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Rick Stewart
For the

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Offense
YOUTH
WING T
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Football Playbook

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& Installation Manual

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Football Playbook & Installation Manual for the Youth Wing T Offense
First Edition, April, 2015
ISBN (XXXXXXXXXXXXX)
Copyright © 2015 by Rick Stewart

All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced, distributed, or transmitted in any form or by any means,
including photocopying, recording, or other electronic or mechanical methods, without the prior written permission of Rick
Stewart. For permission requests, write to Rick Stewart at the address listed on his website: www.footballcoachessite.com.

Certain other noncommercial uses are permitted under Fair Use in United States Copyright Law, Title 17, Chapter 1, Section
110. Reproductions and displaying of sections of this book, including charts and diagrams may be reproduced by individual
coaches for their teams and coaching staff if it is in a classroom setting for educational use. No parts of this book can be
displayed online for public viewing or sent electronically, for example via email. If there is an admission fee being charged
(i.e. clinics) then the law states that as NOT being an educational classroom setting.

Ordering Information:
Special discounts are available on quantity purchases by corporations, associations, and others, especially educational uses
for faculty, staffs, and schools. Special editions or book excerpts can also be created to meet specific needs.
Printed in the United States of America

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Championship Football
3646 W. Babcock Ct
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Visalia, CA 93291

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Websites

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www.footballcoachessite.com
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www.wingtcoaching.com
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www.coachrickstewart.com

Videos
Youth Pistol Wing T: Installation & Practice Drills
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Youth Pistol Wing T: Running Game


Youth Pistol Wing T: Passing Game
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Youth Pistol Wing T: Trick Plays & Formations


Pistol Wing T: Complete Backfield Drills
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Pistol Wing T: Complete Passing Game Drills


Pistol Wing T: Complete Offensive Line Drills

Printed in USA by:


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TABLE OF CONTENTS

Dedication ........................................................................................................ iii


Preface .............................................................................................................. 2

I. THE WING-T OFFENSE


Ch 1: History & Philosophy of the Wing-T ............................................ 9
Ch 2: Huddle, Alignment, Formations, Motions .................................. 19
Ch 3: Putting It All Together: Calling the Plays ................................... 33

II. RUN GAME


Ch 4: Jet Sweep: Liz / Rip Family ....................................................... 43

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Ch 5: Weakside Iso: Belly Family ....................................................... 67

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Ch 6: Off Tackle: Down Family .......................................................... 87
Ch 7: Short Yardage & Special Plays ................................................. 105
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III. PASS GAME

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Ch 8: Routes, QB Footwork, & Play Action ....................................... 117

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Ch 9: Drop Back Passing Game ......................................................... 129
Ch 10: Sprint Passing Game .............................................................. 137
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IV. INSTALLATION
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Ch 11: Individual Position Drills ....................................................... 145


Ch 12: Practice Organization ............................................................. 159
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Ch 13: Attacking Defenses ................................................................ 164

V. APPENDIX.............................................................................................. 173
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PREFACE

Coach Stewart is a high school football coach and has turned around three different schools, leading each
team to the playoffs within his first two seasons at the helm. Since none of these schools had any scholarship
players on their roster, Stewart’s system gave his players a chance to be successful versus superior talent.

 McFarland, a small, agricultural school of 600 students with no weight room, had lost 21 games in a row.
Stewart served as offensive coordinator and they went 8-2 with a playoff berth.
 Stewart left McFarland for 3 years and they went 3-26 during his absence. He returned as head coach to make the
playoffs in Year 2. (the Disney movie, “McFarland”, starring Kevin Costner is the same town and school)
 Broke 0-27 losing streak at Corcoran, a school with 900 students, winning an undefeated league title in Year 2;

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 Porterville, a large, rural school of 2,000 students, won 40 games in 5 years, including back-to-back section
runnerups at a that had won 8 games in the 5 years prior to his arrival.
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With 27 years total high school experience, 12 as a head coach, Stewart has been to 2 CIF Section Finals, and
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his 12-0 team lost the CIF championship on a hail mary pass in the rain.

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Stewart also has extensive experience at the youth level.
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 McFarland, a small, agricultural school of 600 students with no weight room, had lost 21 games in a row.
Stewart served as offensive coordinator and they went 8-2 with a playoff berth.
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 Stewart left McFarland for 3 years and they went 3-26 during his absence. He returned as head coach to make the
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A Message From Coach Stewart


Football is a game that can be very complex with its 22 moving parts while at the same time being so simple.
This paradox of learning all of its interconnected layers while not forgetting the simplicity of its fundamentals
makes coaching football a great challenge. The successful coaches all have one thing in common: single-
mindedness. They have bought into something that they really believe in and became an expert at it.
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“Name an offense or defensive scheme and I’ll find a coach who went 10-0 running it
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I have seen to many young coaches who have not yet decided which direction they want to go on offense,
defense, or just general coaching philosophy. Experimentation is good, but it can be painful and I have seen
programs crumble or at the very least have stunted growth while the head coach is searching for a single, sound
concept. I encourage shopping around—calling, writing, and visiting coaches you admire. Investigate all aspects

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of their attacks. Talk it over with your coaches and mentors, think it through. But once you decide, lock on and
stick with it through the rough waters that definitely will come as your entire program is learning it.

In my experience, the biggest tests will come from within the inner circle of your program from people who
believe they have the program in their best interest. These are people that you trust and they are not intentionally
being disloyal, but they were not with you at every step as you formed your vision. You need to have a
“contagious” confidence that comes from knowing you have a sound product. The hidden fears of uncertainty
will be diminished by the knowledge that is gained by your staff and players as you shape and develop it.

It is OK to add your personal touch in many area, in fact it is imperative that you take ownership and make it
your own. The head coach must remain true to himself and not try to be someone or something that he is not.
The following statement is true in all areas of life, not just football: “Be Yourself, not your idea of what you think
somebody else's idea of yourself should be.”

As you take in all of our X’s and O’s, our techniques, and drills….please remember the most important job

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that you have as coach: To teach your players to be better sons, husbands, and fathers.

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It’s never an easy decision to change offenses or go away from your Wing-T roots. This playbook is not only
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written in great detail to make YOUR learning easier, it comes with a CD-Rom with powerpoints and handouts to

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make teaching your PROGRAM effortless. Finally, as the many testimonials attest, I am always available to

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answer your questions.

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Rick Stewart, March, 2015
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WHY PISTOL WING-T ?

Merging the fast tempo & deception of the Under Center Wing-T offense with the slick read options out of
the Pistol formation, Stewart’s Pistol Wing-T offense is an up tempo, multiple formation offense that’s primary
purpose is to put defender’s in conflict.

“The 3 yd alignment is a “happy medium” between under


center (allowing TB to hit the LOS the quickest) and the 5 yd
alignment (giving QB most time to make his reads).”

