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Poster Presentations P1

(Continued )
EM
Group

Mean

Std dv

dementia
SC

10,33
4,44

10
24

2,25
1,53

Group

Mean

Std dv

Control
aMCI
mMCI
dementia
SC

1,36
4,17
2,47
5,90
0,84

39
24
32
10
24

1,38
1,68
2,31
2,13
1,71

RDT

Bonferroni RDT
(I) Group

(J) Group

Control

aMCI
mMCI
dementia
SC
Control
mMCI
dementia
SC
Control
aMCI
dementia
SC
Control
aMCI
mMCI
SC
Control
aMCI
mMCI
dementia

,00
,12
,00
1,00
,00
,00
,12
,00
,12
,00
,00
,012
,00
,12
,00
,00
1,00
,00
,012
,00

aMCI

mMCI

dementia

SC

MCI. Dementia group score was higher than any other group. RDT: Control
and SC RDT scores were comparable. Control RDT score was higher (better
performance) than aMCI, mMCI and Dementia scores. aMCI score was worse
than mMCI score in RDT. RDT score in dementia group was lesser than any
other. (Table) Conclusions: In our study only RDT score were able to discriminate between aMCI and other groups. Additions, to classic ADAS-cog, of semantic encoding and delayed free and cued recall of the word list could be
useful in aMCI detection.

P1-432

DYNAMIC SELF-REFERENT COGNITIVE


PROCESS ON NEW LEARNING IS RELATIVELY
PRESERVED IN ALZHEIMERS DISEASE

Jennifer Lalanne1, Johanna Rozenberg1, Thierry Gallarda2,


Anne-Sophie Rigaud3, Pascale Piolino1, 1University Paris Descartes,
Boulogne Billancourt, France; 2Hopital Sainte Anne, Paris, France;
3
Hopital Broca, Paris, France.
Background: Dynamic self-referential cognitive processing on new learning
is relatively preserved in Alzheimers disease. Many studies report a significant
benefit of the self reference effect (SRE) in the process of memorization of new
information in healthy young and elderly [1], but no studies have been conducted in normal aging and Alzheimers disease taking into account both implicit/explicit measures and different components of self reference. The Self

S251

is indeed defined as a set of multidimensional representations stored in memory


either semantic or episodic in nature [2]. Methods: 15 young adults, 15 healthy
elderly and 15 patients with Alzheimers disease in mild to moderate stage
rated personality traits according to four types of incidental encoding: perceptual (Judgement on the alphabetical order of letters), non- semantics itself
(Judgement valence as social norms), Self-semantic (reference to his own character traits), Self-episodic (reference to an event personally experienced). The
SRE was evaluated quantitatively by the difference in performance between
conditions Self and Non-Self either in implicit recall or explicit recall (free recall and recognition). Results: Analysis of variance with repeated measures indicated a significant presence of the SRE in all healthy subjects and patients,
with better memory performance on implicit and explicit recalls and recognition for words encoded in terms of reference to the self. This benefit was observed regardless of semantic or episodic nature of self reference. However,
this benefit was better for semantic self reference in the elderly and patients
and better for implicit recall in patients. Conclusions: The SRE improves
memorization of new information by a deeper processing of information based
on self knowledge (semantic or episodic) targeting autobiographical memory.
Although patients at an early to moderate stage of dementia present severe
memory deficits, this study reports evidence for the persistence of SRE in Alzheimers disease, especially via implicit retrieval, and supports new avenues
for the creation of new non-medical therapies of memory deficits using
SRE. [1] Gutchess, A., Kensinger, E., Yoon, C., Schacter, D. (2007). Ageing
and the self-reference effect in memory. Memory, 15(8), 822-837. [2] Duval,
C., Eustache, F., Piolino, P. (2007). Self multidimensionnel, memoire autobiographique et vieillissement. Psychologie NeuroPsychiatrie du Vieillissement, 5, 179-92.

P1-433

LONG-TERM AMNESIA FOLLOWING


ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY

Pauline Lapalus1, Beatrice Belliard1, Julien Dumurgier1,


Jean Louis Laplanche2, Jean Pierre Guichard3, Jacques Hugon1,
Claire Paquet1, 1Centre Mmemoire de Ressources et de Recherche Groupe
Hospitalier Lariboisiere Fernand Widal Saint-Louis APHP, Universite Paris
VII, Paris, France; 2Service de Biochimie, Groupe Hospitalier Lariboisiere
Fernand Widal Saint-Louis, Universite Paris V, 75010, France; 3Service de
Neuroradiologie, Groupe Hospitalier Lariboisiere Fernand Widal
Saint-Louis, Paris, France.
Background: Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an intervention using
neuro-stimulation with an alternating current between two electrodes placed
on either side of the skull. It has been shown to be highly effective in major
depression and schizophrenia. However, ECT could also have adverse cognitive effects but this risk and its severity are generally low and have a good
prognosis over a year. We report the case of a patient who displayed cognitive
decline after ECT with atypical evolution. Methods: A 28 year old woman
was referred to our Memory Center for cognitive complains in 2008. Her
mother, brother and grandfather had a family history of psychiatric disorders.
She was diagnosed with schizophrenia since she was 20 years old for which
she received neuroleptic treatment and 13 ECT sessions in 2002 with a complete disappearance of psychiatric symptoms. However, a few months after
the end of ECT sessions, she complained of memory disturbances. Neuropsychological and biological tests, MRI imaging and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)
analysis were performed in 2008. Results: Neuropsychological tests revealed
isolated episodic memory impairment while all others cognitive functions
were preserved. Biological tests and brain MRI were normal as routine blood
analysis and biomarkers of the CSF. The clinical follow up showed a persistence of the memory deficit during the 2 years followed by a rapid return to
normal in 2010. Conclusions: This case shows that the cognitive side effects
of ECT can remain during several years after the treatment even in absence of
other neurological or biological disorders. Given the clinical importance of
this complication, detailed monitoring of cognitive impairment should be routinely carried out after ECT. Furthermore, in aging people, memory episodic
impairment could mimic mild cognitive impairment (MCI)or Alzheimers
disease (AD). In these cases, CSF biomarkers could be a good tool to differentiate AD from cognitive decline due to ECT.