Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 41

TLIO207D Follow

security
procedures
Learner Guide
Contents
What this Learner’s Guide is about ........................................ 3  
Planning your learning ........................................................... 4  
How you will be assessed ...................................................... 7  

Section 1............................................................................................. 9  
Following security procedures for goods and cargo............... 9  

Section 2........................................................................................... 25  
Reporting incidents/emergencies......................................... 25  

Additional resources ....................................................................... 36  

Feedback on activities .................................................................... 38  


TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Page 2 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1041 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

What this Learner’s Guide is about

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  about  the  skills  and  knowledge  to  follow  
security  procedures  in  accordance  with  workplace  requirements,  
including  checking  seals  on  containers*  or  packages,  taking  
appropriate  action  to  reseal  or  dispose  of  packages  and  empty  
containers,  securing  pillage  and  high  value  goods,  recording  delivery  of  
cargo,  and  dealing  with  and  writing  reports  on  security  incidents  
and/or  emergencies.  

  NOTE: Throughout this Learner’s Guide, the word ‘container’ refers to a


box-like receptacle used to contain goods of standard size and shape for
  transport on a ship, truck or by rail or the box-like receptacle used to
contain goods of standard size and shape for transport by air. Package
refers to any other receptacle for goods or cargo that is contained within
  such containers or is ready for transportation as is.

The  Elements  of  Competency  from  the  unit  TLIO207D  Follow  security  
procedures  covered  in  this  Learner’s  Guide  are  listed  below.  

Check  seals  on  containers  or  packages  

Take  action  to  reseal  or  dispose  of  packages  and  empty  containers  

Secure  pillage  and  high  value  goods  

Record  delivery  of  cargo  

Deal  with  and  write  reports  on  security  incidents/emergencies  

This  unit  of  competency  is  from  the  Transport  and  Logistics  Training  
Package  (TLI07).  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 3


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1041
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Planning your learning

It  is  important  to  plan  your  learning  before  you  start  because  you  may  
already  have  some  of  the  knowledge  and  skills  that  are  covered  in  this  
Learner’s  Guide.  This  might  be  because:  
• you  have  been  working  in  the  industry  for  some  time,  
and/or  
• you  have  already  completed  training  in  this  area.  

Together  with  your  supervisor  or  trainer  use  the  checklists  on  the  
following  pages  to  help  you  plan  your  study  program.  Your  answers  to  
the  questions  in  the  checklist  will  help  you  work  out  which  sections  of  
this  Learner’s  Guide  you  need  to  complete.  

This  Learner’s  Guide  is  written  with  the  idea  that  learning  is  made  
more  relevant  when  you,  the  learner,  are  actually  working  in  the  
industry.  This  means  that  you  will  have  people  within  the  enterprise  
who  can  show  you  things,  discuss  how  things  are  done  and  answer  any  
questions  you  have.  Also  you  can  practise  what  you  learn  and  see  how  
what  you  learn  is  applied  in  the  enterprise.  

If  you  are  working  through  this  Learner’s  Guide  and  have  not  yet  found  
a  job  in  the  industry,  you  will  need  to  talk  to  your  trainer  about  doing  
work  experience  or  working  and  learning  in  some  sort  of  simulated  
workplace.    

Page 4 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1041 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Section 1: Check seals on containers or


packages

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. check  seals  to  ensure  they  are  intact  prior  
to  unstuffing  or  unpacking?        
2. report  damaged  seals  in  accordance  with  
workplace  regulations?        

Section 2: Take action to reseal or dispose of


packages and empty containers

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. complete  unstuffing  or  unpacking  
operations  in  accordance  with  workplace  
regulations?        
2. check  personnel  and/or  vehicles  access  
(entry  and  exit)  to/from  unpacking  areas?        
3. check  and  record  entry  and  exit  from  
unpacking  areas  to  prevent  unlawful  entry  
and/or  removal  of  goods  and  cargo?        

Section 3: Secure pillage and high value goods

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. identify  and  secure  goods  of  high  value  
and  those  that  are  easily  stolen  within  
specified  locations?          
2. report  any  breaches  of  security  to  
appropriate  personnel?        