Whether snapping the ball within 3 seconds after breaking the huddle or not huddling at all, this fast pace
offense doe not allow 17-year old defenders to line up properly or make adjustments. Run every play out of

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MANY different formations, making the defense think that a play like BELLY is actually 8 different plays!!!
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“Do Everything Really Fast and Confuse the Defense”
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The Pistol Wing-T offense has evolved into an extremely effective system that does not have to change from
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year to year as different types of athletes come through your program.

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The unique terminology makes it very easy for players to learn as Stewart draws upon 16 years of teaching
special ed students and English Language Learners.
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THE PISTOL FORMATION moves the QB back 3 yards and the FB stays behind him.
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 BACKFIELD STEPS ARE THE SAME as traditional Wing-T.


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 EASIER TO PASS as QB can read defense

 RUN or PASS PRE-SNAP READS


This playbook expands on our “combo play” concepts, which have perimeter pass plays built into
running plays. The QB makes simple audibles after scanning the defense.

 POST SNAP READS. This playbook is full of scenarios where the QB reads unblocked
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defenders, always being a threat to run the ball.


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As you can see, this offense puts so much pressure on the defense by using lots of formations, lining up
before the defense can make their calls, and making the QB A THREAT on every play.

I offer you my personal guarantee: If you don’t achieve your ambitions as an Independent Self-Published
Author within six months, please e-mail me and I will personally refund your money. You’ll find my contact
details at the end of the book.

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WHAT’S IN THIS BOOK?

Since the original videos were published in 2010, over a thousand copies have been sold. In addtion to

running the offense for 4 years, I have corresponded with hundreds of coaches running the offense and have
installed the offense at over 20 schools in 8 different states. This 2nd Edition Playbook contains many updates and
wrinkles to this exciting offense contributed by this vast pool of coaching knowledge.

 CHANGES IN BACKFIELD STEPS


The GO (Buck Sweep) and Belly Families have different footwork than what is on the videos.

 Reading UNBLOCKED defenders has been added since making the videos.

 DO NOT ABANDON UNDER CENTER FORMATION


This playbook makes it easy to go back under center in the event of bad weather, or when

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the backups have to go in. Also gives the defense something else to prepare for;

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ORGANIZATION FOR SUCCESS

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Forty pages explaining easy to learn terminology, No-Huddle, and how to install the offense. This is a fast
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offense using 7 different tempos with a hybrid HUDDLE - NO HUDDLE system.

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These tempos range from calling the play in the HUDDLE and sprinting to line, running the play in 3
seconds; or waiting to call the play after the defense lines up; or letting the QB “check with me” based on
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defensive alignment; or running MUSTANG / NASCAR tempo, snapping the ball 1 second after ball is in play.
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Several different NO HUDDLE systems are discussed, allowing you to choose the one that is best for your
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program. Wristbands, hand signals, and sideline cards are all explained in this section.

RUN GAME

Every traditional Wing-T family is covered in this section:


Buck); Belly; and Down. There is also Midline and Veer. The Jet
& Rocket section shows how to run the entire offense using the
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flat Jet motion. There are two short yardage packages, a special
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“check with me” package, and trick plays. The combination plays
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combines a run play with a perimeter pass play and the QB decides
where the ball goes as both plays are being ran.

Detailed diagrams show the backfield steps on every play.

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PASS GAME

While I believe that the Wing-T offense is the best high school offense, I also agree with the criticism that it
can lack a passing game. But it is the not the Wing-T system that lacks a passing attack, it is the coaches that are
refusing or not understanding how to pass.

This Second edition has a completely expanded Pass Section that will show you how to simply attack each
coverage in terminology that matches the Wing-T run game using the same concepts used by spread & air-raid
systems.

 PASS PROTECTION schemes that require very little practice time;


 PASS ROUTE concepts in a simple language so a few concepts combined with a few formations
gives the defense a lot to worry about;
 Three SCREEN concepts that can go to any of your 5 players out of 12 formations;
 QUICK passing game that gives your athletes the ball in space;

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 DROP BACK passing attack putting 4 receivers in routes;
 SPRINT OUT off Jet motion putting edge defenders in coflict with the QB run threat.
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Every pass route is diagrammed versus Cover 1, 2, 3, 4 and man coverages. Stewart shows which concepts
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are better against each defense.

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GAME PLANNING and SCOUTING
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 Detailed explainations of what to look for when watching opponent’s film.


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 Flow charts of “If-Then” statements using plays that are most effective vs defenses.
 How to call the plays on Friday night so that the defense is in conflict.
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APPENDIX and CD-ROM

There is an excerpt taken from Stewart’s “Practice and Drills for the Wing-T” book showing you how to run
an up tempo practice with maximum reps.
Blocking rule summary.
Playsheets, wristbands, pressbox reports, player evaluations.
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Everything is on a CD-Rom so you can customize everything to your program.


Over 25 powerpoints to share with players and coaches.
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If you have any questions, please email me at rick@wingtcoaching.com and I am commited to helping you
build a CHAMPIONSHIP OFFENSE. There are also videos and articles on my website:

www.footballcoachessite.com “Coaches Helping Coaches”

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SECTION ONE

THE WING-T OFFENSE

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1: History & Philosophy of Wing -T


2: Huddle, Alignment, Formation, Motion
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3: Calling the Plays


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CHAPTER ONE

The Wing-T Offense

HISTORY OF THE WING-T

The Delaware Wing T was developed by Dave Nelson in 1950’s. At the time Nelson was the head
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coach of the University of Maine, but he was heavily influenced as a player running the single wing offense as a

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player at Michigan under Fritz Crisler. After leaving Maine, Nelson joined the University of Delaware where he
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perfected the Wing T from being used primarily as formation into a complete offense.

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Nelson’s Delaware Wing T also borrowed the wing concept from the powerful single wing offenses at the
time, most notably the powerful Minnesota teams coached by Doc Williams. They also added Earl “Red” Blaik’s
Army Trap Series. The concepts of angle blocking and line splits were taken from Knute Rockne’s Notre Dame
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offense and the dual threat of the wing was originated with Pop Warner’s double wing formation.
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Fig 1: The single wing formation Fig 2: Notre Dame Box Formation Fig 3: Pop Warner's double wing

The precursor of the original Wing-T is Clark Shaughnessy’s modern-T, which put all 3 backs in the
backfield and the QB under center. The deception possibilities of crossing the backs paths, as well as putting
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them in motion, helped Shaughnessy to one of the best turn-arounds in college history: taking the last place 1939
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Stanford team to the Rose Bowl in 1940. The great Chicago Bears teams of the 40’s and 50’s ran the modern-T
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also after George Halas hired Shaughnessy to tutor his NFL staff. The Bears 73-0 championship victory in 1940
led the movement by most of America to move their QB under the center.

