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Seven Days Of Crap!

By H. M. Dain Lybarger
(With technical assistance from Jim Benji Thielan)

v1.4

Introduction
This brief manual is intended to aid the reader in learning the game of casino craps. It begins from the very
basics, assuming that you, the reader, know nothing of
the game. In just seven days of study and practice,
you too can become a craps expert!
The ideal way to use this manual is as a study guide.
At various points in the text, there are labels indicating
what to learn on each day of the Seven Days of Craps
course. Concentrate on reading and learning the bets
assigned for each day of study. Dont try to take in the
entire game at one time. A casino craps game is actually many overlapping games, all played simultaneously. Learn each one separately, dont become overwhelmed by the apparent complexity of the game. Its
really not as complex as it first appears.
Let the games begin!

The Game of Craps


More history than you want to know...
Dice were invented far
back in antiquity. The first
dice known were made
from the knucklebones of
sheep (which happen to
be roughly cubical).
I TOLD YOU THAT THIS WOULD BE

MORE THAN YOU WANT TO KNOW...

It didnt take long for our ancestors to invent gambling


games using these primitive dice. The ancient Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans gambled with dice by anteing up a wager and then rolling two or more dice for
each player. The highest total won the bet. This was
fun, but not exciting enough for some people.
By the sixteenth century, the English were playing a
dice game called Hazard, which was the ancestor of
modern craps. It was played on a round table, with
two dice. Different totals of the dice paid out at different odds. One player acted as banker, and played
against all comers until he was knocked out of the
game, then the player who had beaten him took over
as banker. Sort of like King of the Hill with cash. Un-

fortunately, the payout odds for combinations at Hazard were not mathematically correct, so the banker
was not getting the advantage he thought he was getting...

Street Craps
By the early nineteenth century, a dice game now
called craps was played in most American cities. USUALLY IN DEAD-END ALLEYWAYS... One player, the shooter,
rolled the dice. All the other players either bet against
him, or backed him by covering wagers played
against. When the shooter failed to make his point,
the dice passed to anyone else who had the nerve to
play.

Casino or "two-way" Craps


Modern craps is referred to as two-way craps because of a casino innovation. Rather than letting the
players bet for or against the shooter directly, the casino banks the game, covering wagers going in either
direction (and taking a cut of the action both ways).

Anatomy of a Craps Layout


Casino craps is played on a rectangular table, usually
between nine and twelve feet in length. The layout
itself is made of felt, and is surrounded by a low wall,
used to contain the dice as they bounce around. The
wall is topped by a rail, which is grooved to hold casino
checks, and divided into segments, for the convenience of the players. The inner surface of the wall at
both ends of the table is covered with small rubber
pyramids, which help to keep the dice bouncing randomly. The inner surface of the wall across from the
bankroll is mirrored, to help the Boxperson see both
sides of the dice at one time.
The layout is divided into three printed areas, which
are detailed below.

Bases
The two ends of the table are called the bases. The
one to the Boxpersons right is 2nd base, the one to his
left is 3rd base. The easiest way to identify the bases
is that the number four appears on the outer edge of
2nd base. The number ten appears on the outer edge
of 3rd base.

Both bases are identical to one another, and are divided into areas for betting. The Pass Line runs around
the outside edge of the base. The Dont Pass line
runs just inside the Pass Line. Two large areas are
marked Field and Come. A smaller area on the outside edge is marked Dont Come. Across the base
dealers edge of the table are a set of numbered boxes, referred to as the Come Numbers. The uses of all
these areas will be explained below.

Prop Area
The prop area takes up
the middle of the printed
layout, between the two
bases. If there is a 1st
base, this must be it
but it is never referred to
as such. The name
prop area derives from
the proposition bets
which are made there.
Proposition bets are a
variety of one-roll bets,
which do not stay on the
table more than one roll
unless they win. The
main part of the prop
area are four boxes
showing pictures of dice
a pair of 1s, a pair of
2s, a pair of 4s, and a pair of 5s. These are known as
the Hard Ways. Hard Ways are unique in that they
are proposition bets that do last more than one roll. All
of the proposition bets will be explained below.