Section 4: Record delivery of cargo

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. complete  documents  recording  cargo  
delivered  from  depot?        

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 5


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1041
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Section 5: Deal with and write reports on


security incidents/emergencies

Are  you  able  to:   Yes   No  


1. deal  with  security  incidents/emergencies  
in  accordance  with  workplace  
procedures?        
2. write  reports  to  communicate  security  
incidents/emergencies?        

Page 6 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1041 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

How you will be assessed

Assessment  of  this  Unit  of  Competency  will  include  observation  of  real  
or  simulated  work  processes  using  workplace  procedures  and  
questioning  on  underpinning  knowledge  and  skills.  It  must  be  
demonstrated  in  an  actual  or  simulated  work  situation  under  
supervision.  

You  will  be  required  to:  


• check  seals  on  containers  and  report  broken  seals  in  
accordance  with  workplace  procedures  
• follow  workplace  procedures  to  maintain  the  security  of  
cargo  and  goods  that  you  handle  including  high  value  
goods  or  those  able  to  easily  stolen  
• complete  records  of  delivery  of  cargo  from  depot  
• deal  with  and  write  reports  of  security  
incidents/emergencies.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 7


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1041
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Page 8 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1041 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Section 1

Following security procedures for


goods and cargo

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 9


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1041
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  


Following  security  procedures  including:  
− identifying  workplace  procedures  for  security  
− checking  and  resealing  containers  or  packages  
− monitoring  and  securing  entry  and  exit  from  the  site  
− following  procedures  for  securing  high  value  and  easily  pilfered  
goods  

Page 10 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1041 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

How do you follow workplace security


procedures?

Worldwide  the  direct  cost  of  cargo  theft  is  estimated  at  US$30  billion  
per  year,  with  indirect  costs  many  times  higher  (Source:  Australian  
Institute  of  Criminology).    The  result  of  poor  security  procedures  for  
cargo  handling  companies  can  be  an  increase  in  insurance  premiums  to  
cover  loads  and  a  loss  of  business  through  loss  of  confidence  in  the  
company’s  ability  to  secure  goods.    The  sale  of  stolen  goods  onto  the  
black  market  results  in  under-­‐cutting  and  further  loss  of  business.    
Fraudulent  activity  to  prevent  payment  of  excise  duty  and  taxes  can  
create  further  economic  problems.    As  an  example  of  the  value  of  
cargo,  a  single  truckload  of  cigarettes  can  be  worth  up  to  A$3milion.    It  
is  estimated  that  nearly  half  of  cargo  losses  can  be  traced  to  organised  
crime.  

Official  estimates  of  figures  for  indirect  costs  such  as  those  associated  
with  investigation  and  insurance  payments  are  between  US$20  billion  
–  60  billion.    The  breakdown  into  sectors  is  as  follows:  
• road  transport  -­‐  87%  of  cargo  losses  
• maritime  -­‐  8%  of  all  cargo  losses  
• rail  –  4%  of  all  cargo  losses  
• air  –  less  than  1%  of  all  cargo  losses.    

‘Track  and  trace’  systems  have  helped  to  reduce  petty  pilferage  (thefts  
of  small  amounts)  but  allows  for  large-­‐scale  cargo  theft.    According  to  
the  Australian  Institute  of  Criminology,  there  is  now  an  increased  
possibility  that  a  truck  with  cargo  can  be  stolen  in  transit,  or  that  cargo  
can  be  removed  at  storage  facilities  or  after  transportation.    The  
greatest  danger  is  when  cargo  is  being  loaded  and  unloaded  or  from  
fraudulent  papers.    With  laptop  computers  and  available  software,  
orders  can  be  scanned,  changed  to  a  smaller  amount  and  then  used  as  
a  replacement  for  the  original  (full)  order.      

