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John Crane EAA

INTERNAL TO JOHN CRANE - NOT TO BE RELEASED TO EXTERNAL PARTIES WITHOUT PERMISSION

PAGE 1

GUIDE TO
MEASUREMENT OF
ROTATING EQUIPMENT
Contents:

1.0

INTRODUCTION

2.0

SOURCES OF EQUIPMENT DIMENSIONS

3.0

WHERE TO TAKE DIMENSIONS

4.0

RECORDING DATA

5.0

MEASURING EQUIPMENT & ACCURACY

6.0

MEASUREMENTS & CHECKS

7.0

RETROFITS - REUSING EXISTING SEAL PARTS

8.0

UPGRADES FROM GLAND PACKING

9.0

DOUBLE SEALS

10

10.0

PRE-COMMISSIONING EQUIPMENT CHECKS

10

11.0

OTHER EQUIPMENT

13

12.0

STUFFING BOX & SLEEVE DATA SHEET

14

Page

John Crane EAA


GUIDE TO MEASUREMENT
OF ROTATING EQUIPMENT
INTERNAL TO JOHN CRANE - NOT TO BE RELEASED TO EXTERNAL PARTIES WITHOUT PERMISSION

PAGE

John Crane EAA


GUIDE TO MEASUREMENT
OF ROTATING EQUIPMENT
INTERNAL TO JOHN CRANE - NOT TO BE RELEASED TO EXTERNAL PARTIES WITHOUT PERMISSION

PAGE

Hyperlinks to points in the document:

KEY ASPECTS OF ROTATING


EQUIPMENT:
Heating / Cooling Galler
y
See Section 6.4

Shaft
See Section 6.1.1

Access Window
See Section
6.3.3

Nearest Obstructio
n
See Section 6.3.1

Direction of Rotati
on
See Section 6.5

PCD / Bolt Studs


See Section 6.2

Seal Chamber Bo
re
See Section 6.1.2

Flush Connecti
on

See Section 6.6

Radial Obstruction
See Section 6.3.2

Spigot Location
See Section
6.1.2

John Crane EAA


GUIDE TO MEASUREMENT
OF ROTATING EQUIPMENT
INTERNAL TO JOHN CRANE - NOT TO BE RELEASED TO EXTERNAL PARTIES WITHOUT PERMISSION

PAGE

1.0 INTRODUCTION
Mechanical seals are not stand-alone items, but always form part of a larger rotating
equipment assembly. Obviously if the seal is to function properly it is vital that the design
of the seal installation is based on the correct dimensions and information covering all
aspects of the rotating equipment which affect the seal. In many cases, this
information is reliably available from drawings, but in some situations, there is no
alternative but to take measurements of the actual equipment in the field.
By their nature, rotating equipment tends to be very diverse in design; hence, it is not
possible to produce a document guide covering all such designs that may be encountered
in the field. Rather this document covers normal measurements for a typical centrifugal
pump, but also refers to other equipment types in passing. With some field experience, it
should be possible to apply the points given in this guide to other types of equipments on
a case-by-case basis.

2.0 SOURCES OF EQUIPMENT DIMENSIONS


1. EQUIPMENT OEM
ADVANTAGES
DISADVANTAGES

2. END-USER

ADVANTAGES
DISADVANTAGES

3. COMPETITOR

ADVANTAGES
DISADVANTAGES

4. SITE
MEASUREMENT
ADVANTAGES

As the original manufacturer, the OEM must have


drawings!
As original manufacturing drawings these should reflect the
actual equipment dimensions (but see below)
May not be correct, changes may have been made in
Production or on site which are not reflected on the drawing
OEM often unwilling to release drawings due to a)
confidentiality, b) no benefit to them, c) desire to retain seal
spares business etc.
The end-user may have access to drawings from the
OEM or in some cases may even have made their own
drawings
As a customer the end-user may have more influence for
obtaining OEM drawings than John Crane as a supplier
Drawings may be inaccurate or incomplete
Modifications may have been made to the equipment which
have not been recorded
For retrofits the end-user may have a seal drawing
from a competitor showing seal chamber and / or the
envelope dimensions of the existing sealing
arrangement
Easier than site measurement
The competitor's drawing may contain errors (sometimes
deliberate!)
There may be inadequate dimensional information shown on
the competitor's drawings - again this is sometimes
intentional to make seal retrofitting very difficult
The subject of this Guide
Access to the actual equipment in which the seal will be
installed ensures that any local modifications etc. that may
have been made will be apparent