Bankroll
Sitting in front of the seated Boxperson is the table
bankroll. It can come to quite a large amount of money -- $50,000 to $80,000 craps bankrolls are not uncommon. The checks are arranged in stacks, with the
largest value checks in the center, directly under the
Boxpersons eyes at all times. The smaller value
checks are arranged fanning out from there, with the
$1 checks placed at the ends of the bankroll, next to
the base dealers. Base dealers are permitted to take
stacks of $1 or $5 checks out of the bankroll on their
own all other denominations are given to them by the
Boxperson, when they need them.

Equipment
In addition to the table layout, a craps game requires
some tools; a curved stick, a dice boat, two ON/OFF
pucks, a selection of lammers for marking wagers of
specific types, and, of course, dice. A stick of dice is
typically five identical dice. Some casinos provide six
dice per table, instead.

Table Staff
A craps table is staffed by five people, although there
are never more than four of them on duty at one time.
A Boxperson oversees the
game, seated behind the
table bankroll. Two base
dealers handle the action
on 2nd and 3rd base, and
a stickperson controls the
pace of the game. The
stickperson also handles
the prop area. The base
dealers and the stickperson rotate their duties; first
working stick, then dealing
one base, then the other
base, and finally going on
break. One of the dealers
is always on break while
the other three work. The
Boxperson is a table
games supervisor, and is
relieved by other supervisors as necessary.

Base Dealers
The duties of a base dealer are to handle the wagers
made on his or her base. The base dealer will maintain a set of working stacks of checks, used to pay
out winning wagers on that base. Lost wagers will be
placed on top of the working stacks. When a working
stack gets too large, a full stack of 20 checks will be
passed back to the boxperson.

Stickperson
The duties of a stickperson are to handle wagers
made in the prop area, and to control the pace of the
game. The stickperson will have a set of working
stacks as well, generally white and red, which are the
collected losses from the prop area. The stickperson
is equipped with the stick, which is used to move dice
around the table. The stickperson is responsible for

watching the dice as they are passed to the shooter


and then thrown. The stickperson calls out the number rolled. The base dealers listen to the stick calls to
determine what wagers won and lost each roll.

Boxperson
The duty of the Boxperson is to supervise the dealing
team, and to handle patrons buy-ins and cash-outs.
He is also responsible for officially booking all bets.

The Rhythm of a Craps Game


The sequence of actions on a craps game is complex,
but it is a strictly repeating order of events. We begin
with the pucks in the OFF position, and no wagers on
the table (just as if the table were newly opened). This
is a come out roll, since there is no point established.
Pass line and Dont Pass wagers are made. The dice
are passed by the stickman to the first shooter, who
selects two of the dice for his throw. To be permitted
to shoot the dice, a player must have either a Pass
Line or a Dont Pass wager. When the dice are
thrown, the result will either be a pass line winner, a
pass line loser (craps), or it will establish a point. If a
point is established, the pucks will go into the ON position, behind the point number on the layout. The
shooter can continue to throw the dice until he fails to
make his point. When that happens, the dice pass
clockwise to the next patron who qualifies to shoot.
This pattern continues until the table closes.

Day One

Bets
Now we get to the meat of the course the bets.
Each player at a craps game can have many different
bets working at one time. Each bet, however, lives
and dies according to its own rules, and is unaffected
by any other bet on the table, whether owned by the
same player or a different one.

Base Bets
The most popular wagers on a craps table are made
on the base ends of the layout. There is space for
eight players around each base, but more can crowd
in if necessary.