In  the  past  (before  containerised  transportation  of  cargo)  loads  were  


counted  and  recounted  at  each  stage  of  handling  to  ensure  that  the  
correct  consignment  had  been  made  at  each  step.    Although  time  
consuming,  this  ensured  that  any  ‘shortfalls’  were  detected  quickly  
and  reported  and  acted  upon.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 11


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1041
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

What are the workplace’s procedures for the


security of goods and cargo?

The  aim  of  your  workplace  is  to  ensure  that  all  goods  and  cargo  
handled  by  your  company  are  secure.    That  is,  whatever  comes  into  
the  work  area  leaves  there  in  good  condition  and  in  the  quantities  
delivered  to  you.  

The  benefits  of  this  are:  


• lower  insurance  premiums  
• developing  a  reputation  as  a  company  that  is  trustworthy  and  
efficient  
• no  lost  time  to  investigate  loss  of  goods  
• increased  business.  

Businesses  have  recognised  the  cost  of  losing  stock  and  along  with  
changes  such  as  containerisation,  use  of  IT  and  ‘track  and  trace’  
systems,  seals  on  cargo  are  now  widespread.  

Seals  can  be  made  in  a  variety  of  materials  including  plastics,  metal,  
wire,  etc.    The  seals  are  designed  to  remain  in  place  during  transit  of  
goods  and  not  be  ‘accidentally’  cut  or  to  fall  off.    A  visual  identification  
is  required  with  the  seal  and  a  number  or  code  is  added  to  the  seal  that  
is  unique  to  that  container.    Seals  can  stay  in  place  until  the  container  is  
to  be  unpacked  or  unstuffed.    Examples  can  be  found  at  the  CGM’s  
(US)  company  web  site  at  http://www.cgmsecuritysolutions.com.  

The  seals  available  include  locks  and  cables  for  containers,  trucks  and  
pallets  and  tape  that  can  be  used  on  corrugated  cardboard  boxes  that  
if  pealed  off  displays  a  message  ‘tampered  with’  or  ‘opened’.    Again  
visual  inspection  is  required  to  make  these  systems  100%  effective.  

Where  seals  have  been  removed,  your  workplace  will  have  procedures  
in  place  for  reporting  this.    Some  workplaces  have  a  Polaroid  camera  
available  to  easily  record  the  effects  of  tampering  with  cargo.    A  
written  report  will  usually  be  required  as  well.  

It  is  important  to  remember  that  reporting  broken  or  tampered  seals,  
protects  you  also.    If  you  do  not  report  the  situation,  you  may  later  be  
blamed  for  breaking  into  the  container.    Reporting  the  situation  
immediately  protects  you  and  your  fellow  team  members  from  blame.  

The  first  activity  looks  at  inspection  of  seals  and  what  to  do  about  
broken  seals.  

Page 12 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1041 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Activity 1: Seals

Talk to your fellow team members, trainer and supervisor. Find out
what types of seals are placed around containers or packages. Try
to find six different examples. (Do this activity with the next
activity). Use the table below to record this information:

Description of Type of seal used (or insert photos)


packages or
container

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 13


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1041
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Activity 2: Broken seals

While you are completing activity 1, try to your find out how you can
tell that a seal has been tampered with. You might use photos
here. Use the six examples you listed in activity 1. (Do this activity
with the previous activity). Use the table below to record this
information:

Type of seal used Indication of tampering

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 14 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1041 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Activity 3: Reporting tampering with seals

Talk to your trainer. Find out what you are required to do if you
identify a seal that is broken or tampered with.
________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 15


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1041
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

How is entry and exit from the site monitored


and secured?

Security  of  the  area  you  work  in  is  also  important.    If  anyone  can  
wander  into  the  area  without  being  stopped  or  asked  for  proof  that  
they  are  lawfully  in  the  area,  then  theft  can  and  will  occur.    Unlawful  
entry  to  the  area  could  be  at  night  or  during  the  day  when  ‘everyone’  
is  busy.      

Also,  if  someone  does  try  to  remove  goods  from  the  area,  can  they  get  
out  without  being  checked?      

Sometimes  the  fact  that  the  checks  are  in  place,  can  be  a  good  way  to  
limit  theft  from  the  area.  