Don Faurot of Missourri widened the splits of the 3 RB with his “Split-T” formation. But Faurot’s main
contribution to the development of the Wing-T was designing plays that ran through seams that the defense could
not defend with their normal techniques. The term “defensive conflict” is credited to Faurot and Shaughnessy.

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SECTION ONE: The Wing T Offense Chapter One

WIN WITH AVERAGE PLAYERS


 Angle blocking allows a team to be successful with smaller linemen;
 Does not require precision. Can still score if blocks are missed;
 Easier for running backs to make great fakes vs great blocks;

BUILDS TEAM CONCEPT


 Star Players have to fake and every player on team can be all league faker;
 Can’t stop one player because ball will be spread around;
 The tough mentality required to run the Wing-T affects the defense. The development of a grueling
consistent ground game builds a desire to dominate the opponent physically.

TOUGH ON OPPONENT
 Misdirection puts pressure on undisciplined 17-year old linebackers;

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 Very hard for defense to prepare for in 3 days when only see it once per year;
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 Logical progression. Defense must stop core play, its counter, and its play action pass;

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SIMPLICITY with COMPLEXITY: Simple for US -- Complex for THEM
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ENHANCES YOUR OFFENSE


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 Ball control run attack is more suitable to end of season bad weather;
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 Good run game HELPS the passing game;


 Pass protection is easier because can’t blitz this offense;

If you really understand the offense, you will find that it is a system that allows you to focus on the plays
and playmakers that you have in any given year.
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The Wing T is an offense that has withstood the test of time. Where other offenses and fads make great
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clinic talk, the Wing T continues to baffle teams with its misdirection attack. The Delaware Wing T continues to
be one of the finest offenses used today on both the high school and college levels.

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SECTION ONE: The Wing T Offense Chapter One

PHILOSOPHY OF THE WING-T

This chapter will familiarize you with not only my Pistol Wing T Not a formation or
offense, but also the philosophy of the Wing T. This offense is more than a
certain plays...
formation. It is a system that puts defenders in conflict while putting your It is a system of
players in the best position to be successful. The key to the entire system is If-Then scenarios.
understanding how to use a defender’s assignment or reaction to your
advantage.

“If the defense does this, then you run that”


The Wing T offense is a multiple formation, four-back attack that depends heavily on misdirection.

1. DECEPTION: Minimize defensive pursuit and provides big play opportunities. Does not ask a 140-lb

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running back to block a 220-lb linebacker...but instead takes the LB out of the play with great fakes.
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2. ANGLES & FLANKS: Created by both technique and formation, an offense does not need big, strong

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guys to move the football.
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3. FLEXIBLITY: From option to power runs to trapping game, all aspects of the run game can be ran.

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The passing game can include drop back, sprint out, & of course play action. The location of the
wing backs allows this flexibility.
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The problem with the offense is its great flexibility. As you gain more
knowledge of all the conflicts from the many formations and plays, the trap
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“Don’t have so
many plays that you must avoid falling into is running to much stuff. You can very rapidly
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you aren’t any have over 20 run plays, 20 pass plays, and 20 formations….which every play
good at running can be ran out of every formation. This leads to the problem of teaching and
any of them” practicing 800 variations !

QB THREAT
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Threatens playside flank with option threat or opposite flank with misdirection away from flow. Gives
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defense contain problems and minimizes backside pursuit.


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Under Center: Allows QB to hide the ball by turning his back to the defense.

Pistol: The loss of hiding the ball is offset by QB reading pass defenders, blitzers, and unblocked defenders on
run plays.

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SECTION ONE: The Wing T Offense Chapter One

MULTI-FORMATION
It is a multi formation offense where all three backs may be used as blockers, ball-carriers deception, or
receivers. The ability to run every play out of many formations, minimizing tendencies for the defense. Since
pre-game scouting via use of film is so minimal at the youth level, a creative youth coach can really gain HUGE
advantages over the defense by getting extra blockers at the point of attack.

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PASSING GAME
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Overaggressive secondary support and plugging linebackers can make it difficult to move the ball on the
ground. Consequently, the play action passing game creates defensive conflict for the players assigned to stopping
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the run. Of course, having 3 running backs enhances the play action more than other offenses. Most of the spread
passing game concepts can be easily infused into the Wing-T because the wing alignment presents a 4 receiver
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threat on any play.

“There are only 3 things that can happen by throwing and 2 of them are bad”
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MISDIRECTION AND MOTION


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The Wing T uses misdirection as no other modern offensive formation does. Because of the four back
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attack, misdirection has a maximum impact and is a staple of the Wing-T attack. It has same effect as the passing
game in forcing the defense to play honestly at the flank and to not over pursue. Just as important is when a
smaller running back takes out a larger defensive player by faking instead of having to try to block him.

Motion increases the chances of misdirection as you can send the motion man one way and have a player,
such as the QB, keep the ball in the opposite direction. Conversely, you can give the ball to the motion man and
have other backs fake in the opposite direction.

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SECTION ONE: The Wing T Offense Chapter One

DEFENSIVE CONFLICTS

This is the secret ingredient to the entire enchilada. Everything that you do when installing and running

this offense should always be predicated on where the defense is in conflict. Every play has an “if-then”
statement where a defensive technique will be used against that player. If the defensive player uses Technique A,
then there is a certain play that is called next. If the player reacts with Technique B, then there is a different play
that must be called.

Now let’s look at Belly and its Tackle Trap counter play to put linebackers in conflict.

 IF the OLB tackles the TB on Belly, THEN the QB keeps the ball and runs option.
 IF the backside ILB makes the tackle on Belly, THEN run counter (tackle trap).

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Fig 6: OLB conflict on Belly Fig 7: ILB conflict on Trap
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Now let’s look at a conflict with the defensive end. Let’s start with Figure 8 where he lined up to wide
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because he has been told to not let anything outside. Kick him out and run up inside, until he starts creeping in
tighter to stop the TB (Fig 9). Now the right wing can hook block him and we run sweep outside.
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Fig 8: DE to wide Fig 9: DE to tight Fig 10: CB to aggressive

After establishing successful runs by both tailback (down) and left wing (sweep), this forces the Corner to
become more aggressive on the run. He should already be rolled up, because if he starts out deep (8 yards or
more), then nobody is guarding the flats on pass plays. Rolling the CB up (Fig 10) to let the OLB focus on run
puts stress on the FS if both the TE & WB run deeper routes. The key is that everyone’s 1st steps are the same.

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SECTION ONE: The Wing T Offense Chapter One

Another conflict is the NG (#1 defender) lined up over the guards. After a heavy dosage of Down and
Sweep they will start stepping outside, which leaves the middle wide open. Furthermore, by leaning / stepping
it makes the guards blocks easier because the defender is moving the way that WE WANT him to go !!!!