Pass Line
The primary wager on a craps table is the Pass Line

wager. It is placed on the line on the layout marked


Pass Line, and directly in front of the player who
makes it. (Kind of obvious, I know...) A Pass Line wager is generally made only on the come out roll. (That
means that the pucks are in the OFF position, when
there is no point established from a previous roll.) On
the come out roll, the pass line wagers win on a 7 or
11 (called natural numbers), and lose on a 2, 3, or
12 (called crap numbers). Any other number rolled
becomes the point. The pucks are moved to the ON
position, marking the number on the layout that is now
the point.
Once a point is established, pass line wagers win if the
point number rolls, and lose if a 7 rolls. No other
numbers make any difference to the pass line wagers.
Terminology Note: Since many wagers lose on a roll
of 7, that roll is referred to as a 7-out, and often
causes the entire table to be cleared off.
Pass Line wagers are flat bets they get paid even
money when they win.
Pass Line wagers are known as contract bets because once they are made, they cannot be taken back.
They will either win or lose, but they cannot come
down. They can be increased or pressed if the player
wishes.
At some casinos, a Pass Line wager can be made
even after a point is established! This is considered to
be pressing a wager of zero. Some casinos do not
allow this, and a Pass Line wager made at that time is
considered to be a Place bet instead. This is referred
to as Placing the Point. The wager is still positioned
on the Pass Line, but cannot have odds placed behind
it, and it is paid as a Place bet. (Dont worry about this
technicality now. Place bets are covered on Day
Three.)

Don't Pass
For patrons who wish to bet against the shooter, casinos offer the Dont Pass wager. Dont Pass wagers
are places on the line marked Dont Pass on the layout. Again, they are placed exactly in front of the patron who owns them. The Dont Pass wager is almost
the exact opposite of the Pass Line wager. It loses on
a 7 or 11 on the come out roll, and wins on a 2 or
3. If a 12 is rolled, the wager is a push it neither
wins nor loses. (That is why the Dont Pass line on the

layout says Dont Pass Bar 12. We bar the 12 from


winning, in order to make the odds for the casino more
favorable.) If any other number is rolled, it becomes
the point.
After the point is established, a Dont Pass wager wins
if a 7 rolls before the point number, and loses if the
point number rolls before a 7 comes up.
Dont Pass wagers are flat bets, just like the Pass
Line. They are paid even money when they win.
Dont Pass bets can be taken down whenever the
player likes. They are not contract bets. They cannot
be pressed however. (Dont Pass bets run their biggest risk of losing on the come out roll once they get
past that, the chances are in their favor. It would not
be good business to allow someone to make a low bet
when the risk is big, and then press it up when the risk
is smaller...)

Pass Line Odds


Now we have to get into some theory. Brace yourself:
There are 36 combinations of numbers that can come
up on two dice. They are:
1-1, 1-2, 1-3, 1-4, 1-5, 1-6,
2-1, 2-2, 2-3, 2-4, 2-5, 2-6,
3-1, 3-2, 3-3, 3-4, 3-5, 3-6,
4-1, 4-2, 4-3, 4-4, 4-5, 4-6,
5-1, 5-2, 5-3, 5-4, 5-5, 5-6,
6-1, 6-2, 6-3, 6-4, 6-5, 6-6.
When you add them up, you will notice that some total
values are more common than others. For each total
value, there are a different number of ways to make it
out of two dice.
Total: 2 3
Ways: 1 2

4
3

5
4

6
5

7
6

8
5

9
4

10 11 12
3 2 1

As you can see, 7s are the most common number,


with six ways to make a 7 on two dice.
Since 7s, 11s, 2s, 3s, and 12s all either make
Pass Line wagers win or lose, the only possible points
are 4, 5, 6, 8, 9,and 10. You can see from the
table above that it is much easier to roll a 6 or an 8
than it is to roll a 4 or a 10. Players are allowed to

take advantage of this fact by placing an odds wager


with their Pass Line or Dont Pass wagers.
Many casinos allow 10-times-odds on craps. That
means that a patrons odds wager can be up to ten
times the value of his Pass Line wager. The odds wager, if it wins, is paid True Odds instead of being paid
even money like the Pass Line wager. True Odds are
paid as follows:
Point: 4
Odds: 2-1

5
3-2

6
6-5

8
6-5

9
3-2

10
2-1

Pass Line Odds wagers are placed directly behind the


pass line, slightly separated from the matching Pass
Line bet. They can be placed or taken down at any
time.

