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TLIF307C Implement

and monitor OHS


procedures
Learner Guide
Contents
What this Learner’s Guide is about ........................................ 3
Planning your learning ........................................................... 4
How you will be assessed ...................................................... 7

Section 1............................................................................................. 9
How do you identify hazards and assess and control risks in
road transport?....................................................................... 9

Section 2........................................................................................... 23
How do you record and report on safety problems in road
transport? ............................................................................. 23

Section 3........................................................................................... 39
How do you organise and maintain road transport safety
procedures? ......................................................................... 39

Section 4........................................................................................... 49
How do you promote road transport health and safety practices
and procedures? .................................................................. 49

Section 5........................................................................................... 59
How can I make sure the housekeeping gets done? ........... 59

Section 6........................................................................................... 75
How do I meet my responsibilities for equipment?............... 75

Additional resources ....................................................................... 85

Feedback on activities .................................................................... 99


TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

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ADELG1019 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

What this Learner’s Guide is about

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  about  the  required  to  implement  and  monitor  
OHS  procedures,  including  accessing  information  about  OHS  and  the  
workplace  policies  and  procedures,  implementing  and  monitoring  
procedures  for  identifying  and  assessing  hazards,  implementing  and  
monitoring/auditing  procedures  for  controlling  risks,  planning  and  
supervising  housekeeping  arrangements,  and  implementing  and  
monitoring  procedures  for  dealing  with  hazardous  events.  

The  Elements  of  Competency  from  the  unit  TLIF307C  Implement  and  
monitor  OHS  procedures  covered  in  this  Learner’s  Guide  are  listed  
below.  

Access  information  about  OH&S  and  the  workplace  policies  and  


procedures  

Implement  and  monitor  procedures  for  identifying  and  assessing  


hazards  

Implement  and  monitor  procedures  for  controlling  risks  

Plan  and  supervise  housekeeping  arrangements  

Implement  and  monitor  procedures  for  dealing  with  hazardous  events  

This  unit  of  competency  is  from  the  Transport  and  Logistics  Training  
Package  (TLI07).  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 3


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008 ADELG1019
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

Planning your learning

It  is  important  to  plan  your  learning  before  you  start  because  you  may  
already  have  some  of  the  knowledge  and  skills  that  are  covered  in  this  
Learner’s  Guide.  This  might  be  because:  
• you  have  been  working  in  the  industry  for  some  time,  
and/or  
• you  have  already  completed  training  in  this  area.  

Together  with  your  supervisor  or  trainer  use  the  checklists  on  the  
following  pages  to  help  you  plan  your  study  program.  Your  answers  to  
the  questions  in  the  checklist  will  help  you  work  out  which  sections  of  
this  Learner’s  Guide  you  need  to  complete.  

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  written  with  the  idea  that  learning  is  made  more  
relevant  when  you,  the  learner,  are  actually  working  in  the  industry.  
This  means  that  you  will  have  people  within  the  enterprise  who  can  
show  you  things,  discuss  how  things  are  done  and  answer  any  
questions  you  have.  Also  you  can  practise  what  you  learn  and  see  how  
what  you  learn  is  applied  in  the  enterprise.  

If  you  are  working  through  this  Learner’s  Guide  and  have  not  yet  found  
a  job  in  the  industry,  you  will  need  to  talk  to  your  trainer  about  doing  
work  experience  or  working  and  learning  in  some  sort  of  simulated  
workplace.    

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ADELG1019 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

Section 1: Identifying hazards and assessing


and controlling risks in the road
transport setting

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. identify  OHS  legislation?        
2. identify  hazards  and  access  risks?        
3. control  risks  in  the  workplace?      

Section 2: Recording safety problems in the


road transport setting

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. record  workplace  health  and  safety  
problems?        
2. carry  out  accident  investigations?        
3. report  occupational  health  and  safety  
problems?        

Section 3: Organising and maintaining


workplace safety procedures

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. organise  and  maintain  workplace  safety  
procedures?        

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Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008 ADELG1019
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

Section 4: Promoting road transport health and


safety practices and procedures

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. resolve  safety  problems?        
2. promote  safety  in  the  workplace?        
3. detail  how  accidents/incidents/injuries  
should  be  reported?        
4. identify  what  happens  if  those  incidents  
are  not  reported?        

Section 5: Making sure the housekeeping gets


done

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. identify  tasks?        
2. allocate  tasks?        
3. explain  environmental  requirements?        
4. communicate  with  the  rest  of  the  team?        

Section 6: Meeting my responsibilities for


equipment

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. identify  housekeeping  equipment?        
2. correctly  use  and  check  equipment?        
3. identify  safety  equipment  and  other  
resources?        

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ADELG1019 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

How you will be assessed

Assessment  of  this  Unit  of  Competency  will  include  observation  of  real  
or  simulated  work  processes  using  workplace  procedures  and  
questioning  on  underpinning  knowledge  and  skills.  It  must  be  
demonstrated  in  an  actual  or  simulated  work  situation  under  
supervision.  

You  will  be  required  to:  


• organise  housekeeping  duties  within  your  workplace  or  
workgroup  
• prepare  and  deliver  a  safety  presentation  related  to  hazard  
management  
• explain  the  provision  of  OHS  regulations  
• document  and  implement  a  risk  control  strategy.    

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 7


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008 ADELG1019
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

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ADELG1019 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

Section 1

How do you identify hazards and


assess and control risks in road
transport?

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 9


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008 ADELG1019
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  

Occupational  health  and  safety  legislation  

Identifying  hazards  and  assessing  risks  in  the  workplace  

Controlling  risks  

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ADELG1019 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

Background

The  transport  and  storage  industry  has  a  poor  occupational  health  and  
safety  reputation.  To  support  this  statement,  it  is  useful  to  note  that  
Worksafe  Australia  (1995)  reported  for  the  financial  year  1993-­‐94,  that  
in  the  transport  and  storage  industry  in  Australia  (excluding  the  ACT):  
• 77  compensated  fatalities  were  reported  
• 10,000  new  compensation  cases  were  reported  for  injury  
and  disease  
• the  average  time  lost  per  compensated  case  was  8.78  
weeks.  
(See:  Worksafe  Australia  1995,  Estimates  of  Occupational  Health  and  
Safety  Statistics,  Australia,  1993-­‐94,  Australian  Government  Publishing  
Service,  Canberra.)  

A  South  Australian  analysis  of  workers’  compensation  records  for  the  


year  1994  reported  the  following  facts  for  the  road  freight  industry  
alone.  
• Trucks,  semis  and  lorries  were  involved  in  the  greatest  
number  of  claims,  with  ‘falls  from  a  height’  being  the  main  
type  of  accident  during  loading  and  unloading,  getting  out  
of  truck,  and  so  on.  Other  reported  types  of  accidents  
included  ‘body  stressing’  in  handling  trucks  (such  as  occurs  
in  hooking/attaching  trailers,  gates  and  so  on)  and  vehicle  
accidents  (mainly  roll-­‐overs).  
• Crates,  cartons,  boxes,  and  so  on  also  featured  highly  in  
the  claims  made.  In  particular,  injuries  were  sustained  
whilst  handling  these  objects  and  when  being  hit  by  them  
falling  onto  people.  
• Lifting,  tying  down  and  dragging  tarpaulins  along  the  
ground  were  actions  that  led  to  a  significant  number  of  
claims  being  made  for  workplace  injury.  
(For  details,  see  Workcover  Corporation  1995,  Occupational  Health  and  
Safety  in  SA,  Adelaide.)  

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Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008 ADELG1019
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

Occupational health and safety legislation

Occupational  health  and  safety  related  legislation  in  the  form  of  acts  
and  regulations  exist  in  each  of  the  state/territory  and  commonwealth  
jurisdictions.  You  should  be  aware  of  and  comply  with  the  
requirements  of  the  legislation  in  the  jurisdiction  you  work  in.  If  your  
employer  operates  in  several  of  the  jurisdictions,  you  will  need  to  
familiarise  yourself  with  the  OHS  requirements  of  the  different  
jurisdictions.    

This  should  not  be  too  onerous  a  task  because  of  the  fact  that  the  
states/territories  and  commonwealth  are  now  working  together  to  
make  their  laws  as  uniform  as  possible.  The  end  result  is  that  good  
health  and  safety  practice  in  one  jurisdiction  is  considered  to  be  good  
OHS  practice  in  another.  

Depending  on  the  part  of  the  transport  industry  you  work  in,  you  will  
need  to  know  the  legal  requirements  for:  
• general  occupational  health  and  safety  
• dangerous  goods  
• radiation  safety  legislation.    

Each  different  piece  of  legislation  specifies  a  range  of  legal  duties  and  
responsibilities  that  are  relevant  in  the  transport  industry.    

Employers  have  the  ultimate  responsibility  for  health  and  safety  in  the  
workplace.  However,  everybody  in  the  workplace,  including  
supervisors,  has  OHS  responsibilities.  

For  example,  all  employees  must  comply  with  safety  instructions  and  
not  put  others  at  risk  of  injury.    

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ADELG1019 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

Activity 1: Occupational health and safety legislation that


applies to you

Identify the names of the occupational health and safety,


dangerous goods and radiation protection acts and/or regulations
which apply in the jurisdiction (commonwealth, state/territory) you
primarily work in.

