community development projects (CDP) were identified under the Closure Agreement including farm-to-market roads, potable water systems, communal irrigation systems and other community support projects such as agriculture-based enterprises and health and tribal facilities. As of 30 June 2015, four (4) CDPs in ifugao were completed bringing the total of completed projects to 62 with 11 CPDs still ongoing and eight (8) in preparatory and other stages of implementation. GPH- Rebolusyonaryong Partidong Manggagawang Pilipinas/Revolutionary Proletarian Army/Alex Boncayao Brigade-Tabara Paduano Group (RPM-P/RPA/ABB-TPG). PAMANA will support implementation and completion of the Closure Agreement with the RPIV-P/RPA/ABB-TPG and assist in PAMANA Progress Report | 2015 the institutional transformation of this group into an unarmed political and socio-economic organization that promotes the welfare of members and host communities. In preparation for the signing of the Closure Agreement with the RPM-P/RPA/ABB-TPG, PAMANA has supported the implementation of components relative to community peace dividends, disposition of arms and forces, socio-economic reintegration including employment of TPG members as forest guards with the DENR, participation in the health insurance program with PhilHealth and study grant program with CHED, and development support to settlement sites such as infrastructure projects. PAMANA Program Accomplishments The following are the program accomplishments of PAMANA as of 30 June 2015, based on status reports submitted by PAMANA implementing agencies: Pillar 1: Building Foundations for Peace Pillar 1 refers to macro-level policy reform interventions that support the establishment of the foundations of peace building including governance and convergence interventions, social protection for former combatants and their next-of-kin, and support for indigenous peoples and other marginalized sectors, Pillar 2 is being implemented by the Philippine Health Insurance Corporation (PhilHealth), Commission on Higher Education (CHED), Department of interior and Local Government (DILG) and the National ‘Commission on indigenous Peoples (NCIP). Social Protection Packages for Former Combatants and/or Next-of Kin A. PhilHealth The PAMANA-sponsored Health Insurance Program with PhilHealth covers former combatants from different rebel affiliations and those covered by peace agreements. A total of 4,836 identified beneficiaries were endorsed to PhilHealth in 2014. Of which, 2,996 were enrolled in the program (see Table 1). Table 1. PAMANA-PhilHealth Health Insurance Program for FY 2014 (2 Quarter 2015) Year Affiliation Target Endorsed ‘Actual Enrolled CPLA 1,219 1,169 565, RPA, 77 266 257 2014 CNN 1554 401 24 MNLF 3,000 3,000 1900 Total 6,500 4836 2,996 Of the 19,901 slots made available for 2015, a total of 9,041 (45%) identified beneficiaries were endorsed to PhilHealth as of 24 June 2015. Of which, 3,740 were enrolled in the program as of the reporting period (see Table 1A). Office of the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process | PAMANA Progress Report Table 1A. PAMANA-PhilHealth Health Insurance Program for FY 2015 (2 Quarter 2015) Year Affiliation Target Endorsed ‘Actual Enrolled RPA (CPD)* 10,000, 4,460 MNLF 7,000 2,196 2,057 2015 CPLAY® 1374 1115 323 CNN. ‘800 890 458 BPAY 727 380 402 Total 19,901, 9,043 3,740 ~The RPA Table has submited the highest number of propored banefidarez at #60, actual enrollees aivong these submissions a= at 202 but stil o be update from concerned PhlHeath Reponal Offices as lit of proposed beneficiaries continue to come in, Most of the proposed beneficiaries came from Region VI and were endorsed direcly to Phibealth RVP as a result of the program asessment Conducted ta steamtine processes and expedite enrolment. **Renewal and ational. Remaining 551 sos reserved for CBA and acdtional forest guards. Of the 3,125 submitted inivduals, $77 were enrolled as rrewal and 286 as adeitional fr 2015, bringing the total af enrolled baneiciares to 823 only due to coverage i other Sponsored programs (e4, NNTS, LGU, moving up the economic category/having regular employment), Seventy four (74) individuals ‘rm the Forest Guard Program aren the pipeline B. CHED For AY 2014-2015, a total of 200 beneficiaries from Regions Il (3), IX (16), X (14), XII (6), CAR (46) and ARMM (115) were awarded scholarships under the PAMANA-sponsored Study Grant Program with HED. For AY 2015-2016, OPAPP