The  checklist  on  the  following  page  has  been  developed  from  
suggestions  made  in  the  Australian  Institute  of  Criminology  Report  No  
214,  The  Detection  and  Prevention  of  Cargo  Theft  for  strategies  to  
secure  the  work  area.  

The  columns  are  for:  

1st  column  –  area  to  check  

2nd  column  –  tick  if  current  system  works  effectively  

3rd  column  –  put  a  cross  if  improvement  needed  

4th  column  –  make  suggestions  for  improvement  

The  activities  that  follow  get  you  to  audit  your  own  workplace’s  
security.  

Page 16 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1041 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

CHECKLIST  FOR  AREA  SECURITY  


Check  to  be  made      X   Suggested  change  
Is  there  a  fence  around        
the  work  area  with  no  
gaps  and  unable  to  be  
climbed  over?  
Are  gates  to  area  fitted        
with  strong  locks  that  
cannot  be  cut  with  a  
bolt  cutter,  wire  cutters,  
other  portable  hand  
tools?  
Are  gates  crash  proof?        
Do  buildings  have  smash        
proof  windows  and  
doors  or  guards  over  
windows?  
Do  manholes  in        
buildings  have  restricted  
access?  
Is  an  alarm  fitted  and        
operational  with  some  
warning  to  police  or  a  
security  service  for  call  
out?  
Is  there  a  surveillance        
system  in  place  to  
record  movements  after  
dark  and  outside  
working  hours  with  an  
alarm  connected  to  this  
system?  
Is  access  to  unused  seals        
restricted  (to  prevent  
removal  and  
replacement)?  
Is  loose  cargo  secured        
and/or  marked  (e.g.  
with  marks  visible  under  
UV)?  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 17


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1041
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Are  containers  stored        


with  doors  facing  each  
other  to  prevent  easy  
opening?  
 

Page 18 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1041 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

 
Check  to  be  made      X   Suggested  change  
Is  an  audit  undertaken  of        
vulnerability  (chance  of  
break  in)  on  a  regular  
basis  (internally  or  
externally)?  
Is  high  value  cargo        
stored  in  special  
locations  with  greater  
security?  
Are  company  vehicles        
parked  overnight  in  area  
fitted  with  immobilisers?  
Are  all  persons  entering        
work  area  checked?  
Are  vehicles  leaving  the        
area  checked?  
Is  all  loading  and        
unloading  supervised  by  
someone  within  the  
company?  
Are  all  vehicles  belonging        
to  employees  and  
contractors  parked  
outside  the  work  area?  
Are  rubbish  bins  and        
skips  checked  regularly  
(these  can  be  used  to  
remove  goods  from  
area)?  
Are  empty  containers        
stored  away  from  other  
cargo?  
Are  used  seals  disposed        
of  carefully?  
Is  security  upgraded        
during  breaks?  
Are  staff  and  contractors        
screened  before  hiring?  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 19


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1041
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Do  company  policies        
clearly  spell  out  penalties  
for  theft?    Are  they  
serious  enough?  

Page 20 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1041 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Activity 4: Checking your workplace’s security system

Photocopy the checklist above and conduct an ‘audit’ or check of


how security conscious your workplace is. Ask your trainer for
assistance and other people you work with.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 21


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1041
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Activity 5: Assisting with security

Talk to your trainer and arrange to work with a fellow team


member(s) whose tasks involve checking visitors to the work area
or those leaving the area. Discuss what needs to be done in
monitoring visitors and vehicles in and out of the area and what
situations have arisen in the past (the ‘what could happen’ column).
Record what you learn in the table below:

What is being Why it is being What could happen


checked checked

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 22 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1041 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

What arrangements are in place for high value


goods and cargo?

The  smaller  and  more  valuable  an  item  is,  the  easier  it  is  to  be  removed  
or  stolen.    Probably  the  best  example  of  money  value  compared  to  
weight  is  a  diamond.    Even  a  small  diamond  that  could  be  hidden  in  a  
person’s  ear,  tooth  or  other  body  parts  could  be  worth  a  large  sum.  