Don't Pass Odds


The Pass Line and Dont Pass wagers are nearly exact opposites of one another. Pass Line Odds and
Dont Pass Odds wagers have the same relationship.
Because of the smaller working space on the Dont
Pass line, Dont Pass Odds are placed partly on top of
their associated Dont Pass bet, and leaning off to one
side. This is referred to as heeled.
The primary way in which they are opposite is the payoff rate. The odds are reversed. A $100 wager when
the point is 4 will win $50. (This is not as bad as it
seems, since the chances of success are better than
even.) The table below shows the payoffs for Dont

Pass Odds:
Point: 4
Odds: 1-2

be pressed.
5
2-3

6
5-6

8
5-6

9
2-3

10
1-2

Day Two
Come Bets
Some people want to have more than one Pass Line
wager, in order to have more than one number that
can win for them. They want to play the Pass Line
game again and they want to play it right now. The
Come bet was created for this purpose. Whenever
you make a Come bet, the very next roll is the comeout roll for that bet.
Every Come bet is a separate game, unconnected to
any other Come bet. Come bet games are just overlapping Pass Line games, all played on the same table, and using the same series of dice rolls. They
dont interact with each other, or with the real Pass
Line game.
Come bets are placed in the large space on the layout
marked Come, as close to directly in front of the owning player as possible.
Since the next roll after a Come bet is made is its personal come out roll, a Come bet wins on a 7 or 11,
and loses on a 2, 3, or 12, just like a Pass Line bet.
Any other number becomes the point for that Come
bet. How, you may ask, do we keep track of the point
for each separate Come bet, when the pucks are already in use marking the real point for the Pass Line
wagers? This is where the Come Numbers get used.
When a point number is rolled for a Come bet, the bet
is moved from the Come area into the matching Come
Number box on the layout. The base dealers keep
track of who owns established come bets by where
inside the box they place the wagers.
Come bets which have a point established win and
lose just like the Pass Line they win if their number
shows up before a 7 is rolled, and lose if a 7 is rolled
before their number. They get paid even money when
they win, just like Pass Line wagers.
Come bets have all the other characteristics of Pass
Line wagers as well; they are contract bets, and can

Don't Come
As you have probably guessed, the Dont Come wager has
the same relationship to the Come wager as the Dont Pass
has to the Pass Line they are almost exactly opposites.

When a Dont Come wager is placed, it goes in the


Dont Come space on the table layout. The very next
roll is the come out roll for that wager. Therefore, it
loses on a 7 or 11, and wins on a 2 or 3. A 12 is
a push just like for Dont Pass wagers. And just like all
the other wagers we have discussed so far, any other
number becomes the point for that bet.
Dont Come bets which have a point established are
moved by the dealer to the small boxes behind the
Come Numbers on the layout. Thats how the base
dealers keep track of what the point is for each wager.
Once a point is established, a Dont Come bet wins if a
7 comes up before its number, and loses if its number comes up before a 7 just like a Dont Pass.
Dont Come bets have all the other characteristics of
Dont Pass bets. They are not contract bets, and can
be taken down, but they cannot be pressed up.

Come Bet Odds


Since Come bets are the same as Pass Line bets, just
not synchronized with the official Pass Line come out
rolls, players can take odds on their Come bets, just
like they do on their Pass Line bets. The payouts are
exactly the same.
Point: 4
Odds: 2-1

5
3-2

6
6-5

8
6-5

9
3-2

10
2-1

Come Bet Odds wagers are placed in the Come Number boxes, on top of the matching Come Bets, and
canted off slightly to one side. Stacking them crooked
like that makes it clear which part of the stack is the
flat bet and which part is the odds. Come Bet Odds
can be placed or taken down at any time.
Come Bets and Come Bet Odds which win are moved
into the Come are on the layout before being paid.
This gives the base dealer more space to work in.
Come Bet Odds are off on the Come Out roll unless
called on by the player.

Don't Come Odds


As you can probably guess by now, Dont Come Odds
are the same as Dont Pass Odds. They can be increased or decreased, or even taken down, at any
time.
Just like Dont Pass Odds, the payout odds are reversed. The table below shows the payoffs for Dont
Come Odds: ITS THE SAME TABLE. GO BACK AND CHECK IF YOU
DONT BELIEVE ME...

Point: 4
Odds: 1-2

5
2-3

6
5-6

8
5-6

9
2-3

10
1-2

Winning Dont Come bets and Dont Come Odds wagers are also moved into the Come area before being
paid, to give the dealer extra room to work.

