You are on page 1of 141

NDSTA

ATISTTICS

UNESCO
O-NIGER
RIA TECH
HNICAL &
VOC
CATIONA
AL EDUCA
ATION
R
REVITALI
ISATION
N PROJEC
CT-PHASE
E II

NATION
NAL DIPL
LOM
MA IN
N
STATISTICS

COM
001
CO

YEAR
R I: SEMES
SETER
RI
Version 1
1: July 2
2009

TABLE OF CONTENTS

TableofContents
WEEK 1 .....................................................................
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER ..........................
COMPUTER DEFINED ..............................................
THE GENERAL FEATURE OF A COMPUTER SYSTEM.....
defined.
HARDWARE.........................................................................
COMPUTER SOFTWARE.....................................................
Categories of Software............................................................

System Software ..................................................


Operating systems ................................................
The main functions of operating systems ............
System Services ...........................................................
Language Translators (Processors) ..............................
Graphical User Interfaces (GUls) ........................
USER APPLICATIONS SOFTWARE .......................
User Programs:........................................................................
Commercial Packages.............................................................

WEEK 2 .......................................................................
Getting to Know Windows ..........................................
IMPORTANT WINDOWS OPERATIONS................
Using Menus ................................................................
Using the Start MenuAnd Switching Programs .......
LaunchingaProgram...............................................................
SwitchingBetweenPrograms..................................................

USING WINDOWS EXPLORERS My Computer ..


BrowsingforFileswiththeDocumentsExplorer....................
ManagingPCResourceswiththeComputerExplorer............
GettingHelpinWindows.........................................................
ShuttingDownWindowsAndYourComputer....................
PoweringDown.......................................................................
PuttingWindowstoSleep.......................................................
ShuttingDownWindowsXP....................................................
WorkingwiththeMyDocumentsFolder................................

WindowsXPApplications........................................................

Week 3 .........................................................................
Understanding Files and Folders .................................
Viewing Folders and Files ...........................................
Changing the Way Files Are Displayed.......................
Sorting Files and Folders .............................................
Grouping Files and Folders ..........................................
NavigatingFolders...................................................................
SearchingforFiles...................................................................
CreatingNewFolders..............................................................
RenamingFilesandFolders.....................................................
CopyingFiles............................................................................
TheEasyWaytoCopy.............................................................
OtherWaystoCopy................................................................
MovingFiles.............................................................................
TheEasyWaytoMove............................................................
DeletingFiles...........................................................................
TheEasyWaytoDelete...........................................................
OtherWaystoDeleteaFile.....................................................
RestoringDeletedFiles............................................................

Managing the Recycle Bin ...........................................


WorkingwithCompressedFolders.........................................
CompressingaFile...................................................................
ExtractingFilesfromaCompressedFolder.............................
CopyingFilestoAnotherComputer........................................
CopyingFileswithaPortableDrive.........................................
CopyingFilesViaEmail............................................................
BackingUpYourImportantFiles.............................................

Week 4 .........................................................................
MS-Word ...................................................................
Getting started ..............................................................
Working With Documents ...........................................
CreateaNewDocument.........................................................
OpeninganExistingDocument...............................................
RenamingDocuments.............................................................

WorkingonMultipleDocuments............................................
DocumentViews......................................................................
CloseaDocument....................................................................

Week 5 .........................................................................
Customize the Word Environment...........................
Editing a Document ...................................................
ChangeFontTypefaceandSize..............................................

Formatting Paragraphs .......................................


Styles............................................................................
NewStylesTocreateanewstyle:..........................................

Week 6 .........................................................................
TABLES ......................................................................
Adding Tables ..............................................................
WEEK 7 .......................................................................
GRAPHICS ..................................................................
WEEK 8 .......................................................................
Proofreading a Document .........................................
Page Formatting .........................................................
WEEK 9 .......................................................................
Macros.....................................................................................

Table of Contents .......................................................


MarkTableofContentsEntries..............................................
CreateaTableofContents.....................................................

Update Table of Contents..........................................


WEEK 10 .....................................................................
MAIL MERGE ..............................................................
Use mail merge to create and print letters and other documents
defined.
Set up the main document..................................................
Resume a mail merge..........................................................
Connect the document to a data source...........................
Choose a data file.................................................................
Refine the list of recipients or items...................................
Add placeholders, called mail merge fields, to the document.....
defined.
What happens when you merge.........................................

Working with fields: Examples............................................


Map mail merge fields to your data file..............................
Type content and add fields................................................
Format merged data..............................................................

Preview and complete the merge.......................................


Preview the merge................................................................

Complete the merge.............................................................


Print the merged documents...............................................

Change individual copies of the document........................


Save the main document.....................................................

WEEK 11 ....................................................................
MICROSOFT EXCEL - 2007 ...................................
Getting started with Excel 2007 ................................
Spreadsheets ...............................................................
Week 12 .......................................................................
Customize excel ..........................................................
Work with a Workbook.............................................
Create a Workbook....................................................
SaveaWorkbook....................................................................

OpenaWorkbook...................................................................
EnteringData..........................................................................

Modifyingaworksheet............................................................

Week 13 .......................................................................
Modifying a worksheet ................................................
Insert Cells, Rows, and Columns ..............................
Delete Cells, Rows and Columns ..............................
Find and Replace........................................................
Spell Check .................................................................
Week 14 .......................................................................
Perform calculation ......................................................
ExcelFormulas........................................................................
CalculatewithFunctions........................................................
FunctionLibrary......................................................................
Relative,AbsoluteandMixedReferences...............................

Linking Worksheets ...................................................

Sort and filter ...............................................................


Week 15 .......................................................................
Graphic in excel ...........................................................
AddingaPicture......................................................................
AddingClipArt........................................................................
EditingPicturesandClipArt...................................................
AddingShapes.........................................................................
AddingSmartArt.....................................................................

Charts in excel..............................................................
CreateaChart.........................................................................

Format worksheet.........................................................
ConvertTexttoColumns........................................................
ModifyFonts...........................................................................
FormatCellsDialogBox..........................................................
ChangeColumnWidthandRowHeight.................................
HideorUnhideRowsorColumns..........................................
MergeCells..............................................................................

AlignCellContents..................................................................

Developing a worksheet ...............................................


FormatWorksheetTab...........................................................

Reposition Worksheets in a Workbook ...................


Insert and Delete Worksheets ...................................
CopyandPasteWorksheets:..................................................

Pages properties printing..............................................


Set Print Titles ............................................................
CreateaHeaderorFooter......................................................

SetPageMargins....................................................................
ChangePageOrientation........................................................
SetPageBreaks.......................................................................
PrintaRange...........................................................................

Customize the layout....................................................


SplitaWorksheet....................................................................
FreezeRowsandColumns......................................................
HideWorksheets.....................................................................

WEEK 1
INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTER
COMPUTER DEFINED
A computer is a device that accepts data in one form and processes it to produce data
in another form. For now it is also worth noting that the data is normally held within
the computer as it is being processed, and is often held much longer than that. Also,
the nature of the processing may change according to the data entered. The forms in
which data is accepted or produced by the computer vary enormously from simple
words or numbers to signals sent from or received by other items of technology. So,
when the computer processes data it actually performs a number of separate functions
as follows.
a. Input. The computer accepts data from outside for processing within.
b. Storage. The computer holds data internally before, during and after
processing.
c. Processing. The computer performs operations on the data it holds within.
d. Output. The computer produces data from within for external use. This is
summarised in the diagram below
The Basic Function of a Computer

Data

INPUT

PROCESS

OUTPUT

Information

STORAGE

At this point it is appropriate to give a more concise and acceptable definition of


Computer as follows:
Computer is a device that works under the control of stored programs, automatically
accepting, storing and processing data to produce information that is the result of that
processing.
To get the picture clear, other elements mentioned in the definition, programs, data
and information would have to be defined.
Program: A program is a set of instructions that is written in a computer
understandable language to make the computer perform a specific task. (Note the
spelling program not programme.) The computer is only able to obey a program's
instructions if the program has first been stored within the computer. This implies that
the computer must be able to input and store programs in addition to data. So, the
computer works under the control of stored programs.

Data: This is the name given to basic (raw) facts about event, person, object etc., that
have not been processed and hence cant be used for any serious decision making
process.
Information: A distinction is sometimes made between data and information. When
data is converted into a more useful or intelligible form then it is said to have been
processed into information. Therefore Information is a fact that have undergone
processes and can be used for any decision making process.

. What is Computer?

A computer is one of the electronic items that are used for handing
information and communication. On there own, computers can do
nothing, but with people to give them instructions they are powerful
and useful tools.
The first computers were so simple, it was just to do sums or
computers results.

Since those early days, however, technology has advanced so


much that computers can now be used as tools in many ways:
As calculators
As pen and paper
As filing cabinets
As reference books
As calculators
As teachers or learning aids
As source of entertainment
As shopping centre

The reason why they are so useful is that they do all these things
electronically

far

faster

that

we

can

do

them

by

hand.

Computers have several advantages over people:


They do not get bored or distracted, so they can do the
same job thousands of times very quickly (speed)
They dont make mistakes, so they always get the same
results from the same information (accuracy and consistency)
They can remember large amount of information (storage).

However, it has some disadvantages such as security. That means


having data on the computer rather than on paper means lots of
data can be stored on a single floppy disk, CDROM or DVD and the
data could be easily removed (stolen), changed or even damaged.

Activity 1.2.
Do you think that introduction of computers had any social cost?. Discuss your
views with your peers and your teacher.

At one time it was easy to divide computers into three groups


according to their size: micro (smallest), mini (personal) and
mainframe (largest).

Minis were using for office information, micros for home computing,
and mainframe for large-scale information handing.

Now the

categories have emerged into one another, as so many different


sizes of computers have become available.

Large co
omputer systemss
can fill a lot of space

Microcom
mputers sit on
single deskk tops

Notebooks andd palmtop are evenn smallerand can


n have
greater memory
y capacity.

al computter itself (PC) could be divided


d
in
nto four
The persona
egories de
epending into their size: pocket
p
PC
Cs, lapto
op PCs,
cate
deskktop PCs, tower PC
Cs.

er System
m
1.2. Compute

Alwa
ays we he
ear this company follows this system, b
but what does
d
a
word
d system mean?
A sy
ystem mea
ans any group of co
omponents (people,, items, acctivities,
etc) that comp
plement each otherr to achiev
ve a goal.

c
r system has on
nly four basic
b
com
mponents
s: input,
A computer
proc
cessor, ou
utput and storage.
s

Tip 1.1.
Note that the computer is just one component of computer system.

Input is data entered to a computer system for processing. Lets


look at ourselves for example. All of us have five senses. These
senses are the sight, touch, taste, hearing and smell. This is how we
receive information from the outside world. The most common input
devices are keyboard a mouse,
Microphone Allows the computer to receive and record sound.
Necessary for voice recognition software and any software that
needs to record sound.
Scanner Much like a copying machine. Allows the computer to
digitalise copies of text or graphics. This is an example of going from
a hardcopy or physical paper to softcopy or digital image.

Mouse & keyboard

Microphone

Scanner

Example of input devices

Process: in home, business and school microcomputers, a main


processing chip called the processor or central processing unit
(CPU) handles the instructions from the computer program and
process the data.

While output is the presentation of the results of processing. Output


can be routed to a monitor, audio speakers, or a printer.

The output on a monitor is called soft copy because it is temporary,


while the printer output is called hard copy, which is can you
handled, folded and so on.

Monitors

Speakers

Printer

Example of output devices

Storage is a place within the computer where we put information for


later use. Storage of data in a computer system is either temporary
or permanent.

Whenever we speak of storing information whether it is temporary


storage or permanent storage we speak in terms of RAM and ROM.

Random-access memory (RAM) provides temporary storage


during processing so when the computer is turned off the RAM is
completely erased. ROM is permanent memory and cannot be
erased, whether or not the computer is turned off or on. ROM cannot
even be changed the information stored in ROM can only be read
and not updated. In terms of storage we can think of RAM in terms
of saving music on a cassette tape. If you were to decide to change
the contents of that tape you can, by simply recording over the
information that is stored on it. We can think of ROM in terms of

having music on a com


mpact disk.. If you we
ere to decide to cha
ange the
conttents of the CD, you wo
ould be unable
u
to
o. Disks provide
perm
manent sttorage for data an
nd progra
ams. How
wever, you
u might
upda
ate data in a CDRO
OM or DV
VDROM when
w
theyy are re-w
writable
(CD-RW or DV
VD-RW).

Inte
ernal

servver

CDROM / DVD ROM

CD/DVD burner

storrage units

xample of sto
orage devic
ces
Ex

omputer works?
w
1.3. How a co

s of comp
puting fall into one of four ca
ategories: theory,
Mosst aspects
hard
dware, sofftware and
d applications.

Com
mputing th
heory beg
gins by d
defining a special type of machine
m
who
ose behav
viour can be
b rigidly defined and
a determ
mined. This is the
basic model of
o a comp
puter. Alm
most all computers are
a 'digitall', which
ans that th
hey recognise data and instrructions only in the form of
mea
zero
os and ones. Com
mputing th
heory stu
udies how
w this apparently
inad
dequate 'la
anguage' can be used to express numbers, letters,
shap
pes and more
m
com
mplex ideas like 'a holiday
h
forr two in Dubai'.
D
It
also
o examiness the logiccal processses by which
w
real--life proble
ems can

be solved by computers: how to get them to add up a series of


numbers or sort a list of names into alphabetical order.

Hardware refers to the physical components of a computer.

In

other words, it is anything that is tangible. This is the most basic


level on which your computer operates. So the hardware could be
classified into one of four categories: input devices, processor,
output devices, and storage.

When the information has been

entered through input devices into the PCs system unit. The
information is processed electronically by the CPU and stored in
electronic memory. In the processing section, the computer only
understands two things; those two things are ON and OFF. ON is
represented by the number 1, while OFF is represented by 0. This is
based on the binary number system, these digits are known as bits.
The monitor for example, receives and displays information.

To

keep a permanent copy of your work, you must save it to a storage


device,

such

as

floppy

or

hard

disk.

Software is the set of instructions your computer hardware needs to


be able to work. Without software, the computer cannot process any
information. Your computer uses two different types of software to
process information: an operating system and software applications.

The operating system is the most important piece of software for


your computer. It is the primary program, working with the hardware
to manage all of the basic tasks which you need your computer to
perform. An operating system must be present before any other
software can run.

Software applications are the set of programs you can run on top
of your operating system. The sample list below shows six
categories of software and some of the specific applications we
have available on the IPFW network.
Word Processing: Word for Windows, Word Perfect, etc.
E-Mail: Hotmail, Yahoo, Microsoft Outlook, etc.
Communications: Netscape, Telnet , Internet explorer, Online chat,
etc.
Database: Access
Graphics: Harvard Graphics, MS Power Point Presentations,
Photoshop, etc.
Spreadsheet: Excel, Lotus, etc.

WEEK 2
Getting to Know Windows
Windows is a type of software called an operating system. An operating
system does what its name impliesoperates your computer system,
working in the background every time you turn on your PC. Equally
important, Windows is what you see when you first turn on your
Computer, after everything turns on and boots up. The desktop that fills
your screen is part of Windows, as are the taskbar at the bottom of the
screen and the big menu that pops up when you click the Start button.
If youve recently purchased a new PC, the version of Windows on your
PC is probably Windows Vista.
Microsoft released different versions of Windows over the years, and
Vista is the latestwhich is why it comes preinstalled on most new PCs.
If youve used a previous version of Windows such as Windows XP,
Windows 2000, or Windows 98on another PC, Windows Vista no
doubt looks and acts differently from what youre used to.
Dont worry; everything that was in the old Windows is still in the new

The Windows XP Desk

The Windows Vista Desktop


As you can see in the Figure above the Windows XP desktop looks a lot
like the Windows Vista desktop but without the see-through windows and
the Sidebar. Everything else is where youd expect it to bethe Start
button, the taskbar, the system tray (what Vista calls the notification
area), the shortcut icons, and the Recycle Bin.
IMPORTANT WINDOWS OPERATIONS
To use Windows efficiently, you must master a few simple operations,
such as pointing and clicking, dragging and dropping, and right-clicking.
You perform all these operations with your mouse.
Pointing and Clicking
The most common mouse operation is pointing and clicking. Simply
move the mouse so that the cursor is pointing to the object you want to
select and then click the left mouse button once. Pointing and clicking is
an effective way to select menu items, directories, and files.
Double-Clicking
To launch a program or open a file folder, single-clicking isnt enough.
Instead, you need to double-click an item to activate an operation. This
involves pointing at something onscreen with the cursor and then clicking
the left mouse button twice in rapid succession. For example, to open

program groups or launch individual programs, simply double-click a


specific icon.
Right-Clicking
Heres one of the secret keys to efficient Windows operation. When you
select an item and then click the right mouse button, youll often see a
pop-up menu. This menu, when available, contains commands that
directly relate to the selected object. So, for example, if you right-click a
file icon, youll see commands related to that filecopy, move, delete,
and so forth.
Refer to your individual programs to see whether and how they use the
right mouse button.
Dragging and Dropping
Dragging is a variation of clicking. To drag an object, point at it with the
cursor and then press and hold down the left mouse button. Move the
mouse without releasing the mouse button and drag the object to a new
location. When youre finished moving the object, release the mouse
button to drop it onto the new location.
You can use dragging and dropping to move files from one folder to
another or to delete files by dragging them onto the Recycle Bin icon.
Hovering
When you position the cursor over an item without clicking your mouse,
youre hovering over that item. Many operations require you to hover
your cursor and then perform some other action.
Moving and Resizing Windows
Every software program you launch is displayed in a separate onscreen
window. When you open more than one program, you get more than one
windowand your desktop can quickly get cluttered.
There are many ways to deal with desktop clutter. One way is to move a
window to a new position. You do this by positioning your cursor over a
blank area at the top of the window frame and then clicking and holding
down the left button on your mouse. As long as this button is depressed,
you can use your mouse to drag the window around the screen. When you
release the mouse button, the window stays where you put it.
NB
The cursor changes shapeto a double-ended arrow
when its positioned over the edge of a window.

You also can change the size of most windows.


You do this by positioning the cursor over the edge of the windowany
edge. If you position the cursor on either side of the window, you can
resize the width. If you position the cursor on the top or bottom edge, you
can resize the height. Finally, if you position the cursor on a corner, you
can resize the width and height at the same time.
After the cursor is positioned over the windows edge, press and hold
down the left mouse button; then drag the window border to its new size.
Release the mouse button to lock in the newly sized window.
Maximizing, Minimizing, and Closing Windows
Another way to manage a window in Windows is to make it display fullscreen. You do this by maximizing the window. All you have to do is
click the Maximize button at the upper-right corner of the window, as
shown below

If the window is already maximized, the Maximize button changes to a


Restore Down button. When you click the Restore Down button, the
window resumes its previous (premaximized) dimensions.
If you would rather hide the window so that it doesnt clutter your
desktop, click the Minimize button. This shoves the window off the
desktop, onto the taskbar. The program in the window is still running,
howeverits just not on the desktop. To restore a minimized window,
all you have to do is click the windows button on the Windows taskbar
(at the bottom of the screen).
If what you really want to do is close the window (and close any program
running within the window), just click the windows Close button.
Caution
If you try to close a window that contains a document you havent saved,
youll be prompted to save the changes to the document. Because you
probably dont want to lose any of your work, click Yes to save the
document and then close the program.

Scrolling Through a Window


Many windows contain more information than can be displayed at once.
When you have a long document or web page, only the first part of the
document or page is displayed in the window. To view the rest of the
document or page, you have to scroll down through the window, using
the various parts of the scrollbar

Scroll bar
There are several ways to scroll through a window. To scroll up or down
a line at a time, click the up or down arrow on the windows scrollbar. To
move to a specific place in a long document, use your mouse to grab the
scroll box (between the up and down arrows) and drag it to a new
position. You can also click on the scrollbar between the scroll box and
the end arrow, which scrolls you one screen at a time. If your mouse has a
scroll wheel, you can use it to scroll through a long document. Just roll
the wheel back or forward to scroll down or up through a window.

Using Menus
Many windows in Windows use a set of pull-down menus to store all the
commands and operations you can perform. The menus are aligned across
the top of the window, just below the title bar, in what is called a menu
bar.
You open (or pull down) a menu by clicking the menus name. The full
menu then appears just below the menu bar, as shown in Figure 2.3. You
activate a command or select a menu item by clicking it with your mouse.
Menu bar Pull-down menu

FIGURE 2.4: Navigating Windows menu


Some menu items have a little black arrow to the right of the label. This
indicates that additional choices are available, displayed on a submenu.
Click the menu item or the arrow to display the submenu.
Other menu items have three little dots (called an ellipsis) to the right of
the label. This indicates that additional choices are available, displayed in
a dialog box. Click the menu item to display the dialog box.
The nice thing is, after you get the hang of this menu thing in one
program, the menus should be similar in all the other programs you use.
For example, most of the Office 2007 programs have an Office button
that, when clicked, displays a pull-down menu of common file oriented
operations; older programs have a File menu that contains similar
operations. Although each program has menus and menu items specific to
its own needs, these common menus make it easy to get up and running
when you install new software programs on your system.
Using the Start MenuAnd Switching Programs
All the software programs and utilities on your computer are accessed via
Windows Start menu. You display the Start menu by using your mouse
to click the Start button, located in the lower-left corner of your screen.
As you can see in Figure 2.5, the Windows Vista Start menu consists of
two columns of icons. Your most frequently and recently used programs
are listed in the left column; basic Windows utilities and folders are listed
in the right column. To open a specific program or folder, just click the
name of the item.

To view the rest of your programs, click the All Programs arrow. This
displays a new submenu called the Programs menu. From here you can
access various programs, sorted by type or manufacturer.
(When more programs are contained within a master folder, youll see an
arrow to the right of the title; click this arrow to expand the menu and
display additional choices.)

Figure 2.5: Start Menu to Access Program


By the way, the All Programs menu works differently in Windows Vista
than in Windows XP. In Windows XP, clicking a right arrow caused the
menu to cascade to the right; in Vista, clicking a right arrow simply
expands the menu in-place, which takes up a lot less screen space.
Launching a Program
Now that you know how to work the Start menu, its easy to start any
particular software program. All you have to do is follow these steps:
1. Click the Start button to display the Start menu.
2. If the program is displayed on the Start menu, click the programs icon.
3. If the program isnt visible on the main Start menu, click the All
Programs button, find the programs icon, and then click it.

Another way to find a program to launch is to use the Instant Search box
on the Start menu. Just start entering the programs name into the search
box, and a list of matching programs appears on the Start menu. When
the program you want appears, click it to launch it.
Switching Between Programs
After youve launched a few programs, its easy to switch from one
program to another. Windows Vista offers several different ways to
switch between programs, including
Click any visible part of the applications window, which brings
that window to the front.
Click the applications button in the taskbar, as shown in Figure
2.6. (And heres a tip; if you hover your cursor over a taskbar
button, youll see a live thumbnail of the open document or
application.)

FIGURE 2.6: Use the taskbar buttons to switch between applications.


Hold down the Alt key and then press the Tab key repeatedly until
the application window you want is selected. This is called
Windows Flip and cycles through thumbnails of all open windows,
as shown in Figure 2.7. When youre at the window you want,
release the Alt key.

FIGURE 2.7: Use Windows Flip to select from thumbnails of all open
programs.

Hold down the Start button and then press the Tab key to activate
the Flip 3Dfeature. This displays a three-dimensional stack of all
open windows, as shown in Figure 2.8. Continue pressing the Tab
key (or rotate the scroll button on your mouse) to cycle through the
windows on the stack.

FIGURE 2.8: Flip 3D lets you flip through a three-dimensional stack of


open windows.

USING WINDOWS EXPLORERS My Computer


In Windows Vista, all the items stored on your computerincluding
programs, documents, and configuration settingsare accessible from
special windows, called Explorers. You use Explorers to find, copy,
delete, launch, and even configure programs and documents. Note that in
XP windows Explorer is called My Computer.
There are many different Explorers in Windows Vista. For example,
when you click the Music icon on the Start menu, you open the Music
Explorer, which then displays all the songs you have stored on your
system. Likewise, clicking the Photos icon opens the Photos Explorer,
which displays all the digital photographs on your system.

Browsing for Files with the Documents Explorer


Perhaps the most-used Explorer is the Documents Explorer, which is
where youll find practically all of the documents, photos, music, and
other files stored on your computers hard disk.
Click the Documents icon on the Start menu, and you see a window full
of folders, such as the one shown in Figure 2.9. Double-click a folder
icon to view the contents of that folderwhich could be individual files
or additional folders (sometimes called subfolders). To launch a program
or open a document, double-click that items icon. To perform other tasks
(copying, deleting, and so forth), right-click the icon and select an option
from the pop-up menu.

FIGURE 2.9: Browsing through the folders and files stored on your
system with the Documents Explorer.

Managing PC Resources with the Computer Explorer


The Computer Explorer lets you access each major component of your
system and perform basic maintenance functions. For example, you can
use the Computer Explorer to open the contents of your hard disk and
then copy, move, and delete individual files. To open the Computer
Explorer, simply click the Computer icon on the Start menu.

As you can see in Figure 2.10, the Computer Explorer contains icons for
each of the major components of your systemyour hard disk drive,
external drives, CD-ROM or DVD drive, and so on. To view the contents
of a specific drive, simply double-click the icon for that drive. Youll see
a list of folders and files located on that drive; to view the contents of any
folder, just double-click the icon for that folder.

FIGURE 2.10: Use the Computer Explorer to manage your hard drive
and other key components.

Getting Help in Windows


When you cant figure out how to perform a particular task, its time to
ask for help. In Windows Vista, this is done through the Help and
Support Center.
To launch the Help and Support Center, click the Start button and then
select Help and Support.
The Help and Support Center, shown in Figure 2.11, lets you search for
specific answers to your problems, browse the table of contents, connect
to another computer for remote assistance, go online for additional help,

and troubleshoot any problems you may be having. Click the type of help
you want and follow the onscreen instructions from there.

FIGURE 2.11: Windows Vistas Help and Support centerthe place to


go for answers.

Shutting Down WindowsAnd Your Computer


Youve probably already noticed that Windows starts automatically every
time you turn on your computer. Although you will see lines of text
flashing onscreen during the initial startup, Windows loads automatically
and goes on to display the Windows desktop.
Powering Down
When you want to turn off your computer, you do it through Windows. In
fact, you dont want to turn off your computer any other wayyou
always want to turn off things through the official Windows procedure.
To shut down Windows and turn off your PC, follow these steps:
1. Click the Start button to display the Start menu.

2. Click the right arrow next to the Power button at the lower-right corner
of the menu; then select Shut Down.
3. Manually turn off your monitor, printer, and other peripherals.
Putting Windows to Sleep
Notice that you dont just click the Power button to shut down your
system. If you click the Power button, Windows doesnt shut down;
instead, it enters a special Sleep mode. When you enter Sleep mode,
Windows saves all your open documents, applications, and data to both
your PCs hard drive and memory; shuts down your PCs hard drive and
monitor; and then enters a special power-saving mode. It doesnt turn off
your computerit simply puts it to sleep.
The advantage of using Sleep mode is that it makes it faster to turn your
computer back onor, more accurately, to wake it up. When youve put
Windows into Sleep mode, pressing your computers On button powers
up your equipment, wakes up Windows from Sleep mode, and quickly
retrieves all open documents and applications from system memory. Its a
lot faster than rebooting from a power-off condition which is why
Sleep is the default operation when you click Vistas Power button.

Shutting Down Windows XP


Shutting down Windows XP is actually a little less confusing than
shutting down Windows Vista. If you recall, when you click Vistas
power button, you dont actually turn off the power; instead, you put
the computer into a special sleep mode. Not so in Windows XPwhen
you click the power button, you shut off the computer. Simplicity itself.
To shut down Windows and turn off your PC, follow these steps:
1. Click the Start button to display the Start menu.
2. Click the Turn Off Computer button.
3. When the Turn Off Computer dialog box appears, click the Turn Off
button.
4. Manually turn off your monitor, printer, and other peripherals.
Working with the My Documents Folder
Where Windows Vista uses a similar series of Explorers to display files,
folders, and configuration data, Windows XP simply displays the
contents of folders within a window. Its pretty much the same thing,
except that each folder has its own distinct name.

By default, all your documents are stored within the My Documents


folder. You open this folder by clicking the My Documents icon on the
Start menu. As you can see in Figure 2.12, the My Documents folder not
only contains files and subfolders but also displays a panel on the lefthand side, called the Tasks panel. Vista doesnt have a similar panel, and
thats too bad, because the Tasks panel is one of the most practical parts
of Windows XP. All the common tasks related to the open folder are
displayed in this panel. All you have to do is select a folder or file and
then click the appropriate task in the Tasks Panel. It makes copying,
moving, and deleting files much easier.
Windows XP puts the word my in front of most of the similar folders
found in Windows Vista. For example, what Vista calls Documents, XP
calls My Documents; what Vista calls Computer, XP calls My Computer.

Fig. 2.12
Other Folders
The My Documents folder is just one of several similar folders within
Windows XP. Youll also find the My Music folder, which contains all
your digital music files; the My Pictures folder, which contains all your
digital photographs; the My Network Places folder, which contains files
and folders stored on other PCs in your computer network; and the My

Computer folder, which lets you access all the disk drives on your main
computer. And, of course, Windows XP also has its own Control Panel,
which you use to configure various aspects of your system.
Windows XP Applications
Windows XP contains manybut not allof the same built-in
applications as Windows Vista. You get Windows Media Player,
Windows Movie Maker, and Internet Explorer, as well as Notepad,
WordPad, and Paint. Instead of Windows Mail, theres Outlook Express,
which works pretty much the same way. What you miss in XP are Vistas
new applications, including Windows Photo Gallery, Windows Calendar,
and Windows DVD Maker.
Know that depending on when Windows XP was installed on your PC,
and how often its been updated, you may not have the latest version of
some of these programs.
In particular, new versions of Internet Explorer (7) and Windows Media
Player (11) are available for Windows XP. These new versions upgrade
the programs so that they look and work pretty much like their Windows
Vista cousins.

Activity1.1: What name given tothe below diagram.

Activity1.2
1. List and explain some important windows operations.
2. Explain the steps involve when launching a program.

Week 3
Understanding Files and Folders
All the information on your computer is stored in files. A file is nothing
more than a collection of digital data. The contents of a file can be a
document (such as a Word memo or Excel spreadsheet), a digital photo or
music track, or the executable code for a software program. The contents
of a file can be a document from an application (such as a Works
worksheet or a Word document), or they can be the executable code for
the application itself. Every file has its own unique name. A defined
structure exists for naming files, and its conventions must be followed for
Windows to understand exactly what file you want when you try to
access one. Each filename must consist of two parts, separated by a
periodthe name (to the left of the period) and the extension (to the right
of the period). A filename can consist of letters, numbers, spaces, and
characters and looks something like this: filename.ext.
Windows stores files in folders. A folder is like a master file; each folder
can contain both files and additional folders. The exact location of a file
is called its path and contains all the folders leading to the file. For
example, a file named filename.doc that exists in the system folder, that
is itself contained in the windows folder on your c:\ drive, has a path that
looks like this:
c:\windows\system\filename.doc.
Learning how to use files and folders is a necessary skill for all computer
users. You might need to copy files from one folder to another or from
your hard disk to a floppy disk. You certainly need to delete files every
now and then. To do this in Windows Vista, you use Windows Explorer;
in Windows XP, you use the My Documents folder.

Viewing Folders and Files


In Windows Vista you can open any Windows Explorer to view the
folders and files on your system. Perhaps the easiest Explorer to use is the
Documents Explorer, which you open by clicking the Documents icon on
the Start menu. The Documents Explorer opens automatically to display
the contents of the Documents folder on your computers hard disk.
As you can see in Figure below the Documents Explorer displays not
only individual files but also other folderscalled subfoldersthat
themselves contain other files. You can perform most file-related
operations by clicking the Organize button to display the Organize menu,
or by right-clicking a file icon to display the context sensitive pop-up
menu.

Manage your folders and files with Windows Vistas Documents Explorer.

Changing the Way Files Are Displayed


You can choose to view the contents of a folder in a variety of ways. To
change the file view, click the Views button on the Explorer toolbar; this
displays a pull-down menu. You can then select from the available views:
Extra Large Icons, Large Icons, Medium Icons, Small Icons, List, Details,
or Tiles. You can also move the slider up and down to change the size of
the file/folder icons.
Sorting Files and Folders
When viewing files in the Documents Explorer, you can sort your files
and folders in a number of ways. To do this, right-click anywhere in the
Explorer window, select the Sort By option, and then choose to sort by
Name, Date Modified, Type, Size, or Tags. You can also choose to sort
the items in either ascending or descending order. If you want to view
your files in alphabetical order, choose to sort by Name. If you want to
see all similar files grouped together, choose to sort by Type. If you want
to sort your files by the date and time they were last edited, choose the
Date Modified option. And if you want to sort by a user-applied file tag
(assuming youve done this in the files host program), choose the Tags
option.
Grouping Files and Folders
You can also configure Windows to group the files in your folder, which
can make it easier to identify particular files. For example, if you sorted
your files by time and date modified, theyll now be grouped by date

(Today, Yesterday, Last Week, and so on). If you sorted your files by
type, theyll be grouped by file extension, and so on.
To turn on grouping, right-click anywhere in the Explorer window, select
the Group By option, and then choose to group by Name, Date Modified,
Type, Size, or Tags. Windows now groups your files and folders by the
selected criteria.
Navigating Folders
You can navigate through all your folders and subfolders in several ways:
To view the contents of a disk or folder, double-click the selected
item.
To move back to the disk or folder previously selected, click the
Back button on the toolbar.
To choose from the history of disks and folders previously viewed,
click the down arrow in the Address bar at the top of the Explorer
window and select a disk or folder.
If youve moved back through multiple disks or folders, you can
move forward to the next folder by clicking the Forward button on
the toolbar.
Go directly to any disk or folder by entering the path in the
Address Bar (in the format x:\folder\subfolder) and pressing Enter.
Move backward through the bread crumb path in the Address
bar. Click any previous folder location (separated by arrows) to
display that particular folder.
You can also go directly to key locations by using the list of locations in
the navigation pane on the left side of the Explorer window. This pane
displays the most common locations for files on your system. The top
part of the pane displays your Favorite Linksincluding the Documents,
Pictures, and Music folders. The Folders section on the bottom of the
pane displays all the contents of your system in a treelike outline.
Double-click any section of the tree to display that items contents.
Searching for Files
As organized as you might be, you may not always be able to find the
specific files you want. Fortunately, Windows Vista offers an easy way to
locate difficult-to-find files, via the new Instant Search function. Instant
Search indexes all the files stored on your hard disk (including email
messages) by type, title, and contents. So you can search for a file by
extension, filename, or keywords within the document.
To use the Instant Search feature, follow these steps:

1. From within the Explorer window, locate the Search box at the top
right of the window, as shown in Figure below.
2. Enter one or more keywords into the search box.
3. Press Enter, or click the Go button (looks like a magnifying glass).

FIGURE: The Search box in Windows Explorer.


Vista now displays a list of files that match your search criteria
Double-click any icon to open that file.
Creating New Folders
The more files you create, the harder it is to organize and find things on
your hard disk. When the number of files you have becomes
unmanageable, you need to create more folders and subfoldersto
better categorize your files.
To create a new folder, follow these steps:
1. Navigate to the drive or folder where you want to place the new folder.
2. Click the Organize button to display the drop-down menu; then select
New Folder.
3. A new, empty folder now appears within the Explorer window, with
the filename New Folder highlighted.
4. Type a name for your folder (which overwrites the New Folder name),
and press Enter.
tip
You can also search for files from Vistas main Instant Search window,
accessible by clicking the Search icon on the Start menu. This window
offers more advanced search options than are available from the
Windows Explorer Search box.
Renaming Files and Folders
When you create a new file or folder, it helps to give it a name that
somehow describes its contents. Sometimes, however, you might need to
change a files name. Fortunately, Windows makes it relatively easy to
rename an item.
To rename a file (or folder), follow these steps:
1. Click the file or folder you want to rename.

2. Click the Organize button and then select Rename from the pull-down
menu (or just press the F2 key on your keyboard); this highlights the
filename.
3. Type a new name for your folder (which overwrites the current name),
and press Enter.
Copying Files
Now its time to address the most common things you do with files
copying and moving them from one location to another.
Its important to remember that copying is different from moving. When
you copy an item, the original item remains in its original location plus
you have the new copy. When you move an item, the original is no longer
present in the original locationall you have is the item in the new
location.
The Easy Way to Copy
To copy a file or a folder with Windows Vista, follow these steps:
1. Select the item you want to copy.
2. Click the Organize button and select Copy from the pull-down menu.
3. Use Windows Explorer to navigate to the new location for the item.
4. Click the Organize button and select Paste from the pull-down menu.
Thats it. Youve just copied the file from one location to another.
Other Ways to Copy
The method just presented is just one of many ways to copy a file.
Windows Vista provides several other methods, including
Right-click a file and select Copy from the pop-up menu, then
paste to the new location.
Right-click a file and select Send To from the pop-up menu, then
select a location from the choices listed.
Hold down the Ctrl key and then use your mouse to drag the file or
folder from one location to another within the Explorer window.
Drag the file or folder while holding down the right mouse button.
When you
drop the file into a new location, you see a pop-up menu that asks
whether
you want to move it or copy it. Select the copy option.
Moving Files
Moving a file (or folder) is different from copying it. Moving cuts the
item from its
previous location and places it in a new location. Copying leaves the
original item

where it was and creates a copy of the item elsewhere.


In other words, when you copy something you end up with two of it.
When you
move something, you only have the one thing.
The Easy Way to Move
To move a file, follow these steps:
1. Select the item you want to move.
2. Click the Organize button and select Cut from the pull-down menu.
3. Use Windows Explorer to navigate to the new location for the item.
4. Click the Organize button and select Paste from the pull-down menu.
Other Ways to Move a File
Just as Windows provides several other ways to copy a file, you also have
a choice of alternative methods for moving a file, including the following:
Right-click a filename and select Cut from the pop-up menu; then paste
it to the new location.
Use your mouse to drag the file from one location to another.
Drag the file or folder while holding down the right mouse button.
When you drop the file into a new location, you see a pop-up menu that
asks whether you want to move it or copy it. Select the move option.
Deleting Files
Too many files eat up too much hard disk spacewhich is a bad thing,
because you only have so much disk space. (Music and video files, in
particular, can chew up big chunks of your hard drive.) Because you
dont want to waste disk space, you should periodically delete those files
(and folders) you no longer need.
The Easy Way to Delete
Deleting a file is as easy as following these two simple steps:
1. Select the file.
2. Click the Organize button and select Delete from the pull-down menu.
This simple operation sends the file to the Windows Recycle Bin, which
is kind of a trash can for deleted files. (Its also a trash can that
periodically needs to be dumpedas discussed later in this activity.)
Other Ways to Delete a File
As you might expect, there are other ways to delete files in Windows
Vista. In particular, you can do the following:
Highlight the file and press the Del key on your keyboard.
Drag the file from the Explorer window onto the Recycle Bin icon on
your desktop.

Restoring Deleted Files


Have you ever accidentally deleted the wrong file? If so, youre in luck.
For a short period of time, Windows stores the files you delete in the
Recycle Bin.
The Recycle Bin is actually a special folder on your hard disk; if youve
recently deleted a file, it should still be in the Recycle Bin folder.
To undelete a file from the Recycle Bin, follow these steps:
1. Double-click the Recycle Bin icon on your desktop (shown below) to
open the Recycle Bin folder.
2. Click the file(s) you want to restore.
3. Click the Restore This Item button on the toolbar.
This copies the deleted file back to its original location, ready for
continued use.

The Recycle Bin, where all your deleted files end up.
Managing the Recycle Bin
Deleted files do not stay in the Recycle Bin indefinitely. By default, the
deleted files in the Recycle Bin can occupy 10% of your hard disk space.
When youve deleted enough files to exceed this 10%, the oldest files in
the Recycle Bin are automatically and permanently deleted from your
hard disk. If youd rather dump the Recycle Bin manually (and thus free
up some hard disk space), follow these steps:
1. Double-click the Recycle Bin icon on your desktop to open the
Recycle Bin folder.
2. Click the Empty the Recycle Bin button on the toolbar.
3. When the confirmation dialog box appears, click Yes to completely
erase the files, or click No to continue storing the files in the Recycle Bin.