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Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008 ADELG1019
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Activity 2: Employer’s and employee’s responsibilities

Using one of the pieces of legislation you identified in Activity 1,


state the employer’s and then employee’s responsibilities under
that legislation.

You will need to read through the index of the legislation to identify
what parts of the legislation could apply to employers and what
parts could apply to employees.

Once you have done that, you will need to read the relevant parts
of the legislation to identify what the specific responsibilities are.

Employers:

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Employees:

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ADELG1019 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

Identifying hazards and assessing risks in the


workplace

A  hazard  is  anything  that  has  the  potential  to  cause  harm  to  life,  health  
or  property.  For  example,  the  height  of  the  truck  cabin  floor  above  
ground  level  may  be  a  hazard  because  it  requires  drivers  getting  out  to  
jump  rather  than  step  down.  Another  example  of  a  hazard  is  having  to  
work  at  a  height  to  secure  loads  on  a  truck.  

For  simplicity,  hazards  are  often  grouped  into  the  following  broad  
classes:  
• physical  hazards  (including  mechanical  and  electrical  
hazards)  
• chemical  hazards  
• biological  hazards  
• social/administrative  hazards.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 15


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008 ADELG1019
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

The  following  table  gives  examples  of  different  classes  of  hazards:  

 
Physical  hazards   Chemical   Biological   Social,  administrative  
hazards   hazards   hazards  

noise   fumes   bacteria   inappropriate  drug  use  


(alcohol,    prescription  
drugs,  etc)  
weight  of  load  to  be   gases   contaminated   speed  
moved   wastes  
vibration   explosives   fungi  infections   driving  schedules/  
shift/arrangements  
ultraviolet  radiation   fibres       lack  of  training  lack  of  
vehicle  maintenance  
confined  spaces   splashing     unrealistic  deadlines  
liquids    
thermal  stress   chemical  spills     lack  of  safe  working  
procedures  
poor  road  surfaces   limited  oxygen,     lack  of  sleep  
presence  of  
noxious  gases  
furniture  design       use  of  inappropriate,  ill-­‐
fitting  or  poorly  
maintained  protective  
gear  (such  as  gloves,  
sunglasses,  etc)  
electrical  current        
sun  glare  whilst        
driving  
falling  objects        
flying  particles  and        
objects  
sharp  edges        
materials  handling        
equipment  
working  at  heights        

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ADELG1019 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

Risk  is  the  likelihood  that  a  hazard  will  actually  result  in  injury  or  
disease  to  a  person  (or  damage  to  property),  for  example:    
• the  likelihood  of  a  driver  spraining  an  ankle  after  jumping  
down  from  a  cab  is  higher  than  if  the  driver  was  able  to  
just  step  down  
• the  likelihood  of  a  person  hurting  their  back  when  walking  
in  the  yard  is  increased  if  grease  and  oil  spills  are  not  
cleaned  up.  

A  major  occupational  health  and  safety  role  for  supervisors  is  


identifying  hazards  in  the  workplace  under  their  supervision  and  then  
minimising  the  risks  as  appropriate.  By  actively  identifying  hazards  and  
controlling  the  risks  they  present  before  injuries  and  illness  occurs,  
supervisors  have  a  great  opportunity  for  reducing  the  incidence  of,  
and  costs  associated  with,  injury  and  illness  in  the  workplace.  

In  assessing  risks,  supervisors  should  consider  several  things,  including,  


for  example:  
• whether  there  are  established  legislative  and/or  industry  
standards  against  which  the  hazard  should  be  measured    
• whether  there  are  legislated  or  industry  risk  assessment  
procedures  to  be  followed  for  a  certain  hazard,  such  as,  in  
manual  handling  and  plant  regulations  
• the  potential  for  injury  and  illness  
• the  severity  of  the  potential  illness    
• the  mix  of  injuries  could  result?    
• the  number  of  people  who  could  be  affected  
• the  skill  and  experience  of  people  undertaking  the  task  at  
hand  
• the  type  of  work  to  be  done  and  the  nature  of  the  
equipment  to  be  used  
• the  potential  for  third  parties,  such  as  customers  and  other  
road  users,  to  be  injured  if  something  went  wrong  
• industry  and  employer  experience.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 17


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008 ADELG1019
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

Activity 3: Hazards and risks in road transport

Describe three hazards associated with working in road transport


and explain the nature of the risks associated with the hazards
identified (that is, what is it about the hazards that adds to the risk).

Situation 1

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Situation 2

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Situation 3

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ADELG1019 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

Activity 4: Assessing risks in road transport

Identify the issues you should consider in assessing risks


associated with manual handling hazards. (Hint: Refer to the
manual handling provisions included under the occupational health
and safety legislation in the jurisdiction in which you work.)

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Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008 ADELG1019
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

Controlling risks

A  range  of  OHS  practices  and  procedures  are  commonly  used  by  
supervisors  and  their  employers  to  manage  and  control  the  OHS  risks  
in  road  transport.  These  include:  
• purchasing  trucks  in  which  hazards  have  been  ‘engineered  
out’  as  far  as  possible  (e.g.  purchase  trucks  in  which  the  
suspension  minimises  the  amount  of  whole-­‐body  vibration  
felt  by  a  driver  to  reduce  the  driver’s  risk  of  back  pain)    
• changing  the  work  height  wherever  possible  to  suit  the  
size  of  the  employee  and  the  task  by  providing  
hydraulically  operated  tail  gates  
• maintaining  step  surfaces  in  a  condition  which  minimises  
slips  and  falls  
• providing  appropriate  training  in  safe  working  practices  
• periodically  testing  straps  and  chains  used  to  secure  loads  
so  as  to  minimise  the  potential  of  unexpected  failure  
• establishing  and  implementing  work  rules  which  ensure  
drivers  carrying  dangerous  goods  know  what  they  are  
carrying  and  any  special  work  procedures  they  should  
follow.  

A  ‘hierarchy  of  controls’  exists  which  lists  in  order  of  priority  the  types  
of  controls  which  should  be  implemented  in  workplaces.  

The  following  table  summarises  in  order  of  preference  the  types  of  
controls  which  should/can  be  implemented  to  control  hazards  in  
workplaces.  

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ADELG1019 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

The  Hierarchy  of  Hazard  Control  

1   Elimination  
  at  the  source  

2   Substitution  
  of  materials/process  

3   Enclosure  
  of  materials/process  

4   Isolation  
  of  materials/process  

5   Engineering  methods  
  such  as  guards  ventilation  

6   Work  practices  
  such  as  maintenance,  good  housekeeping  

7   Administrative  controls  
  such  as  work  schedules,  job  rotation  and  monitoring  

8   Training  and  education  


  for  example,  on  specific  hazards,  emergency  response  

9   Personal  protective  equipment  

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TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

Activity 5: Controlling risks in road transport

Four hazards typically found in a road transport industry have been


listed in the table below.
1. Complete the table by identifying a control (found in the
Hierarchy of Hazard Controls on the previous page) for each
hazard.
2. List three additional hazards relevant to your workplace and
identify a control for each.

Note, you may identify more than one type of control for each of the
hazards identified.

Hazard Control
Absence of handholds for
getting onto/into truck
Fatigue whilst driving
Overlooking of truck
Fall from truck

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Section 2

How do you record and report on


safety problems in road
transport?

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 23


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Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  

Identifying  safety  problems  in  your  workplace  

Recording  transport  health  and  safety  problems  

Investigating  accidents  

Reporting  OHS  problems  


 

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Identifying safety problems in the workplace

As  a  supervisor,  you  have  a  major  role  identifying  and  monitoring  


hazards  and  safe  work  procedures  in  your  area  of  control.  You  may  
find  some  hazards  relatively  easy  to  identify  by  referring  to  written  
worksafe  procedures.  Others  may  be  harder  to  identify.    

You  cannot  assume  that  a  control  measure  which  was  put  into  place  a  
year  ago  still  works.  Parts  can  become  worn,  staff  may  change,  
installations  not  go  to  schedule  and  instructions  can  become  out-­‐of-­‐
date  or  lost  over  time.    

To  monitor  the  emergence  of  hazards,  the  effectiveness  of  safe  work  
procedures  and  the  integrity  of  risk  control  measures,  you  should:  
• carry  out  periodic  inspections  of  the  workplace  or  parts  of  
a  workplace  
• review  accident  and  sickness  records  
• review  safety  committee  meeting  minutes  and,  if  possible,  
participate  in  their  meetings  
• carry  out  of  accident  investigations  
• read  OHS  authority,  industry  and  trade  journals  and  
newsletters  (they  may  report  on  alternative  control  
approaches  that  are  suitable  for  dealing  with  your  safety  
problems)  
• check  whether  relevant  OHS,  dangerous  goods,  and  other  
regulations,  codes  of  practice  and  standards  are  being  
complied  with  in  your  workplace  using  audit  type  tools  
developed  in  the  different  jurisdictions  
• check  maintenance  and  other  procedures  have  been  
implemented  in  accordance  with  safe  working  procedures  
• talk  with  the  people  doing  the  work  about  any  problems  
they  have  in  carrying  out  the  work  safely.  

