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INDIAN INDIPENDANCE DAY

After more than two hundred years of British rule, India finally won backs
its freedom on 15th August, 1947. It was a birth of a new nation and a
new beginning. It was on the eve of 15th of August, 1947 that India
tricolour flag was unfurled by Jawahar Lal Nehru, the first Prime Minister
of
India,
on
the
ramparts
the
Red
Fort
of
Delhi.
The day is celebrated to commemorate the birth of the world's biggest
democracy as a national holiday. Schools and people hoist the national
flag through out the country and put them up on the rooftops and the
buildings. People only go to offices to attend the flag hoisting ceremony.
The Prime Minister addresses the Nation after the flag has been unfurled
recounting the country's achievements of the year, discussing current
major issues and future plans for the progress of the country. Recently,
kite-flying has become a tradition on this day and people can be seen
flying numerous kites of all colours, sizes and shapes symbolizing the
freedom.
It has been more than 60 years since India gained her freedom from
British reign. Liberty was not easy to attain for India, as is the case with
any other nation.
The 1857 Sepoy mutiny was an important landmark

Though the British government suppressed the rebellion, the flame of


discontent had been kindled.
The next few decades saw various big and small wars being fought
against the Empire.
These wars took place in isolated areas of the country and hence, met
with little success.
The next few decades saw various big and small wars being fought
against the Empire.
These wars took place in isolated areas of the country and hence, met
with little success.
Political groups such as the Congress were formed to counter the
Britishers in a peaceful way.
Iconic leaders such as Mahatma Gandhi, Subhas Chandra Bose and Lala
Lajpat Rai tried to attain liberty through peaceful means while
personalities like Mastarda Surya Sen, Chandrasekhar Azad, Bhagat Singh

and others strived to snatch freedom forcefully from the uncompromising


British empire.
At last on June 3 1947, Viscount Louis Mountbatten, the last British
Governor-General of India, declared that the British would leave the
Indian subcontinent but the British Indian Empire was to be split up into a
secular
India
and
a
Muslim
Pakistan.
The Muslim League demanded a separate nation for them selves with the
result that the Indian subcontinent was divided into a Muslim Pakistan and
a secular India. Pakistan was officially announced to be a separate nation
and given an independent status on 14 August 1947. At midnight, on 15
August 1947, India was declared to be an independent nation by her first
Prime Minister Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru.