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The Bosch Program for industrial applications

Have we succeeded in arousing your curiosity? Simply get into contact with us using the Fax form on the inside of the cover. You will hear from us promptly.

on the inside of the cover. You will hear from us promptly. Sensors for angles, rotation

Sensors for angles, rotation rate, speed, pressure, air-mass flow rate, oxygen, temperature, structure-borne sound

flow rate, oxygen, temperature, structure-borne sound Part number: 1 987 721 555 Part number: 1 987

Part number: 1 987 721 555

structure-borne sound Part number: 1 987 721 555 Part number: 1 987 721 021 Sensors 2009

Part number: 1 987 721 021

Sensors 2009 | 2010 Sensors
Sensors
2009 | 2010
Sensors
555 Part number: 1 987 721 021 Sensors 2009 | 2010 Sensors 2009 | 2010 A

2009 | 2010

A 1 987 721 021/200812 www.bosch.de/aa AA/MKV2 – 12.2008 – en © 2008 Robert Bosch
A 1 987 721 021/200812
www.bosch.de/aa
AA/MKV2 – 12.2008 – en
© 2008 Robert Bosch GmbH
Automotive Aftermarket
Postfach 41 09 60
76225 Karlsruhe
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Editoral closing: 30.09.2008
Subject to change without
notice! Please direct questions
and comments to our
Authorized Representative in
your country. This edition
supersedes all previous
editions.
4 047023 038838

Sensors – the vehicle’s “Sensory System”

Vehicle electronics are constantly gaining in significance. Here, sensors are the vehicle’s “sensory system” for travel, angle, speed, velocity, acceleration, vibration, pressure, flow rate, gas con- centration, temperature and other influencing variables. Their signals have, in the meantime, become indispensable for many con- trol and regulating functions of the various management systems for engine and vehicle control, safety and comfort. Electronic data processing has ultimately made it possible to evaluate the stated influencing variables faster, and to condition them for the required vehicle functions.

These sensors, which have demonstrated their value in millions of vehicles covering numerous kilometers under rough vehicle service conditions, also harbor a tremendous potential for industrial applications. Particularly in those areas dependent on high reliab- ility, and where low prices can be achieved through high-volume production.

The areas in which they can be used are almost limitless: wherever tests, closed and open-loop controls, and monitoring are required; wherever computers have to be “fed” with physical data, or even simply wherever automatic switch-on of the heating is required in the cold or of the air conditioner when temperatures climb. Constant further development and refinement of the sensors by Bosch, including their miniaturization, means that Bosch is well equipped for tomorrow’s challenges and is able to actively participate in shaping state-of-the-art technology.

actively participate in shaping state-of-the-art technology. Our philosophy Our philosophy With the quality, value for

Our philosophy

Our philosophy With the quality, value for money and function of our products, we wish to set standards and capture a peak position in the market. By working towards economical solutions, we reinforce our innovative strength and thus our future. For our customers, we are an active, receptive partner who is aware of their goals and gives complete satisfaction. We react rapidly and flexibly to the requirements of our customers and colleagues. We accomplish our agreed tasks creatively, with the emphasis on quality and on the protection of the environment.

Our staff We prefer target-oriented team-work, and treat problems as an opportunity for continual improvement. All management personnel delegate responsibility and support their workers by stipulating clear targets and by the appropriate control of resources. They set an example in putting our philosophy into practice.

Our organization Bosch is never far from its clients. We are close to vehicle manu- facturers, working in close cooperation with them in the devel- opment of new solutions. But we are also close to the users of sensors, who can enjoy competent service all over the world from nearly 10,000 Bosch Service Agents. Bosch has agents in 130 coun- tries. In our international alliance, we develop and produce sensors in Europe, the USA and Asia.

Our technology From drafting through design to production, we use the latest techniques and facilities, such as process control and 100 % testing of all parameters which are relevant for correct function.

Our contribution to environmental protection Our sensors are made from materials which can be recycled, which, thanks to thermal and magnetic separation processes, can be reintroduced into the material cycle. We use re-cyclable cardboard packaging containing a high proportion of recycled paper, or, on request, reusable packaging.

2009 | 2010

Yaw sensors

Angular-position sensors
8

Air-mass meters

Acceleration sensors

Rotational-speed sensors
26

NTC temperature sensors: -40° to 150°C

Lambda sensors

Pressure sensors

194
198

178
186
190

166
170

142

146

48
52

38

32

84

54
60

68
72

20

10

16

3
6

Yaw sensor (Gyrometer) Yaw sensor with CAN interface

Differential pressure sensor Absolute pressure sensor Absolute-pressure sensor in atmosphere High-pressure sensor

Inductive speed sensor Passive speed sensor Hall speed sensor Active speed sensor

Angle sensor

Techniques and applications CAN-Bus

Type LSU 4.9 Type LSU 4.X Type LSU 1

Steering-angle sensor

Piezoelectric acceleration sensor Surface micromechanical acceleration sensor Piezoelectric vibration sensor Signal evaluation for vibration sensors

We reserve the right to make technical changes.

Measurement of air temperatures Measurement of liquid temperatures

Hot-film air mass meter, type HFM 5 Hot-film air mass meter, type HFM 6

Content

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Hot-film air mass meter, type HFM 5 Hot-film air mass meter, type HFM 6 Content Bosch

2

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Electronic Catalogue for Automotive Parts

| Sensors

2009 | 2010

1 987 720 014 Easy and quick access to vehicle application data from Bosch in
1 987 720 014
Easy and quick access to vehicle application data from Bosch in 18 languages.

This catalog features the most important technical data required for selecting a given sensor. To date, the sensors listed have all been used in automotive applications, but their universal and highly versatile characte- ristics also make them ideally suitable for industrial applications. For instance in:

Techniques and applications

2009 | 2010

technology Installation and plant engineering

Manufacturing engineering Mechanical engineering Automation Materials handling and conveying Heating and air-conditioning Chemical and process engineering Environmental and conservation

Brief descriptions and examples of application are to be found in the Table

below.

For the applications listed below, prior clarification of the technical suitability is imperative. This Catalog only lists those products which are available from series manufacture. If your problem cannot be solved with this range of products, please inform of us of your requirements using the Enquiry Data Sheet.

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Sensors |

3

 

Air-mass meters measure the flow rate of gases.

Lambda oxygen sensors determine the residual oxygen content in the exhaust gas.

the temperatures of liquids in the temparature range of the earth’s atmosphere and of water.

Temperature sensors measure the temperature of gaseous materials and, inside a suitable housing,

Differential-pressure sensors measure differential gas pressures, e.g. for pressure- compensation purposes.

Absolute-pressure sensors measure the pressure ranges from about 50 % to 500 % of the earth’s atmospheric pressure.

Piezoelectric vibration sensors measure structure-borne vibrations which occur at engines, machines, and pivot bearings.

Yaw sensors measure skidding movements, such as occur in vehicles under road traffic conditions.

Piezoelectric acceleration sensors measure shocks and vibration which occur when vehicles and bodies impact against an obstacle.

Bending-beam acceleration sensors register shocks and vibration which are caused by impacts on rough/unpaved road surfaces or contact with kerbstones.

Spring-mass acceleration sensors measure changes in speed, such as are common in road traffic.

Rotational-speed sensors measure rotational speeds, positions and angles in excess of 360°.

Angular position sensors measure simple angular settings and changes in angle.

Sensors

Measurement of the mass of the air drawn in by the engine.

Control of A/F mixture for minimization of pollutant emissions on gasoline and gas engines.

Display of outside and inside temperature, control of air conditioners and inside temperature, control of radiators and thermostats, measurement of lube-oil, coolant, and engine temperatures.

Pressure measurement in the fuel tank, evaporative-emissions control systems.