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Some  of  the  checklists  which  could  usefully  be  developed  and  used  in  
the  transport  industry  include  those  which  state  the  potential  hazards  
to  look  for  in  carrying  out  such  tasks  as:  
• securing  and  unsecuring  loads  
• loading  and  unloading  from  ground  level  
• delivering  loads  from  trucks  to  storage    
• transporting  dangerous  goods  
• developing  safe  work  procedures  for  getting  into  and  out  
of  trucks  
• working  at  heights  on  trucks  
• handling  tarpaulins  
• carrying  out  basic  truck  maintenance.  

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Activity 6: Identifying task specific safety problems in your


workplace using a checklist

Discuss this task with your employer.

Ask for a checklist which can be used in your workplace to inspect


or identify the hazards/safety rules associated with one of the
previously mentioned activities or an activity of your choice. The
checklist should ideally be one which already exists in your
workplace.

If this is not available, obtain and use a suitable checklist


developed by, for example, the transport industry or relevant OHS
authorities. Alternatively, you can develop your own checklist from
the sample checklists.

Use the checklist to identify whether the safety rules are being
implemented properly and/or safety problems exist.

Talk to your trainer or supervisor about any action that needs to be


taken in your workplace to improve the safe working rules
associated with the operation you have investigated.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 27


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Recording transport health and safety problems

As  a  supervisor,  it  is  important  to  record  and  report  information  on  
occupational  incidents,  disease  and  injury  to  help  you  monitor  the  
emergence  and  control  of  workplace  hazards.  You  also  have  a  legal  
obligation  to  record  detail  on  certain  types  of  incidents  and  to  report  
particular  incidents  to  the  relevant  OHS  authority.  

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Activity 7: Reportable incidents, accidents and dangerous


occurrences

List the types of incidents, accidents and dangerous occurrences


which are required to be reported to occupational health and safety
authorities under the occupational health and safety legislation.

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

Hint: Comcare (the Commonwealth occupational health and safety


authority) has published the booklet Notification and reporting of
accidents and dangerous occurrences: Reporting guidelines. This
booklet sets out what is legally required to be reported and how.
Contact Comcare for a copy of these guidelines. Contact your
state/territory occupational health and safety authority for similar
information under their legislation.)

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 29


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Activity 8: Recording workplace incidents on standard forms

With the help of your employer, obtain a copy of the following


forms:
• incident/dangerous occurrence report form from the local
occupational health and safety authority
• workers’ compensation claim form from your claims agent
• your employer’s incident report form.
Using a scenario of your choice in which a person is assumed to
have been injured while working in the transport industry, fill out
each of the forms. (Make sure you write on each of the forms
‘sample incident only’).

Discuss with your employer any difficulties you have in completing


the forms.

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Accident investigation

Investigating  workplace  incidents  (including  incidents  in  which  people  


were  injured,  property  was  damaged,  ‘near  misses’  that  had  the  
potential  for  people  to  be  hurt  and/or  property  damaged)  is  more  
complex  than  simply  looking  at  a  situation  and  saying  someone,  for  
example,  slipped  on  oil.    

To  carry  out  an  investigation  you  must  look  more  deeply    into  the  
situation.  You  need  to  determine  why  the  oil  was  spilt,  why  it  was  not  
cleaned  up  off  the  floor,  and  so  on.  

In  particular,  you  need  to  identify:  


• what  started  the  sequence  of  events  that  made  up  the  
incident  
• the  sequence  of  events  involved  in  the  incident  
• the  final  thing  that  happened    
• the  nature  of  any  particular  chemical,  product,  process  or  
equipment  that  was  involved  
• who  was  involved,  and  so  on.  

You  need  to  look  at  the  site  of  the  accident  and  talk  to  the  people  
involved  in  the  incident  under  investigation,  and  any  observers.  You  
may  need  to  read  through  the  work  rules  associated  with  the  task  to  
find  out  if  action  has  been  taken  in  the  past  to  prevent  such  an  incident  
occurring.    

Depending  on  the  jurisdiction  you  work  in,  you  may  need  to  carry  out  
the  investigation  along  with  the  area’s  health  and  safety  
representative,  a  health  and  safety  committee  member  or  a  workplace  
health  and  safety  officer.    

Accident  investigations  are  carried  out  to  find  out  why  an  incident  
occurred.  They  are  also  carried  out  to  identify  what  can  be  done  to  
prevent  similar  accidents  in  the  future.  

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The  following  table  summarise  the  key  steps  involved  in  investigating  
incidents:  
 
Steps  to  be  taken   Special  note  
Check  site.   Secure  the  site;  government  
inspectors  check  if  need  to  inspect  
and  arrange  for  this  to  occur.  
Ensure  other  workers  are  not  at  
risk  of  injury.  
Interview  co-­‐workers  and   Use  checklist  to  ensure  full  history  
injured  person  as  soon  as   is  obtained.  
possible.  
Observe  the  task  being   Observe  for  failures  in  the  system;  
performed.   i.e.  What  were  some  of  the  factors  
that  could  have  contributed  to  the  
accident?  
Draw  a  diagram  of  the  site.   Include:  
•    layout  
•    work  operations  
•    materials  involved  
•    how  the  accident  happened.  
Discuss  incident  with  health  and   Did  failures  occur  due  to:  
safety  committee.   •  poor  training  methods?  
•  poor  design  of  safety  
equipment?  
•  poor  machinery  design?  
•  lack  of  warning  signs?  
•  insufficient  maintenance?  
•  work  flow  problems?  
•  unsafe  operation  of  equipment?  
What  action  can  be  taken  to   Communication  actions  to  relevant  
avoid  the  same  accident?   people  in  the  workplace.  
   
What  questions  should  you  as  a  trainer  ask  when  investigating  
incidents?  These  questions  may  help  you.  
 

1.    Who:  
• was  injured?  
• saw  the  accident  and  what  did  they  see?  
• was  working  with  the  injured  person?  

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• else  was  involved  (and  how)?  


• was  the  person’s  supervisor?  

2.   What:  
• is  the  injury/damage/potential  injury?  
• was  the  worker  doing  at  the  time  of  injury?  
• machinery/tools  were  involved  in  the  incident?  
• was  the  worker’s  task  and  were  they  following  procedure?  
• communication  took  place  between  worker,  trainer  and/or  
co-­‐workers  prior  to  the  accident?  
• action  had  been  taken  to  prevent  the  incident?  
• previous  near  misses  or  similar  incidents  have  occurred?  
• personal/protective  equipment  was  in  use  (was  it  
adequate)?  

 
3.   When:  
• did  the  accident  occur/damage  become  evident?  
• did  the  person  commence  the  job?  
• did  the  person  last  receive  an  explanation  of  the  hazards?  
 

4.   Where:  
• did  the  injury/incident  occur?  
• was  the  trainer  at  the  time?  
• were  the  witnesses  at  the  time?  

5.   How:  
• did  the  injury  occur?  
• could  the  incident/injury  have  been  prevented?  
• could  changes  in  the  way  the  job  was  done,  machinery,  
plant  or  equipment  have  prevented  the  accident?  

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6.   Why:  
• did  the  incident/injury  occur?  
• did  communication  fail?  
• was  training  not  given?  
• were  unsafe  conditions  permitted?  
• was  the  hazard  not  identified?  
• was  personal/protective  equipment  not  provided  or  used?  
• was  the  way  the  job  was  done  unsafe?  
• was  the  injured  person  in  that  location  at  that  time?  
• were  specific  safety  instructions  not  given?  

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Activity 9: Carrying out accident investigations

Identify a recent incident which occurred at your workplace and


investigate it.

Either:
• obtain from your employer a copy of your workplace accident
investigation form/procedures to be followed and complete the
form;
or, if your employer does not have a form:
• write the details of the incident (who?, what?, when?, where?,
why?) and the prevention measures to be taken in the space
provided below. Use a sketch if necessary to highlight the
location of relevant parts/people in the incident.
_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

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Reporting OHS problems

From  the  previous  activities,  you  have  now  built  up  a  portfolio  of  
information  which  deals  with  the  identification,  assessment  and  
control  of  hazards  in  the  workplace.  Although  it  is  important  that  you  
know  what  is  causing  problems  in  your  work  area,  your  employer  and  
the  people  you  supervise  also  want  to  be  informed  of  your  findings.  

You  may  have  to  present  your  findings  in  writing  or  verbally.  

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ADELG1019 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
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Activity 10: Reporting OHS findings – written and oral


Prepare a written report to go to either your employer or to the
occupational health and safety committee on an incident
investigation you carried out. In the report propose the controls to
be implemented in the workplace to prevent such an incident
occurring again.

Verbally present the report to your employer or the occupational


health and safety committee.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 37


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ADELG1019 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
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Section 3

How do you organise and


maintain road transport safety
procedures?

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 39


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Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  

Organising  and  maintaining  road  transport  safety  procedures.  

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Organising and maintaining road transport


safety procedures

One  of  your  main  responsibilities  as  a  trainer  is  to  organise  and  
maintain  good  health  and  safety  practices  among  those  you  supervise.  
A  guide  to  accepted  practices  can  be  found  in  your  employer’s  safety  
procedures  manual.    

