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Another Case of Plagiarism

The Left-Side:

Plagiarist: Prof. AA. Banyu Perwita “Rising China and the implications for SE Asia”

The Right-Side:

Victim #1: Prof. Rommel C. Banlaoi “Southeast Asian perspectives on the rise of China:

regional security after 9/11”

Published in Parameters Journal, Summer, 2003 Link: http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0IBR/is_2_33/ai_102835193/?

The Right-Side:

Victim #2: Dr. Aileen San Pablo-Baviera “China as a Rising Power:

Implications for the Asia-Pacific Region”

Published in PASCN Discussion Paper No. 99-06 Link: http://pascn.pids.gov.ph/DiscList/d99/s99-06.PDF

PLEASE NOTICE THE HIGHLIGHTED PHRASES

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Prof. Anak Agung Banyu Perwita’s Article

China started to focus on economic and military modernization programs in the late 1970s. This modernization has elevated China's profile at both the regional and global levels.

The rise of China can be seen since the launch of the Fourth Modernization program in 1978, and specifically in the late 1980s and 1990s. The rise of China has also become one of the major issues in the new dynamics of contemporary international relations.

There are of course many questions that can be raised in determining and assessing the scope, significance and implication of this development in the near future. Will China continue its peaceful rise and to what extent will this have any impact on the region?

Many countries have paid much attention to the rise of China and its possible impacts both at the regional and global levels.

The United States has particularly

 

expressed its concern

by saying

the rise

of China will "pose the greatest

 

uncertainty"

at the global level.

While

 

the Council of Foreign Relations has

stated that "China poses significant

 

economic, military and political

 

challenges for the U.S. and for the

 

nations of Southeast Asia".

 

Prof. Rommel C. Banlaoi’s Article

Napoleon Bonaparte once described China as a sleeping dragon and warned not to wake it up. Now that China has awakened, it causes many nations to tremble—including the United States, the sole global power and the world’s preeminent policeman.

The unprecedented rise of the People’s Republic of China (PRC) is a global reality. […] Because of the burgeoning economic and military power of China, there are enormous worries about the idea of a “China threat.”

The United States has particularly

The United States has particularly

expressed strong apprehensions

The United States has particularly expressed strong apprehensions

regarding the ascension of China. The US Commission on National Security/21st Century warns that “the potential for competition between the United States and China may increase as China grows stronger.” 4 Even the Global Trends 2015 prepared under the direction of the US National Intelligence Council argues that the

implications of

the rise of China “pose

the greatest uncertainty” in the

 

world

. 5 The Commission on America’s

National Interests describes China as “America’s major potential strategic

adversary in East Asia,” 6

while the

 

Council on Foreign Relations has stated

that “China poses significant economic,

military, and political challenges for the

United States and for the nations of

 

Southeast Asia.”

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This theme is

 

supported by a RAND study describing China as a potential military threat to the United States and Southeast Asia. 8

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Prof. Anak Agung Banyu Perwita’s Article

 

Prof. Rommel C. Banlaoi’s Article

The above statements clearly show that

While

the United States views China as

 

the U.S. perceives China as a potential

   

a potential threat to its national

threat to its national security. Further,

   

security, how do Southeast Asian

the U.S. is very concerned about the possible challenge from China to its regional hegemony. However, is it correct that China is a potential threat to Southeast Asian countries?

9/11.

countries view the rise of China? What are the implications of the growth of China for regional security, especially in the aftermath of 9/11? This article aims to present Southeast Asian perspectives on the rise of China and its regional security implications since

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Prof. Anak Agung Banyu Perwita’s Article Taken individually, Southeast Asian countries have varying perceptions of
Prof. Anak Agung Banyu Perwita’s Article Taken individually, Southeast Asian countries have varying perceptions of

Prof. Anak Agung Banyu Perwita’s Article

Prof. Anak Agung Banyu Perwita’s Article Taken individually, Southeast Asian countries have varying perceptions of the
Prof. Anak Agung Banyu Perwita’s Article Taken individually, Southeast Asian countries have varying perceptions of the
Prof. Anak Agung Banyu Perwita’s Article Taken individually, Southeast Asian countries have varying perceptions of the
Prof. Anak Agung Banyu Perwita’s Article Taken individually, Southeast Asian countries have varying perceptions of the
Prof. Anak Agung Banyu Perwita’s Article Taken individually, Southeast Asian countries have varying perceptions of the
Prof. Anak Agung Banyu Perwita’s Article Taken individually, Southeast Asian countries have varying perceptions of the
Prof. Anak Agung Banyu Perwita’s Article Taken individually, Southeast Asian countries have varying perceptions of the

Taken individually, Southeast Asian

countries have varying perceptions of
countries have varying perceptions of

countries have varying perceptions of

countries have varying perceptions of
countries have varying perceptions of

the possibility of China as a threat in

the region.

of the possibility of China as a threat in the region. Yet, China still has existing

Yet, China still has existing

territorial disputes with several countries in the region, namely Brunei Darussalam, Malaysia, the Philippines and Vietnam over the South China Sea. China also has overlapping territorial claims with Indonesia in the Natuna

 

The South China Sea disputes

 

continue to serve as a potential major

flash-point in China-Southeast Asian

   
 
 

However, Southeast Asian countries,

taken as a whole, perceive the rise of

China as a great opportunity rather

 

than as a serious threat.