John Crane EAA


GUIDE TO MEASUREMENT
OF ROTATING EQUIPMENT
INTERNAL TO JOHN CRANE - NOT TO BE RELEASED TO EXTERNAL PARTIES WITHOUT PERMISSION

PAGE
DISADVANTAGES

The equipment may be running and there may be no


maintenance opportunity to dismantle it for measurement
purposes
Careful measurement, recording and communication of
dimensions by the engineer are essential - errors must be
avoided!
The measurement process is time-consuming

While the other options should be considered first, this document focuses on option no. 4
above, i.e. measurement of rotating equipment on site. This measurement is
invariably carried out by John Crane personnel, either because the site engineers are too
busy to do this and regard it as a seal vendor's task, or because they are unwilling to take
the responsibility of measuring it themselves in case the seal ultimately does not fit!

3.0 WHERE TO TAKE DIMENSIONS - e.g. SITE / JC WORKSHOP / OTHER


For small pumps at sites close to a John Crane workshop, removing backplates or other
parts of the equipment from the site for measurement purposes may sometimes be
possible. This gives the advantages of being able to measure and record details in a
'controlled' manner, with more measurement equipment available and the option of
making a cup of tea. However, in practice this is generally impractical either due to time
constraints, remote location, large equipment, difficulties of getting a gate pass to
remove the parts from site etc.
Therefore, measurements will normally be taken at the site, either at the installation itself
or (better) in the site Maintenance Workshop.

4.0 RECORDING DATA


Measurements taken should be recorded in a clear and concise way. This should normally
be done on the John Crane Stuffing Box & Sleeve Data Sheet as shown in Section
12.0. Any aspects of the equipment not shown on the form but which are relevant can be
sketched separately.
Note that one practical way of recording various features of the equipment may be to use
photographs (digital or Polaroid), since these can show the overall 'style' of the
equipment, the positions of any obstructions, the extent of the damage to any worn
components etc. The photographs can be reviewed by other engineers / draftsmen back
in the office, and can be kept as a record for future reference.

5.0 MEASURING EQUIPMENT & ACCURACY


The John Crane representative should take suitable measuring equipment when attending
the site, normally including a Vernier Calliper (250mm-range min.), a Micrometer and a
12" ruler.
Suitable measuring equipment and accuracies are given against each of the dimensions
described below. Where accurate measurement is needed and a Vernier Calliper or
Micrometer is to be used, these should be periodically calibrated (typical interval 1 year
for irregular use). It is sometimes thought that only Manufacturing / QC measuring
equipment needs calibration, and that this is not necessary for equipment used
intermittently on site. Clearly this is a fallacy, since measuring anything with uncalibrated
/ inaccurate equipment defeats the whole purpose of taking an 'accurate' measurement.

John Crane EAA


GUIDE TO MEASUREMENT
OF ROTATING EQUIPMENT
INTERNAL TO JOHN CRANE - NOT TO BE RELEASED TO EXTERNAL PARTIES WITHOUT PERMISSION

PAGE

Even for calibrated equipment, it should be remembered that a Vernier Calliper is subject
to a measuring tolerance of + 0.02mm, a Micrometer to + 0.01mm. Attempting to
measure anything to greater accuracy than + 0.5mm with a ruler is unacceptable
practice.
While greater accuracy could be achieved with bore gauges, these are usually unavailable
on site and are not normally warranted for this type of work.

6.0 MEASUREMENTS & CHECKS


6.1 CRITICAL SURFACES FOR SEALING & LOCATION
The following are critical surfaces for location of seal components and for secondary
sealing. Accordingly special care must be taken to ensure these elements of the
equipment are properly measured / checked.