Safe  work  and  emergency  procedures,  sometimes  called  ‘working  


rules’,  must  be  in  writing  so  new  and  existing  staff  alike    can  easily  
work  out  what  they  should  do  in  any  situation.  Staff  should  not  have  to  
rely  on  their  own  or  others’  memory  of  procedures  to  get  it  right.    

Section  2  of  this  Learner’s  Guide  introduced  the  idea  of  work  
procedures  being  required  in  the  workplace  to  cover  such  activities  as  
transporting  dangerous  goods  and  handling  tarpaulins.  Your  
workplace  might  require  additional  safe  work  procedures  for:  
• housekeeping  
• the  use  of  Forklifts  and  other  plant  
• the  use  of  personal  protective  equipment  
• preventative  maintenance  procedures  
• reversing  
• accident  reporting  
• First  Aid  
• fire  and  emergency  
• defensive  driving.  

If  you  work  for  a  quality  endorsed  company  or  organisation,  you  will  
find  safe  work  and  emergencies  procedures  in  the  Quality  manual.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 41


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Activity 11: Written safety procedures (rules) in your


workplace

Identify and list all written safe working procedures you have in
your workplace in the space below.

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

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ADELG1019 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
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Activity 12: Writing hazard specific work procedures (rules)

Identify a hazard in your workplace for which there are no written


work rules.

Write up some procedures (in draft form) for working with the
identified hazard to ensure people will not be injured.

Trial these work procedures to check that they are useful.

If necessary, re-write the work procedures so that they can be


understood and followed by all employees in your area.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 43


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Activity 13: Reviewing accident investigation procedures

Review the accident investigation procedures followed in Activity 9.


Discuss with your employer any problems you had in using the
procedures. Suggest ways in which the procedures could be
improved so they are practical and allow you to get the information
you need from the investigation.

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Activity 14: Safety equipment procedures

Obtain a copy of your workplace’s procedures for dealing with one


of the following:
• First Aid
• emergency response (in the event of a dangerous goods or
hazardous substances spill on the road)
• personal protective equipment.
Highlight the procedure you chose. In the space below, jot down
some notes on how will you ensure that the procedure you chose
will be implemented in your area? Discuss this with your employer.

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

What type of maintenance and up-keep of safety equipment is


required to ensure the procedures can be implemented when
needed?

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 45


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What procedures will you take to ensure the necessary


maintenance and up-keep activities are carried out? Develop
procedures which set this out if they do not already exist.

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

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In  this  unit  you  have  gained  experience  in  identifying/monitoring  


workplace  hazards.  Occasionally,  in  the  course  of  identifying  hazards,  
you  will  find  that  workplace  procedures  are  not  being  carried  properly.  
This  may  be  for  a  number  of  reasons,  such  as:  
• the  person  did  not  know  procedures  existed  
• the  person  could  not  understand  the  procedure  and  so  did  
not  apply  it  properly  
• circumstances  did  not  allow  for  procedures  to  be  
implemented  as  written  
• procedures  are  faulty  (eg  the  equipment  may  have  
changed  since  the  procedures  were  written).  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 47


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Activity 15: Monitoring workplace procedures

With your trainer:


Identify a circumstance in your workplace in which a written work
procedure is not being used properly or consistently by the
employees.
_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

Determine why the procedure is not being used properly and what
you can do to either amend the procedure or encourage its use.
_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

Review implementation of the revised procedures/implementation


strategy over a three month period and report to your trainer on its
success. If further improvements are needed, identify strategies for
dealing with them with your trainer.

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Section 4

How do you promote road


transport health and safety
practices and procedures?

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Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  

Resolving  safety  problems  

Promoting  safety  

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Resolving safety problems

Consultation  in  the  workplace  on  safety  issues  is  a  key  feature  of  all  
Australian  OHS  acts.  Depending  on  the  jurisdiction  in  which  you  work,  
this  may  mean  that  you  have  to  consult  with  any  of  the  following  
people  in  resolving  health  and  safety  problems:  
• health  and  safety  representatives  
• health  and  safety  committees  
• workplace  health  and  safety  officers  
• employees  doing  the  work.  

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Activity 16: Legislated requirements for consultation and


issue resolution contained in the OHS Act

Using a copy of the Occupational Health and Safety Act relevant to


your workplace (or other information about consultation and issue
resolution provided by your local OHS authority) answer the
following questions.
Who you should consult to deal with OHS problems (such as
identification, assessment and control of health and safety
problems) in your work area?
_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

When should you consult the identified people and how should you
go about the consultation process?
_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

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Activity 17: Consultation and issue resolution arrangements


in your workplace

With your trainer, discuss the approach taken in your workplace to


resolve safety problems and what is required by law.

Using the information gained in Activity 6, consult the appropriate


people in your workplace and determine suitable controls and
timeframes for actions to be taken to remedy the problems you
identified.

Discuss your findings with your trainer.

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Promoting safety

There  are  many  ways  in  which  safety  can  be  promoted  in  the  
workplace.  They  include  ensuring:  
• people  are  properly  trained  in  the  work  they  are  to  do  and  
in  all  safety  aspects  of  that  work  
• safety  is  discussed  not  only  at  safety  committee  meetings  
but  also  as  part  of  the  general  meetings  you  have  with  the  
people  you  supervise  
• people  you  supervise  know  how  to  report  safety  problems  
and  that  when  they  do  report  problems,  they  are  kept  
informed  of  what  has  been  done  to  solve  the  problems  
• safety  procedures  are  written  in  clear,  plain  language  and  
are  readily  available  to  employees  
• safety  resources,  such  as  copies  of  the  occupational  health  
and  safety  legislation,  checklists,  minutes  of  safety  
committee  meetings,  safety  newsletters,  etc,    are  easily  
accessed  by  employees.  

Such  activities  variously  aim  to  raise  people’s  awareness,  knowledge,  


understanding  and  commitment  to  safe  working  practices.    

Other  activities  which  are  thought  to  have  limited  value  in  promoting  
safety  are  promotional  strategies  which  focus  on  giving  rewards  (such  
as  bonuses)  for  ‘safe  behaviour’  and  penalties  for  ‘unsafe  behaviour’  
(withholding  bonuses).  Other  workplaces  use  posters,  banners,  
stickers,  etc,    to  promote  safety.  

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Activity 18: Promoting safety

In consultation with your trainer and other relevant people in your


workplace, develop a range of activities to promote one of the
following:
• good manual handling practices (such as, handling tarpaulins,
loading trucks)
• defensive driving
• reporting hazards
• any other issue of your choice.

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Activity 19: Who is responsible when something goes


wrong?

Locate and read the emergency procedures that apply to your work
area.

Use the map to find the two nearest exits from where you work.
Show your trainer where the exits are on the map. Take your
trainer to these exits and also to the area that you are to assemble
following an evacuation.

Imagine that a fire has started in your work area. It is well under
way before anyone notices. You suddenly notice the fire and can
see that it is dangerous. Referring to the emergency procedures,
work through what are your actual responsibilities. Practice your
role as far as you can.
_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

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How should accidents/incidents/injuries be


reported and recorded?

Making  your  workplace  safe  and  healthy  means  that  you  should  try  to  
stop  accidents  before  they  happen.    The  following  kinds  of  accidents  
and  incidents  must  be  reported  so  that  something  can  be  done  to  
improve  the  situation.  
• Near  misses  –  something  goes  wrong  but  no-­‐one  gets  hurt  
and  nothing  is  damaged.  The  incident  could  have  injured  
someone  or  damaged  property.  
• Property  damage  –  no-­‐one  is  hurt  but  there  is  some  
damage  to  plant  or  equipment.    Someone  could  have  been  
hurt.  
• Minor  injury  –  one  or  more  workers  is  hurt,  including  cuts,  
strains,  sprains  and  bruises  and  other  injuries  which  require  
First  Aid.    No  time  is  lost  from  work  except  for  rest  and  
treatment.  There  may  also  be  property  damage.  
• Serious  injury  –  one  or  more  workers  are  killed  or  injured  
badly  enough  to  require  hospital  treatment  or  admission.    
One  or  more  workers  lose  time  from  work.    These  injuries  
must  be  reported  by  the  trainer  to  the  authorities.  

What happens if these incidents are not


reported?

If  an  accident  or  incident  is  not  reported  a  more  serious  event  is  likely  
to  occur.    As  well  as  injury  and  time  lost  from  work,  every  accident  has  
a  major  effect  on  the  company.    Effects  can  include:  
• damage  to  plant  and  equipment  
• distress  to  other  employees  
• delay  in  getting  orders  out  to  customers  
• cost  of  finding  and  training  a  new  person  for  the  job,  even  
if  only  for  a  short  time    
• increased  insurance  premiums  
• medical  and  rehabilitation  costs.  

Injuries  that  seem  minor  could  develop  into  serious  conditions  at  a  
later  time  if  not  reported  and  treated  immediately.  

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Activity 20: Reporting and recording incidents

Find out about accidents and ‘near misses’ in the workplace


industry by talking to your trainer and co-workers. Write these down
below. Mark the ones that you think would be the most common.
_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

Write in your own words company’s procedure for reporting


accidents, incidents, or illness. Check this with your trainer.
_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

Get a copy of your company’s accident/incident reporting form. If


this is not possible use the one from the Additional Resources
section of this booklet. Imagine one of the incidents above has
occurred and someone has been injured. Fill in the form as if you
were the person involved. Show this form to your trainer who can
help you with any questions you have about filling it in properly.