Fig 11: NG conflict on Dive Fig 12: NG conflict on G Left

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The key to all of this conflict is that both the blocking and backfield action looks the same. Don’t ever run a
play in the Wing T system without a “look-a-like” companion play. A list of the companion plays and the many
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conflicts are summarized in the Appendix.

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LOOK-A-LIKE BACKFIELD DECEPTION


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Plays are grouped into “families” by similar backfield action and each family attacks several areas of the
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defense on every snap. The line blocking matches the backfield action to minimize defensive keys. Even a
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defense who reads linemen has to find backfield flow after the OL 1st or 2nd step. For example running the same
Liz or Rip motion on Sweep, Down, & Down Pass combined with the same backfield action on those 3 plays does
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not allow the defense to just key on one player.

Plays are grouped into series, or families, based upon backfield action. The paths of the backs on every play
in that family should “look-a-like” so the defense who keys backs will be confused

Every family has the CORE play; a COUNTER play, and a PASS play. They attack backside, middle, and
outside.
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The Delaware Wing-T then, is a multiple formation, four-back running attack that depends heavily on
play-action passing and misdirection, utilizing synchroized schemes both in the line-blocking and backfield
action. Defense can't make tackle until it locates the ball

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SECTION ONE: The Wing T Offense Chapter One

SHOULD THE QB BE IN PISTOL FORMATION?

This is the million dollar question. And you need to bounce this off your coaching staff and be very, very
honest with yourself: Don’t run Wing-T out of the PISTOL formation because you want to change it up...examine
your Quarterback position before deciding.

The ONLY reason to be in Pistol is so that the QB can read unblocked defenders and decide whether to hand
off or keep the ball. This requires a QB with great game instincts and quickness. Pure, raw athleticism helps, but
there has to be discipline and intelligence. While he doesn’t need Olympic gold medal speed, he needs to have
quick feet and above average change of direction. When he decides to pull the handoff and keep it, his first steps
have to be very quick so he can hit the hole or the edge before the defense reacts. And the last, but very important
quality, is unselfishness. This offense gives him the green light to run, but he has to possess patience and great
decision making skills.

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TRADE OFFS of GOING TO PISTOL

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 Loss of deception is offset by opportunity to read unblocked defenders;
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 TB plays ran up the middle will hit slower with TB at 5 yards, but option is better as “ride” is longer;
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 Center has to learn the 3 yard snap.
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KNUCKLE BALL SNAP
The center will hold the top cone of the ball while the bottom cone sits on the ground. The laces will face
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outward to the right if the QB is right handed. He will snap the ball so that is does not spin or rotate, but “knuckle
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ball” so that the laces land on the fingertips of the QB right hand. The center cannot flex, or snap his elbow or
wrist. He keeps his entire arm solid as he releases the ball at “calf length”.
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KEEP UNDER CENTER ALIGNMENT


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Their will be scenarios when your backup center or quarterback has to go in the game. You might be playing
in heavy rain or snow, especially come playoff time. For these reasons I have designed the backfield action to
make it very easy to run plays from both under center and out of PISTOL.

Having the ability to be in both alignments also puts more pressure on the defensive coordinators. They will
stay up all weekend trying to find tendencies, which is why it is very important to not have any. My quarterback
and I go off gut feeling week to week as to how much Pistol vs under center we will run.

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SECTION ONE: The Wing T Offense Chapter One

BACKFIELD ACTION AND FOOTWORK


The Pistol formation keeps the TB directly behind the QB, which severely minimizes changes to RB footwork
and landmarks. A disadvantage to Shotgun Wing T is having to offset the TB to the side of the QB, which
necessitates more changes to backfield footwork.

 Easier for the QB to run every play from both under center and in Pistol.
 Younger teams can stay under center for easy transition to Pistol at older levels.
 Zero changes to wing back footwork & motion landmarks.
 Only difference to TB footwork is always having midline GO family.

Regardless of whether a team runs the Wing T out of Pistol or Shotgun, the QB is going to have very different
footwork compared to being under center. But these differences between Pistol and direct snap are far less than
direct snap and shotgun.

EASIER TO PASS

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There is something to be said about the defense being more worried about the passing game when the QB gets
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There is more to this however. The farther away from the LOS that the QB gets makes it easier for HIM to

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read the defense and find his pre-snap reads. Furthermore, he can get to his landmark and setup quicker than
having to “drop back” five yards.
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EASIER TO MAKE POST SNAP READS


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While passing the ball is easier from the Pistol formation, the hidden advantage is in the running
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game. The 3 yard alignment and facing the defense gives the QB more time to read unblocked defenders without
sacrificing the quick hitting run game that is lost by backing all the way up to 5 yards.

“The 3 yd alignment is a “happy medium” between under center (allowing TB to hit the
LOS the quickest) and the 5 yd alignment (giving QB most time to make his reads).”
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Post Snap Reads:


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A basic premise of option football is lengthening the time that the QB has to “ride & decide”. Obviously
putting the QB at 3yards instead of at the Line of Scrimmage will give the QB more time to decide whether to
give the ball to the RB or keep the ball and run. This longer faking action also freezes defenders which allows the
lineman to gain better angles and more leverage. Again, putting the QB at 5 yards allows even more time, but the
tradeoff is that the back also takes longer to get to the LOS.

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CHAPTER TWO

Huddle, Alignment,
Formations, Motions
PERSONELL

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Fig 13: Alignment and Titles of Running Backs


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LT Quicker of the two tackles X Wide Receiver


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LG Great feet; Quick; Shorter is better; Y Can be a 3rd tackle with 80 number
Would be FB in I-back offense but a Tony Gonzalez type is ideal
C I hide my worse lineman here; RH Right Half. Quick & can catch.
RG Same as LG; Stronger of the two LH Left Half. Quick & can catch
RT Strongest lineman QB Quarterback
TB Tailback. Best player. Tough with
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thick legs; Takes a pounding.


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We “cross-train” all of our players because in high school football injuries happen and we seldom have 4
good players at any position. So our depth chart will have 3 tackles, 3 guards, and 2 centers. We will have 3
Halfbacks, 2 Tailbacks, and many times only 1 QB.

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SECTION ONE: The Wing T Offense Chapter Two

Wingbacks: Can be smaller, but tough enough to block inside


linebackers and defensive ends. They should be quick as their
carries come on counters and sweeps attacking the edge of the
defense. They are also integral to the passing attack as
receivers.

Ends
The offense is very difficult to stop if the Tight End (“Y”) can be a physical down blocker as well as being an
effective split-end Wide Receiver. If we don’t have a player at TE, then our blocking TE is our 3rd best tackle
wearing an 80’s number. We cross train all of X’s to play both sides so when we take the TE out, we simply yell
“Two X’s” and our 2 best WR enters the game.

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We will huddle approx 4 yards from the ball with everyone facing the ball.

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We have signaled and ran

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plays in and both methods work well. Whether I am running plays in or signaling from the sideline, the QB has
a wristband with all the plays that have over 5 words on it.
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SPRINT TO THE LINE

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SECTION ONE: The Wing T Offense Chapter Two

It is very important that nobody move as the QB steps back, looks everyone in the eye with confidence, and
they all clap in unison. Nobody takes even an inch forward until the clap. We have to really coach our players on
this, because they will start leaning and inching forward before the clap. It is also important that the "Y" hides
behind the Center to minimize defensive strength calls.

After the clap the entire team SPRINTS to the LOS and immediately gets into their stances. Our goal is to
snap the ball before the defense can line up.

IMPORTANT that the TE hides behind the Center so the defense cannot make an early strength call. If there
is no “Tight”, “Over”, or “Nasty” call, the TE leaves with the X after the QB says the play for the 1st time.

Also notice the Tackles hiding behind the Guards. This makes is easier to do our Tackle Over calls.

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The No-Huddle has many uses, including wearing a defense down, speeding up play, and reducing the
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defense’s ability to change and adjust.

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Effect on Opponent Defense
 Wear out your opponent, both physcally and mentally
 Limits defensive substitutions and defensive blitz calls from sideline;
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 Harder for defense to prepare since their scout offense can’t simulate the speed.
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 No time for defensive celebrations or emotion slapping between snaps.


Changes to Your Offense
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 More snaps per game thereby increasing your chances to score;


 Easier to run 2-minute offense
 Fun for the players and fans
Changes the Way You Practice
 Kids will run No Huddle at full speed. They won’t condition at full speed.
 Conditioning simulates game situations. Gassers & stadium runs do not.
 Forces position coaches to make corrections on the fly.
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 Players hear coaching corrections at game speed.


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 Get more reps in practice


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NASCAR & MUSTANG


I do not recommend running NO HUDDLE for entire game at the youth level. But here are two
ways that you can have a fast, No Huddle curveball to throw at the defense during the game.

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SECTION ONE: The Wing T Offense Chapter Two

GET THE PLAY IN

Signals vs Wristbands vs Running plays in

Signal: This is the fasest, but requires memorization. (see list of signals at end of this chapter)
One coach signals in the actual play and another coach signals in a “dummy” play. Coaches can switch
at quarters or halves, or use indicators such as wearing a certain wristband or turning his hat backwards.

Wristband: This is the easiest way to get the play in and there is no confusion but it is slower. Also players
will not learn plays and become dependent upon the wristbands. Wristbands have to be collected &
changed every week; Some coaches change wristbands at half time.

Run the Play In: This is a great way to get more players in (very important in youth football), but the player
running the play in is probably not a top player and will tell the QB the wrong play. Only use this method

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if the play call requires 5 or more words, then those plays are put on the QB wristband. Our QB and receivers are

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the only players with wristbands, so wristband plays require huddling up. All of our youth teams used wristbands,
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which after watching all 3 teams run this offense for five years, I suggest using wristbands, but still run players in
and out of the game. Nobody is going to forget how to tell the QB, “Play 3”.
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Wristband Examples
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Print your wristbands on laser printer. Inkjet will smudge and smear with moisture. If
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you don’t have enough wristbands, you could print them on 9x12 laminating film sheets. They will cost $20 for a
box of 50 which will yield 100 wristbands. These sheets can be taped to the players wrist or tucked in their pants.

Put all the formations on the front card and all the plays on the 2 cards under the wristband flap. You could
just signal or yell a letter with a number.
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FORMATIONS on front card RUN PLAYS on inside card PASS PLAYS on inside card
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A Loose 1 33 Belly 81 Purple Arrow


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B Tight 2 34 Belly 82 Purple Swing


C Over 3 35 Down 83 Purple Quick
D Tight Trips Right 4 36 Down 84 TE Silver
E Over Trips Right 5 31 G 85 Red 75 Flat

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SECTION ONE: The Wing T Offense Chapter Two

HAND SIGNALS

FIRST Formations + motion SECOND Actual Play

WRISTBAND: tap our left forearm with right hand & signal numbers using body clock + fingers. Odd numbers point away
from body; Even numbers touch the body. 2 touch left shoulder, 3 point straight out, 4 touch rib cage.

DIRECTION: Run play to the left by flexing left bicep. Run play to the right by flexing right bicep.

Loose
JKLJL;JKLJKJL;JKL 28/47 Sweep
Tight
JKJKLJKL;JKL; Dive Middle
JKLJKLJKL;JL
Over 31 G Left Shaking dice
JKL;JKLJL;
X-Over Boot Pass Kick with a boot
JKL;JKLJLK;
X-Tight Down 36 O Hands in downward motion
JKL;JKLJL;L
Doubles Down Counter Down sign+4 finger claw

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Lucky ba is re E Down Pass Horns on head
Ringo 33 Belly Rub belly

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Halves Rt or Lt 22 Trap thumb & pinky in air (hang loose sign)
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Stack Belly Sweep Flex in bulldog stance

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Empty Belly Pass Lasso above head
Liz2 / Rip2
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Lazer / Rocket
X Cross arms into an X Wraparound Hug body
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Y Rt fist in Lt forearm. Sideways “T”. Screen


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L “L” loser sign with left hand Chop Pass Tap top of head
R Right fist straight out Sprint Pass
TB Both hands behind your back
2
Liz & Rip motions are part of 28/47 Sweep.. Only need signal if running flat motion on belly, down, or G plays.
3
Pass Plays are on the wristbands. We have signals for play action pass tags (slant, wheel, post, out) that can be used.
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FORMATIONS

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SECTION ONE: The Wing T Offense

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Chapter Two

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SECTION ONE: The Wing T Offense

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Chapter Two
CHAPTER THREER

Putting It All Together


We teach a language instead of memorization. Every player has certain words that apply to him and
other positions are taught to ignore those words. This allows us alot of flexibility in teaching and changing things
with very little explanation. It is no different to when we learn our alphabets and words...allowing us to easily

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Fig 16: PROGRESSION OF HOW WE CALL A PLAY

We need to communicate all six of these areas in order to get a play called.

1. Huddle or No Huddle: This is communicated from sideline as soon as previous play is blown dead.
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2. Formation & Motions: X/Y Words combined with RB words.


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3. Run or Pass: If the word “P-A-S-S” is not mentioned, then it is a run play.
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4. Run Hole or Pass Protection: We use 2-digit numbers for run and colors for pass protection.