 

relations, China and ASEAN can become "partners in competition".

 

There is also a widespread perception

in the region that "China will be the

 

new engine of growth for the entire

 

Trade between ASEAN

In economic

countries and China will be more significant and it will see ASEAN trade more with China than with the U.S. or the EU. In other words, Southeast Asia will become more dependent on China.

Prof. Rommel C. Banlaoi’s Article

Southeast Asian Perspectives

Rommel C. Banlaoi’s Article Southeast Asian Perspectives Taken individually, Southeast Asian countries have varying
Taken individually, Southeast Asian countries have varying perspectives on the many ramifications of strategic issues
Taken individually, Southeast Asian
countries have varying perspectives on
the many ramifications of strategic
issues in the region.
9 Unlike some
Western countries,
however, Southeast
Asian nations, taken as a whole,
consider the rise of China as a great
opportunity, with concomitant security
challenges,
rather than as a serious
threat.
From an economic standpoint,
Rodolfo Severino, former Secretary
General of the Association of Southeast
Asian Nations (ASEAN), candidly
describes China and ASEAN as
“partners in competition.” 10
There is
also a widespread perception in
Southeast Asia that “China will be the
new engine of growth for the entire
region
.” 11 In a report submitted by the
ASEAN-China Expert Group on
Economic Cooperation in October
2001, Southeast Asia optimistically
views China as an economic
opportunity. The Expert Group has, in
fact, proposed the forging of closer
ASEAN-China economic relations in
the 21st century to integrate their
economies. 12 […]
China has existing territorial disputes
with a few countries in Southeast Asia,
namely Brunei, Malaysia, the
Philippines, and Vietnam. […]
The
South China Sea disputes continue to
serve as major irritants in China-
Southeast Asia relations.
[…]

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Prof. Anak Agung Banyu Perwita’s Article Dr. Aileen San Pablo- Baviera’s Article There are of
Prof. Anak Agung Banyu
Perwita’s Article
Dr. Aileen San Pablo-
Baviera’s Article
There are of course some options that
ASEAN has in dealing with China. In
short, ASEAN must take some issues
into consideration in further engaging
China in the region, as follows:
Off-hand, some premises and pointers
we may wish to consider are the
following:
(1)
Southeast Asia
, the Philippines
Southeast Asia must learn to see China
included,
must learn to see China as a
as a rich source of opportunity rather
rich source of opportunity rather than
than merely as a potential threat.
One
merely as a potential threat;
of the possible opportunities is to boost
the level of defense cooperation with
China. This was quite obviously the
main topic of discussion during the
recent visit of China's defense minister
to Indonesia.
(2)
There is a need to create a stable
balance in the Asia-Pacific region
no
longer a balance of power in the
traditional sense, but a balance of
legitimate interests more in keeping
with the realities of interdependence;
There is also a need to create a stable
balance in the Asia-Pacific region. This
(3) China must be comprehensively
is no longer a balance of power in the
engaged, not militarily but in
traditional sense, but a balance of
diplomatic, political, economic,
legitimate interests more in keeping
functional, social, cultural intercourse;
with realities of interdependence.
and not just by the United States, but
China must be comprehensively
more importantly by those of us who
engaged, not militarily but in
live close by;
diplomatic, political, economic,
functional, social, cultural intercourse;
and not just by the U.S., but more
importantly by Southeast Asian
countries.
The creation of a new post-Cold War
architecture or arrangements for
(4) China's "big-power" mentality -- its
"Middle Kingdom" complex -- must be
neutralized, and China must be made
sensitive to the effects, intended or
otherwise, of its size and growing power
on other countries of the region;
international, economic and political
relations must involve China, without
necessarily revolving around it.
By engaging China in many aspects of
regional cooperation, we can at least be
sure that we can reduce the level of
uncertainty in the region, which can be
useful for further regional cooperation
in this new era of international
relations.
(5) It is to the benefit of all that China
should develop an even greater stake in
the security and prosperity of its
neighbors and potential adversaries;
and
(6)
The creation of a new post-Cold
War architecture or arrangements for
international economic and political
relations must involve China, without
necessarily revolving around it.

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Acknowledgment

Compiler:

Kompasianer Hireka Eric

Informants:

Kompasianer Limantina Sihaloho Kompasianer Nora Hanindita

This report is copyleft, anyway…

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