Point: 4
Odds: 9-5

5
7-5

6
7-6

8
7-6

9
7-5

10
9-5

Place bets are the only bets that get paid House Odds.
Note that Place bets are unusual, since they are odds
bets without a matching flat bet. You cant take odds
on a Place bet the Place bet is already an odds bet
on its own.
(Note that the 6 and 8 have odds divisible by 6. All
place bets on the 6 and the 8 must be in units divisible by 6. OR THE DEALERS GET CRANKY... Other place bets
can be in units divisible by 5.)
Place bets are off on the Come Out Roll, unless called
on by the player.

Day Three
Place Bets
When making a Come bet, the dice decide what number the wager is made on, and therefore the payoff
odds. Suppose a player wants to pick a number (and
a set of odds), without letting the dice decide. In that
case, he can make a Place bet.
Place bets are positioned on the layout on the double
lines in front of and behind the Come Numbers. The
dealers position the wager to show who owns it. Bets
from people standing along the long side of the base
are placed on the front double lines, bets from people
standing along the short side of the base are placed
on the back double lines.
Note: If a player wishes to make a Place bet on the
current point number, he can put it down bisecting the
Pass Line on the layout in front of him. This counts as
a Place bet just the same as if he had given the money
to the base dealer and had the base dealer position
the wager.
A Place bet wins if its number rolls before the 7 rolls,
and loses if a 7 rolls before its number. No other
rolls affect the wager.
Place bets are paid House Odds, not True Odds.
House Odds are slightly reduced values, as shown
below:

Day Four
Buy Bets
What if you dont want to get the reduced House Odds,
but still want to pick your number? The Buy bet was
invented for that purpose. Like a Place bet, it is an
odds bet without a matching flat bet but it gets paid
True Odds.
A player makes a Buy bet by telling the base dealer
what number he wants to buy, and giving him the money. The bet is placed in the appropriate number box
on the layout, positioned to show which player made
the bet. To distinguish a Buy bet from a Come bet, a
small lammer labeled BUY is placed on the wager.
Once placed, a Buy bet can be taken down at any

time. It wins if its number comes up before a 7, and


loses if a 7 comes up first. Its just like Come Bet
Odds, without the messy flat-paying Come Bet underneath. So much like it, in fact, that theyre also off on
the Come Out Roll unless called on.
Winning Buy bets are paid True Odds for the number
they are placed on. They are moved down into the
Come area before being paid.
In fact, it is so much like Come Bet Odds, only with
more freedom of choice, that you might ask why anyone would bother with Come Bets at all. Well, theres
a price for all that freedom; 5% of the amount of the
bet. This is called a vig (short for the Yiddish word
vigorish). AND YOU THOUGHT YOU WOULD BE SAFE FROM TRIVIA BY
NOW... The vig is paid when the bet is made, and goes
into the table bankroll, (or the dealers working stacks).
For example, a $100 buy bet cost the player an extra
$5 when it is placed. The vig is charged regardless of
whether the bet wins or loses but if the Buy bet is
taken down voluntarily, the vig is returned to the player
with his bet.

Lay Bets
Lay bets are Dont Come Odds without the Dont
Come bet. Or, in other words, they are the opposite of
Buy bets. When placed, they go in the Dont Come
boxes behind the numbers on the layout, and are
marked with a LAY lammer, so they dont get confused
with Dont Come bets.
Lay bets win if a 7 comes up before their number, and
lose if their number comes up first. Winning Lay bets
get paid Reverse True Odds, just like Dont Come
Odds and Dont Pass Odds.
Point: 4
Odds: 1-2

5
2-3

6
5-6

8
5-6

9
2-3

10
1-2

OK, now for the tricky part. The vig is reversed too
the vig is not 5% of the wager, its 5% of the amount
the wager could win. The vig is still paid when the bet
is made, only the calculation differs. The vig still goes
into the table bankroll. If the point were 4, for example, a $200 could win $100. The vig would be $5, so
the base dealer would need to be given $205 to set up
the bet.
If a lay bet is taken down by its owner, his vig is returned.