Manifold vacuum measurement for engine manage- ment. Charge-air-pressure measurement for charge- air pressure control, altitude-pressure-dependent fuel injection for diesel engines.

Engine-knock detection for anti-knock control in engine-management systems.

Used on the vehicle dynamics control (Electronic Stability Program, ESP) for measuring yaw rate and lateral acceleration, and for vehicle navigation sensors.

 

Impact detection used for triggering airbags and belt tighteners.

For engine management, detection of vibration on rough/unpaved road surfaces.

(ABS) and the Traction Control System (TCS).

Registration of vehicular acceleration and deceleration. Used for the Antilock Braking System

Wheel-speed measurement for ABS/TCS, engine speeds, positioning angle for engine management,

measurement of steering-wheel angle, distance covered, and curves/bends for vehicle navigation systems.

Throttle-valve-angle measurement for engine management on gasoline (SI) engines.

Automotive application

and in combustion plant.

Flow-rate measurement for gases on test benches

Pollutants reduction during combustion, smoke measurement, gas analysis.

Thermometers, thermostats, thermal protection, frost detectors, air-conditioner control, temperature and central heating, refrigerant-temperature monitoring, regulation of hot-water and heat pumps.

Monitoring of over and underpressure. Pressure limiters, filled-level measurement.

air-pressure, altitude, blood pressure, manometers, storm-warning devices.

Pressure control in electronic vacuum cleaners, monitoring of pneumatic production lines, meters for

Machine-tool safety, cavitation detection, pivot- bearing monitoring, structure-borne-noise detection in measurement systems.

Stabilization of model vehicles and airplanes, safety circuits in carousels and other entertainment devices on fairgrounds etc.

harvesters, filling machines, and sorting plants. Registration of score during rifleman competitions.

Detection of impact in monitoring/surveillance installations, detection of foreign bodies in combine

Forced switch-off for machines, industrial robots, manufacturing plant, and gaming machines in case of sudden acceleration or deceleration caused by shock or impact.

Acceleration and deceleration measurement for safety, control, protective systems in lifts, cable railways, fork-lift trucks, conveyor belts, machines, wind power stations.

speed, displacement and angular measurement, definition of end and limit settings for industrial machines, robots, and installations of all types.

Proximity or non-contact measurement of rotational

Door/window opening angle, setting-lever angles in monitoring and control installations.

Examples of non-automotive applications

IP degres of protection Valid for the electrical equipment of road vehicles as per DIN 40 050 (Part 9). Protection of the electrical equipment inside the enclosure against the effects of solid foreign objects including dust. Protection of the electrical equipment inside the enclosure against the ingress of water. Protection of persons against contact with dangerous parts, and rotating parts, inside the enclosure.

4

2) During the water test. Example: IP16KB protection against the ingress of solid foreign bodies with diameter 50 mm,

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

protection against high-pressure hose water, protection against access with a finger.

| Sensors

2009 | 2010

against access with a finger. | Sensors 2009 | 2010 9 6 Structure of the IP
9 6 Structure of the IP code IP 2 3 C M n 1) n
9
6
Structure of the IP code
IP
2
3
C
M
n 1)
n 2)
Code letters
First characteristic numeral
0
or letter X
Second characteristic numeral
0
or letter X
Additional letter (optional)
A, B, C, D
Supplementary letter (optional)
M, S
K
1)
If a characteristic numeral is not given, it must be superseded by the letter “X” (i. e. “XX” if both characteristic numerals are not given).
The supplementary and/or additional letters can be omitted at will, and need not be superseded by other letters.
1) The supplementary letter “K” is located either directly after the first characteristic numerals 5 and 6,
or directly after the second characteristic numerals 4, 6 and 9.

Comments IP code

2009 | 2010

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Sensors |

5

         

6K

5K

 

4

 

3

 

2

 

1

0

K

letter

plementary

and sup-

numeral

teristic

1st charac-

Dust-proof

Dust-protected

Ø

foreign bodies

Protection against

Ø

foreign bodies

Protection against

Ø

foreign bodies

Protection against

Ø

foreign bodies

Protection against

Non-protected

 

foreign objects

ingress of solid

ment against

electrical equip-

Protection of

≥ 1.0 mm

≥ 2.5 mm

≥ 12.5 mm

≥ 50 mm

Protection against contact with wire

Protection against contact with wire

Protection against contact with wire

Protection against contact with tool

Protection against contact with finger

Protection against contact with back of hand

Non-protected

 

Persons

 

9K

 

9

 

7

 

6K

6

5

4K

 

4

 

3

 

2

 

1

0

K

letter

plementary

and sup-

numeral

teristic

2nd charac-

steam-jet cleaners

high-pressure/

Protection against

sion

continuous immer-

Protection against

sion

temporary immer-

Protection against

of water

high-pressure jets

Protection against

Protection against powerful jets of water

Protection against jets of water

Protection against high- pressure spray water

 

spray water

Protection against

 

splash water

Protection against

Protection against dripping water (at an angle of 15°)

water

vertically dripping

Protection against

Non-protected

 

Protection of elec- trical equipment against the ingress of water

                 

D

 

C

 

B

A

 

(optional)

letter

Additional

 

Protection against contact with wire

 

Protection against contact with tool

 

contact with finger

Protection against

Protection against contact with back of hand

 

hazardous parts

contact with

persons against

Protection of

                   

K

 

S

M

 

(optional)

letter

Additional

equipment of road vehicles

For the electrical

stationary 2)

Movable parts of the equipment are

Movable parts of the equipment are in motion 2)

 

Applications There are four areas of application for CAN in the motor vehicle, each with its own individual requirements:

Real-time applications Real-time applications, in which electrical systems such as Motronic, transmission-shift control, electronic stability-control systems are networked with one another, are used to control vehicle dynamics. Typical data transmission rates range from 125 kbit/s to 1 Mbit/s (high-speed CAN) in order to be able to guarantee the real- time characteristics demanded.

Present-day motor vehicles are equipped with a large number of electronic control units (ECUs) which have to exchange large volumes of data with one another in order to perform their various functions. The con- ventional method of doing so by using dedi-

Diagnostic applications Diagnostic applications for CAN aim to make use of existing networking for the diagnosis of the ECUs incorporated in the network. The use of the “K” line (ISO 9141), which is currently the normal practice, is then no longer necessary. The data rate envisaged is 500 kbit/s.

Multiplex applications Multiplex applications are suitable for situations requiring control and regulation of body-compo- nent and luxury/convenience systems such as air conditioning, central locking and seat adjust- ment. Typical data transmission rates are be- tween 10 kbits and 125 kbit/s (low-speed CAN).

Mobile-communications applications Mobile-communications applications connect components such as the navigation system, cellular phone or audio system with central displays and controls. The basic aim is to standardize control operations and to condense status information so as to minimize driver dis- traction. Data transmission rates are generally below 125 kbit/s; whereby direct transmission of audio or video data is not possible.

6

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

CAN-Bus Controller Area Network

| Sensors

Content-based addressing Addressing is message-based when using CAN. This involves assigning a fixed identifier to each message. The identifier classifies the content of the message (e.g., engine speed). Each station processes only those messages whose identi- fiers are stored in its acceptance list (message filtering, Fig. 2). Thus CAN requires no station addresses for data transmission, and the nodes are not involved in administering system configu- ration. This facilitates adaptation to variations in equipment levels.

Priority assignments The identifier labels both the data content and the priority of the message being sent. Identifiers corresponding to low binary numbers enjoy a high priority and vice versa.

The bits are either “recessive” (logical 1) or “dominant” (logical 0). When at least one station transmits a dominant bit, then the recessive bits simultaneously sent from other stations are overwritten.