Working with Compressed Folders


Really big files can be difficult to move or copy. Theyre especially
difficult to transfer to other users, whether by email or portable disk
drive. Fortunately, Windows includes a way to make big files smaller.
Compressed folders take big files and compress their size, which makes
them easier to copy or move. After the file has been transferred, you can
then uncompress the file back to its original state.
Compressing a File
Compressing one or more files is a relatively easy task from within any
Windows folder. Just follow these steps:
1. Select the file(s) you want to compress.
2. Right-click the file(s) to display the pop-up menu.
3. Select Send to, Compressed (zipped) Folder.
Windows now creates a new folder that contains compressed versions of
the file(s) you selected. (This folder is distinguished by a little zipper on
the folder icon, as shown below.) You can now copy, move, or email this
folder, which is a lot smaller than the original file(s).

A compressed folder containing one or more files.


Extracting Files from a Compressed Folder
The process of decompressing a file is actually an extraction process.
Thats because you extract the original file(s) from the compressed
folder.
In Windows XP and Windows Vista, this process is eased by the use of
the Extraction Wizard. Follow these steps:
1. Right-click the compressed folder to display the pop-up menu.
2. Select Extract All.

3. When the Extraction Wizard launches, select a location for the


extracted files and then click the Extract button to complete the process.
Copying Files to Another Computer
Of course, youre not limited to copying and moving files from one
location to another on a single PC. You can also copy files to other PCs
via either a network connection or some sort of portable disk drive.
Copying Files with a Portable Drive
If youre not on a network, you can use a portable drive to transport files
from one computer to another. The most popular type of portable drive
today is the USB drive, such as the one shown in Figure below, which
stores computer data in flash memory.
The drive itself is small enough to fit on a keychain, hence the nickname
of keychain drive. (Some people also called them thumb drives.) You
can find USB drives with capacities up to 4GBmore than big enough to
hold even your biggest files.

Use a USB drive to transport files from one computer to another.


To use a USB drive, simply insert the device into an open USB port on
your computer. Once inserted, the drive appears as a new drive in the
Computer Explorer (My Computer in Windows XP). Double-click the
USB drive icon to view the contents of the drive; you can then copy and
paste files from your hard drive to the USB drive and vice versa. When
youre finished copying files, just remove the USB device. Its that
simple.
Copying Files Via Email
Another popular way to send files from one computer to another is via
email. You can send any file as an email attachment; a file is literally
attached to an email message.

When the message is sent, the recipient can open or save the attached file
when reading the message.
Backing Up Your Important Files
Then theres the issue of protecting your files. What do you do if your
computer crashes, or your hard disk diesare all your important files and
documents totally lost?
Not so if youre prescient enough to back up your key files on a regular
basis. The easiest way to do this is by connecting an external hard disk
drive to your computer.
Get a big enough external disk (200GB or larger), and you can copy your
entire hard disk to the external drive. Then, if your system ever crashes,
you can restore your backed-up files from the external drive to your
computers system unit.
External hard drives can be purchased for as little as $100 and are easy to
connect via either USB or FireWire. You can use the proprietary backup
software that comes with most external drives, or use Vistas Windows
Backup utility. Whichever program you use, you should back up your
data at least weeklyif not daily. That way you wont lose much fresh
data if the worst happens.
Activity3.1
1.Explain the steps needed to create a folder
2.How a file is created
3.Explain how a file is copy to a folder

Week 4

MS-Word
Getting started

Microsoft Office Button


The Ribbon (Formerly the Toolbars)
Quick Access Toolbar

Screen Layout

Menus
When you begin to explore Word 2007 you will notice a new look to the menu
bar. There are three features that you should remember as you work within Word
2007: the Microsoft Office Button, the Quick Access Toolbar, and the Ribbon.
These three features contain many of the functions that were in the menu of
previous versions of Word. The functions of these three features will be more fully
explored below.

The Microsoft Office Button

The Microsoft Office button performs many of the functions that were located in
the File menu of older versions of Word. This button allows you to create a new
document, open an existing document, save or save as, print, send (through
email or fax), publish or close.
The Ribbon

The Ribbon is the panel at the top portion of the document. It has seven tabs:
Home, Insert, Page Layout, References, Mailings, Review, and View that contain
many new and existing features of Word. Each tab is divided into groups. The
groups are logical collections of features designed to perform functions that you
will utilize in developing or editing your Word document. Commonly used features
are displayed on the Ribbon, to view additional features within each group, click
on the arrow at the bottom right of each group.

Each of the tabs contains the following tools:


Home: Clipboard, Fonts, Paragraph, Styles, and Editing.
Insert: Pages, Tables, Illustrations, Links, Header & Footer, Text, and Symbols
Page Layout: Themes, Page Setup, Page Background, Paragraph, Arrange
References: Table of Contents, Footnote, Citation & Bibliography, Captions,
Index, and Table of Authorities
Mailings: Create, Start Mail Merge, Write & Insert Fields, Preview Results, Finish
Review: Proofing, Comments, Tracking, Changes, Compare, Protect
View: Document Views, Show/Hide, Zoom, Window, Macros
Quick Access Toolbar

The quick access toolbar is a customizable toolbar that contains commands that
you may want to use. You can place the quick access toolbar above or below the
ribbon. To change the location of the quick access toolbar, click on the arrow at
the end of the toolbar and click on Show Below the Ribbon.

You can also add items to the quick access toolbar. Right click on any item in the
Office Button or the Ribbon and click on Add to Quick Access Toolbar and a
shortcut will be added to the Quick Access Toolbar.

Working With Documents

Creating a New Document


Open an Existing Document
Saving a Document
Save As or Renaming Documents
Working on Multiple Documents
Document Views

Close a Document

Create a New Document


There are several ways to create new documents, open existing documents, and
save documents in Word:

Click the Microsoft Office Button


and Click New or
Press CTRL+N (Depress the CTRL key while pressing the N) on the keyboard

You will notice that when you click on the Microsoft Office Button and Click New,
you have many choices about the types of documents you can create. If you wish
to start from a blank document, click Blank. If you wish to start from a template
you can browse through your choices on the left, see the choices on center
screen, and preview the selection on the right screen.

Opening an Existing Document

Click the Microsoft Office Button


and Click Open, or
Press CTRL+O (Depress the CTRL key while pressing the O) on the keyboard, or
If you have recently used the document you can click the Microsoft Office
Button and click the name of the document in the Recent Documents section of
the window Insert picture of recent docs

Saving a Document

Click the Microsoft Office Button


and Click Save or Save As (remember, if
youre sending the document to someone who does not have Office 2007, you will
need to click the Office Button, click Save As, and Click Word 97-2003
Document), or
Press CTRL+S (Depress the CTRL key while pressing the S) on the keyboard, or

Click the File icon on the Quick Access Toolbar

Renaming Documents
To rename a Word document while using the program:

Click the Office Button


and find the file you want to rename.
Right-click the document name with the mouse and select Rename from the
shortcut menu.
Type the new name for the file and press the ENTER key.

Working on Multiple Documents


Several documents can be opened simultaneously if you are typing or editing
multiple documents at once. All open documents will be listed in the View Tab
of the Ribbon when you click on Switch Windows. The current document has a
checkmark beside the file name. Select another open document to view it.

Document Views
There are many ways to view a document in Word.

Print Layout: This is a view of the document as it would appear when printed. It
includes all tables, text, graphics, and images.
Full Screen Reading: This is a full view length view of a document. Good for
viewing two pages at a time.
Web Layout: This is a view of the document as it would appear in a web
browser.
Outline: This is an outline form of the document in the form of bullets.
Draft: This view does not display pictures or layouts, just text.

To view a document in different forms, click the document views shortcuts at the
bottom of the screen

or:

Click the View Tab on the Ribbon


Click on the appropriate document view.

Close a Document
To close a document:

Click the Office Button


Click Close

Activity4.1
1.Get to word environment type your Name,Age,Department,and Level.
2.Save the above document and close the document.

Week 5
The Word Environment

Popular
Display
Proofing
Save
Advanced

Word offers a wide range of customizable options that allow you to make Word
work the best for you. To access these customizable options:

Click the Office Button


Click Word Options

Popular
These features allow you to personalize your work environment with language,
color schemes, user name and allow you to access the Live Preview feature. The
Live Preview feature allows you to preview the results of applying design and
formatting changes without actually applying it.

Display
This feature allows you to modify how the document content is displayed on the
screen and when printed. You can opt to show or hide certain page elements.

Proofing
This feature allows you personalize how word corrects and formats your text. You
can customize auto correction settings and have word ignore certain words or
errors in a document.

Save
This feature allows you personalize how your document is saved. You can specify
how often you want auto save to run and where you want the documents saved.

Advanced
This feature allows you to specify options for editing, copying, pasting, displaying,
printing and saving.

Editing a Document

Typing and inserting Text


Selecting Text
Inserting Additional Text
Rearranging Blocks of Text
Deleting Blocks of Text
Search and Replace Text
Undo Changes

Typing and inserting Text


To enter text, just start typing! The text will appear where the blinking cursor is
located. Move the cursor by using the arrow buttons on the keyboard or
positioning the mouse and clicking the left button. The keyboard shortcuts listed
below are also helpful when moving through the text of a document:
Move Action
Beginning of the line
End of the line
Top of the document
End of the document

Keystroke
HOME
END
CTRL+HOME
CTRL+END

Selecting Text
To change any attributes of text it must be highlighted first. Select the text by
dragging the mouse over the desired text while keeping the left mouse button

depressed, or hold down the SHIFT key on the keyboard while using the arrow
buttons to highlight the text. The following table contains shortcuts for selecting a
portion of the text:
Selection
Whole word
Whole paragraph
Several words or
lines
Entire document

Technique
double-click within the word
triple-click within the paragraph
drag the mouse over the words, or hold down SHIFT
while using the arrow keys
choose Editing | Select | Select All from the Ribbon,
or press CTRL+A

Deselect the text by clicking anywhere outside of the selection on the page or
press an arrow key on the keyboard.
Inserting Additional Text
Text can be inserted in a document at any point using any of the following
methods:

Type Text: Put your cursor where you want to add the text and begin typing
Copy and Paste Text: Highlight the text you wish to copy and right click and
click Copy, put your cursor where you want the text in the document and right
click and click Paste.
Cut and Paste Text: Highlight the text you wish to copy and right click and click
Cut, put your cursor where you want the text in the document and right click and
click Paste.
Drag Text: Highlight the text you wish to move, click on it and drag it to the
place where you want the text in the document.

You will notice that you can also use the Clipboard group on the Ribbon.

Rearranging Blocks of Text


To rearrange text within a document, you can utilize the Clipboard Group on the

Home Tab of the Ribbon.


Insert picture of clipboard group labeled

Move text: Cut and Paste or Drag as shown above


Copy Text: Copy and Paste as above or use the Clipboard group on the Ribbon
Paste Text: Ctrl + V (hold down the CTRL and the V key at the same time) or
use the Clipboard group to Paste, Paste Special, or Paste as Hyperlink

Deleting Blocks of Text


Use the BACKSPACE and DELETE keys on the keyboard to delete text.
Backspace will delete text to the left of the cursor and Delete will erase text to
the right. To delete a large selection of text, highlight it using any of the methods
outlined above and press the DELETE key.
Search and Replace Text
To find a particular word or phrase in a document:

Click Find on the Editing Group on the Ribbon


To find and replace a word or phrase in the document, click Replace on the
Editing Group of the Ribbon.

Undo Changes
To undo changes:

Click the Undo Button on the Quick Access Toolbar

Formatting Text

Styles
Changing Font and Size
Font Styles and Effects
Change Text Color
Highlight Text

Copy Formatting
Clear Formatting

Styles
A style is a format enhancing tool that includes font typefaces, font size, effects
(bold, italics, underline, etc.), colors and more. You will notice that on the Home
Tab of the Ribbon, that you have several areas that will control the style of your
document: Font, Paragraph, and Styles.

Change Font Typeface and Size


To change the font typeface:

Click the arrow next to the font name and choose a font.

Remember that you can preview how the new font will look by highlighting the
text, and hovering over the new font typeface.

To change the font size:

Click the arrow next to the font size and choose the appropriate size, or
Click the increase or decrease font size buttons.

Font Styles and Effects


Font styles are predefined formatting options that are used to emphasize text.
They include: Bold, Italic, and Underline. To add these to text:

Select the text and click the Font Styles included on the Font Group of the
Ribbon, or
Select the text and right click to display the font tools

Change Text Color


To change the text color:

Select the text and click the Colors button included on the Font Group of the
Ribbon, or
Highlight the text and right click and choose the colors tool.
Select the color by clicking the down arrow next to the font color button.

Highlight Text
Highlighting text allows you to use emphasize text as you would if you had a
marker. To highlight text:

Select the text


Click the Highlight Button on the Font Group of the Ribbon, or
Select the text and right click and select the highlight tool
To change the color of the highlighter click on down arrow next to the highlight
button.

Copy Formatting
If you have already formatted text the way you want it and would like another
portion of the document to have the same formatting, you can copy the
formatting. To copy the formatting, do the following:

Select the text with the formatting you want to copy.

Copy the format of the text selected by clicking the Format Painter button on the
Clipboard Group of the Home Tab
Apply the copied format by selecting the text and clicking on it.