1 - shaft diameter
2 - bore of seal chamber
3 - face of seal chamber

6.1.1 Shaft
The shaft of the equipment sets the position of all the rotating portion of the seal
assembly, either through a close clearance shaft sleeve or directly to a retainer / collar
etc. It also forms part of a static or dynamic seal (e.g. sleeve o-ring / trapped gasket /
secondary seal etc.).
For stepped shafts, it is essential to measure all relevant diameters in the seal chamber
area, both inboard and outboard of the seal. Where the design is a hooked sleeve, the
position of the hooked step, the minor diameter and the keyway should all be noted.
The major diameter on the shaft should have an adequate lead-in chamfer (typically
1.5mm long X 20o) to ensure that the sleeve / sleeve o-ring / secondary seal can easily be
passed onto the shaft during seal installation. If this does not exist then the end-user
should be asked to modify the shaft.
Note should be taken of any special features existing on the shaft, for example pin or
setscrew holes, threads etc., and their size and position should be recorded.

John Crane EAA


GUIDE TO MEASUREMENT
OF ROTATING EQUIPMENT
INTERNAL TO JOHN CRANE - NOT TO BE RELEASED TO EXTERNAL PARTIES WITHOUT PERMISSION

PAGE

NOTE: Some shaft sleeves have a high hardness (chrome steels etc.) or a hard coating
(Metco, chrome oxide spray etc.) in the area of the seal. It is important to note the
position of any such coatings, and to establish the shaft hardness (normally via the OEM
or possibly with a hardness tester), since this would affect the holding power of setscrews
(seal head or drive collar).
Typical manufacturing tolerance: + 0.02 to + 0.05mm
Required measurement tolerance: + 0.01mm
Surface finish: 0.8m
Roundness: 0.05mm TIR
Preferred method of measurement: Micrometer
6.1.2 Bore of seal chamber / spigot diameter
Good practice for all mechanical seals demands a radial location of the stationary
element, to ensure those parts are centred relative to the shaft. For the majority of seal
installations the bore of the seal chamber is used as a close clearance pilot diameter, to
radially locate the stationary portion of the seal assembly. The exceptions are installations
where:
the radial location is taken from an OD spigot, in which case similar comments apply
to that OD surface instead of the ID
some cartridge seal designs are radially set through setting spacers or centralising
rings (e.g. Type 5600 series etc).
For either of the seal chamber bore is then less critical, since it is not used for sealing or
location.

I D Spigot

OD Spigot

Where an ID spigot is used, there may be a short recess machined as a counterbore into
the face of the seal chamber. In such cases this recess is intended specifically for
spigotting purposes, hence should be a controlled (tight tolerance) diameter.
For some seal designs, an o-ring in the bore of the seal chamber forms the static seal
between the gland plate and the seal chamber. In such cases the surface finish of the seal
chamber bore must be sufficient for sealing purposes (see below), and there must be an
adequate lead-in chamfer to ensure the o-ring does not get cut during installation
(typically 1.5mm long X 20o). Similarly, if the o-ring has to pass over any connection holes
or other steps on the ID surface, these should be dressed or relieved to prevent o-ring
damage during installation.
Typical manufacturing tolerance: varies
Required tolerance: + 0.02mm
Required measurement tolerance: + 0.02 - + 0.05mm
Surface finish: 0.8m
Roundness: 0.05mm TIR
Preferred method of measurement: Vernier

John Crane EAA


GUIDE TO MEASUREMENT
OF ROTATING EQUIPMENT
INTERNAL TO JOHN CRANE - NOT TO BE RELEASED TO EXTERNAL PARTIES WITHOUT PERMISSION

PAGE

6.1.3 Face of seal chamber


The face of the seal chamber is normally used as a sealing surface for either an o-ring or
gasket in the seal gland plate. Although this is a static secondary seal, nevertheless it is
important that the surface finish of the seal chamber face is adequate for sealing
purposes. The face of the seal chamber also acts as an abutment for the gland plate,
hence must be square to the shaft to prevent any misalignment of the stationary seal
assembly.
Surface finish: 0.8m
Squareness to shaft: TIR 0.005mm per 10mm of seal chamber bore