Bus configuration CAN operates according to the multimaster prin- ciple, in which a linear bus structure connects several ECUs of equal priority rating (Fig. 1). The advantage of this type of structure lies in the fact that a malfunction at one node does not im- pair bus-system access for the remaining devices. Thus the probability of a total system failure is substantially lower than with other logical archi- tectures (such as ring or active star structures). When a ring or active star structure is employed, failure at a single node or at the CPU is sufficient to cause a total failure.

Logical bus states The CAN protocol is based on two logical states:

cated data lines for each link is now reaching the limits of its capabilities. On the one hand, it makes the wiring harnesses so com- plex that they become unmanageable, and on the other the finite number of pins on the connectors becomes the limiting factor

When several stations start to transmit simul-

with the sole distinction being in the length of

“Start of frame” indicates the beginning of a message and synchronizes all stations. “Arbitration field” consists of the message’s identifier and an additional control bit. While this field is being transmitted, the transmitter accompanies the transmission of each bit with a check to ensure that no higher-priority message is being trans- mitted (which would cancel the access autho- rization). The control bit determines whether the message is classified under “data frame” or “remote frame”. “Control field” enthält den Code für die Anzahl der Datenbytes im „Data Field“. “Data field’s” information content comprises between 0 and 8 bytes. A message of data length 0 can be used to synchronize distributed processes. “CRC field” (Cyclic Redundancy Check) contains the check word for detecting possible transmission inter- ference. “Ack field” contains the acknowledgement signals with which all receivers indicate receipt of non- corrupted messages. “End of frame” marks the end of the message.

the highest priority is assigned first access, with-

to failure to gain bus access by automatically

taneously, the system responds by employing

transmission attempt as soon as the bus is free

the identifier (ID). The standard-format ID is

tains a maximum of 130 bits in standard format, or 150 bits in the extended format. This ensures miminal waiting time until the subsequent trans- mission (which could be urgent). The data frame consists of seven consecutive bit fields (Fig. 3):

switching to receive mode; they then repeat the

for ECU development. The solution is to be found in the use of specialized, vehicle-com- patible serial bus systems among which the CAN has established itself as the standard.

contentions over bus access. The message with

out any bit loss or delay. Transmitters respond

again.

29

CAN supports two different data-frame formats,

“Wired-AND” arbitration to sort out the resulting

Bus access Each station can begin transmitting its most im-

Message format

portant data as soon as the bus is unoccupied.

11

bits, while the extended version consists of bits. Thus the transmission data frame con-

2009 | 2010

Transmitter initiative The transmitter will usually initiate a data transfer by sending a data frame. However, the receiver can also request data from the trans- mitter. This involves the receiver sending out a “remote frame”. The “data frame” and the corresponding “remote frame” have the same identifier. They are distinguished from one another by means of the bit that follows the identifier.

Error handling When a CAN controller detects an error, it aborts the current transmission by sending an “error flag”. An error flag consists of 6 dominant bits; it functions by deliberately violating the conven- tions governing stuffing and/or formats.

Error detection CAN incorporates a number of monitoring features for detecting errors. These include:

15 Bit CRC (Cyclic Redundancy Check): Each

transmitted and scanned bit. Bit stufng: Between start of frame and

receiver compares the CRC sequence which it receives with the calculated sequence. Monitoring: Each transmitter compares

transmitter follows up a sequence of 5 bits of the same polarity by inserting a bit of the opposite polarity in the bit stream; the re- ceivers eliminate these bits as the messages arrive. Frame check: The CAN protocol contains

2009 | 2010

the end of the “CRC field”, each “data frame” or “remote frame” may contain a maximum of 5 consecutive bits of the same polarity. The

several bit fields with a fixed format for verifi-

cation by all stations.

Implementations In order to provide the proper CPU support for a wide range of different requirements, the semi- conductor manufacturers have introduced imple- mentations representing a broad range of per- formance levels. The various implementations differ neither in the message they produce, nor in their arrangements for responding to errors. The difference lies solely in the type of CPU support required for message administration. As the demands placed on the ECU’s processing capacity are extensive, the interface controller should be able to administer a large number of messages and expedite data communications

Fault confinement with local failure Defective stations can severely impair the ability to process bus traffic. Therefore, the CAN con- trollers incorporate mechanisms which can distinguish between intermittent and permanent errors and local station failures. This process is based on statistical evaluation of error con- ditions.

Standardization CANs for data exchange in automotive applica- tions have been standardized both by the ISO and the SAE – in ISO 11519-2 for low-speed applications ≤ 125 kbit/s and in ISO 11898 and SAE J 22584 (cars) and SAE J 1939 (trucks and busses) for high-speed applications >125 kbit/s. There is also an ISO standard for diagnosis via CAN (ISO 15765 – Draft) in the course of pre- paration.

with, as far as possible, no demands on the CPU’s computational resources. Powerful CAN controllers are generally used in this type of ap- plication. The demands placed on the controllers by multiplex systems and present-day mobile communications are more modest. For that reason, more basic and less expensive chips are preferred for such uses.

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Sensors |

7

for such uses. Bosch Automotive Aftermarket Sensors | 7 Further information on sensors in the vehicle

Further information on sensors in the vehicle can be taken from the Bosch Yellow Jacket publication “Automotive Sensors”.

Source: Texts and illustra- tions on the subject of CAN-Bus are taken from the Bosch Automotive Hand- book, 7th Edition, 2007. The Automotive Handbook contains a very wide variety of information covering the whole range of modern- day automotive engineering.

1 Linear bus structure Transmission Engine 2 shift control management Station 1 Station CAN ABS/TCS/ESP
1 Linear bus structure
Transmission
Engine 2
shift
control
management
Station
1
Station
CAN
ABS/TCS/ESP
Instrument
cluster
Station
3
Station
4
2 Message fittering CAN 1 CAN 2 CAN 3 CAN 4 Station Station Station Station
2 Message fittering
CAN 1
CAN 2
CAN 3
CAN 4
Station
Station
Station
Station
Make
Accept
Accept
ready
Send
Selection
Selection
Selection
message
Reception
Reception
Reception
Bus

3 Message format

Start of Frame Arbitration Field Control Field Data Field CRC Field ACK Field End of
Start of Frame
Arbitration Field
Control Field
Data Field
CRC Field
ACK Field
End of
Frame
Inter
Frame
Space
1
IDLEIDLE
1*
12*
6*
0
16*
2*
7*
3*
0
Data Frame
Message Frame
64*

Application

The steering column drives two measurement gears by way of a gear wheel. Magnets are incorporated into the measurement gears. AMR elements, the resistance of which changes as a function of the magnetic field direction, detect the angular position of the magnets. The analog measured values are supplied to the microprocessor via an A/D converter. The measurement gears have different numbers of teeth and their rotational position thus changes at differ- ent rates. The total steering angle can be calculated by combining the two current angles. After several turns of the steering wheel, the two measurement gears have returned to their original positions. This measurement principle can therefore be used to cover a measuring range of several turns of the steering wheel without the need for a revolution counter. The steer- ing angle is output as an absolute value over the total angle range (turning range) of the steering column. A special feature of the sensor is the correct angle output immediately after switching on the ignition without moving the steering wheel (True Power On). Steering angle and velocity are output via CAN.

8 | Angular-position sensors

The steering-angle sensor was developed for use in electronic stability programs (ESP). Integrated plausibility checks and special self-diagnosis functions make the steering-wheel angle sensor suitable for use in safety systems.

Steering-angle sensor Measurement of angles from -780° to +780°

True Power on function Multiturn capability CAN interface

Design and operation

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Using the standardized CAN bus, the steering wheel angle information can be utilized, for example for chassis control, navigation and electrical power-steering systems. Different types of mechanical connection and electrical interface versions are available on request.