5. Snap Count: Built into each play.

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SECTION ONE: The Wing T Offense Chapter Three

NO HUDDLE TEMPOS
We huddle up and sprint to the line most of the game. These are our two No Huddle tempos that we
run when the defense is getting tired or when we need to go really fast.

“MUSTANG”. Our best plays every week are assigned “Mustang-1”, “Mustang-2”, etc.
For example, “Mustang-1” stands for Liz 28-O and “Mustang-2” stands for 33 Belly.
The sideline screams the Mustang call and we run play as soon as the ball is put into play.
These plays can change every week or you can keep them the same.

“NASCAR”. These are the same 3 plays, ran in the same order, in the same direction all year long. The
sideline screams which NASCAR package we are running and the players continue to run
those 3 plays in that order until sideline tells them to Huddle up.

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NASCAR: Sweep, Wraparound, Belly Sweep; (ran in LOOSE formation)
NASCAR TIGHT: Down, Boot, Belly; (ran in TIGHT formation)
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In MUSTANG and NASCAR tempo’s, we do NOT soft huddle, but wait, in formation, 1 yard behind the

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ball until the Umpire steps back behind the defensive line after the White Hat has chopped the ball into play. Our
goal is snap the ball within 1 second after the Umpire steps back away from the ball.
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FORMATION
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If X and Y do not hear a formation word that affect them, then they both line up as Wide Outs (“LOOSE”).
If the LW and RW do not hear one of their words, then they line up as Wings. To lineup in LOOSE, the first
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word of the play call would be a motion or the actual play.


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SECTION TWO
RUN GAME

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4: Sweep: LizLazer / RipRocket Family


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5: Iso: Belly Family


6: Off Tackle: Down Family
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7: Short Yardage & Special Plays


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[Type here]

CHAPTER FOUR

Sweep Family
PEEWEE JUNIOR SENIOR
Liz Sweep Right Liz Sweep Right Liz 28-0 or 28 Reach
Liz Boot Pass Right Liz Boot Pass Right Liz Boot Pass Right
Rip Sweep Left Rip Sweep Left Rip 47-0 or 47 Reachg
Rip Dive Middle Rip G Left Rip 31 G
Rip Boot Pass Left Rip Boot Pass Left Rip Boot Pass Left

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We recommend replacing Buck Sweep with Jet Sweep for youth football.
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(32-G) and Boot (17 GO Pass) off the flat Liz/Rip motion fakes. The sweep is a sister play with Down that puts

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the DE in conflict, which is why on Liz Sweep Right we have the FB faking Down rather than faking up the

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middle.
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FOOTWORK: LIZ/LAZER...RIP/ROCKET
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LIZ/RIP-Pistol Snap ball when Wing is at inside leg of G. Hold ball out in front as snap hits hands.
Wing should be there & almost "intercepts" the snap. QB could keep ball and run up middle or turn with the
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Liz/Rip motion to fake Belly or Down.


LIZ/RIP-Under Center Snap ball when Wing is at inside leg of G. Reverse pivot on playside leg so that the QB is
opening towards the motion man and handing off at inside leg of playside Guard.
LAZER/ROCKET- The footwork from Pistol and Under Center is the same. Open pivot pitch with right
hand on Rocket motion and reverse pivot pitch with right hand on Lazer motion. After pitch reverse pivot
back to defense and fake to TB up the middle.
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Chapter Four
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Chapter Four

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Chapter Four

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Chapter Four
Gap Highway
Gap Highway
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Chapter Four

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Chapter Four
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Chapter Four

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Chapter Four

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Gap Highway
Gap Highway
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Chapter Four

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Chapter Four
CHAPTER FIVE

Belly Family
PEEWEE JUNIOR SENIOR
Rip Belly Left Rip Belly Left Rip 33 Belly
Rip Belly Counter Right Rip Belly G Right Rip Belly 24 Trap
Belly Sweep Left Belly Sweep Left Belly 47-G
Rip Belly Pass Left Rip Belly Pass Left Rip Belly Pass Left

FOOTWORK: BELLY FAMILY

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QUARTERBACK "OPEN & RIDE"
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Open pivots on playside left foot and bring right foot square.
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Cannot ride into the LOS on Belly Pass, Tackle Trap, or Belly Sweep.

TAILBACK Shuffle step laterally. Eyes go from NG to offensive tackles butt.


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If NG/1 tech is slanting towards Belly hole, then going to cutback (1 hole on 34 belly) as soon
as gets ball. On 2nd & 3rd step of the shuffle step, read the playside tackle butt and hit the 4 or 6 hole
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depending on his block angle.


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WINGBACKS Flat Liz or Rip motion in front of QB and before the TB. Block DE if not getting ball.
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Chapter Five
SECTION TWO: Run Game Chapter Five

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Reach - On - Away
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Reach - On - Away

On - Gap - LB

On - Gap - Away
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SECTION TWO: Run Game Chapter Five

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Reach - On - Away
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Reach - On - Away

On - Gap - LB

On - Gap - Away
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CHAPTER SIX

Down Family
PEEWEE JUNIOR SENIOR
Liz Down Right Liz Down Right Liz Down 36-0
Liz Down Counter Left Liz Down G Left Liz Down 45 TY
Liz Down Pass Right Liz Down Pass Right Liz Down Pass Right

FOOTWORK: DOWN FAMILY


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QUARTERBACK "OPEN - CROSSOVER - PLANT & RIDE"
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Do not reverse pivot. Cannot ride into the LOS on Pass or Counter.
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TAILBACK Attack the hole as quickly as possible.

WINGBACKS: Liz motion...coming underneath the QB to block kickout Defensive End.


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Chapter Six
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Chapter Six

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Chapter Six

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Chapter Six
CHAPTER SEVEN

Special Plays
Short Yardage: Tubby
Short Yardage: Ram/Lion

Trick Plays

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TUBBY: Both Tackles & TE line up on same side of formation. Under Center, No Pistol.
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RAM / LION: Both Wings on same side of formation, giving 2 lead blockers for TB.

TRICK PLAYS: We install a new trick play every week, so that we have 10-12 for playoffs.
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Chapter Seven
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Chapter Seven

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Chapter Seven
SECTION THREE

PASS GAME

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8: Routes, Footwork, & Play Action


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9: Drop Back Passing Game


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10: Sprint Passing Game

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CHAPTER EIGHT

All of the pass plays can be broken down into four categories:
PLAY ACTION: Belly and Down passes will be your best pass plays due to the “Look-A-Like”
backfield action. The run fakes and motions will cause the flats to be wide open.
DROP BACK PASS: The pass protection is chop blocking and the QB takes 1 step and throws slant,
fade, or swing pass. The reason for no deep drop back passing is because it is very difficult to
teach the pass protections. Furthermore, a youth coach does not have time in practice.
SPRINT PASS: Since the youth QB is usually the better athlete on the team, sprinting him out makes
sense because there is always a good chance that this athlete will make good things happen by
running the ball. Furthermore the pass protection is easy since it is identical to Jet Sweep.