Clear Formatting
To clear text formatting:

Select the text you wish to clear the formatting


Click the Styles dialogue box on the Styles Group on the Home Tab
Click Clear All

Formatting Paragraphs

Change Paragraph Alignment


Indent Paragraphs
Add Borders and Shading
Apply Styles
Create Links
Change Spacing Between
Pargraphs and Lines

Formatting paragraphs allows you to change the look of the overall document.
You can access many of the tools of paragraph formatting by clicking the Page
Layout Tab of the Ribbon or the Paragraph Group on the Home Tab of the

Ribbon.

Change Paragraph Alignment


The paragraph alignment allows you to set how you want text to appear. To
change the alignment:

Click the Home Tab


Choose the appropriate button for alignment on the Paragraph Group.
Align Left: the text is aligned with your left margin
Center: The text is centered within your margins
Align Right: Aligns text with the right margin
Justify: Aligns text to both the left and right margins.

Indent Paragraphs
Indenting paragraphs allows you set text within a paragraph at different margins.
There are several options for indenting:

First Line: Controls the left boundary for the first line of a paragraph
Hanging: Controls the left boundary of every line in a paragraph except the first
one

Left: Controls the left boundary for every line in a paragraph


Right: Controls the right boundary for every line in a paragraph

To indent paragraphs, you can do the following:

Click the Indent buttons to control the indent.


Click the Indent button repeated times to increase the size of the indent.

Click the dialog box of the Paragraph Group


Click the Indents and Spacing Tab
Select your indents

Add Borders and Shading


You can add borders and shading to paragraphs and entire pages. To create a
border around a paragraph or paragraphs:

Select the area of text where you want the border or shading.
Click the Borders Button on the Paragraph Group on the Home Tab
Choose the Border and Shading
Choose the appropriate options

Apply Styles
Styles are a present collection of formatting that you can apply to text. To utilize
Quick Styles:

Select the text you wish to format.


Click the dialog box next to the Styles Group on the Home Tab.
Click the style you wish to apply.

Create Links
Creating links in a word document allows you to put in a URL that readers can
click on to visit a web page. To insert a link:

Click the Hyperlink Button on the Links Group of the Insert Tab.
Type in the text in the Text to Display box and the web address in the Address
box.

Change Spacing Between Paragraphs and Lines


You can change the space between lines and paragraphs by doing the following:

Select the paragraph or paragraphs you wish to change.


On the Home Tab, Click the Paragraph Dialog Box
Click the Indents and Spacing Tab
In the Spacing section, adjust your spacing accordingly

Styles

Apply a style
Create New Styles
New Style
New Quick Style
Style Inspector

The use of Styles in Word will allow you to quickly format a document with a
consistent and professional look. Styles can be saved for use in many
documents.
Apply Styles
There are many styles that are already in Word ready for you to use. To view the
available styles click the Styles dialog box on the Styles Group in the Home Tab.
To apply a style:

Select the text


Click the Styles Dialog Box
Click the Style you choose

Creating New Styles


You can create styles for formatting that you use regularly. There are two ways
to do this: New Styles or New Quick Styles.
New Styles
To create a new style:

Click the Styles Dialog Box


Click the New Style Button

Complete the New Style dialog box.


At the bottom of that dialog box, you can choose to add this to the Quick Style
List or to make it available only in this document.

New Quick Style


To create a style easily:

Insert your cursor anywhere in the chosen style


Click the Styles dialog box

Click Save Selection as New Quick Style

Style Inspector
To determine the style of a particular section of a document:

Insert cursor anywhere in the text that you want to explain the style
Click the Styles Drop Down Menu
Click the Style Inspector Button

Activity5.1
1.Explain how to search a particular word or phrase in a document.
2.Demonstrate how to Undo changes in a document.
3.Explain the formatting of styles,change text color and paragraph.

Week 6

TABLES
Adding Tables

Create a Table
Enter data in a Table
Modify the Table Structure and Format a Table

Tables are used to display data in a table format.


Create a Table
To create a table:

Place the cursor on the page where you want the new table
Click the Insert Tab of the Ribbon
Click the Tables Button on the Tables Group. You can create a table one of four
ways:
Highlight the number of row and columns
Click Insert Table and enter the number of rows and columns
Click the Draw Table, create your table by clicking and entering the rows
and columns
Click Quick Tables and choose a table

Enter Data in a Table


Place the cursor in the cell where you wish to enter the information. Begin
typing.

Modify the Table Structure and Format a Table


To modify the structure of a table:

Click the table and notice that you have two new tabs on the Ribbon: Design and
Layout. These pertain to the table design and layout.

.
On the Design Tab, you can choose:

Table Style Options


Table Styles
Draw Borders

To format a table, click the table and then click the Layout Tab on the Ribbon.
This Layout tab allows you to:

View Gridlines and Properties (from the Table Group)


Insert Rows and Columns (from the Rows & Columns Group)
Delete the Table, Rows and/or Columns (from the Rows & Columns Group)
Merge or Split Cells (from the Merge Group)
Increase and Decrease cell size (Cell Size Group)
Align text within the cells and change text directions (Alignment Group)

Activity6.1
1. Demonstrate how to create a table and enter a suitable data into the table.
2. Save the table with individual Name.

WEEK 7
GRAPHICS

Symbols and Special Characters


Equations
Illustrations, Pictures, and SmartArt
Watermarks

Word 2007 allows you to insert special characters, symbols, pictures, illustrations,
and watermarks.

Symbols and Special Characters


Special characters are punctuation, spacing, or typographical characters that are
not generally available on the standard keyboard. To insert symbols and special
characters:

Place your cursor in the document where you want the symbol
Click the Insert Tab on the Ribbon
Click the Symbol button on the Symbols Group
Choose the appropriate symbol.

Equations
Word 2007 also allows you to insert mathematical equations. To access the
mathematical equations tool:

Place your cursor in the document where you want the symbol
Click the Insert Tab on the Ribbon
Click the Equation Button on the Symbols Group
Choose the appropriate equation and structure or click Insert New Equation

To edit the equation click the equation and the Design Tab will be available in the
Ribbon

Illustrations, Pictures, and SmartArt


Word 2007 allows you to insert illustrations and pictures into a document. To
insert illustrations:

Place your cursor in the document where you want the illustration/picture
Click the Insert Tab on the Ribbon
Click the Clip Art Button
The dialog box will open on the screen and you can search for clip art.
Choose the illustration you wish to include

To insert a picture:

Place your cursor in the document where you want the illustration/picture
Click the Insert Tab on the Ribbon
Click the Picture Button
Browse to the picture you wish to include
Click the Picture
Click Insert

Smart Art is a collection of graphics you can utilize to organize information


within your document. It includes timelines, processes, or workflow. To insert
SmartArt

Place your cursor in the document where you want the illustration/picture
Click the Insert Tab on the Ribbon
Click the SmartArt button
Click the SmartArt you wish to include in your document
Click the arrow on the left side of the graphic to insert text or type the text in the
graphic.

Resize Graphics
All graphics can be resized by clicking the image and clicking one corner of the
image and dragging the cursor to the size you want the picture.

Watermarks
A watermark is a translucent image that appears behind the primary text in a
document. To insert a watermark:

Click the Page Layout Tab in the Ribbon


Click the Watermark Button in the Page Background Group

Click the Watermark you want for the document or click Custom Watermark and
create your own watermark
To remove a watermark, follow the steps above, but click Remove Watermark

Activity7.1
1. Demonstrate how to insert a picture.
2. Demonstrate how to resize the pictue.

WEEK 8

Proofreading a Document

Spelling and Grammar


Thesaurus
Customize AutoCorrect
Create a New Default Dictionary
Check Word Count

There are many features to help you proofread your document. These include:
Spelling and Grammar, Thesaurus, AutoCorrect, Default Dictionary, and Word
Count.
Spelling and Grammar
To check the spelling and grammar of a document

Place the cursor at the beginning of the document or the beginning of the section
that you want to check
Click the Review Tab on the Ribbon
Click Spelling & Grammar on the Proofing Group.

Any errors will display a dialog box that allows you to choose a more appropriate
spelling or phrasing.

If you wish to check the spelling of an individual word, you can right click any
word that has been underlined by Word and choose a substitution.

Thesaurus
The Thesaurus allows you to view synonyms. To use the thesaurus:

Click the Review Tab of the Ribbon


Click the Thesaurus Button on the Proofing Group.
The thesaurus tool will appear on the right side of the screen and you can view
word options.

You can also access the thesaurus by right-clicking any word and choosing
Synonyms on the menu.

Customize AutoCorrect
You can set up the AutoCorrect tool in Word to retain certain text the way it is.
To customize AutoCorrect:

Click
Click
Click
Click

the Microsoft Office button


the Word Options Button
the Proofing tab
AutoCorrect Options button

On the AutoCorrect Tab, you can specify words you want to replace as you type

Create a New Default Dictionary


Often you will have business or educational jargon that may not be recognized by
the spelling and/or grammar check in Word. You can customize the dictionary to
recognize these words.

Click
Click
Click
Click
Click

the Microsoft Office button


the Word Options Button
the Proofing tab
the When Correcting Spelling tab
Custom Dictionaries

Click Edit Word List


Type in any words that you may use that are not recognized by the current
dictionary.

Check Word Count


To check the word count in Word 2007 look at the bottom left corner of the
screen. It will give you a total word count or if you have text highlighted it will
tell you how many words are highlighted out of the total.

Page Formatting

Modify Page Margins and Orientation


Apply a Page Border and Color
Insert Common Header and Footer Information
Create a Page Break
Insert a Cover Page
Insert a Blank Page

Modify Page Margins and Orientations


The page margins can be modified through the following steps:

Click the Page Layout Tab on the Ribbon


On the Page Setup Group, Click Margins
Click a Default Margin, or
Click Custom Margins and complete the dialog box.

I
To change the Orientation, Size of the Page, or Columns:

Click the Page Layout Tab on the Ribbon


On the Page Setup Group, Click the Orientation, Size, or Columns drop down
menus
Click the appropriate choice

Apply a Page Border and Color


To apply a page border or color:

Click the Page Layout Tab on the Ribbon


On the Page Background Group, click the Page Colors or Page Borders drop
down menus

Insert Common Header and Footer Information


To insert Header and Footer information such as page numbers, date, or title,

first, decide if you want the information in the header (at the top of the page) or
in the Footer (at the bottom of the page), then:

Click the Insert Tab on the Ribbon


Click Header or Footer
Choose a style

The Header/Footer Design Tab will display on the Ribbon


Choose the information that you would like to have in the header or footer (date,
time, page numbers, etc.) or type in the information you would like to have in the
header or footer

Create a Page Break


To insert a page break:

Click the Page Layout Tab on the Ribbon


On the Page Setup Group, click the Breaks Drop Down Menu
Click Page Break

Activity8.1
Demonstrate in the lab. How to do the following:
o Modify page margins and orientation.
o Insert a cover page.
o Insert ablank page.

WEEK 9
Insert a Cover Page
To insert a cover page:

Click the Insert Tab on the Ribbon


Click the Cover Page Button on the Pages Group
Choose a style for the cover page

I
Insert a Blank Page
To insert a blank page:

Click the Insert Tab on the Ribbon


Click the Blank Page Button on the Page Group

Table of Contents

Mark TOC Entries


Create a Table of Contents
Update Table of Contents
Delete Table of Contents

The easiest way to create a Table of Contents is to utilize the Heading Styles
that you want to include in the Table of Contents. For example: Heading 1,
Heading 2, etc. based on the content of your document. When you add or delete
headings from your document, Word updates your Table of Contents. Word
also updates the page number in the table of contents when information in the
document is added or deleted. When you create a Table of Contents, the first
thing you want to do is mark the entries in your document. The Table of
Contents is formatted based on levels of headings. Level 1 will include any text
identified with the style Heading 1.
Mark Table of Contents Entries
You can mark the Table of Contents entries in one of two ways: by using built-in
heading styles or by marking individual text entries.
To Use Built-In Heading Styles

Select the text that you wish to be the heading


Click the Home Tab
In the Styles Group, click Heading 1 (or the appropriate heading)

If you dont see the style you want, click the arrow to expand the Quick Styles
Gallery
If the style you want does not appear click Save Selection as New Quick Style

To Mark Individual Entries:

Select the text you wish to make a heading


Click the References Tab
Click Add Text in the Table of Contents Group
Click the Level that you want to label your selection

Create a Table of Contents


To create the table of contents:

Put your cursor in the document where you want the Table of Contents
Click the References Tab
Click the Table of Contents button

Update Table of Contents


If you have added or removed headings or other table of contents entries you can
update by:

Apply headings or mark individual entries as directed above


Click the References Tab in the Ribbon
Click Update Table

Delete Table of Contents


To delete a table of contents:

Click the References Tab on the Ribbon


Click Table of Contents
Click Remove Table of Contents

Activity9.1

o
o
o
o

Demonstrate how to create a table of contents


Update the table of contents
Show how to delete table of contents.

WEEK 10

MAIL MERGE
Use mail merge to create and print letters and
other documents
You use mail merge when you want to create a set of documents, such as a form letter that is sent to
many customers or a sheet of address labels. Each letter or label has the same kind of information, yet
the content is unique. For example, in letters to your customers, each letter can be personalized to
address each customer by name. The unique information in each letter or label comes from entries in a
data source.

The mail merge process entails the following overall steps:

1.

Set up the main document. The main document contains the text and graphics that are the same
for each version of the merged document. For example, the return address or salutation in a form
letter.

2.

Connect the document to a data source. A data source is a file that contains the information to be
merged into a document. For example, the names and addresses of the recipients of a letter.

3.

Refine the list of recipients or items. Microsoft Office Word generates a copy of the main
document for each item, or record, in your data file. If your data file is a mailing list, these items
are probably recipients of your mailing. If you want to generate copies for only certain items in
your data file, you can choose which items (records) to include.