4
5

3

6
7

2

1

Steering column AMR measurement cells Gear wheel with m teeth Evaluation electronics Magnets Gear wheel with n>m teeth Gear wheel with m+1 teeth

2009 | 2010

Output signal Characteristic curve Counterclockwise Clockwise 700° 0° -780° 0°700° -780° Steering-wheel
Output signal
Characteristic curve
Counterclockwise
Clockwise
700°
-780°
0°700°
-780°
Steering-wheel angle
700° 0° -780° 0°700° -780° Steering-wheel angle Design and operation 1 2 5 6 3 7
700° 0° -780° 0°700° -780° Steering-wheel angle Design and operation 1 2 5 6 3 7
Design and operation 1 2 5 6 3 7 4
Design and operation
1
2
5
6
3
7
4
Further areas of application Attachment options
Further areas of application
Attachment options
A B A Steering-column switch B Steering column
A
B
A
Steering-column switch
B
Steering column

X

Steering-angle sensor

2009 | 2010

H
P

Part number

Measurement of angles from -780° to +780°

Accessories are not included in the scope of delivery of the sensor and are therefore to be ordered separately as required.

Sensitivity and resolution over measuring range, steering-angle velocity

Other designs on request.

Steering-wheel angle velocity, maximum

Storage temperature

Sensitivity and resolution over measuring range, angle

Steering-wheel angle velocity, displayed

Supply-voltage range

Supply voltage

Current consumption at 12 V

Connector housing

Operating temperature

Contact pins

Measuring range, angle

Non-linearity over measuring range

Measuring range, steering-angle velocity

Hysteresis over measuring range

Retaining plate Space for mating connector and wiring harness Pin assignment

7-pin

For 0.5 - 0.7 mm ; Contents: 100 x

4 °/s

8

- 2,5

- 780

- 40

- 40

0

0

0,1 °

0

+ 2000 °/s

< 150 mA

12 V nominal

5 °

16 V

1016

1016

85

50

2,5 °

780 °

°/s

°/s

°C

°C

Angular-position sensors | 9

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

1 928 404 025

1 928 498 001

Accessories

AMR element AMR element converter A/D processor Micro- CAN- CAN-Bus Driver
AMR element AMR element
AMR
element
AMR
element

converter

A/D

processor

Micro-

CAN- CAN-Bus Driver
CAN-
CAN-Bus
Driver

Block diagram

Y

79 0 60 ø 8,3
79
0
60
ø 8,3
30,7 + 0,2 - 0,1 Y 49,1 22,7 35,1 8 14,3 6,7 H
30,7
+ 0,2
- 0,1
Y
49,1
22,7
35,1
8
14,3
6,7
H
84 79 1 2 3 7 4 5 6 X
84
79
1
2
3
7
4
5
6
X
ø 32,7 27 P ø 32,7 26 2,8 17,6
ø 32,7
27
P
ø 32,7
26
2,8
17,6

Dimensional drawing

+

+

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Pin 1 Ground Pin 5 – Pin 2
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Pin 1
Ground
Pin 5
Pin 2
12 V
Pin 6
Pin 3
CAN High
Pin 7
Pin 4
CAN Low
Part number
Dimensional drawing A 30,5 max. B M ø 34 A B M Distance between hub
Dimensional drawing
A
30,5 max.
B
M
ø 34
A
B
M
Distance between hub and holder
Distance between steering-angle sensor
and steering-column assembly flange
Fitting direction
Pin assignment
1
0,5
1,8
0,8
23

+

+

Technical data

0 265 005 411 Figure
0 265 005 411
Figure

Application

Angle sensor Measurement of angles up to 88°

vehicles to record the angle of rotation of

into the above-mentioned voltage ratio. The throttle-valve angular-position sensors have no return spring.

The throttle-valve angular-position sensor

with a linear characteristic curve. It is used

with fuel-injection engines to convert the

rotor with its special wipers connected to the throttle-valve shaft travels along cor- responding resistance tracks, with the position of the throttle valve being converted

the sensors are resistant to fuels, oils,

the throttle valve. They are exposed to

saline fog and industrial atmospheres.

Potentiometric angular-position sensors with linear characteristic curve. Sturdy design for exacting demands. Compact size.

extreme operating conditions, being attached

angle of rotation of the throttle valve into

a

directly to the throttle valve housing by

Sensors of this type are used in motor

Design and operation

in the engine compartment. To maintain

is

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

10 | Angular-position sensors

means of an extended throttle valve shaft

reliable operation under such conditions,

Operating voltage

Load

proportional voltage ratio. To do so, the

a potentiometric angular-position sensor

Output-voltage characteristic curve 2 Output-voltage characteristic curve 3

Output voltage Supply voltage

The throttle-valve angular-position sensor

curves. This permits a particularly high resolution

0

Explanation of characteristic quantities

in the angle range 0°

280 122 201 has two linear characteristic

Angle of rotation

V

5

Ohmic resistance

2009 | 2010

Technical data

23°.

Version The throttle-valve angular-position sensor 0 280 122 001 has one linear characteristic curve.
Version
The throttle-valve angular-position sensor
0
280 122 001 has one linear characteristic
curve.
data 23°. Version The throttle-valve angular-position sensor 0 280 122 001 has one linear characteristic curve.

Angle sensor Measurement of angles up to 88°

2009 | 2010

Part number

Voltage ratio from stop to stop -

Accessories are not included in the scope of delivery of the sensor and are therefore to be ordered separately as required.

Approximate value for permissible

Angle between internal stops (must not be reached when fitted)

vibration acceleration

Total resistance (term. 1-2)

Wiper protective resistor (wiper in zero position, term. 2-3)

characteristic curve 1

Service life (rotary cycles)

Slope of nominal characteristic curve

Operating temperature

Connector

Useful electrical angle range

Useful mechanical angle range

Permissible wiper current

Direction of rotation

A

deg

degrees

degrees

degrees

m/s

Mill.

k

700

18

86

86

95

Any

- 40 °C

0,00927

0,04 / 0,96

2

2 20 %

710

1380

130 °C

Useful electrical angle range

A
L

T

N

Internal stop Positional tolerance of wiper when attached Nominal characteristic curve Tolerance limits

Angular-position sensors | 11

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

1 237 000 039

Accessories

Part number

Circuit diagram 1 3 2 1 ( - )( + )
Circuit diagram 1
3
2
1
( - )(
+ )
Part number Circuit diagram 1 3 2 1 ( - )( + ) 3 2 (

3

2

( + )

1

3 2 ( + ) 1 ( - )
( - )
( - )

Circuit diagram 2

2 1 ( - )( + ) 3 2 ( + ) 1 ( - )

Characteristic curve

+

Technical data

0 280 122 001 Figure
0 280 122 001
Figure

Angle sensor

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

12 | Angular-position sensors

Measurement of angles up to 88°

A
B

Ö

C
D
E

Plug connection O-ring 14.65 x 2 mm Attachment dimensions for throttle-valve housing Clockwise Anti-clockwise Throttle-valve opening direction

2009 | 2010

Dimensional drawing A A 2 31 4,5 5 55 68 11 13 35 16 4,6
Dimensional drawing
A A
2 31
4,5
5
55
68
11
13
35
16
4,6
2
C
B B
M4
M4
0,5 x 45°
2,3
24,530,5
13
13,5
Ø 15,1
Ø 8
55
30,5
16
min.Ø 21
6
Ø 15,1
-
9,7
ED
35
38
2
2
176°
Ö
Ö
6,5R
90°
13 13,5 Ø 15,1 Ø 8 55 30,5 16 min.Ø 21 6 Ø 15,1 - 9,7

Angle sensor Measurement of angles up to 88°

2009 | 2010

Part number

Voltage ratio in range 0 characteristic curve 2

Voltage ratio in range 0 characteristic curve 3

Accessories are not included in the scope of delivery of the sensor and are therefore to be ordered separately as required.