Day Five
Okay, today you get a break, only a couple of new bets to learn, and they
are easy,
since they are such a bad idea for the player.
USE THE REST OF TODAY TO REVIEW
LEARNED SO FAR!

THE OTHER WAGERS YOU HAVE

Field Bets
A Field Bet is a wager placed in the Field space on
the table layout. It wins if any of the numbers shown in
the space are rolled on the next roll, and loses is anything else is thrown. It is a one-roll bet.
A Field Bet is paid even money in most cases. However, if a 2 or 12 is rolled, it is paid double. (Most
casinos only pay double on 12s, but a few pay triple
on the 12.)
The field bet is a scam, pure and simple. The numbers printed in the Field space on the table layout are
2, 3, 4, 9, 10, 11, and 12. The stickmans call
for a roll of 9 is Centerfield nine, implying that the
value 9 is the center of something but the value of
7 is the center of the two-dice sequence. For the field
numbers to be symmetrical, the 5 should be counted
as a winner, and only 6s, 7s, and 8s should be losers. By making the 5 a losing number as well, the
casino makes the Field bet very unfavorable to the
player. By calling out Centerfield nine, we disguise
the mathematical truth.

Big 6 and Big 8


The spaces in the corner of the table layout marked
Big 6 and Big 8 are simple wagers, which are paid
even money if they win. They win if a 6 (or 8) is
rolled before a 7, and lose if a 7 is rolled before their
number. Does this sound familiar? It should its the
same win and lose criteria as a Place Bet only it
pays even worse than House Odds, since it only pays
even money.
The Big 6 and Big 8 are for people who want to bet
Place bets on the 6and 8, but cant manage to make
their bets divisible by 6.
ANYBODY WHO CANT DIVIDE EVENLY BY 6 WONT NOTICE THAT THEY
ARENT GETTING PAID 7-6 ODDS EITHER...

Day Six
Prop Bets
Most prop bets are one roll bets. Generally, players
will throw in $1 or $5 checks for their prop action the
payouts are extremely high, but the odds of success
are extremely low. The stickperson is responsible for
keeping track of the prop area, and collects losing prop
wagers each roll. When a prop bet wins, the payouts
are generally high enough that the stickpersons working stacks wont cover it, since they are just white and
red. The stickperson uses his stick to tap in front of
winning players, and tells the appropriate base dealer
how much to pay that person.
Prop bets are extremely unfavorable to the player so
the stickperson is also responsible for selling the prop
area. The stickperson is supposed to talk up the prop
bets, and make a big show of paying the winners, to
convince players to bet them. Another trick used to
sell the prop area is leaving you up to win. Winning
prop bets are paid off, but the wager is left on the layout for the next roll, unless the player calls it down.
That usually results in the casino getting the bet in the
end...

Hard Ways
The four Hard Way wagers are unique in the prop area
they are the only prop bets which are not one-roll
bets. Rolling a number the hard way means rolling it
with like dice in other words, a pair. Any roll of nonmatching dice is a soft way or easy way. There are
four Hard Ways, Hard 4 ( a pair of 2s), Hard 6 (a pair
of 3s), Hard 8 (a pair of 4s), and Hard 10 (a pair of
5s). Hard Way wagers win if their combination appears on the dice, and lose if a 7 rolls, or if a soft way
rolls for their number. No other number matters to
Hard Ways. Customarily, Hard Way wagers are off on
the Come Out Roll unless called on by the owner.
Hard 6 and Hard 8 pay 9-1 when they win. Hard 4 and
Hard 10 pay 7-1 when they win.
Note: It would seem like the 4 and 10 should pay
more, since they are harder to roll on 2 dice than the
6 and the 8. The odds are the way they are because
its harder to roll soft 4s and soft 10s than it is to
roll soft 6s and soft 8s. They lose fewer ways, so
they pay less.

Another note: Hard 2 and Hard 12 are craps numbers,


and are not included in the Hard Ways, since there is
no soft way to make either number.

Day Seven
Any Sevens
This is a one-roll bet on any combination on the dice
totaling 7. It pays 4-1

Any Craps
This is a one-roll bet on any crap number ( 2, 3, or
12) coming up on the next roll. It pays 7-1.