Special  procedures  are  usually  in  place  for  items  of  high  value  that  are  
easily  pilfered  or  stolen.    These  might  include:  
• electronic  equipment  (video  cameras,  mobile  phones,  etc)  
• jewellery,  precious  minerals,  gold  
• pharmaceuticals  
• cigarettes  
• prohibited  goods  or  those  subject  to  licences  or  restrictions  for  
which  there  is  a  black  market  (e.g.  chemicals  used  in  illicit  drug  
manufacture).    

The  range  of  measures  taken  to  protect  these  goods  might  include:  
• use  of  safes  
• use  of  ‘cages’  or  lockers  with  reinforced  panels  and  locks  
• additional  alarms  
• use  of  guard  dogs  in  area  where  these  goods  are  stored  
• use  of  dye  bombs  in  goods  that  spray  a  dye  over  anyone  tampering  
with  containers  (used  for  money  being  moved  or  stored  by  banks).  

The  next  activity  looks  at  the  procedures  in  place  within  your  
workplace  for  securing  high  value  items.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 23


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1041
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Activity 6: Securing high value and easily pilfered goods

Talk to your trainer and others in your workplace about how high
value and easily pilfered goods are secured in your workplace.
Use the table below to record your answers. Try to find out about a
range of measures for goods typically handled by your company.

Type of goods How secured

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 24 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1041 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Section 2

Reporting incidents/emergencies

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 25


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1041
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Section outline

Areas  covered  in  this  section  


Completing  workplace  documents  to  record  goods  moved  out  
of  the  area  
Responding  to  security  incidents/emergencies  including:  
− writing  reports  
− dealing  with  incidents  
 

Page 26 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1041 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

How do you respond to situations involving


security of goods?

What workplace documents are required to


record movement of goods?

The  process  of  moving  goods  from  the  manufacturer  to  the  end  user  
or  customer  involves  many  steps.    This  is  called  the  ‘supply  chain’.    
Typically  for  goods  imported  from  overseas,  the  supply  chain  will  look  
like  this:  

  Manufacturer Goods Goods


makes goods ordered by packaged by
  wholesalers manufacturer
for shipment
  (air/sea)

  Goods Goods Goods


unpacked and received at transported to
  sorted into wharf or air destination
destinations terminal country/state
within area
 

 
Goods Goods Goods
 
repackaged transported to received and
for distribution wholesalers unpacked by
  to wholesalers wholesaler

 
Goods bought Goods received Goods
  by end at retail outlet, distributed to
customer unpacked and retail outlets
put into stock or
  storage

The  shaded  areas  represent  the  area  you  may  be  working  in.    At  this  
point  containers  are  broken  open  and  sorted  for  distribution  to  the  
next  step  in  the  supply  chain.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 27


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1041
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

As  there  are  possibly  ten  or  more  points  at  which  the  goods  can  suffer  
damage  or  be  pilfered,  it  is  important  to  count  the  goods  and  check  
these  against  what  is  supposed  to  be  in  the  container  or  package.  

Presume  that  you  are  working  at  a  wharf  where  you  open  containers  
from  overseas,  unpack  and  sort  the  contents  into  locations  for  these  
goods  to  be  sent.    Suppose  that  one  container  contains  a  load  of  
earthenware  garden  pots  from  China.    These  pots  are  to  be  sent  to  4  
different  wholesalers  in  the  suburbs  of  your  city.    The  following  table  
identifies  what  can  go  wrong  and  makes  suggestions  for  how  these  
situations  should  be  acted  upon:  

Step  in  process   Problem     Action  

Container  arrives  with   Goods  are  checked   Report  back  to  


unbroken  seal   against  documents   company  that  packed  
and  found  to  be  short   the  container  

Goods  are  unpacked   Some  of  contents  are   Report  back  to  
broken   transporters  of  
container  or  claim  on  
insurance  

Goods  are  made  into   Order  is  now  short  of   Document  what  is  
packages  for  each   what  is  required   being  sent  to  each  
wholesaler   wholesaler  and  short  
falls  compared  to  
orders  

Final  check  made  of   Individual  packs   Internal  problem  of  


each  load   contain  broken  goods   care  of  goods  during  
and  quantities  are   handling  and  
less  than  that   pilfering.    Report.    
supposed  to  be   Change  documents  to  
packed   wholesalers  

The  importance  of  checking  and  recording  what  you  are  handling  and  
sending  out  of  the  area  can  be  seen  from  this  example.    Your  
workplace  will  have  procedures  for  dealing  with  each  of  these  
situations.  