4.

Add placeholders, called mail merge fields, to the document. When you perform the mail merge,
the mail merge fields are filled with information from your data file.

5.

Preview and complete the merge. You can preview each copy of the document before you print
the whole set.

You use commands on the Mailings tab to perform a mail merge.

TIP You can also perform a mail merge by using the Mail Merge task pane, which leads you step by
step through the process. To use the task pane, in the Start Mail Merge group on the Mailings tab,
click Start Mail Merge, and then click Step by Step Mail Merge Wizard.

Set up the main document


1.

Start Word.

A blank document opens by default. Leave it open. If you close it, the commands in the next step
are not available.

2.

On the Mailings tab, in the Start Mail Merge group, click Start Mail Merge.

3.

Click the type of document that you want to create.

For example, you can create:

A set of envelopes The return address is the same on all the envelopes, but the destination
address is unique on each one. Click Envelopes, and then specify your preferences for envelope
size and text formatting on the Envelope Options tab of the Envelope Options dialog box.

A set of address labels Each label shows a person's name and address, but the name and
address on each label is unique. Click Labels, and then specify your preferences for the type of
label in the Label Options dialog box.

A set of form letters or e-mail messages The basic content is the same in all the letters or
messages, but each contains information that is specific to the individual recipient, such as name,
address, or some other piece of information. Click Letters or E-mail messages to create these
types of documents.

A catalog or directory The same kind of information, such as name and description, is shown
for each item, but the name and description in each item is unique. Click Directory to create this
type of document.

Resume a mail merge


If you need to stop working on a mail merge, you can save the main document and resume the merge
later. Microsoft Office Word retains the data source and field information. If you were using the Mail
Merge task pane, Word returns to your place in the task pane when you resume the merge.

1.

When you're ready to resume the merge, open the document.

Word displays a message that asks you to confirm whether you want to open the document, which
will run a SQL command.

2.

Because this document is connected to a data source and you want to retrieve the data, click Yes.
If you were opening a document that you did not realize was connected to a data source, you
could click No to prevent potentially malicious access to data.

The text of the document, along with any fields that you inserted, appears.

3.

Click the Mailings tab, and resume your work.

Connect the document to a data source


To merge information into your main document, you must connect the document to a data source, or a
data file. If you don't already have a data file, you can create one during the mail merge process.

Choose a data file


1.

On the Mailings tab, in the Start Mail Merge group, click Select Recipients.

2.

Do one of the following:

If you want to use your Contacts list in Outlook, click Select from Outlook Contacts.

Tips for working with Microsoft Outlook Contacts list

I can't find my Outlook Contacts folder to connect to it.

I get error messages about mail clients and tables.

I can't connect to an Outlook Contacts folder in Public Folders.

I want to use my Outlook Express address book as my Contacts folder, but I can't
connect to it.

5.

6.

In Microsoft Office Outlook, on the Go menu, click Contacts.

Right-click the Contacts folder that contains the information that you want to use for a
mail merge, and then click Properties.

7.

On the Outlook Address Book tab, make sure that the Show this folder as an email Address Book check box is selected, and then click OK.

8.

9.

Close Outlook.

In Control Panel, switch to Classic View, and then click Mail.

10. Click Show Profiles.

11. To be prompted to select a profile each time you start Outlook, click Prompt for a
profile to be used, and then click OK.

12.

Exit Word.

13. On the Internet Explorer Tools menu, click Internet Options, and then click the
Programs tab.

14. Under E-mail, click Microsoft Office Outlook, and then click OK.

15.

Start Microsoft Outlook Express.

16. On the File menu, point to Export, and then click Address Book.

17. In the Address Book Export Tool dialog box, click Text File (Comma Separated
Values), and then click Export.

18. In the Save exported file as box, type a file name for your exported file, and then
click Browse.

19. In the Save As dialog box, in the Save in list, choose where you want to save the file,
and then click Save. It's handy to save data files in the My Data Sources folder in
your My Documents folder. That's where Word looks first for data files when you
browse for them during a merge.

20. Click Next. Select the check boxes next to the fields that you want to export, and then
click Finish.

NOTE

When you are deciding which fields to export, think about the form letters

or e-mail messages or labels that you intend to create with mail merge. For example,
if you never include nicknames or personal Web sites in your merged documents,
don't export those fields.

21.

When you receive the message that the export procedure is completed, click

OK.

22. To close the Address Book Export Tool dialog box, click Close, and then exit
Outlook Express.

If you have a Microsoft Office Excel worksheet, a Microsoft Office Access database, or
another type of data file, click Use Existing List, and then locate the file in the Select Data
Source dialog box.

For Excel, you can select data from any worksheet or named range within a workbook. For
Access, you can select data from any table or query that is defined in the database. For
another type of data file, select the file in the Select Data Source dialog box. If the file is not
listed, select the appropriate file type or select All Files in the Files of type box. In a mail
merge, you can use the following types of data files:

Files from single-tier, file-based database programs for which you have installed an
OLE DB provider or ODBC driver (a number of which are included with Microsoft
Office).

An HTML file that has a single table. The first row of the table must contain column
names, and the other rows must contain data.

Electronic address books:

Microsoft Outlook Address Book

Microsoft Schedule+ 7.0 Contact List

Any similar address lists that were created with a MAPI-compatible messaging
system, such as Microsoft Outlook.

A Microsoft Word docume


ent. The docum
ment should con
ntain a single ta
able. The first
row of the ta
able must conttain headings, a
and the other rows
r
must conttain the records
s
that you want to merge. You can also usse a header sou
urce as a data source.

Any text file


e that has data fields separate
ed (or delimited
d) by tab characters or commas
and data records separate
ed by paragrap
ph marks.

n Excel
Tips for forrmatting data in

5..

Click the Miicrosoft Office


e Button

ns.
, and then clickk Word Option

6..

Click Advan
nced.

7..

Scroll to the
e General section, and selectt the Confirm file
f format con
nversion on
open check
k box.

8..

Click OK.

9..

With the ma
ail merge main document ope
en, in the Start Mail Merge grroup of the
Mailings ta
ab, click Select Recipients, a
and then click Use
U Existing L
List.

10
0. Locate the Excel
E
worksheet in the Selec
ct Data Source
e dialog box, an
nd double-clickk it.

11
1. In the Conffirm Data Sourrce dialog box, click MS Exce
el Worksheets
s via DDE (*.xls),
and then click OK.

NOTE

If you don't see


e MS Excel Wo
orksheets via DDE (*.xls), se
elect the Show
w

all check bo
ox.

12
2. In the Micro
osoft Office Ex
xcel dialog boxx, for Named or
o cell range, sselect the cell
range or wo
orksheet that co
ontains the info
ormation that you want to merrge, and then
click OK.

NOTE

To
T prevent bein
ng prompted evvery time you open
o
a data file
e, you can turn off

the Confirm
m conversion at Open option
n after you havve connected to
o the workshee
et.

If you don't have a data file


e yet, click Typ
pe a new list, and
a then use th
he form that op
pens
t create your list. The list is saved
to
s
as a dattabase (.mdb) file
f that you can reuse.

NOT
TE

If you installed 2007 Mic


crosoft Office syystem (instead of installing Microsoft
M
Word by
b itself),

you ca
an also use Miccrosoft Query to construct a q
query and retrie
eve the data yo
ou want from an
n external
data source.

p of Page
Top

Re
efine the listt of re
ecipien
nts or items
s
When you connect to
o a certain data
a file, you migh
ht not want to merge
m
informatiion from all the
e records in
that da
ata file into you
ur main docume
ent.

To narrrow the list of recipients or usse a subset of the items in yo


our data file, do
o the following:

1.

On the Mailings tab,


t
in the Starrt Mail Merge g
group, click Ed
dit Recipient List.

2.

t Mail Merge
e Recipients dialog box, do a
any of the follow
wing:
In the

S
Select
individual records This
T
method is most useful if your
y
list is shorrt. Select the ch
heck
boxes next to the
t recipients you
y want to incclude, and clearr the check boxxes next to the
recipients you want to exclud
de.

at you want to include


i
only a ffew records in your merge, yo
ou can clear th
he
If you know tha
c
check
box in th
he header row and then selecct only those re
ecords that you want. Similarlyy, if
y want to incclude most of th
you
he list, select th
he check box in the header ro
ow, and then clear
t check boxe
the
es for the recorrds that you do
on't want to include.

Sort records Click the column heading of the item that you want to sort by. The list sorts in
ascending alphabetical order (from A to Z). Click the column heading again to sort the list in
descending alphabetical order (Z to A).

If you want more complex sorting, click Sort under Refine recipient list and choose your
sorting preferences on the Sort Records tab of the Filter and Sort dialog box. For
example, you can use this type of sorting if you want recipient addresses to be alphabetized
by last name within each zip code and the zip codes listed in numerical order.

Filter records This is useful if the list contains records that you know you don't want to see
or include in the merge. After you filter the list, you can use the check boxes to include and
exclude records.

To filter records, do the following:

1.

Under Refine recipient list, click Filter.

2.

On the Filter Records tab of the Filter and Sort dialog box, choose the criteria you
want to use for the filter.

For example, to generate copies of your main document only for addresses that list
Australia as the country/region, you would click Country or Region in the Field list,
Equal to in the Comparison list, and Australia in the Compare to list.

3.

To refine the filter further, click And or Or, and then specify more criteria.

For example, to generate copies of your main document only for businesses in
Munich, you would filter on records whose City field contains Munich and whose
Company Name field is not blank. If you use Or instead of And in this filter, your mail
merge includes all Munich addresses as well as all addresses that include a company
name, regardless of city.

NOTE

If you have installed address validation software, you can click Validate addresses in the

Mail Merge Recipients dialog box to validate your recipients' addresses.

Add placeholders, called mail merge


fields, to the document
After you connect your main document to a data file, you are ready to type the text of the document and
add placeholders that indicate where the unique information will appear in each copy of the document.

The placeholders, such as address and greeting, are called mail merge fields. Fields in Word
correspond to the column headings in the data file that you select.

Columns in a data file represent categories of information. Fields that you add to the main document
are placeholders for these categories.

Rows in a data file represent records of information. Word generates a copy of the main document for
each record when you perform a mail merge.

By putting a field in your main document, you indicate that you want a certain category of information,
such as name or address, to appear in that location.

NOTE

When you insert a mail merge field into the main document, the field name is always

surrounded by chevrons ( ). These chevrons do not show up in the merged documents. They just help
you distinguish the fields in the main document from the regular text.

What happens when you merge


When you merge, information from the first row in the data file replaces the fields in your main document
to create the first merged document. Information from the second row in the data file replaces the fields
to create the second merged document, and so on.

Working with fields: Examples

You can add any column heading from your data file to the main document as a field. This gives you
flexibility when you design form letters, labels, e-mail messages, and other merged documents. For
example:

Suppose you are creating a letter to notify local businesses that they have been selected for
inclusion in your annual city guide. If your data file contains a Company column with the name of
each business that you want to contact, you can insert the Company field instead of typing the
name of each individual company.

Imagine that you send quarterly e-mail messages to your customers alerting them to new products
and special deals. To personalize those messages for your best customers, you can add a
PersonalNote column to your data file where you can type notes such as "Miss Miller, the new
widget is exactly what you have been looking for." By placing a PersonalNote field in the main
document, you can include those notes at the bottom of certain messages.

Suppose that your mailing list is for subscribers to your newsletter, and your data file includes a
column, called ExpireDate, for storing the date that each subscription expires. If you place an
ExpireDate field in the label main document before you run the merge, subscribers will each
see their own expiration date on their mailing label.

You can combine fields and separate them by punctuation marks. For example, to create an address,
you can set up the fields in your main document like this:

First Name Last Name

Street Address

City, State Postal code

For things that you use frequently, like address blocks and greeting lines, Word provides composite
fields that group a number of fields together. For example:

The Address Block field is a combination of several fields, including first name, last name, street
address, city, and postal code.

The Greeting Line field can include one or more name fields, depending on your chosen
salutation.

You can customize the content in each of these composite fields. For example, in the address, you may
want to select a formal name format (Mr. Joshua Randall Jr.); in the greeting, you may want to use "To"
instead of "Dear."

Map mail merge fields to your data file


To make sure that Word can find a column in your data file that corresponds to every address or
greeting element, you may need to map the mail merge fields in Word to the columns in your data file.

To map the fields, click Match Fields in the Write & Insert Fields group of the Mailings tab.

The Match Fields dialog box opens.

The elements of an address and greeting are listed on the left. Column headings from your data file are
listed on the right.

Word searches for the column that matches each element. In the illustration, Word automatically
matched the data file's Surname column to Last Name. But Word was unable to match other elements.
From this data file, for example, Word can't match First Name.

In the list on the right, you can select the column from your data file that matches the element on the left.
In the illustration, the Name column now matches First Name. It's okay that Courtesy Title, Unique
Identifier, and Middle Name aren't matched. Your mail merge document doesn't need to use every
field. If you add a field that does not contain data from your data file, it will appear in the merged
document as an empty placeholder usually a blank line or a hidden field.

Type content and add fields


1.

In the main document, click where you want to insert the field.

2.

Use the Write & Insert Fields group on the Mailings tab.

3.

Add any of the following:

Address block with name, address, and other information

1.

Click Address block.

2.

In the Insert Address Block dialog box, select the address elements that you want to
include and the formats that you want, and then click OK.

3.

If the Match Fields dialog box appears, Word may have been unable to find some of the
information that it needs for the address block. Click the arrow next to (not matched), and
then select the field from your data source that corresponds to the field that is required for
the mail merge.