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Section 5

How can I make sure the


housekeeping gets done?

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 59


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Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  

Identification  of  household  tasks  

Housekeeping  standards  

Allocation  of  housekeeping  tasks  

Monitoring  of  housekeeping  

Communicating  with  the  work  team  

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Identification of tasks

Work  in  the  workplace  is  continuous.    You  get  one  job  organised  and  
finished  then  look  for  time  for  a  breather,  but  the  next  job  is  ready  to  
go  and  needs  to  be  done  now.  

In  fact  the  situation  is  often  more  complicated.    Jobs  are  often  queued  
up,  unexpected  events  happen  and  urgent  jobs  need  to  be  picked  
before  anything  else  is  done.    All  of  this  has  to  be  coped  with  in  some  
way.  

Housekeeping  is  just  the  same.    One  housekeeping  task  follows  


another,  and  keeping  a  busy  workplace  clean  and  tidy  is  a  job  that  
never  comes  to  an  end.    Housekeeping  has  to  be  worked  into  the  daily  
work  schedule  so  there  is  a  balance.    The  housekeeping  work  must  be  
done  and  the  employee’s  working  environment  must  kept  clean,  
healthy  and  safe  as  well.  

Housekeeping  therefore  needs  a  systematic  approach.    You  need  to  


make  sure:  
• all  tasks  are  covered  
• all  tasks  are  done  when  they  need  to  be  done  
• you  allow  enough  time  for  each  task  
• you  identify  and  make  available  any  equipment  and  
material  
• you  have  clearly  decided  on  the  location  where  the  
housekeeping  is  to  be  done  
• the  system  covers  unexpected  events.  

You  can  probably  guess  that  the  first  part  of  this  systematic  approach  
is  to  develop  a  plan.    How  this  is  done  is  really  up  to  your  workplace  
and  work  team.    Here  are  a  few  suggestions:  
• brainstorm  at  a  team  meeting  
• one  person  comes  up  with  a  list  and  then  discusses  it  with  
other  team  members  or  the  whole  work  team  
• circulate  a  draft  list  of  tasks  to  team  members  for  
comments  
• look  at  all  the  work  processes  and  list  the  housekeeping  
tasks  for  each  
• check  with  another  work  team  or  work  area  as  to  how  
they  identify  their  tasks  and  what  they  are  

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• get  input  from  others  in  the  company/organisation  such  as  


any  Health,  Safety  and  Environment  Officers,  employees  
with  specific  cleaning  duties,  and  cleaning  contractors  
• walk  around  the  workplace  with  a  pen  and  paper,  listing  
housekeeping  tasks  that  need  to  be  done  
• a  combination  of  any  of  the  above.  

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Activity 21: What needs to be done?

For the area you work in, make a list of all the housekeeping tasks
that have to be done. Show this list to another member of your
work team to see whether there is anything you may have left out.

For each task decide:


• how often it needs to be done
• time taken for the task
• equipment, tools and/or materials required
• where it needs to be done.

Task How often Time taken Equipment, Where


tools,
materials

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 63


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Allocating the tasks

Many  workplace  employees  think  of  housekeeping  as  a  shared  


responsibility  of  the  whole  work  team.    Cleaning  up  is  seen  as  
teamwork,  with  people  looking  out  for  others  as  well  as  themselves.    
The  common  philosophy  is  to  leave  a  work  area  and  any  equipment  in  
a  condition  that  you  would  like  to  find  them  in  yourself.  

Other  organisations  have  special  housekeeping  duties  allocated  to  


individual  employees  such  as  a  storeperson.    

Some  workplaces  contract  out  some  or  all  of  the  housekeeping,  others  
have  a  combination  of  the  above.  

Whatever  system  of  allocating  the  housekeeping  tasks  a  workplace  


uses,  it  is  important  that:  
• tasks  are  done  as  necessary  
• tasks  are  done  to  the  expected  standard  
• housekeeping  tasks  do  not  interfere  with  the  functioning  
of  the  workplace.  

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Activity 22: Giving out the tasks

Think about your work team and their goals. Consider the work
schedules, skills, specific needs, and roles of team members.

In Activity 8 you made a list of housekeeping tasks that the whole


team is responsible for.

Work out how you would allocate these tasks to team members.
_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

Would you trial this arrangement and get feedback from the work
team or would it be permanent with each particular job?
_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 65


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Environmental requirements

All  States,  Territories  and  the  Commonwealth  have  legislation  that  


concerns  protecting  the  environment.    Pollution  of  the  atmosphere,  
water,  soils,  generation  of  noise  and  the  disposal  of  wastes  are  strictly  
monitored  and  licensed.  

Waste  audits  and  waste  management  plans  

The  key  aim  of  environmental  management  is  to  minimise  waste.    This  
should  be  your  aim  in  the  workplace  too.    Many  workplaces  have  
conducted  a  waste  audit  to  record  and  analyse  all  solid,  liquid  and  gas  
wastes  that  have  to  be  removed  from  the  site.    This  includes  wastes  
caused  through  spilt  or  leaked  products  such  as  chemicals  and  oils.  

After  the  audit,  a  waste  management  plan  is  drawn  up.    It  covers  
options  for  minimising  waste  and  strategies  for  handling,  storing,  
treating  and  disposing  of  wastes.    Such  options  include:  
• a  system  for  preventing  run-­‐off  into  the  general  drainage  
system  (this  is  done  via  what  is  known  as  a  triple  intercept  
trap)  
• constructing  bunded  areas  where  contaminated  fluids  can  
be  contained  for  later  treatment  and  removal.  

Recycling  and  resource  recovery  

Recycling  and  resource  recovery  are  ways  of  minimising  the  amount  of  
waste  that  needs  to  be  either  incinerated  or  put  into  landfill.    Glass,  
steel,  aluminum,  paper  and  plastic  can  all  be  collected  for  recycling.    
The  plastic  pallets  with  raised  edges/bunding  for  the  containment  of  
leaked  products  are  an  example  of  a  product  made  from  recycled  
materials.  

Place  bins/hoppers  around  the  work  area  so  that  employees  can  sort  
waste  as  they  go.  

Recycling  may  be  organised  in  conjunction  with  a  specialist  recycling  


company.  

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Prescribed  wastes  

The  disposal  of  some  wastes  is  strictly  controlled  by  law.    These  wastes  
are  called  prescribed  wastes.    You  will  find  a    list  of  these  wastes  in  the  
Additional  Resources  section  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

You  can  see  from  the  list  that  many  materials  commonly  found  in  
workplaces  are  prescribed  wastes  including:  
• detergents  
• containers  and  bags  carrying  hazardous  compounds  
• industrial  plant  washdown  waters  
• oil  water  emulsions/mixtures  
• triple  intercept  trap  effluent  and  residues  
• waste-­‐carrying  vehicle  washdown  waters.  

Storage  and  transport  of  these  wastes  is  monitored  by  the  cradle  to  
grave  approach.    This  is  controlled  by  a  system  using  transportation  
certificates.    There  are  usually  5  copies  of  each  certificate.    Under  this  
system:  
• the  producer  of  the  waste  has  to  state  where  the  waste  is  
going  to  and  how  it  will  be  treated  
• the  transporter  of  the  waste  must  be  licensed  and  
registered  with  the  environment  protection  authority  
• the  producer,  transporter,  and  storer  or  disposer  must  
complete  their  sections  of  the  certificate  and  send  them  to  
the  relevant  environment  protection  authority.  

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Activity 23: Monitoring housekeeping

Plan how you would monitor housekeeping for your specific work
area. Remember, it’s not just getting the task done but having it
done to the correct standard. This means OHS and environmental
legislative standards as well your company’s own standards.

Include areas to be checked such as:


• the workplace, work station, pathways, aisles and access
• what visual checks will need to be made
• questions you might ask team members
• any checklists to be used
• the system for, and response to, reporting hazards or potential
hazards.
_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

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_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 69


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Communicating with the rest of the team

Communication  has  to  be  a  two-­‐way  process  for  it  to  work.  

The  person  giving  the  message  and  the  person  receiving  the  message  
need  to  have  the  same  understanding  of  what  has  been  
communicated.  

At  work,  communication  is  important.    In  this  Learner’s  Guide  you  will  
look  at  communication  about  health  and  safety  and  housekeeping.    To  
prevent  injuries  and  incidents  it  is  critical  that  accurate  information  is  
given  and  understood  by  all.  

Examples  of  health  and  safety  information  are:  


• the  company’s  health  and  safety  policy  
• the  location  and  nature  of  hazards  in  the  workplace  
• hazard  control  measures  used,  including  safe  work  
procedures  and  any  protective  equipment  required,  and  
procedures  for  their  safe  operation  or  use  
• injury/incident  reporting  procedures  
• consultative  structures,  such  as  designated  work  groups,  
the  names  of  health  and  safety  representatives,  health  and  
safety  committee  composition  and  function  
• procedures  for  resolving  health  and  safety  issues  
• emergency  and  First  Aid  procedures  
• safety  signs  and  symbols.  