6.2 BOLT STUD / PCD


The bolt PCD is a critical piece of information; any errors made in recording this could be
expensive and time-consuming (or even impossible!) to rectify, and would inevitably be
damaging to the John Crane reputation.
The diameter across from the outside of one stud to the outside of the diametrically
opposite stud should be measured using a Vernier Calliper. A measurement should then
be taken from the inside of the studs. The mean of these 2 dimensions should then be
taken and this considered as the PCD. With 4 studs, this should be checked with the
opposing pair of studs to ensure the figure is the same!
The angle of the bolt positions should be noted, e.g. TDC and 90 o positions, 45oC
positions, special positions / non-standard angle etc. In the latter case, it may be
necessary to 'construct' the positions of the bolt studs by taking several measurements.
NOTE: there is often a wide tolerance on the actual positions of bolt studs; hence, even
for orthodox bolt positions it is still worth constructing the position as a check.
The bolt stud extension should be measured, since this will limit the section of the seal
gland plate or require replacement longer studs. This dimension should be measured from
the end face of the seal chamber to the end of the threaded portion of the stud. Note that
for seal retrofits the thickness of the existing gland plate can also be used as a guide to
allowable envelope dimensions.
Typical manufacturing tolerance: + 0.2 - 0.5mm
Required measurement tolerance: + 0.2mm
Preferred method of measurement: Vernier

6.3 OBSTRUCTIONS
Most seal selections and designs are constrained by the available space in the seal
chamber. This problem is compounded in a growing number of upgrades to double seal
installations in older equipments, resulting from greater emphasis on emissions/ reliability
/ safety etc.

John Crane EAA


GUIDE TO MEASUREMENT
OF ROTATING EQUIPMENT
INTERNAL TO JOHN CRANE - NOT TO BE RELEASED TO EXTERNAL PARTIES WITHOUT PERMISSION

PAGE
Access Window
typical endview of seal
chamber:

Nearest Radial Obstruction


(bearing bracket)

Nearest Axial
Obstruction
(bearing housing)

Drain Hole

The major constraints facing the seal supplier are as follows:


6.3.1 Axial
The most important axial obstruction to consider is the distance to the bearing
housing. This is variously referred to as the N.O. (Nearest Obstruction) or the F.O.B. (First
OBstruction). This restricts the length of the seal assembly outboard of the seal chamber.
It is normally impossible to increase this distance, because the bearing position will be
fixed as part of the original design. Therefore, the only way to make more space available
would be to machine back the surface of the seal chamber. However, this is unpopular
with end-users due to the difficulties of making the modification, and because it is an
irreversible process. Note that the distance to the nearest obstruction at the shaft may be
less than at a larger diameter, due to the inclusion of a bearing deflector.
Typical build tolerance: + 0.5mm
Required measurement tolerance: + 1mm
Preferred method of measurement: Vernier or ruler
6.3.2 Radial
Radial obstructions typically include bearing brackets or other features limiting the design
of the seal installation. These can affect the gland plate OD, the size and position of
tapped connections for flushing / quenching etc. Thought must also be given to the
'ergonomics' of the seal design, for example the space available for tightening of
setscrews, removal of setting spacers etc.
The positions of any obstructions should be 'constructed' by taking various
measurements relative to the face of the seal chamber, the shaft, the bearing housing
etc. Bearing bracket designs will be vary depending on the individual equipment, however
typical configurations include those shown on the Stuffing Box and Sleeve Data
Sheet.
Typical manufacturing tolerance: + 0.5mm
Required measurement tolerance: + 1mm
Preferred method of measurement: Vernier or ruler
For retrofitting projects, the competitors' seal components are a reliable guide to
acceptable seal envelope dimensions, since they have already been installed in the
available space. Therefore, by measuring the OD of the existing gland plate, the overall
length of the existing sleeve etc., it is safe to conclude that these dimensions will be less
than the radial or axial obstructions.

John Crane EAA


GUIDE TO MEASUREMENT
OF ROTATING EQUIPMENT
INTERNAL TO JOHN CRANE - NOT TO BE RELEASED TO EXTERNAL PARTIES WITHOUT PERMISSION

PAGE

10

6.3.3 Access Windows


Where the seal assembly may have to pass through an access window, this will be a
constraint on the overall dimensions of the seal. Similarly, if a seal is to be fitted from the
coupling side of the equipment, the DBSE (Distance Between Shaft Ends) should be
noted, since with the coupling removed this dimension will limit the overall length of the
seal.