Approximate value for permissible

vibration acceleration

Service life (rotary cycles)

Connector housing

Connector housing

Operating temperature

Useful electrical angle range

Useful mechanical angle range

Protective cap

Direction of rotation

Permissible wiper current

°C -

°C -

A

degrees

degrees

m/s

Mill.

Quantity required: 1 x; Contents: 5 x

Quantity required: 4 x; Contents: 5 x

88

92

20

300

Anti-clockwise

- 40 °C

0,05 / 0,985

0,05 / 0,970

1,2

85 °C

Angular-position sensors | 13

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

1 284 485 118

1 280 703 023

1 284 477 121

Accessories

Part number

Circuit diagram ( ) S 3 2 ( ) S 1 1 4 2 Throttle
Circuit diagram
(
)
S 3 2
(
)
S 1 1
4
2
Throttle valve in idle position
) S 3 2 ( ) S 1 1 4 2 Throttle valve in idle position
Characteristic curve 1 and 2 A Internal stop Useful electrical angle range
Characteristic curve 1 and 2
A
Internal stop
Useful electrical angle range

+

88

88

Technical data

0 280 122 201 Figure
0 280 122 201
Figure

Angle sensor

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

14 | Angular-position sensors

Measurement of angles up to 88°

Ö
L

G
H
I

F

K

O-ring 16.5 x 2.5 mm 2 ribs, 2.5 mm thick Plug connection Blade terminal This installation position is only permissible if throttle-valve shaft is sealed against oil, gasoline etc. Throtle-valve opening direction Attachment dimensions for throttle-valve potentiometer

2009 | 2010

Dimensional drawing 85 70 10,5 4321 F 90° G 4,8 7 K 22 67 39
Dimensional drawing
85
70
10,5
4321
F
90°
G
4,8
7
K
22
67
39
7,5
M4
H
X
2,5
1 x45°
4
M4
I
4,5
Ø 21
h10
Ø 8
14°
Ø 20,5
1
L
20
Ø 21D10
59
54
70
7,5
X
Ø 25 min.
8,5
Ö
R4
30°
4 M4 I 4,5 Ø 21 7° h10 Ø 8 14° Ø 20,5 1 L 20

2009 | 2010

Notes

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Notes

|

15

Yaw sensor with micromechanical acceleration sensor

Application

The sensor is used in the electronic stability program (ESP) on motor vehicles to measure the vehicle rotation about its vertical axis whilst at the same time determining the acceleration at right angles to the direction of travel. Electronic evaluation of the meas- ured values thus enables the ESP system to distinguish between cornering and skid- ding.

The entire unit consists of a yaw sensor and an acceleration sensor, as well as evaluation electronics. The components are mounted on a hybrid and hermetically sealed in a metal housing.

Flexible and cost-effective sensor cluster with highly integrated electronics. Modular concept for different integration stages. Multiple use of sensor signals for future highly dynamic safety and convenience systems. Optimized monitoring and safety concept.

Design

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

16 | Yaw sensors

Two oscillatory masses are provided with printed conductors carrying an alternating current. As the two masses are in a con- stant magnetic field, they are subject to a (Lorentz) force which causes the masses to oscillate. Additional Coriolis forces act on the masses if rotary motion is applied. The resultant Coriolis acceleration is a measure of the yaw rate. The linear accel- eration values are recorded by a separate sensor element.


;



Explanation of characteristic quantities

Installation close to center of gravity. Max. reference axis deviation at right angles to direction of motion 3°. Tightening torque for bolts 6 +2/-1 Nm. Vibrations at installation location.

Yaw rate Acceleration due to gravity 9.8065 m/s Linear (lateral) acceleration

2009 | 2010

Principle of operation Installation instructions
Principle of operation
Installation instructions
due to gravity 9.8065 m/s Linear (lateral) acceleration 2009 | 2010 Principle of operation Installation instructions

Yaw sensor


:

:

2009 | 2010

with micromechanical acceleration sensor

Coriolis acceleration Oscillation speed Angular velocity = 2 x Deviation of axis to reference surface

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Yaw sensors | 17

a c Principle of operation a c a c V a c V t1 m
a
c
Principle of operation
a
c
a
c
V
a c
V t1
m
V t2
V
Principle of operation a c a c V a c V t1 m V t2 V
Block diagram 1. Coriolis C Acceleration U Test + Sens. Offset DRS-OUT Adjust Adjust 2.
Block diagram
1. Coriolis
C
Acceleration
U
Test
+
Sens.
Offset
DRS-OUT
Adjust
Adjust
2. Coriolis
C
Acceleration
U
Oscilator
Oscilator
PLL
REF-OUT
Loop
Yaw Sensor
Acceleration C USensor
Sens.
Low
Pass
Offset
V DD
LIN-OUT
Adjust
Filter
Adjust
GND
Evaluation Circuit
Sensor Acceleration C USensor Sens. Low Pass Offset V DD LIN-OUT Adjust Filter Adjust GND Evaluation

Yaw sensor with micromechanical acceleration sensor

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

18 | Yaw sensors

Part number

Yaw sensor/type Maximum yaw rate about axis of rotation (Z-axis) Minimum resolution Sensitivity Change in sensitivity Yaw-rate offset Change in offset Non-linearity, max. deviation from optimum linear approximation Start-up time Dynamics Electrical noise (measured with 100 Hz bandwidth) Maximum acceleration Sensitivity Change in sensitivity Offset Change in offset Non-linearity, max. deviation from optimum linear approximation Start-up time Dynamics Electrical noise (measured with 100 Hz bandwidth)

Accessories )

) Zero point at 2.5 V (reference).

General information Operating-temperature range Storage-temperature range Supply voltage Supply-voltage range Current consumption at 12 V Reference voltage

Seals

Contact pins

Connector housing

Available from

are not

Tyco included

Electronics.

in the scope of delivery of the sensor and are therefore to be ordered separately as required.

Quantity required: 1 x For 0.75 mm ; Quantity required: 6 x

For 1.4

mm ; Quantity required: 6 x

DRS-MM 1.0R 100 °/s 0,2 °/s 18 mV/°/s 5 % 2 °/s ) 4 °/s 1 % FSO 1 s

1,8

5 m

1000 mV/ 5 % 0 )

30 Hz

0,06

3 % FSO

1,0 s

5

30 Hz

8,2

- 30

- 20

< 70 mA 2,5 V 50 mV )

12 V nominal

16 V

85 °C

50 °C

Tyco number

Tyco number

Tyco number

1-967 616-1 ) 965 907-1 ) 965 907-1 )

2009 | 2010

1.9

Accessories

Part number

+

+

V

5.0 4.35 V 4.0 3.0 2.0 1.0 0.65 V 0.0 -100 +100 Yaw rate Output
5.0
4.35 V
4.0
3.0
2.0
1.0
0.65 V
0.0
-100
+100
Yaw rate
Output voltage U A

Technical data

0 265 005 258 Figure Characteristic curve
0 265 005 258
Figure
Characteristic curve
2.0 1.0 0.65 V 0.0 -100 +100 Yaw rate Output voltage U A Technical data 0

Yaw sensor

2009 | 2010

with micromechanical acceleration sensor

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Yaw sensors | 19

Dimensional drawing F 42,6 A S A-A A 80,2 35,1 Rf Ra 62 33,1 6,1
Dimensional drawing
F
42,6
A
S
A-A
A
80,2
35,1
Rf
Ra
62
33,1
6,1
35
12
33
79,6
83,6
F
S
Ra
Rf
Direction of travel
6-pin connector
Reference axis
Reference surface
Acceleration direction
Pin assignment 54 6 31 2 Pin 1 Reference Pin 2 BITE Pin 3 12
Pin assignment
54
6
31
2
Pin 1 Reference
Pin 2
BITE
Pin 3
12 V
Pin 4 Out DRS
Pin 5
Out BS
Pin 6 Ground

Yaw sensor with CAN interface with micromechanical acceleration sensor

Application

The sensor cluster uses a new generation of micromechanical elements for the measurement and digital processing of angular velocity and acceleration. Based on PCB technology, they form a modular hardware and software concept with many new safety features providing a versatile and reliable solution for a wide variety of motor-vehicle applications.