has endorsed a total of 284 study grant applications to the Office of Student Development and Services of CHED as of 25 June 2015. Processing of payment for the 276 new grantees out of the 284 study grant applications is in progress as of the reporting period. Please see Table 2. ‘Table 2. PAMANA-CHED Study Grant Program (Second Quarter 2015) Beneficiaries ‘Submitted Applications Aettaton Ay2014-2015 | ___ AY 2015-2016 ey CPLA a __s a3 | RPA, - 61 61 CNN 7 7 MNLF if 150, 223, 373 Total 200 eae”) 484 Capacity-Building for Local Government Institutions A. DILG ‘The DILG is tasked to undertake capacity-building initiatives for local government institutions. These initiatives are aimed towards enhancing the capacities of LGUs on conflict-sensitivity and peacebuilding, Table 3 shows the summary of PAMANA priority areas for FY 2015 under Pillar 1 intervention ‘Table 3. Summary of Pillar 1 PAMANA Priority Areas for FY 2015 4 Number of Number of Number of Bureau | Project/intervention | Region | peovince/HUC | Municipalty/cky | Barangay Tralning/Mentoringicus | CAR |S 10 igo | onPlansand Programs that | v-a 4 PAMANA Progress Report | 2015 Nu lumber 7 Bureau | Project/intervention | Region Sie literary ee are ConfietSenstive, | _Ww—8 z FI Chet, ad center |p = = vi 3 vu 1 vi 3 2 % 1 8 x i 5 x 5 37 x a 8 Aa a 9 | Teal % 169 oR 5 10 Wea a 4 w-8 a 3 v 5 26 vi 3 Training Workshop on | yy z ics. | Peace and Order and Puiic Safety (POPS) Plan va 3 20 x 1 3 x 5 7 x 3 7 xi 4 8 oy a 2 Total 36 392 Bangsamoro and Closure Areas (2015) oR 5 10 Tec vi 3 7 3 vu 1 3 | m 2 10 78, x 2 7 Tec Capacity Building forucus |_ARMM 2 4 Tec 1ws00 | to-ensure functionality of | — Tota zr aa Barangay Lupon ‘CNW Areas (2015) WA 1 108 vB 2 6 v 5 2 168 wi 1 3 5 vi 3 10 199 ci of Presenter one Pees Proce PAMANA Progress Report | 2015 ' Number of Number of Number of Bureau | Project/Intervention jon aon reaeiae pew Province/HUC | Municipalty/city | Barangay x 2 6 33 x 4 32 473 Total 7 3 988 can 5 10 vi 2 a Establish and Copacitate x 2 7 tsa | tGUson Mediation and —— Healing Mechanism i S a xi 1 4 ARMM 3 15 Total 4 a As of 30 June 2015, the DILG Bureaus have pursued the following initiatives under Pillar 1 1, Bureau of Local Government Development (BLGD) on mainstreaming conflict-sensitivty, child- friendliness and gender-responsiveness in local development planning © Conducted preparatory activities for the development, of guidelines and policies for the subsequent delivery of 2014 technical assistance to 40 target LGUs. These included planning workshops for the Peace and Development Forum, and development of a roadmap for ‘mainstreaming conflict sensitivity, gender and development and child friendliness into Local Development Plans and Programs (17-18 September 2014). Actual technical assistance is expected to be delivered by the third-fourth quarter of 2015. © Initiated preparatory activities for the development of guidelines and policies for the subsequent delivery of 2015 technical assistance to 141 target LGUs. These included DILG PAMANA coordination meetings on 31 March and 24 April 2015, consultation meetings with institutional partners cum concerned agencies (OPAPP, PCW, NCDA, CWC, Glz-COSERAM), drafting of a Joint Memorandum Circular for “mainstreaming the concerns of vulnerable sectors in local plans and programs in conflict-affected areas” and circulation of the same to concerned regions and agencies for review and comments. Actual technical assistance is expected to be delivered by the third-fourth quarter of 2015. 2. National Barangay Operations Office (NBOO) on capacity-building for LGUs to ensure functionality of Lupon and Barangay Human Rights Action Center © Conducted CLIP program review of Regions Il, IV-A, IV-B, V and CAR on 5-6 May 2015 and for Regions Vi, Vil, Vll,X, XI, Xl and XIll on 12-13 May 2015. © Pursued a joint activity with the Commission on Human Rights (CHR) on the formulation or drafting of training modules for the Barangay Human Rights Action Teams (BHRACTS) in May 2015. © Pursued a joint activity with the CHR on the pilot testing of training modules for the capacity building for City/Municipal Human Rights Action Teams (C/MHRAcTs) on 2-5 June 2015 in La Trinidad, Benguet. Office ofthe resents ave on the Peace Proce | EL PAMANA Progress Report | 2015 * Conducted a series of meetings for the fine-tuning or finalization of the Training Modules and Learners’ kit for the BHRAcTS on 17 and 19 June 2015 in Quezon City. 