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SCREEN / DRAW: It is imperative that all 3 levels put in the wraparound draw play, however, pulling a

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screen pass off during a game is not easy feat. My recommendation is that screen passes are
reserved for the 7th / 8th grade level.
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Chapter Eight
SECTION THREE: Pass Game Chapter Eight

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Chop pass protection with fade and hitch routes require very short 3-step drop. Right handed QB does

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not cross left foot over the right. He opens & plants right foot, bringing the left foot under his body to
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gather his balance. Maintain “fast feet” he simply opens left toe when ready to throw.

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Sprint passing takes adavantage of the great athletes that play the QB position at the youth level.
Basically the QB takes off on a full sprint, which will draw the attention of the End and the Linebackers,
which will leave the flats wide open. I do not recommend traditional dropback passing at the youth level,
but have put the diagram in below for the coaches who desire to do so..
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On - Gap - Down
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Chapter Eight
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SECTION THREE: Pass Game

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Chapter Eight
CHAPTER NINE

Quick Passing Game


In youth football it is important to develop a passing game that only requires the linemen to block for 1.5 to 2
seconds and fits the needs of quarterbacks with limited arm strength. So the Youth Wing T Passing Attack
involves 1-2 step QB drops and routes breaking between three and eight yards. These are high percentage throws
that should be viewed as “long runs”.

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Philosophically, the youth coach has to be satisfied with gains of less than 10 yards on completions.
Ironically, the deeper gains, or the “homeruns”, will come off the play action pass packages. The youth coach
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In my opinion the best pass play in this chapter are the Swing passes, because they are being thrown to your

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wing backs out in space. The youth coach needs to view these swing passes as running plays and if the defense
stops a swing pass for zero gain, think of it the same as a run play being stuffed, and do not be afraid to continue
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calling the swing pass throughout the game. Your wing backs are your best athletes, so keep throwing the swing
pass out to them and eventually they will cause a missed tackle and be off on a long gain.
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When putting this pass package together it was important that certain pass concepts (slant, fade, swing, hitch)
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could be ran out of MANY formations. It is also important to remember that this offense is a Wing T running
attack so the passing game has to complement that package. I have seen so many coaches at both the youth and
high school levels put a play in that stood out like a sore left toe because it did not fit seamlessly with the rest of
the offense. However, I do challege you to find as many creative ways and formations to run these concepts.

LAST SUGGESTION: I have the Tailback swinging out of backfield to serve as a “hot” route in case the
QB is under pressure and other times he is releasing off the edge to block the alley player (safety). The Swing
pass times really well if the QB and TB make a real quick “dive” fake into the 3 or 4 hole before throwing the
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swing. This not only freezes the Inside Linebacker, but gives the wing back time to swing out farther.
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CHOP PASS PROTECTION


The blocking scheme is a basic fire out man protection, with priority being inside gaps. D-gaps are taken care
of by swinging the Tailback out of the backfield.

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Chapter Nine
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Chapter Nine
CHAPTER TEN

Sprint Passing Game

In youth football the quarterback is one of the best athletes on the team, so sprinting him out in space will
draw a lot of attention. Assuming the the edge Corner is in man to man and there is only one Safety over the top,

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the best route is a “flood” concept that puts 3 receivers along the sideline with only 2 defenders to guard them.
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Notice that the two players that will be open are the wing backs,

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which should be the best athletes on the team. Even if the Corner did
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not drop back (Cover 2) he cannot guard both.
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If the End or an Inside Linebacker runs to the flats, then the QB
tucks the ball and runs.
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Several times in this book I have stressed the importance of


running the same concept out of multiple formations. This is illustrated
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below by running the FLOOD routes with a TE and out of Trips.


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PASS PROTECTION: The other great thing about Sprint Out Passing is that the pass protections is blocked
the exact same way as Sweep Right. Furthermore, inside blitzing is not as effective because even if the blitzer
does get through, he still has to turn and chase a very athletic QB towards the sideline.

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Chapter Ten
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Chapter Ten

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SECTION FOUR

INSTALLATION

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11: Individual Position Drills


12: Group Drills
13: Practice Organization
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14: Attacking Defenses


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CHAPTER ELEVEN

Individual Position Drills


OFFENSIVE LINEMEN - Individual Blocks

The following is a 9-page summary taken from my 125-page O-Line Technique & Drills Manual.
Every drill has been videotaped and appears on the 120-minute Offensive Drills DVD.

We believe in using the shoulder as our main blocking surface on all of our down & pull blocks. Since the

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primary blocking scheme involves angle blocking, trapping, and double teams, I believe that using the shoulder

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for initial contact gives the youth player the best chance for success.
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1. Shoulder, forearm, & chest gives much greater contact area versus the palms of our hands;
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3. Less chance of being called for holding.

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Every block is broken into FOUR phases, which we call B-E-E-F.

Blastoff (6 inch first step) “Heel Replaces Toe - Flat Back”


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This is the first step. It is extremely important, should be short, and should open up your hips
up in the direction you need to go. We coach 6" power step & flat back during this phase.
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Execute (2nd step hits ground, shoulder hits ribs, and off hand hits sternum all at the same time)
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This is the second step & when contact is initiated. We want to step in the crotch of the
defender with contact initiated at belt level. This puts us in a great leverage position.
Elevate (3rd step, lift defender up & under shoulder pads)
We use the 3rd step to lift the defender. Once upright, he is very easily moved.
Finish (flip defender on his back)
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SECTION FOUR: Installation Chapter Eleven

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We do all of our shoulder skills, individual, and combo blocks on Homer's Dairy. The squares are 5
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positions to correct each player more efficiently.

The following is the how each individual block would look on a Homer's Dairy. All players would
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be doing the same block at the same time in practice. We have illustrated the different blocks to save
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space.
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Hit & Run Down Reach Pull Right Hook

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#3
#2
SECTION FOUR: Installation Chapter Eleven #1

#4 #5

RUNNING BACKS

HAND SHIELD ZIG ZAG #6


GUANTLET BLOCKING BAG #3
#2
#1
#3
#2
#1 #7 #8

#4 #5
#4

#5

#6
#6

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#1 covers ball with both hands, lowers shoulders, and runs thru #4 & #5 #8

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#4 and #5 hit RB as hard as they can with bags or shields.
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#1 then high knees over to bags laying on ground.