The introduction of the ESP system, the link with other chassis convenience systems and the development of advanced vehicle stabilization systems gave rise to the need for inertial signals to meet with exacting demands, particularly in terms of signal quality and stability, as well as additional measurement axes with a high degree of reliability. Bosch therefore developed a third generation, the versatile and inexpen- sive sensor cluster DRS MM3.x to meet the requirements of functions such as the hill- starting assistant, automatic parking brake, adaptive cruise and distance control, four- wheel drive, rollover intervention, electronic active steering and spring-damper control systems. DRS-MM3.7k is the basic version of the MM3 generation for ESP applications. It comprises a yaw sensor and an integrated lateral acceleration module.

Flexible and cost-effective sensor cluster with highly integrated electronics. Modular concept for different integration stages. Multiple use of sensor signals for future highly dynamic safety and convenience systems. Optimised monitoring and safety concept.

20 | Yaw sensors

Design

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

2009 | 2010

Principle of operation Explanation of characteristic quantities The new micromechanical element for yaw-rate
Principle of operation
Explanation of characteristic quantities
The new micromechanical element for
yaw-rate measurement is a member of the
established group of vibrating gyrometers
operating on the Coriolis principle (CVG
= Coriolis Vibrating Gyros). It consists of
an inverse tuning fork with two mutually
perpendicular linear vibration modes, drive
circuit and evaluation circuit. A comb-like
structure provides electrostatic drive and
evaluation. The Coriolis acceleration is
measured electrostatically by way of en-
gaging electrodes. The measurement ele-
ment is made up of two masses connected
by way of a spring with the same resonance
frequency for both vibration modes. This is
typically 15 kHz and thus outside the normal
vehicle interference spectrum, making it
resistant to disturbance acceleration. The
evaluation circuit ASIC and the microme-
chanical measurement element are located
in a prefabricated housing with 20 connec-
tions (Premold 20).
The design of the acceleration module is
comparable to that of the yaw-sensor module
and consists of a micromechanical meas-
urement element, an electronic evaluation
circuit and a housing with 12 connections
(Premold 12).
The spring-mass structure is moved in its
sensitive axis by external acceleration and
evaluated using a differential capacitor in
the form of a comb structure.
Yaw rate
Acceleration due to gravity 9.8065 m/s
using a differential capacitor in the form of a comb structure. Yaw rate Acceleration due to

Yaw sensor with CAN interface

2009 | 2010

with micromechanical acceleration sensor

S

F

Pin 1

Pin 4

Pin 2 CANL

Pin 3 CANH

Ra
Rf

Direction of travel 4-pin connector Reference axis Reference surface GND

12 V

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Yaw sensors | 21

Dimensional drawing F 61,7 42,8 S Rf Ra 80 62 32,1 6,2 32,7 79,3 35
Dimensional drawing
F
61,7
42,8
S
Rf
Ra
80
62
32,1
6,2
32,7
79,3
35
12
4 3 2 1
Yaw sensors | 21 Dimensional drawing F 61,7 42,8 S Rf Ra 80 62 32,1 6,2

Yaw sensor with CAN interface with micromechanical acceleration sensor

22 | Yaw sensors

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

2009 | 2010

+a y +Y Sensor Principle of operation +Z Sensor + Z-Axis + +Detection a+ x
+a
y
+Y Sensor
Principle of operation
+Z Sensor
+
Z-Axis
+
+Detection
a+
x
ensorS+X
+Drive
–Detection
Drive frame
–Drive
Coriolis frame
Detection frame
Angular velocity (to be measured)
, and are the signals that the (illustrated) sensor supplies, where:
Angular velocity
Acceleration in y direction = Lateral acceleration
Acceleration in x direction = Longitudinal acceleration
Acceleration in y direction = Lateral acceleration Acceleration in x direction = Longitudinal acceleration Block diagram
Block diagram
Block diagram
Acceleration in y direction = Lateral acceleration Acceleration in x direction = Longitudinal acceleration Block diagram

Yaw sensor with CAN interface with micromechanical acceleration sensor

2009 | 2010

Part number

Yaw sensor/type Maximum yaw rate about axis of rotation (Z-axis) Minimum resolution Sensitivity Sensitivity tolerance over service life ) Yaw-rate offset Offset error over service life ) Non-linearity, max. deviation from optimum linear approximation Start-up time Electrical noise (measured with 100 Hz bandwidth)

) Service life: 6,000 h, over 15 years.

General information Operating-temperature range Storage-temperature range Supply voltage Supply-voltage range Current consumption at 12V

Linear acceleration sensor Maximum acceleration Sensitivity Sensitivity Sensitivity tolerance over service life ) Offset Offset error over service life ) Non-linearity, max. deviation from optimum linear approximation Start-up time Dynamics Electrical noise (measured with 100 Hz bandwidth)

Connectors

Pin

Latch

1,8 800 LSB/m/s 7845 LSB/g 5 % 0,03 0,1 4 % FSO 0,25 s 15 Hz 0,01

DRS-MM 3.7K 100 °/s 0,1 °/s 200 LSB/°/s 5 % 1,5 °/s 2 °/s 1 °/s 1 s 0,2 °/

-40

-40

7

< 130 mA

12 V nominal

18 V

85 °C

50 °C

TYCO 114-18063-014, MQS code A

TYCO C-208-15641

114-18063-001

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Yaw sensors | 23

Accessories

Yaw rate characteristic curve upper limitation lower limitation Part number
Yaw rate characteristic curve
upper
limitation
lower
limitation
Part number
upper limitation lower limitation
upper
limitation
lower
limitation

Technical data

0 265 005 642 Figure Acceleration characteristic curve
0 265 005 642
Figure
Acceleration characteristic curve

Yaw sensor with CAN interface with micromechanical acceleration sensor

24 | Yaw sensors

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Part number

Yaw sensor/type Maximum yaw rate about axis of rotation (Z-axis) Minimum resolution Sensitivity Sensitivity tolerance over service life ) Yaw-rate offset Offset error over service life ) Non-linearity, max. deviation from optimum linear approximation Start-up time Electrical noise (measured with 100 Hz bandwidth)

) Service life: 6,000 h, over 15 years.

General information Operating-temperature range Storage-temperature range Supply voltage Supply-voltage range Current consumption at 12V

Linear acceleration sensor Maximum acceleration Sensitivity Sensitivity tolerance over service life ) Offset Offset error over service life ) Start-up time Dynamics Electrical noise (measured with 100 Hz bandwidth)

1,8 7849 LSB/g 5 % 0,03 0,1 5 s 15 Hz 0,01

DRS-MM 3.7K 100 °/s 0,1 °/s 200 LSB/°/s 5 % 3,5 °/s 2 °/s 1 °/s 1 s 0,2 °/

-40

-40

7

< 130 mA

14 V nominal

18 V

85 °C

85 °C

2009 | 2010

7 < 130 mA 14 V nominal 18 V 85 °C 85 °C 2009 | 2010
Yaw rate characteristic curve upper limitation lower limitation
Yaw rate characteristic curve
upper
limitation
lower
limitation
upper limitation lower limitation
upper
limitation
lower
limitation

Technical data

0 265 005 764 Figure Acceleration characteristic curve
0 265 005 764
Figure
Acceleration characteristic curve

2009 | 2010

Notes

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Notes

|

25

Application

The soft iron core of the speed sensor is surrounded by a winding and is located directly opposite a rotating trigger wheel with only a narrow air gap in between. The soft iron core is connected to a permanent magnet, the magnetic field of which extends into the ferromagnetic trigger wheel and

Inductive speed sensors of this type are suitable for a wide range of speed record- ing applications. Depending on design, they measure engine speeds or wheel speeds for ABS systems with zero contact or wear and convert the speeds into elec- trical signals.