6.4 COOLING / HEATING GALLERIES


Some pumps may have galleries around the seal chamber for the purposes of heating or
cooling the pump. These are usually evident from the tapped heating (steam) or cooling
(water) connections running into the pump casing. The position of these connections and
pipes may obstruct the area around the seal, and limit the size / design of the seal
installation.
NOTE: Where modifications are being proposed to older equipment (e.g. re-bore of seal
chamber) with galleries fitted, careful thought must be given to whether the modification
is practical. Decreasing the wall thickness of the casing will affect the integrity of the
pressure casing. Therefore, any such situations should be referred to the OEM and / or
end-user, and John Crane should never take the responsibility for the modification alone.

6.5 DIRECTION OF SHAFT ROTATION


The direction of shaft rotation is critical for seal designs that include:
unidirectional spiral grooves (e.g. Type 2800 series, Type 28 series, Type 28SC, Type
28ST, Type 285 etc.); where there is any likelihood of prolonged reverse rotation a bidirectional seal design should be considered.
axial flow pumping scrolls
'handed' springs (John Crane Flexibox product range)
tangential connections
The direction of shaft rotation (CW / CCW) should be checked on site by reference to any /
all of the following:
pump data sheets
physical pump (there will normally be an arrow on the bearing housing or pumping
casing)
orientation of discharge volute on pump
existing seal parts which may have tangential flushing connections or 'handed'
designs
site operators
The direction of shaft rotation should be recorded as from the motor side. Note that
conventionally an API pump will rotate CW while an ANSI pump will rotate CCW, as seen
from the motor side. TO BE CHECKED.

6.6 PIPING & UTILITIES


For installations that will have ancillary connections such as API Plan 11 flushing, Plan 62
quenching etc., provisions for these supplies must be checked. This includes checking
whether a tapping is provided on the pump discharge for flush recirculation. If on a
retrofit project an existing sealant system or heat exchanger is to be used, then the size /
location / capacity etc. must be noted, and the piping circuit sketched to include rough
overall dimensions, fittings, orifices, and pipe diameters.
As above, the position of any obstructions should be noted carefully, so that the seal can
be designed for straightforward piping access. The utilities themselves should also be

John Crane EAA


GUIDE TO MEASUREMENT
OF ROTATING EQUIPMENT
INTERNAL TO JOHN CRANE - NOT TO BE RELEASED TO EXTERNAL PARTIES WITHOUT PERMISSION

PAGE

11

checked, including external flushing pressure and flow rate (API Plan 32) N 2 pressure (API
Plan 53), steam pressure (API Plan 62), cooling water pressure / temperature / flow etc.

6.7 CORROSION / EROSION / CAVITATION etc.


Any evidence of corrosion / erosion / cavitation to any parts of the pump in the area of the
seal chamber should be noted and discussed with the end-user. This damage may effect
seal selection, design and installation, and may necessitate replacement of affected
pump parts. Such damage may also indicate problems with some aspect of pump
operation that would be detrimental to seal performance; hence, it is in the interests of
John Crane to get such problems resolved.
In particular, any wear to Critical Surfaces for Sealing and Location (see Section 6.1)
should be brought to the attention of the end-user.

7.0 RETROFITS - REUSING EXISTING SEAL PARTS


Note that in some cases the customer may request that parts of the existing competitor's
seal (e.g. shaft sleeve or gland plate) be re-used, as a perceived saving in cost. However,
this is frequently difficult or impossible; the dimensions of the competitor's parts may
force a compromise in the John Crane seal design, and would preclude the supply of a
standard cartridge seal.
Apart from whether this may or may not be feasible, it also creates a problem of split
responsibility for the installation, e.g. John Crane would then be expected to warranty the
quality of materials and manufacture for parts not of our supply. Clearly there could be
doubts over the design, the material, and any wear or corrosion in service. Therefore, this
practice should be avoided unless special circumstances apply.