3. The Bureau of Local Government Supervision (BLGS) takes the lead in the conduct of training on peace and order and public safety plan while the Local Government Academy (LGA) takes on initiatives related to establishing mediation and healing mechanism. Support to Indigenous Peoples A. NCP ‘The NCIP supports initiatives aimed at addressing the marginal and vulnerable status of indigenous peoples in identified provinces. These initiatives include (1) quick response programs; (2) issuance of Certificates of Ancestral Domain Titles (CADTs); and, (3) formulation and enhancement of Ancestral Domain Sustainable Development and Protection Plans (ADSDPP), A total of 33 Quick Response Projects are being undertaken by the NCIP in Regions J, I, Ill IV, V, VI/VIl, 1X, X, X1, XI, XI, CAR and Central Office. Of which, 24 projects have been completed with nine (9) projects in the preparatory stage as of December 2014. An estimated 1,000 direct beneficiaries were served out of the 1,500 targeted beneficiaries. A total of 31 CADT and ADSDPP related projects are also being implemented by the NCIP in Regions IV, IX, XI and XII In Region IV, 17 of the 21 targeted sub-projects under its two (2) major CADT processing and ADSDPP formulation projects in the area were completed as of 30 May 2015. As regards the other areas, the NCIP has one (1) CADT processing and two (2) ADSDPP formulation ongoing projects in Region IX; six (6) CADT processing, 11 new ADSDPP formulation/capacity building and six (6) ADSDPP enhancement ongoing projects in Region XI; and three (3) CADT processing and ADSDPP capacity building ongoing projects in Region Xill under the PAMANA program as of 30 May 2015. Pillar 2: Establishing Resilient Communities Pillar 2 refers to community-driven development interventions aimed towards promoting the convergent delivery of services and goods focused on households and communities. Community-based interventions through development of cooperatives are also being provided for MNLF communities. Provision of shelter assistance for internally-displaced persons is also being undertaken under this Pillar. Pillar 2 is being implemented by the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSW) through the Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan-Comprehensive Integrated Delivery of Social Services (KALAHI-CIDSS) = PAMANA, Local Government Unit (LGU)-Led Mechanism under the DSWD Protective Services Bureau ‘and Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP); the Department of Agrarian Reform (DAR) through the PAMANA in Agrarian Reform Areas (ARA); and the DSWD-Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM), PAMANA Progress Report [2ors Community-Driven Development (CDD) Projects* Within this approach, the PAMANA Peace and Development Fund, which is @ block grant of PhP300,000 per barangay, is provided to targeted barangays every year for a period of three (3) years. Target barangays are assisted in undertaking conflict-sensitive planning, identification, implementation, and monitoring and evaluation of community projects. Projects supported through the CDD approach include livelihood projects, community infrastructures, agricultural production support, farm-to-market roads, pathways, water systems, electrification, capacity-building initiatives, peacebuilding and peace and order activities. ‘A. DSWD 1. KALAHI-CIDSS-PAMANA. Table 4 shows the summary of the status of physical accomplishment of KALAHI-CIDSS -PAMANA as of May 2015. Table 4. KC-PAMANA Physical Accomplishment (May 2015) ‘Target/ ‘Status of Physical Accomplishment ‘Ageia ‘Other ra | Sik | conplted | ongomg || recremert [Ptrererstry | MEY Projects i us| oa & B 3 rE aM am on | 2 2013 & 7 14 56 inns moa wax | woe | 1,094 | 30 zon | as imo an mo |« 2012 & 116 | a 94.83% 5.17% so [2 aon | sea ses | 0308 00% aso | at » ED rosa | 4050 rea | saa aw 7% * Located in 51 muncipalties/cles of Te provinces Covering Regions WR, V, VB, X Xi and Caraga, The TOL fab projet are ali Caraga, A areas are currently in the Socal Preparatio Sage ‘adjusted from 1238 based on latest report, COD interventions are targeted to cover the provinces of Lanao del Sur, Maguindanao, Basilan, Sulu, Tawi-Tawi (ARMM); ‘Quezon (Region IV-A); Zamboanga del Norte, Zamboanga del Sur, Zamboanga Sibugay (Region IX}; Camarines Norte, Masbate, Sorsogon (Region V)}; Northern Samar, Samar (Region Vil}; Lanao del Norte (Region X); Compostela Valley, Davao del Norte, Davao Oriental (Region X)); Cotabato, Sarangani, South Cotabato, Sultan Kudarat (Region Xl); Agusan del Norte, Agusan dl Sur, Surigao del Norte, Surigao del Sur (Region Xil) and the cities of Isabela (Basilan) and Butuan (Region Xl) Office ofthe Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process | [EIN PAMANA Progress Report | 2015 LGU-Led Mechanism for PAMANA. The PAMANA LGU-Led Program provides a grant of PhP300,000 for each targeted conflict-affected barangay. Table 5 shows the summary of the status of physical accomplishment under the LGU-Led Mechanism for PAMANA as of 30 June 2015. ‘Table 5. LGU-Led Mechanism for PAMANA Physical Accomplishment (2” Quarter 2015) Status of Physical Accomplishment For ver | Tae completed | ongcng | rrocirement | erepartory | SOY | reminaton/ Termioated 8 ted Ret enna nas | S| eee Ee mi cra sai | ee aos | ase a sami _| sen | as0n 2 | wn | 28 = 0 woz | a0 joes | ami: 767 [as 64 24 rota | 300 am saan | soe) vax | 27% 3. Sustainable Livelihood Program. Table 6 shows the summary of the status of physical accomplishment under the SLP Program for PAMANA as of 30 June 2015, Table 6. PAMANA-SLP Physical Accomplishment (2 Quarter 2015) ‘Status of Physical Accomplishment Year | Target ll compte | ongsing | rocrement | mreparaton | MY | reminaton Terminated 2015 722 ri i a 2014 470 06. 28 eal =< asaen_| aoe | 530% ce i ors | 70 sarrx_| 06% oat eo | as | 73 rota | as62 | : saam_| 25m | asx | son ‘SBR out ol the 722 projet proposals are ready Tor unding Ofc ae reent avseron he Peace Proce SN PAMANA Progress Report | 2015 B. DAR 1. PAMANA-ARA Table 7 shows the summary of the status of physical accomplishment of the Agrarian Reform Community Development Project under PAMANA as of 30 June 2015. ‘Table 7. PAMANA-ARA Physical Accomplishment (2% Quarter 2015) ‘Status of Physical Accomplishment For Year | Target "E | completed | Ongoing | Procurement | Preparatory | M&YS | termination? Terminated zois | soe Bu 100% cae a |e 59 193 136 36 237% | 9.80% | 32.06% 22.59% 5.98% ey ae a 154 mw | 45.50% | 695% | 433% 20.38% 284% zo. | sess |__ 33 Z a a 58.93% | 893% | 607% 16.07% zon | 35 a a : i 91.43% 5.71% 2.86% 531 108 358 7793 34 Total | 1830 | — 202% | 5.90% | 19.56% 22.57% 2.95% + Rajusea trom 595 ~ seven (7) barangays have two 2) projects each +> ngjuste from 630- three (3) barangays have two [2) projets each ** adjusted from 55 one (1) barangay has two (2) projects The implementation of PAMANA-ARA has been transferred from DAR to DA. A Joint Memorandum Circular between DAR and DA on the implementation arrangements between the two Departments has been prepared. It provides that the DA-Regional Offices administer the funds and provide operational support to DAR-Provincial Offices on community consultations and orientation. c. DSWD-ARMM Table 8 shows the summary of the status of physical accomplishment of CDD projects under DSWD- ARMM as of 30 June 2015: Office of the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process | PAMANA Progress Report Table 8, ARMM CDD Physical Accomplishment (2" Quarter 2015) Status of Physical Accomplishment For Year | Target 5 gf Completed | Ongoing | Procurement | Preparatory Wop vee Termination/ | Other started Terminated Lae ros | 3777 100% 2014 386 se) e Ey 91.45% 77% | 078% 115 20 266 ro zois | arr 79.6% | 450% 197% 090% 2013 386 eeu Es a 95.08% | 440% 052% 385 1 22 | 386 poeta sa7a% | 026% San ee 38 2.073 5 16 otal | 43 - saaex | 207% 23.99% | 0am | 030% ‘Province Ofces are sil the proces ol fociatng the formulation ol projed proposals ofthe community IvelNood cooperatives i target Garanaavs. Thee hundred eighty (380) project proposals are deemed reat for approval and funding (62 Basin, 47 TawiTawi, 82 Sulu, 39 Maguindanao, 57 Lanao de! Sut A, 105 Lanao de Sur). “+ expansion prejectsbarangays. Only 1,761 proects/barangays are funded out ofthe 1,777 target projets/barangars Unfunded target projects/barangays as ofthe reporting perio Overall, 7,557 CDD sub-projects were completed, 746 are ongoing, 448 are in the procurement phase and 1,625 are in the preparatory phase as of 30 June 2015. Tables 9 and 9A show a summary of Pillar 2 physical accomplishment by year and agency as of the reporting period Table 9. Pillar 2 Summary of Physical Accomplishment by Year ~ FY 2011-2015 (2™ Quarter 2015) ‘Status of Physical Accomplishment For Year | Ta — "F | completed | Ongoing | Procurement | Preparatory | N°tYSt | termination/ | other | Terminated | 639 ano aoe a2 | 