Non-contacting and thus wear-free rotational-speed measurement. Sturdy design for exacting demands. Strong output signal. Measurement dependent on specific direction of rotation.

26 | Rotational-speed sensors

Design and operation

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Inductive speed sensor Incremental measurement of rotational speeds and angles.

) Referenced to corresponding trigger wheel. ) Change factor = 1+0.004 ( -20°C); Winding temperature.

Winding resistance at 20 °C )

Signal frequency

Sustained ambient temperature/coil zone

Output voltage )

Rotational-speed measuring range )

Degree of protection

Max. vibration

Number of turns

Inductance at 1 kHz

V

°C

min

mH

m/s

20

4300 10

370 15 %

860 10 %

- 40

0

1

1200

IP 67

2009 | 2010

2500 Hz

200

7000

150

+

Technical data

is influenced by this. If there is a tooth directly opposite the sensor, this concen-
is influenced by this. If there is a tooth
directly opposite the sensor, this concen-
trates the magnetic field and thus intensifies
the magnetic flux in the coil. A gap, on
the other hand, weakens the flux in the
coil. These two situations alternate con-
stantly as the ring gear rotates. Changes
in magnetic flux occur at the gap-to-tooth
transitions (leading tooth edge) and at
the tooth-to-gap transitions (trailing tooth
edge). In accordance with Faraday‘s law,
these changes induce an AC voltage in the
coil. The frequency of this can be used to
determine the speed.
The sensor supplies an output pulse for
each tooth, the level of which depends
on the speed, the size of the air gap, the
shape of the tooth and the rotor materials
used. As well as the frequency, the ampli-
tude of the output signal also increases
as the speed rises. Therefore, a minimum
speed is required to reliably evaluate very
low
voltages. A reference mark on the
trigger wheel in the form of a large “gap”
allows the position of the trigger wheel to
be
the
determined in addition to measuring
speed. The trigger wheel sensor ring is
part of the speed recording system. In order
to be able to draw reliable conclusions
about the speeds, the sensor ring is sub-
ject to stringent technical requirements.
Trigger wheel sensor ring specifications
are
available on request.
Explanation of characteristic quantities
Output voltage
Speed
s
Air gap
specifications are available on request. Explanation of characteristic quantities Output voltage Speed s Air gap

4
5

3

8

6
7

2009 | 2010

2

1

Inductive speed sensor

Incremental measurement of rotational speeds and angles.

Cable Permanent magnet Sensor housing Housing block Soft-iron core Coil Air gap Trigger wheel with reference mark

Rotational-speed sensors | 27

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Rotational-speed sensor (block diagram) 1 2 3 4 x x S xx xxx N xxx
Rotational-speed sensor
(block diagram)
1
2
3
4
x
x
S
xx
xxx
N
xxx
5
xx
6
xx
7
8
x
x
Aftermarket Rotational-speed sensor (block diagram) 1 2 3 4 x x S xx xxx N xxx

28 | Rotational-speed sensors

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Part number

Inductive speed sensor

Incremental measurement of rotational speeds and angles.

Accessories are not included in the scope of delivery of the sensor and are therefore to be ordered separately as required.

Sustained ambient temperature/cable zone

Cable length with connector

Connector

Connector

°C

mm

360 ± 15

- 40

120

1 928 402 412

1 928 402 579

2009 | 2010

Accessories

Part number

Circuit diagram 1 N 3 S 2 Connections: 1 Output voltage 2 Ground 3 Screen
Circuit diagram
1
N
3
S
2
Connections:
1
Output voltage
2
Ground
3
Screen

180°

R7 45 21 24 6,7 5 R11 12 8 ø 3,5 14 10 X X
R7
45
21
24
6,7
5
R11
12
8
ø 3,5
14
10
X
X
2 31
18
27
L = 360
ø 17,95
ø 18 h9
19
R12,5

Dimensional drawing

+

Technical data

0 261 210 104 Figure
0 261 210 104
Figure

2009 | 2010

Inductive speed sensor

Incremental measurement of rotational speeds and angles.

Accessories are not included in the scope of delivery of the sensor and are therefore to be ordered separately as required.

Connector

On request from Tyco Electronics

Rotational-speed sensors | 29

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Accessories

Part number

3 N 1 S 2 Connections: 1 Output voltage 2 Ground 3 Screen
3
N
1
S
2
Connections:
1
Output voltage
2
Ground
3
Screen
Part number 0 261 210 147 Technical data Figure Cable length with connector mm 553
Part number
0 261 210 147
Technical data
Figure
Cable length with connector
mm
553 ± 10
Sustained ambient temperature/cable zone
°C
- 40
130
R7,5
90°
Dimensional drawing
45
21
24
26,5
3,5
5
19
25
R11
O
8
12
14
X
570
13
2
X
27
Circuit diagram
17,95
20,7
+
21,36
13
7,6

30 | Rotational-speed sensors

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Inductive speed sensor

Incremental measurement of rotational speeds and angles.

Accessories are not included in the scope of delivery of the sensor and are therefore to be ordered separately as required.

Connector

1 928 402 966

2009 | 2010

Accessories

Part number

1 N 3 S 2 Connections: 1 Output voltage 2 Ground 3 Screen
1
N
3
S
2
Connections:
1
Output voltage
2
Ground
3
Screen
Part number 0 281 002 214 Technical data Figure 3,5 Cable length with connector mm
Part number
0 281 002 214
Technical data
Figure
3,5
Cable length with connector
mm
450 ± 15
Sustained ambient temperature/cable zone
°C
- 40
120
R12,5
20,7
R7
Dimensional drawing
59
36,522,5
5
O
3
9,5
12
15,5
X
13
2
X
27
450
19
6,7
13
Circuit diagram
18
17,95
+
21,15
°300
R11

2009 | 2010

Notes

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Notes

|

31

Application

32 | Rotational-speed sensors

A

This alters the magnetic flux through the

wheel permanently connected to the wheel

to this is a soft magnetic pole piece within

the winding, which is tapped at the ends

through the coil winding. The change in

tional to the wheel speed. This means that

stant alternation between tooth and gap.

of the winding. Both the frequency and the

constant magnetic field is generated in this

amplitude of the AC voltage are propor-

above the sensor ring, which is a toothed

a

consists of a permanent magnet. Connected

if

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

pole piece and thus also the magnetic flux

magnetic field induces an AC voltage in

hub. As the sensor ring turns, the constant

manner. The pole piece is located directly

magnetic field is „disturbed“ by the con-

Passive speed sensor

Sustained ambient temperature / cable zone

Limited-time temperature for coil zone up to 175 °C

Limited-time temperature for coil zone up to 150 °C

Limited-time temperature for coil zone up to 160 °C

coil with several thousand wire turns. A

a wheel is not moving, the induced volt-

passive (inductive) rotational-speed sensor

4
5

3

2

1

Permanent magnet Solenoid Pole piece Steel sensor ring Magnetic lines of force

b
c

Sensor signal at constant wheel speed Sensor signal with increasing wheel speed

- 40 °C

50 x 30 min

200 h

10 x 10 min

2009 | 2010

115 °C

+

Technical data

Block diagram
Block diagram
Signal output voltage U max U min a t b t c t a Passive
Signal output voltage
U max
U min
a
t
b
t
c
t
a
Passive wheel-speed sensor
with sensor ring
U
t c t a Passive wheel-speed sensor with sensor ring U age is equal to zero.
age is equal to zero. The tooth shape, air gap, rate of voltage rise and
age is equal to zero. The tooth shape, air
gap, rate of voltage rise and input sensitiv-
ity of the electronic control unit determine
the lowest vehicle speed which can still be
measured and thus the minimum response
sensitivity and switching rate which can be
attained for ABS applications. There are
different pole-piece designs and different
methods of installation to suit the differ-
ent conditions encountered at the wheel.
The most commonly used types are the flat
pole piece and the diamond-shaped pole
piece. Both versions must be precisely
aligned with the sensor ring on installation.