8.0 UPGRADES FROM GLAND PACKING


One type of retrofit of an existing sealing device is the replacement of gland packing. For
older equipments that are being fitted with mechanical seals for the first time, the
following key points should be noted:
A mechanical seal will usually need more space than the gland packing, however the
space available in a stuffing box (both radial and axial) will be very limited and not
intended to accommodate a seal (see Section 6.3 Obstructions).
Due to this space limitation, it is often necessary to reuse the flush connection that
normally exists already in the stuffing box; hence, it is important to record the size,
axial position, angle and orientation of this connection.
NOTE: the axial position of the connection relative to the face of the stuffing box is
particularly important, since the effectiveness of the flushing liquid in cooling the seal
faces will depend on this.

Flush
Connection
Stuffing Box

John Crane EAA


GUIDE TO MEASUREMENT
OF ROTATING EQUIPMENT
INTERNAL TO JOHN CRANE - NOT TO BE RELEASED TO EXTERNAL PARTIES WITHOUT PERMISSION

PAGE

It is quite possible that wear on the shaft or the face of the seal stuffing box may have
taken place from the gland packing installation (see below). Any such wear should be
noted and recorded. This may affect the type of seal design used, and in extreme
cases may necessitate substantial modification and / or replacement of parts of the
rotating equipment before a seal could be installed.

Worn Shaft

12

Worn Face of
Stuffing Box

The gland packing follower will typically have been tightened using only 2 gland
bolts / studs, however for even tightening of a seal gland plate 4 bolt studs are
recommended. Therefore, the feasibility of adding in 2 more bolt studs to the face of
the seal chamber should be considered.

9.0 DOUBLE SEALS


The main issues to be considered with double seals are as follows:
The seal installation will need more axial (and possibly radial) space than a single
seal; hence, the position of the nearest obstructions is particularly important (see
Section 6.3 Obstructions).
There may be a need for a barrier or buffer fluid connection in the pump casing. This
may exist from a previous seal or gland packing installation; otherwise, provision
would need to be made to provide this.

10.0 PRE-COMMISSIONING EQUIPMENT CHECKS


Prior to commissioning of the rotating equipment, the points given below should be
always checked (normally by the end-user). However if these can be checked at an earlier
stage during measurement of the seal chamber, this would allow more time to rectify any
problems with bearings / alignment / shaft ovality etc.
The readings taken should be checked against the published limits for the seal AND those
for the equipment itself. If actual equipment tolerances exceed these limits, this must be
discussed with the end-user / OEM as appropriate, to prevent possible seal problems
which would result.

John Crane EAA

pre-commissioning
equipment
surface finish checks
& dimensional check

GUIDE TO MEASUREMENT
OF ROTATING EQUIPMENT

INTERNAL TO JOHN CRANE - NOT TO BE RELEASED TO EXTERNAL PARTIES WITHOUT PERMISSION

PAGE

- 1. dimensions and surface finishes

0.8

13

1.5 LG x 20
Chamfer

0.8

pre-commissioning
Figure #1
equipment
surface
finish
checks
& dimensional
check
check
the shaft
and seal chamber
dimensions

- 2. shaft
runoutfinishes as noted
and surface

Turn the shaft by hand


Note measurement on dial
indicator

Figure # 2
measure the shaft runout at the seal location - the
maximum value should not exceed 0.05mm FIM

John Crane EAA


GUIDE TO MEASUREMENT
OF ROTATING EQUIPMENT

pre-commissioning
equipment
surface finish checks
& dimensional check

INTERNAL TO JOHN CRANE - NOT TO BE RELEASED TO EXTERNAL PARTIES WITHOUT PERMISSION

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14

- 3. axial float

Move shaft in axial direction by hand


Note measurement on dial indicator

Figure # 3
the maximum value should not exceed 0.08mm FIM
- remove any sharp edges or burrs on the shaft
over which the seal sleeve must pass

pre-commissioning
equipment
checks
surface finish
& dimensional check
- 4. squareness

Turn the shaft by hand


Note measurement on dial indicator

Figure #4
the maximum value should not exceed
0.005mm
per 10mm of seal chamber bore diameter FIM

John Crane EAA


GUIDE TO MEASUREMENT
OF ROTATING EQUIPMENT
INTERNAL TO JOHN CRANE - NOT TO BE RELEASED TO EXTERNAL PARTIES WITHOUT PERMISSION

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15

11.0 OTHER TYPES OF EQUIPMENT


This Guide is based around a standard centrifugal pump configuration, since these are the
most common equipments encountered in the field. However, for other equipments (e.g.
agitators, fans, blowers, steam turbines etc.) similar guidelines apply in most cases.
These together with an understanding of the seal type to be installed should ensure that
the right measurements and checks are made.