1,329 477 = : 2.14% 34.73% 46.43% 16.70% 3 soley | esas 156 6 =n 69.06% | 13.69% 9.61% 5.30% 224% | 0.10% 2013 & “4 56 | 2014 20.00% | s0.00% | *Refers to projects in Lanao del Sur (Brey Mansilano, Bumbaran; Brgy Panalawan, Subong; Brgy Palgoay, Pagayawan) Termination is ue to peace and order situation in the community * Refers to projects in Lanao del Sur (Brey Mansilano, Bumbaran; Brgy Palgoay, Pagayawan). Termination is due to peace and Corder situation in the community. PAMANA Progress Report | 2015 ‘Status of Physical Accomplishment Year | Tar Not Yet ve ‘Completed | Ongoing | Procurement | Preparatory Termination/ | Other Started Terminated | 2 16 Sad yee (eas sete | ao rs | esis 130__ 284 83.32% 4.10% 3.31% 2.79% 6.10% 0.04% OK 2012& 110 6 16 2013 94.83% | 5.17% : zo12 | 1364 [2538 & 2 £ — 98.09% | os9% | 0.66% 0.56% 2o11 | 184 1 2 2 98.37% 1.09% 0.54% Total | 13,63 | 7,557 746 448 3,625 2427 5 655 Table 9A. Pillar 2 Summary of Physical Accomplishment by Agency - FY 2011-2015 (2" Quarter 2015) Status of Physical Accomplishment For Year | Target Not Yet - "E' | Completed | Ongoing | Procurement Preparatory | NOt Termination/ | Other started Terminated 2,869 452 9 639 70.68% | 11.10% 240% 15.78% 767 45 2 as22% | soox | 721% 2.67% 870 3 26 723 eo | eteee sur 32.35% | 259% 156% 43.50% 531 108 358 2) 54 par | 1,830 EBLE 29.02% | 590% 13.56% 257% 2.95% oswo-| 4 5,, [2520 98 2073 5 16 arn | *7!? | 358% | 2.08% 33.99% oai% | 034% Total | 13,263 | 7,557 746 408 1,625 2427 5 655 PAMANA Progress Report | 2015 Figure 1. Pillar 2 Summary of Physical Accomplishment by Status and Agency for FY 2011-2015, % Share (2™ Quarter 2015) Terminated notyet aoss stares 106% loxher Nye, Ongoing Peace swo- Gute ™% Dswo.str 12% It is important to note that COD projects are designed to have social preparation and project identification activities during the first half of the year whereas implementation is usually undertaken during the second half of the year. PAMANA for Moro National Liberation Front Communities The PAMANA for MNLF communities focuses on the provision of socio-economic and development interventions in support of the implementation of the 1996 GPH-MINLF Final Peace Agreement. For CY 2014, the ORG-ARMM is mandated to implement socio-economic development projects in 180 communities identified and validated by the military as MNLF communities and applied as PAMANA beneficiaries. The projects are being implemented in partnership either by contract, administration or memorandum of agreement with line agencies. The ORG-ARMM also works in partnership with the Cooperative Development Authority for the conduct of capacity building and skills training including cooperative development and management, leadership skills training, simple bookkeeping and accounting for non-accountants and livelihood. The 180 MNLF communities cover areas in Maguindanao (35), Lanao del Sur (41), Basilan (28), Sulu (52) and Tawi-Tawi (24). In September 2014, the PAMANA-ARMM PMO and heads of partner implementing agencies (e.¢., CDA- ARMM, DPWH-ARMM, BFAR-ARMM, DAF-ARMM, DAF-PAO Basilan) signed a Memorandum of Agreement to facilitate faster delivery and distribution of project items for the MNLF communities. Table 11 shows the summary of projects implemented under the Memorandum of Agreement as of 30 June 2015, PAMANA Progress Report | 2015 Table 11. Status of Projects Implemented under the Memorandum of Agreement (2" Quarter 2015) ‘Agency Name of Project, Project Cost (Phe) Remarks cDA-ARMIM Capacity Building and Skills Training 22,093,300 Funds released to CDA-ARMM on 25, ‘September 2014 (PRP14M) and 25 March 2015 (PhPBM) Ongoing Serves 180 MNLF communities BFAR-ARMM, Fishing Equipment and Facilities (Le, fishing vesse! with engine, payao, motorized boats, non- motorized boats, ‘establishment of fresh water fish cage and feeds) 5,432,692, Funds released to BFAR-ARMM on 18 February 2015 2 projects completed and 2 projects, ‘ongoing and ready for delivery Serves four (4) MNLF communities in Tawi-Tawi (2) and Sulu (2), 56,004,837, Release of funds pending completion of the bidding process ‘Aims to serve a total of 50 MNLF communities in Sulu (27), Tawi-Tawi (28) and Maguindanao (5) DAF-ARMM Lvelinood Projects (e,, agricultural inputs, livestock production, pre-post harvest facilities) 18,432,180 Funds released to DAF-ARMIM on 22 October 2014 ‘Some of the items requested delivered to the MNLF communities Serves 10 MNLF communities in Lanao dl Sur (1), Tawi-Tawi (3) and Sulu (6)_ 77,076,075 Funds released to DAF-ARMIM on 12 March 2015 Pre-Procurement Conference conducted on 10 June 2015 Aims to serve 63 MNLF communities in Sulu (20), Tawi-Tawi (13), Lanao de! Sur (10) and Maguindanao (20) 53,452,237 Release of funds pending completion of the bidding process Aims to serve 52 MINLF communities in Sulu (21), Maguindanao (7) and Lanao del Sur (24) DAF-PAO Basilan Uvelinood Projects (ie, agricultural inputs, livestock production, pre-post harvest facilities) 38,509,444 “Funds released to DAF-PAO Basilan on 10 October 2014 Delivered project items to 18 ‘organized MNLF cooperatives in Basilan, other deliverables still being procured 12,036,328.80 Release of funds pending completion of the bidding process ‘Aims to serve 12 MNLF communities DPWH-ARMIM ‘Small Infrastructures (ie., warehouse, solar dryer, open court for community, deep well water system, multi- purpose center, potable water 38,370,000 '50% of the funds downloaded to DPWH-ARMIM District Engineering Offices on 12 February 2015, Aims to serve 43 MNLF communities in Tawi-Tawi (9), Sulu (18), Lanzo del Office of he Present adie onthe Peas Proce | PAMANA Progress Report | 2015 ae ae Lae ee supply) ‘Sur (4), Maguindanao (11) and Basilan (a) S5a00fbq), | foc elemeriaon by adoration orto Bg Aim eeawe ashlar creme: | insula 26 Tow Tow it) ond Maguindanao (8) Total 356,207,094 | As of 30 June 2015, the following project items which are mostly pre and post-harvest facilities and agricultural production inputs were delivered to the first batch of MNLF communities: © Maguindanao (3 municipalities, 3 barangays): corn sheller, rice thresher, knapsack sprayer, animal ‘drawn plow, garden tools, OPV corn seeds, solar panel and accessories and installation, native goats, fertilizers, pesticides, sewing machines, hand tractor, floating tiller, mobile rice mill; * Lanao del Sur (4 municipalities, 4 barangays): fertilizers, pesticides, rice thresher, knapsack sprayer, garden tools, floating tiller, plow, hand tractor, OPV corn seeds, 6-wheeler hauler truck, corn sheller, {generator set 3.5 kva, sewing machines, zigzag machine, solar panel and accessories and installation, organic fertilizer, breeding cow, polybags, budding knife and tape; ‘+ Basilan (5 municipalities, 1 city, 23 barangays): organic fertilizer, breeding cow, polybags, budding knife and tape, garden tools, pesticides, cassava grater with presser, cassava cuttings, rubber budded seedlings, hogwire, carabao, heifer, fish aggregating device, bull; Sulu (1 municipality, 1 barangay): cattle, motorized banca (boat); and, ‘© Tawi-Tawi (1 municipality, 1 barangay): hogwires, u nails, motorized banca (boat). Under the PAMANA ORG-ARMM Program for the MNLF communities for CY 2014, BFAR-ARMM has completed two (2) projects with two (2) ongoing, DAF-ARMIM has completed seven (7) projects with 10 ‘ongoing, eight (8) ready for delivery and two (2) not yet started, and DPWH-ARMM has 60 small infrastructure projects which are ready for implementation in the ARMM provinces as of the reporting period. Pillar romioting Sub-Regional Economic Development Pillar 3 projects refer to regional and sub-regional development interventions that link conflict-affected and conflict-vulnerable areas to markets and promote jobs and livelihood generation. These specifically refer to interventions that address local development challenges including constraints to local economic development, economic integration of poor areas with more prosperous areas, and physical and ‘economic connectivity improvements. PAMANA provides socio-economic development support to areas that will not have been prioritized under regular agency programs. Pillar 3 projects also aim to heal, build and strengthen the relationships within and among communities, and between citizens and the government to build up the social and institutional capital necessary to further peace and development in these areas. As such, the implementation of sub-regional development projects under PAMANA is guided by peace and social cohesion standards of inclusion, participation, transparency and accountability, and conflict-sensitivity and peace promotion, as embedded and operationalized throughout every stage of policy, program and project implementation Office of the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process | Pama Progress Repor | 2015 Pillar 3 is being implemented by the Department of Agriculture (DA), Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENA), Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG), Department of Energy (00E), Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH), National Electrification Administration (NEA), National Irrigation Administration (NIA), Department of Agriculture and Fisheries (DAF)-ARMM. with the Bureau of Fisheries Aquatic Resources (BFAR)-ARMM, DILG-ARMM, DENR-ARMM, DPWH- ‘ARMM and Office of the Regional Governor-ARMM in partnership with LGUs. Overall, as of 30 June 2015, there are 2,055 sub-regional projects in different stages of development. Of these, 977 projects were completed, 270 are ongoing, 121 are in procurement stage, and 506 are in preparatory stage. Tables 12 and 12A show the summary of the status of physical accomplishment for sub-regional development projects by year and agency as of the reporting period. ‘Table 12. Pillar 3 Summary of Physical Accomplishment by Year ~ FY 2011-2015 (2"* Quarter 2015) ‘Status of Physical Accomplishment Tor vear | target : i ‘Completed | Ongoing | Procurement | Preparatory Neuyen Termination/ | Other Started Terminated 2 qi 28 225 ze aus | 373 sacx | asx | 75m | 764% | 922m B 13 Ey 174 % i aos | 490 | z 673% | 23.06% | 112% | 3as0% | imoex | 020% a a 513 122 13 28 29 2 14 71.15% 16.92% 1.80% 3.88% 4.02% 0.27% 1.94% 286 25 2 22 _ 4 ao | 340 E 4 - - 84.12% 7.35% 0.29% 6.47% 0.29% 0.29% 117% 125 4 1 a nou | 331 95.42% | 305% oven | o76% Total 2,055 977 270 121 506 158 S 18 Table 12A. Pillar 3 Summary of Physical Accomp Status of Physical Accomplishment T For T vear | ta TF | competed | Ongoing | Procirement | preparatory | S&YS | ermiaton/ | other ia ian, | oom | an | 25] 3 1 = : osaam | 305% o76n | 076% i oa | 9, [88 | us 37 a7 8a A 7 BEAR _[iosex | aasa% | s.o4% 50.88% | 13.48% 0.16% “4 small water impounding project in North Cotabato was recommended for contract termination. * A project in North Cotabato was terminated due to local conflict. PENRO recommended for local mechanisms to take over and Continue the process and returned to OPAPP the remainder of the fund. PAMANA Progress Report | 201 Status of Physical Accomplishment aa T For Year | Target | completed | Ongoing | Procurement | Preparatory | NYS" | termination/ | other ‘Terminated Denk | 19 18 300% 369 a @ 180 1 pus | 679 543% | 9.87% 9.13% 26.51% 0.14% a poe | 13 4 § £ et 7.69% 46.15% 46.15% 3 1 if pewH | 8 37.50% | 12.50% fate 50.00% 37 twreversed, | 3 15 8 64 NEA 147 | s0.completes) 38.77% | 2.04% 10.20% 5.4a% | 43.50% 340 75 a 3 2 “4 ARMM | 435 ae 78.16% 17.24% 0.23% 0.69% 0.46% 3. Total | 2,055 977 270 321 506 158 5 8 Figure 2. Pillar 3 Summary of Phys \ment by Status and Agency for FY 2011-2015, ‘% Share (2™ Quarter 2015) for Nettet enintony her See Annex A for breakdown of sub-regional development projects across implementing agencies, year of implementation and project cycle stages. Peat ind Development Communities with Moro National Liberation Front Presence A total of 217 projects have been earmarked for MNLF Peace and Development Communities since 2011. Of which, 174 projects have been completed. These projects were identified through community consultations with the participation of local MNLF leaders and local government units, and were implemented by provincial and municipal local governments with a third party monitoring mechanism, PAMANA Progress Report | 2015 These include agricultural production support, road and community infrastructure projects which have been provided to 131 priority MNLF community groups. Transparency and Accountability Mechanisms PAMANA TAM has five (5) components that provide information on the different mechanisms established to ensure transparency and accountability in PAMANA implementation: 1. PAMANA Feedback and Response System (PERS). The PFRS platform has been developed and willbe rolled out in September 2015. The PFRS guidelines, which aim to enhance the voice of citizens in PAMANA implementation by providing them with opportunities to lodge their feedback regarding peacebuilding interventions of government and improve the capacities of OPAPP in handling and responding to citizens’ feedback, have also been drafted. The guidelines include the following: (a) clarification of roles among units in terms of handling and addressing grievance/feedback; (b) set initial standards/service level agreements (e.g, turn-over time in handling the different kinds of feedback); and, (c) system of review of PERS’ performance. Third