The  person  sending  the  message  has  to  make  sure  the  message  has  
been  received  and  understood.    Messages  may  not  be  understood  for  
a  number  of  reasons.    There  may  be  physical  difficulties  such  as  noise  
or  the  location  of  noticeboards,  use  of  complicated  language  and  
specialised  terms/jargon,  language  and  literacy  difficulties.    Legislation  
states  that  you  must  provide  health  and  safety  information  to  
everyone.    Therefore  you  have  to  find  ways  around  any  
communication  problems.  

You  can  send  messages  in  different  ways.    Research  has  shown  that  
the  most  effective  way  of  communicating  information  at  work  is  using  
an  oral  explanation  combined  with  a  practical  demonstration.    Written  
communication  is  to  be  used  as  a  back-­‐up  only  because  there  is  no  
opportunity  to  ask  questions  or  check  understanding  when  you  
communicate  in  writing.  

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The  following  key  points  apply  to  workplace  communication:  


• information  should  be  in  clear  and  plain  language  eg  ‘DO  
NOT  ENTER’  is  clearer  than  ‘ENTRY  BY  UNAUTHORISED  
PERSONNEL  PROHIBITED’  
• terms  common  to  the  workplace  should  be  explained  and  
used  
• the  same  sign  or  words  should  be  used  to  convey  the  same  
message  throughout  the  workplace  eg  ‘HEARING  
PROTECTION  AREA,  DESIGNATED  NOISE  AREA,  HEARING  
PROTECTION  MUST  BE  USED’  can  all  be  used  to  convey  
the  same  message.    A  picture  safety  sign  may  better  suit  all  
workers  regardless  of  their  literacy  and  language  skills.    
Australian  Standards  exist  for  both  verbal  and  pictorial  
safety  signs  
• for  major  language  groups,  written  and  verbal  instructions  
and  signs  may  need  to  be  in  a  bilingual  form  if  picture  signs  
are  unsuitable  
• information  for  minor  language  groups  may  need  to  be  
translated  and  given  to  each  employee  or  posted  in  an  
appropriate  place.  

Information  will  need  to  be  given  as  part  of  induction  and  then  on  an  
ongoing  basis.    Examples  include  changes  to  procedures  and  
standards,  operation  of  new  equipment,  refreshing  of  emergency  
procedures.  

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Activity 24: How can I communicate so that tasks get done


well?

Communicating with your work team is essential. You will need to


get across to them knowledge, skills and attitudes regarding
housekeeping and OHS. Then they can do the work to the
required standard. In this activity you will consider different ways of
communicating OHS or housekeeping responsibilities with in your
work team.

Choose the message you want to communicate from the following:


• regulations and enterprise standards for housekeeping and
OHS
• standard operating procedures for housekeeping and OHS
• environmental guidelines and issues including waste
management, waste disposal and atmospheric conditions.

Prepare one example each of the following communication


strategies:
• written (instructions/notice)
• oral (talk/discussion)
• visual (poster/sign).

Check that:
• the message you want to send is being understood
• the language you use is clear and plain
• you use terms common to your workplace
• you have taken care of any language difficulties
• team members have an opportunity to ask questions and give
feedback.

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Ask your trainer to observe you deliver or present these to your


team. Make sure you get feedback from your team and your
trainer. Summarise the feedback in the spaces provided.

Written
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Oral
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Visual
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There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 73


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Section 6

How do I meet my responsibilities


for equipment?

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Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  

Cleaning  and  storing  of  housekeeping  equipment  

Maintaining,  using  and  safety  testing  housekeeping  equipment  

Safety  equipment  and  other  resources  

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Housekeeping equipment

So  far  you  have  explored  housekeeping  tasks  and  the  standards  to  
which  they  need  to  be  done.    It  is  important  that  the  equipment  used  
for  housekeeping  is  properly  cared  for.  

Correct  storage  is  important  if  the  equipment  is  to  be  ready,  working  
and  available  when  you  need  it.    This  is  both  for  everyday  use  and  
when  something  unexpected  happens  such  as  a  product  spill.  

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Activity 25: Where is it?

In Activity 8 you made a list of housekeeping tasks and the


equipment and materials needed to do them.

List the location of each item of housekeeping equipment used by


your team. This could be presented using a diagram.
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Evaluate the storage system. Can you make any suggestions for
improvement? Outline these suggestions.
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There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Correct use and checks needed

If  you  are  going  to  be  responsible  for  assessing  damage  to  equipment  
and  checking  it  for  safety  then  it  is  important  to  know  how  to  use  the  
equipment.    If  you  know  how  an  item  of  equipment  works  then  you  
will  find  it  easier  to  recognise  when  it  is  not  working  properly.  

Most  equipment  comes  with  operating  instructions  from  the  


manufacturer.    You  can  use  these  instructions  to  write  safe  operating  
procedures  for  the  employees  who  will  be  using  the  equipment.  

The  systematic  approach  to  the  organisation  of  housekeeping  can  be  
carried  through  to  the  use  and  maintenance  of  equipment.  

There  are  three  stages  to  consider:  


• before  use  
• actual  operation  
• after  use.  

Before  use  procedures  need  to  cover:  


• selecting  the  right  equipment  for  the  job  
• preparing  yourself  and  the  equipment  
• making  the  work  area  safe  
• moving  the  equipment  to  where  it  is  to  be  used  
• completing  any  pre-­‐start  procedure.  

Actual  operation  of  the  equipment  covers:  


• starting  up  the  equipment  
• doing  the  job  
• getting  any  faults  fixed  
• shutting  down  the  equipment.  

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After  use  you  need  to:  


• clean  and  correctly  store  the  equipment  
• report  any  malfunctions,  damaged  parts  or  problems  and  
organise  suitable  repair  
• record  the  use  of  the  equipment.  

As  well  as  getting  equipment  fixed  when  something  goes  wrong  a  


system  can  be  set  up  to  make  sure  equipment  is  regularly  serviced  and  
tested.    If  preventative  maintenance  is  done  by  following  a  schedule,  
most  malfunctions  will  be  prevented.  

By  thinking  about  the  things  that  can  go  wrong  with  equipment  and  
referring  to  the  manufacturer’s  manuals  you  can  draw  up  a  plan  for  
maintenance.  

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Activity 26: A stitch in time

You should already be competent at using a range of


housekeeping equipment and materials. These might include
brooms, industrial vacuums, scrub down equipment, industrial
hoses, non-technical tools, basic solvents and degreasers.

Review your competence with this equipment. Arrange some


refresher training if you think this is necessary.

Find the manufacturer’s instructions for periodic safety testing of


the items of equipment used by your work team. With your trainer
or someone with technical/maintenance knowledge and skills,
practise the maintenance checks.

Once you feel happy doing the checks, draw up a schedule for
these routine checks to be done according to the manufacturer’s
manual. Show this schedule to your trainer.
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There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Safety equipment and other resources

Some  equipment  is  provided  only  for  safety  reasons.    Personal  


protective  equipment  (PPE)  is  an  example  of  this.    Examples  of  PPCE  
are  given  in  section  four  of  this  Learner’s  Guide.  

Other  special  items  of  equipment  to  control  health  and  safety  hazards  
include:  
• pallet  lifters  and  trolleys  
• portable  warning  signs  such  as  ‘cleaning  in  progress’  or  
‘slippery  floors’  
• warning  chain  and  guideline  posts  
• safety  traffic  cones  
• safety  mirrors  
• expanding  barrier  guards  and    
• traffic  and  parking  bollards  
• barricade  tape  
• lock-­‐out  labels,  tags  and  devices  
• extinguishers  and  other  fire  fighting  equipment  
• body  harnesses  and  assemblies  
• chemical  spill  kits  
• personal  alarm  systems  
• dust  extractors  and  portable  ventilation  systems  
• eye/face  wash  and  showers  
• breathing  apparatus  
• spark-­‐preventing  bonding  and  grounding  wires.  

Many  of  the  items  above  could  be  required  for  housekeeping  tasks  
depending  on  the  actual  workplace  and  the  nature  of  any  hazards.    It  is  
important  to  spend  some  time  thinking  about  what  could  go  wrong  
and  whether  protective  measures  have  been  taken.  

To  work  out  what  safety  equipment  is  needed  you  might  have  to  get  
advice  from  other  people.    These  people  may  be  from  inside  your  
organisation  or  from  outside.  

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Outside  information  could  come  from  companies  similar  to  yours,  the  
trainer  organisation  that  your  company  belongs  to,  the  OHS  area  of  
any  relevant  unions,  or  suppliers  of  safety  equipment.  

Outside  organisations  may  send  you  written  information.    This  could  


include  booklets,  journals,  manuals,  union  and  government  
publications.  

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Activity 27: Resources available

You have already identified the equipment necessary for the


housekeeping tasks in your area in Activity 8. Have another look at
that list. Think carefully about the hazards involved and imagine
the worst health and safety issues that could occur while the
person is doing the task.

Are there any extra items of safety equipment that might need to be
considered for this task?

Make a list of them.