11.1 AGITATORS

For agitators the driver unit (motor ' gearbox) may not be removed for seal
installation, as this is a time-consuming process. Rather the maintenance procedure
may involve the coupling only being removed, and the seal then installed through an
access window. The dimensions of the access window are frequently small and
restrict the overall envelope dimensions of the seal. If this is not taken into
consideration then the result can be an expensive seal that finally cannot even be
installed!

Access
Window

Shaft runout and vibration levels on agitators are invariably higher than for a pump,
because the equipment is larger and alignment less precise. These should be
discussed on site, and axial and radial shaft float should be measured if practical. If
the equipment is running then it should be possible to qualitatively assess the shaft
movement and vibration, e.g. 'normal', 'high' etc. Vibration levels at the area of the
seal can be recorded if suitable measurement equipment is available.
Where an integral radial bearing is required in the seal cartridge, the necessary load
figures are needed to correctly size the bearing. These may be available from site
data sheets or the OEM, or in the case of a retrofit the size / specification of the
existing bearing should be noted.

11.2 STEAM TURBINES

For steam turbine retrofits (Type 28ST seals) it is common to find that the
equipment on which the seal will be installed is old, and that corrosion has occurred
on the casing and / or shaft. This can include steam cuts where the casing material
has been eroded by gradual steam leakage over a long period. In some cases this is
likely to affect secondary sealing and pilot locations, and can be so severe that there
is no option but to request major equipment repairs or replacement before the seal
can be reliably installed.

John Crane EAA


GUIDE TO MEASUREMENT
OF ROTATING EQUIPMENT
INTERNAL TO JOHN CRANE - NOT TO BE RELEASED TO EXTERNAL PARTIES WITHOUT PERMISSION

PAGE

16

These aspects should be checked well in advance of seal installation if at all


possible. The alternative is that the customer must be prepared to expect some
'surprises' when the turbine is opened for seal installation, and to carry out necessary
repairs in a short time frame. The OEM should be involved in this process if possible.

John Crane EAA


GUIDE TO MEASUREMENT
OF ROTATING EQUIPMENT
INTERNAL TO JOHN CRANE - NOT TO BE RELEASED TO EXTERNAL PARTIES WITHOUT PERMISSION

PAGE

12.0 STUFFING BOX & SLEEVE DATA SHEET (2 pages)


John Crane Mechanical seals
Engineered Sealing Systems

JC reference :____________
Pump type :____________
Pump model :____________
Date :____________
Measure by:____________

Stuffing Box and Sleeve Data Sheet

PC
D

See spigot
detail

Note: - Irrelevant dimensions and details to be marked as X.


Viewing from A, the End View. Indicate which type of layout.

SPECIAL
Mark location

45

Indicate which method - if needed

Boss

Counterbore

Stud size:_____
Scallop
Slot
Spigot detail dimension

Option 1

Available
area for
sealing

Option 2

Mark location of flush


and quench
connection
Connection size: _____

Number of
studs:_____

Option 3
Sheet 1 of 2

17

John Crane EAA


GUIDE TO MEASUREMENT
OF ROTATING EQUIPMENT
INTERNAL TO JOHN CRANE - NOT TO BE RELEASED TO EXTERNAL PARTIES WITHOUT PERMISSION

PAGE

John Crane Mechanical seals


Engineered Sealing Systems

Stuffing Box and Sleeve Data Sheet

18

JC reference :____________
Pump type :____________
Pump model :____________
Date :____________
Measure by:____________

Sketch and dimension sleeve


detail

Sketch and dimension keyway detail

Feel free to scribble or sketch any relevant information

Sheet 2 of 2

Original Document drafted by Nigel Jenkins