Party Monitoring where CSOs are tapped as independent third party monitors of the implementation process of PAMANA and training interventions are conducted to build the capacities of PAMANA third party monitors in undertaking conflict-sensitive monitoring. Following a review of the initial partnership with CSOs as third party monitors in 2012-2013, OPAPP is developing with assistance from the Affiliated Network for Social Accountability-East ‘Asia and the Pacific (ANSA-EAP) a program proposal that aims to capacitate citizens and other CSOs to highlight and enhance the peacebuilding component of the practice of social accountability in PAMANA. The engagement is geared towards the establishment of a Citizen- Led Monitoring mechanism for PAMANA that is envisioned to provide channels for citizens in conflict-affected and conflict-vulnerable areas to undertake monitoring of PAMANA projects. Citizen-led Monitoring System provides a platform where CSOs serve as catalysts for constructive engagement between citizens and the government in conflict-affected and conflict- vulnerable areas through the conduct of participatory monitoring and evaluation processes. Additionally, the application of Citizen Participatory Audit (CPA) for PAMANA was also explored. ‘The CPA, which is a partnership between the Commission on Audit and ANSA-EAP, aims to institutionalize citizen engagement in public audit processes, in view of improving the transparency, efficiency and effectiveness of the use of public resources 3. Project and community billboards are put-up to provide the beneficiary communities with project information, 4. Web posting of project status updates to provide regular updates on PAMANA where project status reports from implementing agencies are posted online. The GAA 2015 provides that project status reports are to be posted by the web administrator online. In compliance with the GAA provision on the posting of PAMANA status, OPAPP maintains the PAMANA website (worw-pamana.net) which features progress of implementation of projects, news and features on PAMANA interventions, implementation guidelines and contact information of PAMANA PAMANA Progress Report } 201 partner agencies. To comply with GAA provisions, CHED, ARMM and DILG have set up their respective PAMANA websites. Additionally, the following implementing agencies ~ DAR, NEA, PhilHealth and DOE — have linked their websites to the PAMANA website. 5. Performance-based fund releases where program implementation complies with regular government accounting rules and regulations. PAMANA implementing guidelines of partner agencies includes performance-based fund releases anchored on the prepared work and financial plan. ofc ofthe resident dis onthe Peace Process PAMANA Progress Report | 2015 Annex A aus of Pn come te ve | tat . : compen | orgone | rrourenent | Pramatry | SSC | rermintony | other Terminated | ‘OPAPP in partnership with LGUs* T 125 4 | 1 1 ok a 95.42% 3.05% 0.76% 0.76% a cal aa i 7 Tat | 30 x dl | Dang preedswder FAR 0 3 i 7 won| 2 wax | aan aren | a6 «|e 2 2 3 name [eam | inn | eon | aie » pa 5 a aw | on wei | aa [ase | econ | arm 70 ans | 50 ico toa os] ee |e 7 a | t ie ms : | ap ci oe 87.70% 4.85% 0.32% TAK 1 2013 102 #9 2 £ 1 arask | cam | ose | aso ale eats “ 6 2 1 roo | sasex | saan | ana oa 2 zois | 155 1_ a — - a osx | sam | _asare | va| = | | @ @ 0 z ew 2013 19 8 1c is Tar | vot i é wu] 7 1 ean wa] 5 No movement since the 3 Quarter of 2018 Office of the Presidential Adviser on the Peace Process | PAMANA Progress Report | 2015 ‘Status of Physical Accomplishment For Year | Ta TB | completed | Ongoing | Procurement | Preparatory | N°tYSt | termination/ | Other Started Terminated 100% Total | 13 a 6 6 pwr 4 m2] 4 aK 3 1 aos| 4 75.00% 25.00% Tora | 8 3 1 NEA 20 i a Energized ze iad z 30.77% 154% 15.38% 154% | 38.46% ros | 65 i Completed 12.31% 7 Energized a BL z 28.00% 8.00% 12% 48% roa | 25 2 completed 3% 20 2 3 a 28 aos | 57 |_ energized 35.09% 351% 5.26% 702% | 49.12% Total | 147 37 3 35 8 6 ‘| ARMM? 5 1 n2| 6 waai% | 16.67% 331 46 1 2 14 201s | soar eaoi% | 11.67% 0.25% 051% 3.55% 4 Ey 2 roa | 34 aaron | 82.35% 5.88% i aos | a —- 100% Total | 435 340 7 a 3 zi | ‘Adjusted rom 116 based on latest report sT aaustes ++" adjusts from 358 based on units fo be delivered ” project implementation is through ARMM Line Agencies and the ARMM-PAMANA Management Office. rer tt ranar ea or rea PS |

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