2009 | 2010

Part number

Passive speed sensor

Accessories are not included in the scope of delivery of the sensor and are therefore to be ordered separately as required. Customer must provide mating connector/contacts. If another plug connector is to be used, then the cable must be sealed against ingress of moisture.

Cable length with connector Sustained ambient temperature / coil zone Max. vibration loading Number of turns Output voltage Signal frequency

Contact pins

Connector housing

2-pin

For 0,5…2,5 mm ; Content: 100 x

883 mm ± 20 mm

- 40 °C 1000 m/s 6000 40 0,0001 V

1

2000 Hz

115 °C

1 V

Rotational-speed sensors | 33

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Accessories

Part number

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket – – Accessories Part number Dimensional drawing + Technical data 0 265 006
Bosch Automotive Aftermarket – – Accessories Part number Dimensional drawing + Technical data 0 265 006

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket – – Accessories Part number Dimensional drawing + Technical data 0 265 006

Dimensional drawing

+

Technical data

0 265 006 366 Figure
0 265 006 366
Figure

34 | Rotational-speed sensors

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Passive speed sensor

Part number

Accessories are not included in the scope of delivery of the sensor and are therefore to be ordered separately as required. Customer must provide mating connector/contacts. If another plug connector is to be used, then the cable must be sealed against ingress of moisture.

Cable length with connector Sustained ambient temperature / coil zone Max. vibration loading Number of turns Output voltage Signal frequency

Connector housing

Contact pins

2-pin

For 0,5…2,5 mm ; Content: 100 x

- 40 °C 1000 m/s 6000 40 0,0001 V

601 mm ± 10 mm

1

2000 Hz

115 °C

1 V

2009 | 2010

Accessories

Part number

Dimensional drawing
Dimensional drawing
Hz 115 °C 1 V – – 2009 | 2010 Accessories Part number Dimensional drawing +

+

Technical data

0 265 006 833 Figure
0 265 006 833
Figure

2009 | 2010

Part number

Passive speed sensor

Accessories are not included in the scope of delivery of the sensor and are therefore to be ordered separately as required. Customer must provide mating connector/contacts. If another plug connector is to be used, then the cable must be sealed against ingress of moisture.

Cable length with connector Sustained ambient temperature / coil zone Max. vibration loading Number of turns Output voltage Signal frequency

Connector housing

Contact pins

2-pin

For 0,5…2,5 mm ; Content: 100 x

- 40 °C 1000 m/s 6000 40

0,0001 V

525 mm ± 10 mm

1

2000 Hz

120 °C

1 V

Rotational-speed sensors | 35

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Accessories

Part number

Dimensional drawing
Dimensional drawing
Bosch Automotive Aftermarket – – Accessories Part number Dimensional drawing + Technical data 0 265 006

+

Technical data

0 265 006 487 Figure
0 265 006 487
Figure

36 | Rotational-speed sensors

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Part number

Passive speed sensor

Cable length with connector Max. vibration loading

353 mm ± 20 mm 1000 m/s

2009 | 2010

18 Dimensional drawing 1,8 R 11 49,7 21,7 5 28 6,5 27 10 ø 4,8
18
Dimensional drawing
1,8
R 11
49,7
21,7
5
28
6,5
27
10
ø 4,8
14
ø12
ø17,95
353
19
9
0
6R
12,5R
°
21,7 5 28 6,5 27 10 ø 4,8 14 ø12 ø17,95 353 19 9 0 6R

Technical data

0 265 006 227 Figure
0 265 006 227
Figure

2009 | 2010

Part number

Passive speed sensor

drawing FigureDimensional

Rotational-speed sensors | 37

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

0 265 006 482

15 275 290 390 545
15
275
290
390
545
18 ø9,4 4 R7 R12,5
18
ø9,4
4
R7
R12,5

27

61,5 1221,7 27,8 19 6,7 10 14 ø17,95
61,5
1221,7
27,8
19
6,7
10
14
ø17,95
0 265 006 482 15 275 290 390 545 18 ø9,4 4 R7 R12,5 27 61,5
0 265 006 482 15 275 290 390 545 18 ø9,4 4 R7 R12,5 27 61,5
0 265 006 482 15 275 290 390 545 18 ø9,4 4 R7 R12,5 27 61,5

Application

38 | Rotational-speed sensors

Hall sensors consist of a semiconductor wafer with integrated driver circuits (e.g. Schmitt trigger) for signal conditioning, a transistor as output driver and a permanent magnet. These are hermetically sealed in a plastic connector housing. In an active rotational-speed sensor, magnets assume the function of the sensor-ring teeth. The magnets are integrated into a multiple rotor for example and are arranged with alternating polarity around its periphery. The measuring cell of the active rotational- speed sensor is exposed to the constantly changing magnetic field of these magnets. There is thus a constant change in the magnetic flux through the measuring cell as the multiple rotor turns.

Hall speed sensors are suitable for non- contacting and thus wear-free rotational- speed measurement. Thanks to its com-

Precise, reliable digital measurement of rotational speed, angles and distances. Non-contacting measurement. Hall IC in sensor with open collector output. Not susceptible to contamination. Resistant to mineral-oil products (fuel, engine oil). Transmission of information on sensor signal quality.

Design

Bosch Automotive Aftermarket

Hall speed sensor Digital measurement of rotational speeds

) Time from HIGH to LOW, measured between connections (0) and (-) from 90% to 10%. ) Time from LOW to HIGH, measured between connections (0) and (-) from 10% to 90%.

Switching time

Switching time

Output current

A

The principal sensor components are either

the connection to the control unit. The speed information is transmitted in the form of a load-independent current. As with an inductive speed sensor, the fre- quency of the current is proportional to

to an inductive sensor, the voltage to be

tioned in the active speed range. In contrast

speed. The wheel speed can thus be meas-

governed by the magnetic flux through the

evaluated is not a function of the wheel

into the sensor housing together with the measurement cell. A two-core cable provides

is

ured almost until the wheel has stopped.

measuring element. The voltage is condi-

Both elements generate a voltage which is

Hall elements or magneto-resistive elements.

typical feature of an active speed sensor the local amplifier. This is integrated

=0

>0


Installation instructions

)

)

Explanation of characteristic quantities

Standard installation conditions ensure full sensor operating capacity. Route connecting leads in parallel to minimise interference. Protect sensor against the destructive effect of static discharge (CMOS elements).

Static operation possible. Only dynamic operation possible. Max. LOW output voltage with Output current = 20 mA. Supply current for Hall sensor. fall time (trailing signal edge). rise time (leading signal edge).

1 s

15 s

0

2009 | 2010

20 mA

Technical data

pact design and low weight, the active rotational-speed sensor can be installed the wheel speed.
pact design and low weight, the active
rotational-speed sensor can be installed
the wheel speed. This form of transmission
using conditioned digital signals is not
at or in a wheel bearing.
susceptible to inductive disturbance volt-
ages as is the case with the type of trans-
mission with inductive speed sensors.
Principle of operation