Remember  that  accuracy  of  counting,  making  checks  and  rechecks  and  
keeping  goods  secure  is  important  to  you  and  your  company.  

Page 28 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1041 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

The  next  activity  looks  at  problems  that  might  be  encountered  in  this  
area.  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 29


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1041
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Activity 7: Dealing with problems

Problems of security of goods can be tracked back to a variety of


causes. Talk to your supervisor, trainer and others in your
workplace about what you would do in each of the following
situations. The last two rows are left blank to add in any other
companies or organisations. Use the table to record your answers.

Problem traced to .. Action to be taken

Manufacturer or
overseas company
packaging goods for
transport

Shipping company
responsible for
bringing goods into
the country

Your own company

Other companies and


their staff who come
into your area

Customs, AQIS or
other government
agencies

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 30 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1041 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Activity 8: Workplace records of goods movement

Talk to your trainer about what documents you are required to


complete to record goods moved out of your area. Practice filling
these out. Discuss with your fellow team members what sort of
things can go wrong with filling out these documents. Find out
what you do with these documents when you have completed
them. Record what you learn in the space below.

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 31


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1041
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

What do you do when there is a security


incident/emergency?

Your  company  will  have  procedures  for  reporting  security  incidents.    


These  may  be  verbal  or  written,  probably  depending  on  the  nature  of  
the  incident.    More  serious  incidents  will  probably  require  a  written  
report.    The  report  will  include  details  like:  
• time  and  date  of  incident  
• nature  of  incident  (break-­‐in,  alarm  being  sounded,  intruder,  etc)  
• goods  damaged  or  removed  
• value  of  goods  
• actions  taken  
• offender  or  responsible  person/organization  
• any  other  details  explaining  the  incident.  

The  actual  procedures  will  vary.    You  should  get  familiar  with  what  you  
are  expected  to  do  in  such  situations.    These  requirements  are  the  
focus  of  the  next  activity.  
 

Page 32 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1041 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Activity 9: “You’re nicked ….”

Talk to your trainer about what you are supposed to do if you


detect an attempt by anyone (fellow team member or outside
person) to steal or pilfer goods from your workplace. Also check
the workstation or gatehouse where security is located for
resources used in case of an attempted theft. Examples might
include: emergency phone numbers, alarms, switch to lock gate in
an emergency, etc. List what you have learnt in the space below.

Resources available in case of attempted theft

Procedures in case of detecting theft or an attempt at theft

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 33


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1041
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Activity 10: Written reports

Ask your trainer to show you examples of written reports and


discuss how these were filled out. Practice filling out a report form
for the following incidents:

1. A driver from another company attempted to load some loose


cartons containing cigarettes to the value of $1200 into his/her
truck. This was discovered when you checked the load before
allowing him/her to leave the depot.

2. You discover when you arrive at work that a break-in has


occurred. A gate has been forced using bolt cutters and 10
computers valued at $2000 each have been stolen.

3. A pallet is being unpacked and loose goods are lying around


the store. When the goods are checked against the documents
provided for the load, some goods are missing to the value of
$500. No visitors have been in the area – only company staff.

4. A container arrives with a broken seal and a check reveals that


water damage has occurred to the goods and that about $5000
of goods (electronic goods) is missing compared to the
documents recording the contents.

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

Page 34 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1041 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Activity 11: Police involvement

Talk to your trainer about when police are called and other
authorities such as Customs, AQIS, and Federal Police.

Is there a given monetary value or type of goods that require a


police report or report to another authority?