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As he approaches the back of #6 (who is facing #7 and #8).... #1 RB runs at each shield in a "zig=zag" pattern.
#6 simulates a block vs air. He straight arms or spin moves off each shield
#1 breaks off this block and approaches #7 or #8. Ball should be in right hand as he approaches #4...
He then straight arms or spins off #7 or #8. Switch ball to left hand just before he straight arms #4 with right arm.
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#1 replaces #8...who replaces #7...who replaces #6... Run at #5 with ball in left hand..switch ball just before straight arm #5
7 #6 replaces #5...who replaces #4
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#4 gets in back of line behind #3 At end of circuit, #1 replaces #8....


#8 replaces #7...who replaces #6...who replaces #5...who replaces #4
#4 gets in back of line behind #3.
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CHAPTER TWELVE

Practice Organization
This Chapter is a summary of my book: “Wing T Skills & Drills Manual”
This book has 200 pages diagramming every technique and drill you need to run this offense.
It also has 10 spring, 12 summer, 20 August, and in-season practice plans in print & on CD-Rom.
This chapter has one example of each practice schedule

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RACEHORSE MENTALITY
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Move through practice quickly, enthusiastically, and efficiently. A multiple offense has alot to cover during

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each practice and most youth teams are regulated to 120 - 150 minutes per evening and 7 1/2 hours per week.

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Therefore, during practice, we move along at a fast pace, while still getting quality repetitions. Each coach is
expected to be enthusiastic, positive, and extremely efficient in his usage of time.
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The basic ingredients of the Wing-T Race Horse Philosophy are


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I. Keep It Simple
a) KISS is "Keep It Simple, Stupid". "Keep It Simple" for the players and "Stupid" for coaches.
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I sometimes forget the young men I'm working with want to play football not learn biomechanics.

II. One bag for every two players.


a) This means at least half of the lineman will perform the drill at a time.
b) This allows a lot of quality repetitions in a shorter amount of time.
c) Lots of quality repetitions = Technique mastery
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III. Coach on the Fly


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a) Create buzzwords to correct mistakes. The drill or play never stops to correct one player.
The correction has to happen while the drill is happening.
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b) If the correction takes explanation, sub the player out.

IV. Three plays per minute.


a) Goal is to run 3 plays per minute...but 2 plays per minute is great. This include reps during drills!

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SECTION FOUR: Installation Chapter Twelve

Teaching Progression

EASY TO HARD
Teach easy plays (sweep) first and progress to harder plays (Belly). There are so many other things that need
to be established, such as work ethic, going fast, timing of motions, understanding different tempos / snap counts.
We don’t want to add to our players frustrations by teaching a complicatd play that has lots of moving parts
when they are still learning how to huddle, where to line up, and what the snap count is.

PRACT MOTION FORMATION RUN PLAY PASS PLAY MISC


M Day 1 Liz & Rip Loose Sweep Right & Left You-Me Call Huddle
T Day 2 Near & Far

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Th Day 4 Tight & Over Boot Pass Boot Pass
Fr Day 5 Review
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M Day 6 X-Tite/X-Over Liz Down Right 36-0 Fade
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Th Day 9
Fr Day 10 Review

M Day 11 Doubles Rip 33 Belly


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T Day 12 Belly Pass Wheel routes


W Day 13
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Th Day 14 Belly Sweep 47-G


Fr Day 15 Review
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M Day 16 Halves Belly 28 & 47 G Purple Quick [& GO]


T Day 17 Purple Swing [& GO]
W Day 18 Down Counter Left (45 TY) Sprint Pass Right
Th Day 19 Belly Counter Right (trap)
Fr Day 20
Sat SCRIMMAGE

T Day 21 Tubby Tubby Package Wraparound


W Day 22 Lucky & Ringo Lazer & Rocket 28 & 47 "T"
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Th Day 23
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T Day 24 Nascar
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W Day 25 Lazer & Rocket Lion/Ram


Th Day 26 Wildcat, Empty

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AUGUST - First 4 Weeks


Another thought is to spend more time on offense during week one since your league probably does not allow
the players to wear pads until week 2. For example, spend 70 minutes on offense and 40 minutes defense
during the first week.

WEEK 1 WEEK 2 WEEK 3 WEEK 4


15” Perfect Plays 10” Perfect Plays 10” Perfect Plays 10” Perfect Plays
30” Indo Period 25” Indo Period 25” Indo Period 10” Indo Period
15” 1/2 Line 10” 1/2 Line 10” 1/2 Line 10” 1/2 Line
10” Pass Plays
15” Odd-Even 15” Odd-Even 15” Odd-Even 10” Odd-Even
40” Defense 50” Defense 50” Defense 50” Defense
15” Special Teams
10” Conditioning 10” Conditioning 10” Conditioning 10” Conditioning

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IN-SEASON

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TUE - Belly-Down Day
10” Punt+Hidden Time 10” KO Return+Hidden Time 20” Special Teams+Hidden Time
10” Perfect Plays -Huddle 10” Perfect Plays-Huddle 10” Perfect Plays-Nascar
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10” Indo Period 10” Indo Period 10” Indo Period


OL/TE Bag Work OL 1/2 Line OL Reach, Escapes, Middle
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RB RB Blocking RB
Fool Me Drill Sprint Right Passing
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QB QB QB
Slant, fade, hitch Swings & Quicks
X Blocking X/TE X/TE

10” Half Line Belly 10” Full Line 10” Half Line Sweep
C/GT OL/TE Counter/Traps T/TE
Belly Left Liz/Rip Sweeps
RB QB WB
Down Right Slant, fade, hitch Belly Sweep
QB X X
X/TE Hands progression C/G
Dive Middle/G Lt/G Rt
TB
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10” Belly & Down Pass 10” Chop Passes 10” Sprint Right Passing
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10” Odd-Even 15” Odd-Even 10” Goal Line


50” Defense 50” Defense 40” Defense

You need to be very organized sharing your QB. One QB goes with running backs while the other QB throws. If
your starting QB threw on Tue, then the following week have him go with RB.

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CHAPTER THIRTEEN

Attacking Defenses
COUNTING DEFENDERS
The first thing to do is COUNT DEFENDERS INSIDE THE BOX.

 5 v 6: Run ball outside


 6 v 6: Attack the off-tackle. Put tight end in a TIGHT alignment for extra blocker.

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We begin by attacking #3. Draw line thru playside A gap and count defenders from inside to outwards.
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If #3 seals inside, then we go outside, looking for reaction of #4 defender.


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 If #4 goes upfield, run up inside him (Down). If we can hook/crack #4, then run outside #4 (Sweep).
 If #4 aggressive, throw behind him. If he is soft, run at him.

If #3 goes upfield, we go inside.


 The key is the two inside LB vs the 5-3…can you block them? Vs the 6-2, can you double the NG?
 What is backside doing? Can you run Counter or Boot?

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APPENDIX

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Blocking Rule Summary


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Playsheets & Wristbands


Player Evaluations
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Scouting Sheets
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SECTION FIVE: Appendix

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