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Show the complete list to two other team members. Ask them to
comment on it and to suggest anything you may have left out.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

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Additional
resources

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Documents

Document  1:  Sample  hazard  checklist  

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Document  1  continued  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 87


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Document  1  continued  

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Document  1  continued  

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ISSUE  RESOLUTION  PROCEDURE  

  Page  1  of  1  
Document  No:  OHS  –  003     Issue  Date:    29  June  95  
 
The  following  issue  resolution  procedure  is  the  one  that  has  been  agreed  upon  by  
management  and  employee  representatives  at  XXXX.  
The  objective  of  the  agreed  procedures  is  for  the  most  speedy  and  effective  
resolution  of  all  OHS  issues,  as  and  when  they  arise.    It  is  the  responsibility  of  line  
management  to  resolve  issues  in  their  workplace.  
The  agreed  procedure  is  as  follows:  
 
Step  1:   Where  an  employee  identifies  an  OHS  issue  they  should  raise  it  with  
their  immediate  trainer.    The  employee  or  trainer  should  inform  both  
the  management  and  any  OHS  representative  for  the  designated  
work  group.  
 
Step  2:   The  issue  should  be  dealt  with  as  soon  as  possible  after  being  
reported.    If  it  cannot  be  rectified  immediately  then  a  solution  should  
be  implemented  as  soon  as  practicable.    At  a  minimum,  interim  
measures  should  be  put  in  place  to  prevent  any  adverse  
consequences  until  such  time  the  issue  can  be  satisfactory  resolved.  
It  should  be  noted  that  in  deciding  the  extent  of  concern  a  specialist  
may  need  to  be  engaged  for  advice,  (e.g.  hygienist  for  air  
monitoring).  
 
Step  3:   Where  an  issue  or  a  life  threatening  situation  is  not  being  addressed  
by  the  organisation,  the  OHS  employee  or  management  
representative  may  make  contact  with  a  Government  Inspector.    The  
Inspector  may  direct  that  the  issue  be  addressed  and  issue  
appropriate  Notices.  
 
Step  4:   The  issue  should  be  communicated  to  the  OHS  Committee  who  will  
decide  on  the  extent  of  advice  to  other  work  groups.    This  
communication  should  be  formal  using  a  hazard/issue  report  form  as  
outlined  in  OHS  –  007  Procedure.  
 
Step  5:   Solutions  should  be  recorded  as  well  as  being  passed  on  to  relevant  
employees  for  their  information.  
   
  Authorised  by:   Date:  

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Prescribed wastes
• Abattoir effluent • Metal finishing effluent and residues
• Acids and acidic solutions • Methacrylate compounds (excluding solid inert
• Adhesives (excluding solid inert polymeric materials) polymeric materials)
• Animal effluent • Nickel compounds Oil interceptor sludges
• Antimony and antimony compounds • Oil water emulsions
• Arsenic and arsenic compounds • Oil water mixtures
• Asbestos (all chemical forms) • Oils
• Azides • Organic halogen compounds (excluding solid inert
• Barium and barium compounds polymeric materials)
• Beryllium and beryllium compounds • Organic solvents
• Biocides • Oxidising agents
• Boiler blowdown sludge • Paint sludges and residues
• Boron and boron compounds • Perchlorates
• Cadmium and cadmium compounds • Peroxides
• Caustic solutions • Pesticides
• Chlorates • Pharmaceutical substances
• Chromium compounds • Phenolic compounds (excluding solid inert
• Containers and bags containing hazardous compounds polymeric materials)
• Copper compounds • Phosphorus and its compounds
• Detergents • Pickling liquors
• Distillation residues • Polychlorinated biphenyls and related materials
• Dyes and equipment containing polychlorinated
• Electroplating effluent and residues biphenyls and related materials
• Filter backwash waters • Polymeric latices
• Filter cake sludges and residues • Poultry processing residues and effluent
• Fish processing residues • Reactive chemicals
• Fly ash • Reducing agents
• Food processing effluent • Resins (excluding solid inert polymeric materials)
• Grease interceptor trap effluent and residues • Saline effluent and residues
• Heat treatment salts • Scallop processing residues
• Heterocyclic organic compounds containing oxygen, • Selenium and selenium compounds
nitrogen or sulphur Hydrocarbons and their oxygen, • Silver and silver compounds
nitrogen or sulphur compounds • Solvent recovery residues
• Immobilised waste • Surfactants
• Industrial plant washdown waters • Tallow
• Infectious substances • Tannery effluent and residues
• Inks • Tars and tarry residues
• Inorganic cyanides and cyanide complexes • Tellurium and tellurium compounds
• Inorganic halogen containing compounds • Textile effluent and residues
• Inorganic sulphur containing compounds • Thallium and thallium compounds
• Isocyanate compounds (excluding solid inert polymeric • Timber preservative effluent and residues
materials) • Treatment plant sludges and residues (excluding
• Laboratory chemicals sewage and septic tank sludges and residues)
• Lead compounds • Triple interceptor trap effluent and residue
• Lime neutralised sludges • Vanadium and vanadium compounds
• Lime sludges • Vegetable oils
• Materials or equipment contaminated with infectious • Waste, other than those already specified, which
substances pose an environment hazard
• Mercaptans • Waste-carrying vehicle washdown waters
• Mercury and its compounds and equipment containing • Wool scouring effluent and residues
mercury • Zinc compounds

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OHS  AND  ENVIRONMENTAL  POLICY  

  Page  1  of  1    
Document  No:    OHS  –  001     Issue  Date:  29  March  95  

Commitment  
XXXX  recognises  its  moral  and  legal  responsibility,  in  particular  to  the  Occupational  Health  
and  Safety  Act  1985,  to  provide  a  safe  and  healthy  work  environment  for  employees,  
contractors,  customers  and  visitors.    This  commitment  extends  to  ensuring  the  
organisation’s  operations  does  not  place  the  local  community  at  risk  of  injury  or  illness.  

Objectives  
The  policy  aims  to:  
• provide  safe  plant  and  systems  of  work  
• provide  written  procedures  and  instructions  to  ensure  safe  systems  of  work  are  
implemented  
• ensure  compliance  with  legislative  requirements  and  current  ‘state  of  knowledge’  
standards  
• provide  employees,  contractors  and  customers  with  regular  information,  instruction,  
training  and  supervision  to  ensure  their  safety  
• provide  support  mechanism  which  will  assist  employees  with  maintaining  or  improving  
their  psychological  and  physical  health.  
Responsibilities  
XXX  recognises  that  management  have  the  overall  responsibility  to  provide  a  safe  
workplace.    Each  management  representative  will  be  held  accountable  for  implementing  
this  policy  in  their  area  of  responsibility  via  their  annual  performance  reviews.    These  
responsibilities  are  contained  in  full  in  our  Management  OHS  Procedure  002  but  broadly  
encompass:  
• providing  and  maintaining  the  workplace  in  a  safe  condition  
• ensuring  all  ohs  policies  and  procedures  are  implemented  
• actively  promoting  and  being  involved  in  those  policies  and  procedures  
• providing  the  resources  to  meet  their  ohs  commitment  
• employees  will  ensure  that  they:  
• follow  all  ohs  policies  and  procedures  
• report  all  hazards  to  their  trainer.  
Consultation  
The  organisation  has  total  commitment  to  encouraging  consultation  and  co-­‐operation  
between  management  and  employees.    It  will  formally  involve  elected  employee  health  
and  safety  representatives  in  any  workplace  change  which  will  affect  the  health  and  
safety  of  employees  in  any  workplace.  

Authorisation  
The  CEO  will  personally  sign  the  policy.  

Review  
The  policy  will  be  reviewed  annually.  
Authorised  by:   Date:  

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PERSONAL  PROTECTIVE  EQUIPMENT  (PPE)  

Page  1  of  2  

Document No: OHS – 011 Issue  Date:  29  July  95  

The  purpose  of  this  procedure  is  to  outline  the  standards  relating  to  safe  use  of  PPE.    Use  of  PPE  is  
considered  as  the  ‘last  line  of  defence’  in  the  hazard  control  hierarchy.    PPE  does  not  remove  or  
control  the  hazard.    The  hazard  still  exists,  it  just  limits  worker’s  exposure.    Where  it  is  necessary  
to  use  PPE&C  then  it  must  be  carefully  selected,  used  and  maintained  properly  and  monitored  
carefully.    The  following  should  be  followed.  
Hazard  Identification  Form  
Before  PPE  is  provided,  a  Hazard  Identification,  assessment,  control  and  review  of  control  Form  
contained  in  OHS  –  010  must  be  completed  to  ensure  that  PPE  is  the  necessary  control  option  in  
the  opinion  of  appropriate  personnel.  
Purchase  specifications  
PPE  must  conform  to  any  legislative,  Australian  Standard  and/or  Industry  Standard  requirements  
or  guidelines.    Particular  PPE  items  can  only  be  purchased  from  suppliers  who  supply  approved  
(AS  or  equivalent  marking)  PPE  and  are  willing  to  provide  the  following  service:  
Advice  on  the  PPE  
Information  relating  to  any  test  results  
Advice  on  personal  fitting,  use,  cleaning,  maintenance  and  storage  of  PPE  
Carry  a  range  of  sizes  (if  appropriate)  
Information  on  the  availability  and  need  for  replacement  parts  and  when  these  are  
required  
Demonstration  of  the  PPE  
Immediate  replacement  of  any  defective  PPE  
Individual  PPE  Procedures  
Each  item  of  PPE  will  have  specific  procedures  outlining:  
What  the  approved  PPE  item(s)  is   Issuing  of  PPE    
Who  will  wear  them  (general  or   In  what  areas  
exclusive  use)   Training  and  ongoing  instructions  needs  
If  there  are  specific  precautions   Replacement  arrangements  
What  signage  is  required   Supervision  requirements  
Who  will  clean  and  service  them   Any  medical  monitoring  
Operator  training  requirements   Regular  inspection  and  if  necessary  
Storage  arrangements     Repair  of  PPE  
Reviews  of  the  need  for  and  adequacy  of  PPE  
All  reviews  will  be  in  consultation  with  employees  and  reports  submitted  to  OHS  Committee.  