Record what you learn in the space below.

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

________________________________________________________________

There is feedback on this activity at the back of this Learner’s


Guide.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 35


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1041
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Additional
resources

Page 36 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1041 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Web  sites:  
• CGM  (US)  company  manufacturing  and  selling  packaging  seals:  
http://www.cgmsecuritysolutions.com  
• The  Detection  and  Prevention  of  Cargo  Theft,  Australian  Institute  
of  Criminology  Report  No  214,  September  2001  (available  via  
download  at  
http://www.aic.gov.au/publications/tandi/tandi214.html)  
• Tradegate  report  on  cargo  theft  available  at:  
http://www.tradegate.org.au/sfcnsw/Activities/LWG-­‐Minutes-­‐21-­‐
October-­‐2002.pdf  
• Department  of  Foreign  Affairs  and  Trade    
http://www.dfat.gov.au/  
• ‘Switched-­‐on’  packaging  company  (theft  prevention  devices):  
http://www.switchedon.com.au/packaging.html  

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 37


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1041
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Feedback on
activities
The responses provided in this section are suggested responses.
Because every workplace is different, your responses may vary
according to your specific workplace procedures, the equipment
available and the nature of the business.

Page 38 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1041 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Activity 1: Seals

The web reference provided in this section gives a wide range of


seals that are available. Information is also given on how to use
these seals and with what sort of containers or packages. Check
your answers with relevant people in your workplace.

Activity 2: Broken seals and Activity 3: Reporting tampering


with seals

Seals broken on containers or packages arriving at your workplace


indicate some form of tampering. Containers or packages may be
resealed or opened after recording details and checked for lost
goods. Reporting is important where goods have been removed,
stolen or damaged.

Activity 4: Checking your workplace’s security system

The checklist was adapted from a report of the Australian Institute


of Criminology and reflects best practice in securing goods when
being handled. As a result of your audit of the workplace you
should discuss any obvious security risks with your trainer.

Activity 5: Assisting with security

Checking of vehicles and people entering and leaving the area


should include everyone (even the manager) to be totally effective.
It is important to identify what to do if you suspect or identify a
security problem.

Activity 6: Securing high value and easily pilfered goods

High value and easily pilfered goods will have extra security that
might include: extra locks; secure containers/packages; safes;
reinforced storage facility; guards; perhaps guard dogs, etc.

Activity 7: Dealing with problems

The options for dealing with problems of security of goods will vary
from company to company and depend on the value and type of
goods missing. You may also have to make or set in motion: an
insurance claim; a credit; replacement; exchange or a complaint.

© Australian National Training Authority 2003 Page 39


Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008 ADELG1041
TLIO207D Follow security procedures

Activity 8: Workplace records of goods movement

Ask for feedback from your trainer and supervisor. It is useful to


know what problems others have had in filling out records and so
learn what mistakes to avoid. A copy of the record will probably
travel with the goods to their destination so the next step of the
supply chain can make sure they have been delivered the correct
goods.

Activity 9: “You’re nicked ….”

Work areas may have an alarm system, radios to call other


checkpoints, a list of emergency numbers, switches to lock gates in
the event of an emergency, sirens, etc.

Procedures will vary from company to company but will be


designed to give clear instructions in the event of a security
incident or emergency.

Activity 10: Written reports

You reports should be filled out in accordance with company policy


and procedures. The report should clearly indicate details of the
event and may include actions that you recommend be taken as a
result of the incident. In some workplaces, an investigation will
follow an incident or emergency particularly if people’s safety was
threatened.

Activity 11: Police involvement

Your workplace will have policies and procedures to cover this


situation. Pilfering is theft and therefore illegal. Small amounts of
pilfering may not require a police report but large amounts and theft
of restricted goods (drugs, pharmaceuticals, chemicals, dangerous
goods, etc) will require reporting to police and in some cases to the
Federal Police, Customs and AQIS.

Page 40 © Australian National Training Authority 2003


ADELG1041 Customised and developed by Armstrong’s Driver Education Pty Ltd August 2008