Greeting line

4.

Click Greeting line.

5.

Select the greeting line format, which includes the salutation, name format, and following
punctuation.

6.

Select the text that you want to appear in cases where Microsoft Word can't interpret the
recipient's name, for example, when the data source contains no first or last name for a
recipient, but only a company name.

7.

Click OK.

8.

If the Match Fields dialog box appears, Word may have been unable to find some of the
information that it needs for the greeting line. Click the arrow next to (not matched), and
then select the field from your data source that corresponds to the field that is required for
the mail merge.

9.

On the Mailings tab, in the Write & Insert Fields group, click Insert Merge Field.

10. In the Insert Merge Field dialog box, do one of the following:

To select address fields that will automatically correspond to fields in your data
source, even if the data source's fields don't have the same name as your fields, click
Address Fields.

To select fields that always take data directly from a column in your data file, click
Database Fields.

11. In the Fields box, click the field you want.

12. Click Insert, and then click Close.

13. If the Match Fields dialog box appears, Microsoft Word may have been unable to find some
of the information it needs to insert the field. Click the arrow next to (not matched), and
then select the field from your data source that corresponds to the field that is required for
the mail merge.

Custom fields from Outlook contacts

14. In Outlook Contacts, on the View menu, point to Current View, and then click Phone List.

15. Right-click a column heading, and then click Field Chooser.

16. In the drop-down list at the top of the Field Chooser dialog box, select User-defined fields
in folder.

17. Drag the field that you to add from the dialog box to the column headings. A little red arrow
helps you place the field in the location that you want.

NOTE

You can add a new field in the Field Chooser dialog box by clicking New at the

bottom.

18. After you add all of your custom fields to the view, close the Field Chooser dialog box.

19. To remove a field that you do not want included in the mail merge, click the field name in the
column heading in Phone List view, and drag it off of the column heading.

20. In Outlook Contacts, select individual contacts by pressing SHIFT and clicking to select a
range or by pressing CTRL and clicking to select individuals. If you want to include all the
contacts currently visible in the view, do not click on any contacts.

21. On the Tools menu, click Mail Merge.

22. If you have selected individual contacts to include in the merge, click Only selected
contacts. If you want to include all the contacts currently visible in the view, click All
contacts in current view.

23. If you have configured the Phone List view so that it displays exactly the fields you want to
use in the merge, click Contact fields in current view. Otherwise, click All contact fields
to make all of the contact fields available in the merge.

24. If you want to generate a new main document for the merge, click New document.
Otherwise, click Existing document, and click Browse to locate the document to use as
the main document.

25. If you want to save the contacts and fields that you have selected, so that they can be
reused, select the Permanent file check box, and then click Browse to save the file. The
data is saved in a Word document as comma-delimited data.

26. Select any merge options you want:

Form Letters Prepare a batch of letters for a mass mailing.

Mailing Labels Set up address labels for a mass mailing.

Envelopes Set up envelopes for a mass mailing.

Catalog Create a single document that contains a catalog or address list.

New Document Generate merged documents, which you can edit individually in
Word.

Printer Send merged documents directly to the default printer.

E-mail Generate merged documents designed to be e-mail messages. When you are
ready to complete the merge in Word, on the Mailings tab in the Finish group, click
Finish & Merge, and then click Send E-mail Messages. The Subject line is filled
with the text you typed in the Mail Merge Contacts dialog box in Outlook.

27. Click OK. When the document opens in Word, on the Mailings tab, in the Write & Insert
Fields group, click the arrow next to Insert Merge Field, and then click the fields that you
want to add the document.

NOTES

You can't type merge field characters ( ) manually or use the Symbol command on the
Insert menu. You must use mail merge.

If the merge fields appear inside braces, such as { MERGEFIELD City }, then Microsoft Word is
displaying field codes instead of field results. This doesn't affect the merge, but if you want to
display the results instead, right-click the field code, and then click Toggle Field Codes on the
shortcut menu.

Format merged data


Database and spreadsheet programs, such as Microsoft Office Access and Microsoft Office Excel, store
the information that you type in cells as raw data. Formatting that you apply in Access or Excel, such as
fonts and colors, isn't stored with the raw data. When you merge information from a data file into a Word
document, you are merging the raw data without the applied formatting.

To format the data in the document, select the mail merge field and format it, just as you would format
any text. Make sure that the selection includes the chevrons ( ) that surround the field.

Preview and complete the merge


After you add fields to your main document, you are ready to preview the merge results. When you are
satisfied with the preview, you can complete the merge.

Preview the merge


You can preview your merged documents and make changes before you actually complete the merge.

To preview, do any of the following in the Preview Results group of the Mailings tab:

Click Preview Results.

Page through each merged document by using the Next Record and Previous Record buttons in
the Preview Results group.

Preview a specific document by clicking Find Recipient.

NOTE

Click Edit Recipient List in the Start Mail Merge group on the Mailings tab to open the Mail

Merge Recipients dialog box, where you can filter the list or clear recipients if you see records that you
don't want to include.

Complete the merge


You can print the merged documents or modify them individually. You can print or change all or just a
subset of the documents.

Print the merged documents


1.

On the Mailings tab, in the Finish group, click Finish & Merge, and then click Print Documents.

2.

Choose whether to print the whole set of documents, only the copy that's currently visible, or a
subset of the set, which you specify by record number.

Change individual copies of the document


1.

On the Mailings tab, in the Finish group, click Finish & Merge, and then click Edit Individual
Documents.

2.

Choose whether you want to edit the whole set of documents, only the copy that's currently
visible, or a subset of the set, which you specify by record number. Word saves the copies that
you want to edit to a single file, with a page break between each copy of the document.

Save the main document


Remember that merged documents that you save are separate from the main document. It's a good
idea to save the main document itself if you plan to use it for another mail merge.

When you save the main document, you also save its connection to the data file. The next time that you
open the main document, you are prompted to choose whether you want the information from the data
file to be merged again into the main document.

If you click Yes, the document opens with information from the first record merged in.

If you click No, the connection between the main document and the data file is broken. The main
document becomes a standard Word document. Fields are replaced with the unique information
from the first record.

Week11
Introduction to Excel

Getting started with Excel 2007 you will notice that there are many similar
features to previous versions. You will also notice that there are many
new features that youll be able to utilize. There are three features that
you should remember as you work within Excel 2007: the Microsoft Office
Button, the Quick Access Toolbar, and the Ribbon. The function of these
features will be more fully explored below.

Spreadsheets
A spreadsheet is an electronic document that stores various types of
data. There are vertical columns and horizontal rows. A cell is where the
column and row intersect. A cell can contain data and can be used in
calculations of data within the spreadsheet. An Excel spreadsheet can
contain workbooks and worksheets.

The workbook is the holder for

related worksheets.
Microsoft Office Button
The Microsoft Office Button performs many of the functions that were located in
the File menu of older versions of Excel. This button allows you to create a new
workbook, Open an existing workbook, save and save as, print, send, or close.

Ribbon
The ribbon is the panel at the top portion of the document It has seven tabs:
Home, Insert, Page Layouts, Formulas, Data, Review, and View. Each tab is
divided into groups. The groups are logical collections of features designed to
perform function that you will utilize in developing or editing your Excel
spreadsheets.

Commonly utilized features are displayed on the Ribbon. To view additional


features within each group, click the arrow at the bottom right corner of each
group.

Home: Clipboard, Fonts, Alignment, Number, Styles, Cells, Editing


Insert: Tables, Illustrations, Charts, Links, Text
Page Layouts: Themes, Page Setup, Scale to Fit, Sheet Options, Arrange
Formulas: Function Library, Defined Names, Formula Auditing, Calculation
Data: Get External Data, Connections, Sort & Filter, Data Tools, Outline
Review: Proofing, Comments, Changes
View: Workbook Views, Show/Hide, Zoom, Window, Macros
Quick Access Toolbar
The quick access toolbar is a customizable toolbar that contains commands
that you may want to use. You can place the quick access toolbar above or below
the ribbon. To change the location of the quick access toolbar, click on the error
at the end of the toolbar and click Show Below the Ribbon.

You can also add items to the quick access toolbar. Right click on any item in the
Office Button or the Ribbon and click Add to Quick Access Toolbar and a shortcut
will be added.

Mini Toolbar
A new feature in Office 2007 is the Mini Toolbar. This is a floating toolbar that is
displayed when you select text or right-click text. It displays common formatting
tools, such as Bold, Italics, Fonts, Font Size and Font Color.

Activity11.1
Identify each features of the below items
1. Home
2. Formular
3. Review.
4. View.

Week12

POPULAR
These features allow you to personalize your work environment with the mini
toolbar, color schemes, default options for new workbooks, customize sort and fill
sequences user name and allow you to access the Live Preview feature. The Live
Preview feature allows you to preview the results of applying design and
formatting changes without actually applying it.

Formulas
This feature allows you to modify calculation options, working with formulas,
error checking, and error checking rules.

Advanced
This feature allows you to specify options for editing, copying, pasting, printing,
displaying, formulas, calculations, and other general settings.

Save
This feature allows you personalize how your workbook is saved. You can specify
how often you want auto save to run and where you want the workbooks saved.

Work with a Workbook

Create a Workbook
To create a new Workbook:

Click the Microsoft Office Toolbar


Click New
Choose Blank Document

If you want to create a new document from a template, explore the templates
and choose one that fits your needs.

Save a Workbook
When you save a workbook, you have two choices: Save or Save As.
To save a document:

Click the Microsoft Office Button


Click Save

You may need to use the Save As feature when you need to save a workbook
under a different name or to save it for earlier versions of Excel. Remember that
older versions of Excel will not be able to open an Excel 2007 worksheet unless
you save it as an Excel 97-2003 Format. To use the Save As feature:

Click the Microsoft Office Button


Click Save As
Type in the name for the Workbook
In the Save as Type box, choose Excel 97-2003 Workbook

Open a Workbook
To open an existing workbook:

Click the Microsoft Office Button


Click Open
Browse to the workbook
Click the title of the workbook
Click Open

Entering Data
There are different ways to enter data in Excel: in an active cell or in the formula
bar.
To enter data in an active cell:

Click in the cell where you want the data


Begin typing

To enter data into the formula bar

Click the cell where you would like the data


Place the cursor in the Formula Bar
Type in the data

Week 13

Modifying a worksheet
Excel allows you to move, copy, and paste cells and cell content through cutting
and pasting and copying and pasting.
Select Data
To select a cell or data to be copied or cut:

Click the cell

Click and drag the cursor to select many cells in a range

Activity12.1
Demonstrate in the lab. How to modify a worksheet.e.g
- Copying,cutting,pasting.
-

Modifying a worksheet
Excel allows you to move, copy, and paste cells and cell content through cutting
and pasting and copying and pasting.
Select Data
To select a cell or data to be copied or cut:

Click the cell

Click and drag the cursor to select many cells in a range

Select a Row or Column


To select a row or column click on the row or column header.

Copy and Paste


To copy and paste data:

Select the cell(s) that you wish to copy


On the Clipboard group of the Home tab, click Copy

Select the cell(s) where you would like to copy the data
On the Clipboard group of the Home tab, click Paste

Cut and Paste


To cut and paste data:

Select the cell(s) that you wish to copy


On the Clipboard group of the Home tab, click Cut

Select the cell(s) where you would like to copy the data
On the Clipboard group of the Home tab, click Paste

Undo and Redo


To undo or redo your most recent actions:

On the Quick Access Toolbar


Click Undo or Redo

Auto Fill
The Auto Fill feature fills cell data or series of data in a worksheet into a selected
range of cells. If you want the same data copied into the other cells, you only
need to complete one cell. If you want to have a series of data (for example,
days of the week) fill in the first two cells in the series and then use the auto fill
feature. To use the Auto Fill feature:

Click the Fill Handle


Drag the Fill Handle to complete the cells

Insert Cells, Rows, and Columns


To insert cells, rows, and columns in Excel:

Place the cursor in the row below where you want the new row, or in the column to
the left of where you want the new column
Click the Insert button on the Cells group of the Home tab
Click the appropriate choice: Cell, Row, or Column

Delete Cells, Rows and Columns


To delete cells, rows, and columns:

Place the cursor in the cell, row, or column that you want to delete
Click the Delete button on the Cells group of the Home tab
Click the appropriate choice: Cell, Row, or Column

Find and Replace


To find data or find and replace data:

Click the Find & Select button on the Editing group of the Home tab
Choose Find or Replace
Complete the Find What text box
Click on Options for more search options

Go To Command
The Go To command takes you to a specific cell either by cell reference (the
Column Letter and the Row Number) or cell name.

Click the Find & Select button on the Editing group of the Home tab

Click Go To

Spell Check
To check the spelling:

On the Review tab click the Spelling button

Perform calculation
Excel Formulas
A formula is a set of mathematical instructions that can be used in Excel to
perform calculations. Formals are started in the formula box with an = sign.

There are many elements to and excel formula.