Authorised  by:   Date:  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 93


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008 ADELG1019
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

PERSONAL  PROTECTIVE  EQUIPMENT    

  Page  2  of  2  

Document  No.:    OHS  –  011     Issue  Date:  29  July  95  

Training  
All  personnel  required  to  wear  PPE  will  be  provided  with  training  prior  to  use.    Ongoing  
training  will  also  be  provided.    Training  for  all  personnel  involved  in  the  successful  
operation  of  the  PPE  program  (e.g.  users,  selectors,  buyers,  storekeepers,  maintenance  
staff,  supervisors,  trainers)  will  also  be  provided.  
PPE&C  Program  
A  person  must  be  nominated  to  be  responsible  for  the  PPE  program.    Their  name  and  
contact  number  must  be  available  to  all  staff  involved  in  the  program.    The  PPE  program  
must  be  monitored  and  evaluated  regularly.  
Compliance  
Compliance  to  each  specific  PPE  procedure  by  individual  should  be  recognised.    Where  
there  is  non  compliance  this  must  be  investigated  to  ascertain  the  reason(s)  and  handled  
in  accordance  with  personnel  procedures.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Authorised  by:   Date:  

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ADELG1019 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
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HAZARD  REPORTING  

  Page  1  of  1  

Document  No.:    OHS  –  034     Issue  Date:  29  June  95  


 
     
ORGANISATION  NAME  INCIDENT/HAZARD  REPORT   NO:  001  
Reported  by  
Name:  ___________________        Position:  ___________________        Date:  ________  
Reported  to  
Name:  ___________________        Position:  ___________________        Date:  ________  
Department/Area:  _____________________________  
Subject  
(        )    Incident        (          )    Near  miss            (          )    Hazard            (          )    Hazardous  Work  Practices  
Details  of  Incident/Hazard  
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________  
Corrective  or  Recommended  Corrective  Action  
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________________________________________________  
Signature:    ______________________                Date:    _________________  
Copy  given  to:  
  Management  (name)  _______________________________________  
  Employee  Health  &  Safety  Representative  (name)  ________________  
  OHS  Committee  Chairperson  ________________________________  
  Other  (specify  name)  _______________________________________  
 
Authorised  by:   Date:  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 95


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008 ADELG1019
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Workplace  Inspection  
 

Place   Date   Time  


Physical      
Noise      
Vibration      
Light      
UV  radiation      
Heat  or  cold      
Machinery      
Slips  and  trips      
Drops  and  impacts      
Falls      
Projectiles      
Other      
Ergonomic      
Posture      
Furniture      
Manual  handling      
–   lifting  technique  
–      repetition  
Mechanical  aids      
–   weight  
–      frequency  
Workplace  layout      
–   bench  height  
–      accessibility  
Other      
Chemical      
Labels      
Containers      
MSDS      
Work  practices      
Storage      
Disposal      
Liquid      
Gas      
Solids,  dust      
Personal  protective      
equipment  
Other      
 

Page 96 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1019 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

Place   Date   Time  


Psychological      
Pace  of  work      
Public/customer  contact      
Variety  of  work      
Work  overload      
Work  underload      
Planning      
Work  methods      
Resources      
Other      
Biological      
Bacteria      
Viruses      
Plant  materials      
Animal  materials      
Diseases  caught  from      
animals  
Other      
Organisational      
Emergency  procedures      
Policy  and  procedures      
H  &  S  Committee      
H  &  S  Representative      
Quality  management      
Other      

(This  checklist  is  reproduced  from  the  Participants  Workbook  for  the  
Health  &  Safety  Representative  and  Supervisor  5-­‐Day  Training  Course  
by  Holmesglen  Institute  of  TAFE).  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 97


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008 ADELG1019
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

 
ORGANISATION  NAME   INJURY  REGISTER   NO:  001  
 
Surname:  ________________    Other  names:  _________________    Age:  _____  
Marital  Status:  ________________        Gender:    Male  (        )      Female  (        )  
Department/Area:  _________________      Date  of  injury:  _______    Time:  ______  
 
Description  of  injury:   Injury  Type:  eg  cut,  strain,  burn  etc.  
_____________________________   ____________________________  
_____________________________   ____________________________  
_____________________________   ____________________________  
_____________________________   ____________________________  
 
Accident  location:    _______________________________________________  
 
Witness:    (name  and  contact  number  or  address)  
1.  
2.  
Date  of  entry:  _____________   Employee  signature:  _____________  
 
What  other  forms  have  been  completed?:  
Notice  of  Accident  (        )              Investigation  Report    (        )              Workcover  Form    (        )  
 
If  any  of  these  forms  have  been  completed,  have  copies  been  forwarded  to?  
Section  Manager    (        )            Employee  Health  &  Safety  Representative    (        )  
OHS  Committee  Chairperson    (        )      Other    (        )    (Specify)  
 
This  form  must  be  forwarded  to  _____________  within  24  hours  of  the  accident.  
 
 

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ADELG1019 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

Feedback on
activities
The responses provided in this section are suggested responses.
Because every workplace is different, your responses may vary
according to your specific workplace procedures, the equipment
available and the nature of the business.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 99


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008 ADELG1019
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

Activity 21: What needs to be done?


Housekeeping Location How Time Equipment Materials
task often needed required required
Floors swept/ Work area Daily 30 mins Mechanical
vacuumed A and B sweeper,
brooms
Clearing up work Work Twice per 15 mins Trolley,
area area A shift, on brooms, brush
continuous and shovel
basis
Wash down Local Monthly 1 hour Buckets, Hot water,
areas work area, sponges detergent
benches
Forklift cleaning Bypass 3 monthly 30 mins High pressure Hot water,
drain each hose, sponge detergent
areas
Cleaning oil Loading As occurs 15 mins High pressure Degreaser,
drops from trucks areas hose, broom saw dust
Cleaning oil spills Workplace As occurs 10 mins Broom Saw dust
from stock- area
pickers and
Forklifts
Wipe over Racking 6 monthly 1 hour Sponges, Hot water,
shelving area per buckets detergent
section
Cleaning up of All areas As occurs 10 mins Broom, brush Depends on
product spills and shovel nature of
product, as
per Material
Safety Data
Sheet for
Dangerous
Goods e.g.
saw dust,
sand,
vermiculite,
‘cat litter’
Waste removal Bin and Twice daily 10 mins
hoppers or as
needed
Rubbish removal Order Twice daily 10 mins Recycling bins,
e.g. broken assembly and as compactor
pallets, area needed
cardboard,
plastic, strapping

Page 100 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1019 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

Housekeeping Location How Time Equipment Materials


task often needed required required
Vermin control Workplace Continuous Bait stations
area
Routine As per Dependi As per e.g. oil, fan
maintenance on scheduled ng on schedule eg belts
housekeeping maintenan task hand tools
equipment ce and pre-
start check
Water run-off Loading As occurs 10 mins Broom Sawdust
from wet trucks area

Activity 22: Giving out the tasks

Team meeting to discuss duties. Present draft. Get support of


team.

Task Team member

Keep own work area clean and tidy All

Vermin control Person A and B or contractor

Cleaning up of product spills, oil drops, water Person who discovers

Rubbish removal Rotate weekly between all team


members

Recycling of cardboard/plastic Rotate weekly between all team


members

Scheduled maintenance on housekeeping Designated trained


equipment personnel/operators

Operation of mechanical sweeper/vacuum Designated and trained operators


cleaner or contractors

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 101


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008 ADELG1019
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

Activity 23: Monitoring housekeeping

Your answers will vary according to your workplace. You might


have included:
• plan of workplace developed
• standards obtained eg health and safety, environment,
company
• workplace inspections using checklist
• random visual and verbal monitoring
• hazard reporting system put in place with procedures for action.

Activity 25: Where is it?

• Location of housekeeping items presented in a list or on a


diagram.
• Storage may have to be moved from a traffic area, dusty or
contaminated area, away from an eating area, to an area not
exposed to weather, etc.

Activity 26: A stitch in time

Item Identifying Date Type of Other Parts used Signature


number Maintenance: maintenance
performed
inspection
servicing
adjustment
replacement of
worn parts before
failure

• Planned preventative maintenance can be recorded in a table


like the one above.

Page 102 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1019 Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008
TLIF307C Implement and monitor OHS procedures

Activity 27: Resources available

• Items of safety equipment may be selected from those listed in


the text.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 103


Customised and Developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education P/L April 2008 ADELG1019

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