References: The cell or range of cells that you want to use in your calculation
Operators: Symbols (+, -, *, /, etc.) that specify the calculation to be
performed
Constants: Numbers or text values that do not change
Functions: Predefined formulas in Excel
To create a basic formula in Excel:

Select the cell for the formula


Type = (the equal sign) and the formula
Click Enter

Calculate with Functions


A function is a built in formula in Excel. A function has a name and arguments
(the mathematical function) in parentheses. Common functions in Excel:
Sum: Adds all cells in the argument
Average: Calculates the average of the cells in the argument
Min: Finds the minimum value
Max: Finds the maximum value
Count: Finds the number of cells that contain a numerical value within a range
of the argument
To calculate a function:

Click the cell where you want the function applied


Click the Insert Function button
Choose the function
Click OK

Complete the Number 1 box with the first cell in the range that you want
calculated
Complete the Number 2 box with the last cell in the range that you want calculated

Function Library
The function library is a large group of functions on the Formula Tab of the
Ribbon. These functions include:
AutoSum: Easily calculates the sum of a range
Recently Used: All recently used functions
Financial: Accrued interest, cash flow return rates and additional financial
functions
Logical: And, If, True, False, etc.
Text: Text based functions
Date & Time: Functions calculated on date and time
Math & Trig: Mathematical Functions

Relative, Absolute and Mixed References


Calling cells by just their column and row labels (such as "A1") is called relative
referencing. When a formula contains relative referencing and it is copied from
one cell to another, Excel does not create an exact copy of the formula. It will
change cell addresses relative to the row and column they are moved to. For
example, if a simple addition formula in cell C1 "=(A1+B1)" is copied to cell C2,
the formula would change to "=(A2+B2)" to reflect the new row. To prevent this
change, cells must be called by absolute referencing and this is accomplished
by placing dollar signs "$" within the cell addresses in the formula. Continuing the
previous example, the formula in cell C1 would read "=($A$1+$B$1)" if the value
of cell C2 should be the sum of cells A1 and B1. Both the column and row of both
cells are absolute and will not change when copied. Mixed referencing can also
be used where only the row OR column fixed. For example, in the formula
"=(A$1+$B2)", the row of cell A1 is fixed and the column of cell B2 is fixed.
Linking Worksheets
You may want to use the value from a cell in another worksheet within the same
workbook in a formula. For example, the value of cell A1 in the current worksheet

and cell A2 in the second worksheet can be added using the format
"sheetname!celladdress". The formula for this example would be
"=A1+Sheet2!A2" where the value of cell A1 in the current worksheet is added to
the value of cell A2 in the worksheet named "Sheet2"

Excel Formulas
A formula is a set of mathematical instructions that can be used in Excel to
perform calculations. Formals are started in the formula box with an = sign.

There are many elements to and excel formula.


References: The cell or range of cells that you want to use in your calculation
Operators: Symbols (+, -, *, /, etc.) that specify the calculation to be
performed
Constants: Numbers or text values that do not change
Functions: Predefined formulas in Excel
To create a basic formula in Excel:

Select the cell for the formula


Type = (the equal sign) and the formula
Click Enter

Activity13.1
1. Explain how to create a basic formula in Excel.
2. Use the predefined formulas in Excel,explain how to calculate a
function.

Week14

Autosum
AutoSum: Easily calculates the sum of a range
Recently Used: All recently used functions
Financial: Accrued interest, cash flow return rates and additional financial
functions
Logical: And, If, True, False, etc.
Text: Text based functions
Date & Time: Functions calculated on date and time
Math & Trig: Mathematical Functions

Relative, Absolute and Mixed References


Calling cells by just their column and row labels (such as "A1") is called relative
referencing. When a formula contains relative referencing and it is copied from
one cell to another, Excel does not create an exact copy of the formula. It will
change cell addresses relative to the row and column they are moved to. For
example, if a simple addition formula in cell C1 "=(A1+B1)" is copied to cell C2,
the formula would change to "=(A2+B2)" to reflect the new row. To prevent this
change, cells must be called by absolute referencing and this is accomplished
by placing dollar signs "$" within the cell addresses in the formula. Continuing the
previous example, the formula in cell C1 would read "=($A$1+$B$1)" if the value
of cell C2 should be the sum of cells A1 and B1. Both the column and row of both
cells are absolute and will not change when copied. Mixed referencing can also
be used where only the row OR column fixed. For example, in the formula
"=(A$1+$B2)", the row of cell A1 is fixed and the column of cell B2 is fixed.
Linking Worksheets
You may want to use the value from a cell in another worksheet within the same
workbook in a formula. For example, the value of cell A1 in the current worksheet
and cell A2 in the second worksheet can be added using the format
"sheetname!celladdress". The formula for this example would be
"=A1+Sheet2!A2" where the value of cell A1 in the current worksheet is added to
the value of cell A2 in the worksheet named "Sheet2"

Sort and filter


Sorting and Filtering allow you to manipulate data in a worksheet based on given
set of criteria.
Basic Sorts
To execute a basic descending or ascending sort based on one column:

Highlight the cells that will be sorted


Click the Sort & Filter button on the Home tab
Click the Sort Ascending (A-Z) button or Sort Descending (Z-A) button

Custom Sorts
To sort on the basis of more than one column:

Click the Sort & Filter button on the Home tab


Choose which column you want to sort by first
Click Add Level
Choose the next column you want to sort
Click OK

Filtering
Filtering allows you to display only data that meets certain criteria. To filter:

Click the column or columns that contain the data you wish to filter
On the Home tab, click on Sort & Filter
Click Filter button
Click the Arrow at the bottom of the first cell
Click the Text Filter
Click the Words you wish to Filter

To clear the filter click the Sort & Filter button


Click Clear

Activity14.1
Demonstrate in the lab. How to execute a basic descending and ascending sort based
on one column.

Week 15

Graphic in excel
Adding a Picture
To add a picture:

Click the Insert tab


Click the Picture button
Browse to the picture from your files
Click the name of the picture
Click Insert
To move the graphic, click it and drag it to where you want it

Adding Clip Art


To add Clip Art:

Click the Insert tab


Click the Clip Art button
Search for the clip art using the search Clip Art dialog box
Click the clip art
To move the graphic, click it and drag it to where you want it

Editing Pictures and Clip Art


When you add a graphic to the worksheet, an additional tab appears on the
Ribbon. The Format tab allows you to format the pictures and graphics. This tab
has four groups:
Adjust: Controls the picture brightness, contrast, and colors
Picture Style: Allows you to place a frame or border around the picture and add
effects
Arrange: Controls the alignment and rotation of the picture
Size: Cropping and size of graphic

Adding Shapes
To add Shape:

Click the Insert tab


Click the Shapes button
Click the shape you choose

Click the Worksheet


Drag the cursor to expand the Shape

To format the shapes:

Click the Shape


Click the Format tab

Adding SmartArt
SmartArt is a feature in Office 2007 that allows you to choose from a variety of
graphics, including flow charts, lists, cycles, and processes. To add SmartArt:

Click the Insert tab


Click the SmartArt button
Click the SmartArt you choose

Select the Smart Art


Drag it to the desired location in the worksheet

To format the SmartArt:

Select the SmartArt


Click either the Design or the Format tab
Click the SmartArt to add text and pictures.

Charts in excel
Charts allow you to present information contained in the worksheet in a graphic
format. Excel offers many types of charts including: Column, Line, Pie, Bar, Area,
Scatter and more. To view the charts available click the Insert Tab on the
Ribbon.
Create a Chart
To create a chart:

Select the cells that contain the data you want to use in the chart
Click the Insert tab on the Ribbon
Click the type of Chart you want to create

Modify a Chart
Once you have created a chart you can do several things to modify the chart.
To move the chart:

Click the Chart and Drag it another location on the same worksheet, or
Click the Move Chart button on the Design tab
Choose the desired location (either a new sheet or a current sheet in the
workbook)

To change the data included in the chart:

Click the Chart


Click the Select Data button on the Design tab

To reverse which data are displayed in the rows and columns:

Click the Chart


Click the Switch Row/Column button on the Design tab

To modify the labels and titles:

Click the Chart


On the Layout tab, click the Chart Title or the Data Labels button
Change the Title and click Enter

Chart Tools
The Chart Tools appear on the Ribbon when you click on the chart. The tools are
located on three tabs: Design, Layout, and Format.
Within the Design tab you can control the chart type, layout, styles, and location.

Within the Layout tab you can control inserting pictures, shapes and text boxes,
labels, axes, background, and analysis.

Within the Format tab you can modify shape styles, word styles and size of the
chart.

Copy a Chart to Word

Select the chart


Click Copy on the Home tab
Go to the Word document where you want the chart located
Click Paste on the Home tab

Format worksheet
Convert Text to Columns
Sometimes you will want to split data in one cell into two or more cells. You can
do this easily by utilizing the Convert Text to Columns Wizard.

Highlight the column in which you wish to split the data


Click the Text to Columns button on the Data tab
Click Delimited if you have a comma or tab separating the data, or click fixed
widths to set the data separation at a specific size.

Modify Fonts
Modifying fonts in Excel will allow you to emphasize titles and headings. To
modify a font:

Select the cell or cells that you would like the font applied
On the Font group on the Home tab, choose the font type, size, bold, italics,
underline, or color

Format Cells Dialog Box


In Excel, you can also apply specific formatting to a cell. To apply formatting to a
cell or group of cells:

Select the cell or cells that will have the formatting


Click the Dialog Box arrow on the Alignment group of the Home tab

There are several tabs on this dialog box that allow you to modify properties of
the cell or cells.
Number: Allows for the display of different number types and decimal places
Alignment: Allows for the horizontal and vertical alignment of text, wrap text,
shrink text, merge cells and the direction of the text.
Font: Allows for control of font, font style, size, color, and additional features
Border: Border styles and colors
Fill: Cell fill colors and styles
Add Borders and Colors to Cells
Borders and colors can be added to cells manually or through the use of styles.
To add borders manually:

Click the Borders drop down menu on the Font group of the Home tab
Choose the appropriate border

To apply colors manually:

Click the Fill drop down menu on the Font group of the Home tab
Choose the appropriate color

To apply borders and colors using styles:

Click Cell Styles on the Home tab


Choose a style or click New Cell Style

Change Column Width and Row Height


To change the width of a column or the height of a row:

Click the Format button on the Cells group of the Home tab
Manually adjust the height and width by clicking Row Height or Column Width
To use AutoFit click AutoFit Row Height or AutoFit Column Width

Hide or Unhide Rows or Columns


To hide or unhide rows or columns:

Select the row or column you wish to hide or unhide


Click the Format button on the Cells group of the Home tab
Click Hide & Unhide

Merge Cells
To merge cells select the cells you want to merge and click the Merge & Center
button on the Alignment group of the Home tab. The four choices for merging
cells are:
Merge & Center: Combines the cells and centers the contents in the new, larger
cell
Merge Across: Combines the cells across columns without centering data
Merge Cells: Combines the cells in a range without centering
Unmerge Cells: Splits the cell that has been merged

Align Cell Contents


To align cell contents, click the cell or cells you want to align and click on the
options within the Alignment group on the Home tab. There are several options
for alignment of cell contents:
Top Align: Aligns text to the top of the cell
Middle Align: Aligns text between the top and bottom of the cell
Bottom Align: Aligns text to the bottom of the cell
Align Text Left: Aligns text to the left of the cell
Center: Centers the text from left to right in the cell

Align Text Right: Aligns text to the right of the cell


Decrease Indent: Decreases the indent between the left border and the text
Increase Indent: Increase the indent between the left border and the text
Orientation: Rotate the text diagonally or vertically

Developing a worksheet
Format Worksheet Tab
You can rename a worksheet or change the color of the tabs to meet your needs.
To rename a worksheet:

Open the sheet to be renamed


Click the Format button on the Home tab
Click Rename sheet
Type in a new name
Press Enter

To change the color of a worksheet tab:

Open the sheet to be renamed


Click the Format button on the Home tab
Click Tab Color
Click the color

Reposition Worksheets in a Workbook


To move worksheets in a workbook:

Open the workbook that contains the sheets you want to rearrange
Click and hold the worksheet tab that will be moved until an arrow appears in the
left corner of the sheet
Drag the worksheet to the desired location

Insert and Delete Worksheets


To insert a worksheet

Open the workbook


Click the Insert button on the Cells group of the Home tab
Click Insert Sheet

To delete a worksheet

Open the workbook


Click the Delete button on the Cells group of the Home tab
Click Delete Sheet

Copy and Paste Worksheets:


To copy and paste a worksheet:

Click the tab of the worksheet to be copied


Right click and choose Move or Copy
Choose the desired position of the sheet
Click the check box next to Create a Copy
Click OK

Pages properties printing


Set Print Titles
The print titles function allows you to repeat the column and row headings at the
beginning of each new page to make reading a multiple page sheet easier to read
when printed. To Print Titles:

Click the Page Layout tab on the Ribbon


Click the Print Titles button
In the Print Titles section, click the box to select the rows/columns to be repeated
Select the row or column
Click the Select Row/Column Button
Click OK

Create a Header or Footer


To create a header or footer:

Click the Header & Footer button on the Insert tab


This will display the Header & Footer Design Tools Tab
To switch between the Header and Footer, click the Go to Header or Go to
Footer button

To insert text, enter the text in the header or footer


To enter preprogrammed data such as page numbers, date, time, file name or
sheet name, click the appropriate button
To change the location of data, click the desired cell

Set Page Margins


To set the page margins:

Click the Margins button on the Page Layout tab


Select one of the give choices, or

Click Custom Margins


Complete the boxes to set margins
Click Ok

Change Page Orientation


To change the page orientation from portrait to landscape:

Click the Orientation button on the Page Layout tab


Choose Portrait or Landscape

Set Page Breaks


You can manually set up page breaks in a worksheet for ease of reading when the
sheet is printed. To set a page break:

Click the Breaks button on the Page Layout tab


Click Insert Page Break

Print a Range
There may be times when you only want to print a portion of a worksheet. This is
easily done through the Print Range function. To print a range:

Select the area to be printed


Click the Print Area button on the Page Layout tab
Click Select Print Area

Activity15.1
Demonstrate in the lab. How to Adjust,picture style,controls the alignment and
rotation of the picture.
-Show how to print the above document.