Craps Numbers
It is also possible to bet on the Craps numbers individually, as one-roll wagers.
A wager on the 2 or on the 12 pays 30-1 if it wins.
A wager on the 3 pays 15-1 if it wins.

Eleven
A wager on the 11 pays 15-1 if it wins, and it is made
in a similar way to wagers on the Craps numbers. Because the number 11 spoken out loud sounds very
similar to the number 7, craps players and dealers
refer to the 11 as Yo or Yo-eleven.

Horn Bets
The Horn space on the prop area is used for several
different wagers. On its own, it is a wager divided
equally among the 2, 3, 11, and 12. Horn bets
must be divisible by 4. The payout for the Horn bet is
calculated as the appropriate win for the number
rolled, minus all the losing parts of the wager. For example, if an 11 rolls, the $1 wagered on it earns $15
more, but the $1 parts of the wager on the other three
numbers all lose, so the total paid is $12. If the 2 had
rolled, that dollar would have won 30 more, minus the
losing parts of the wager on the other three numbers.
The amount paid would be $27.

Horn High Bets


But what if I want to throw in a $5 check for a Horn
Bet, and I dont want to mess around with getting
change? I can tell the stickperson to put the extra dollar on one of the Horn numbers. For example, a $5
Horn High 2 means $1 on the 3, $1 on the 11, $1

on the 12, and $2 on the 2. A $10 Horn High Yo


means $2 on the 2, $2 on the 3, $2 on the 12, and
$4 on the 11.

World Bet
If I throw in $5 for a Horn bet, but I dont want to stack
up the odd dollar on one of the numbers, I can also put
it on the Any Seven wager. This is convenient, since it
acts as a kind of insurance. If the Horn bet loses because of a 7 rolling, I am out $4. But my $1 Sevens
wager wins 4-1, so I am even.

C and E Bets
The C-and-E spaces around the edges of the prop
area are for a popular set of bets, the Any Craps bet
and the Eleven bet. If there are a lot of players making each, the spots around the edge of the prop area
are oriented to point toward each player, so the stickperson can use them to organize the bets.
It is also possible to make a combination bet, splitting,
for example, a $5 wager between the Any Craps and
the Eleven. This makes it a $2.50 wager on each. If
an 11 rolls, the payout would be $2.50 times 15, minus the $2.50 part of the wager that was on the losing
Any Craps wager, a total of $35. DO YOUR OWN MATH! If a
craps number rolls, the payout would be $2.50 times 7,
minus the $2.50 on the losing Yo wager. That makes
$15.
There is a shortcut for this calculation: If an 11 rolls,
the payout is 7 times the total wager, and if a craps
number rolls, the payout is 3 times the total wager.
Thats the way the base dealers figure this stuff out,
instead of doing it the long way, as above.

Hop Bets
Hop bets are one-roll bets on a single specific combination of the dice. These are also called Turn bets.
They are generally called out by players with the lower
number die stated first 2-3 hopping or 4-6 hopping for example. They pay 15-1 if the next roll of the
dice is exactly as stated, and lose in every other case.

Hopping Hard Ways


These are hop bets on two identical dice. They pay 30
-1.

Conclusion
Congratulations, you have now completed the Seven
Days of Crap course. Now, when someone tells you
You dont know crap! you can look them straight in
the eye and say Yes I do! with pride.
Seriously, though, you now have a working knowledge
of casino craps. From here, you can expand your
knowledge in many ways. Practice watching the
game, figuring out what rolled by what the base dealers do, and who owns which bets by where they are
positioned. Watch payouts, and see if you can keep
up with the base dealers figuring out how much to pay
winning wagers of various kinds. There are other Prop
Bets to learn, which are rare and peculiar, but which
you will occasionally encounter. When you are comfortable with all of that, you can begin to study the
methods of cheating at a craps game, and the various
scams used by dealers and players to manipulate the
odds in their favor.
Be Seeing You!

Deep Crap!
By H. M. Dain Lybarger

v1.4

Eighth Day Of Crap!


By H. M. Dain Lybarger

Introduction
This brief REALLY, THIS ONE WILL BE... manual is intended to aid the reader in learning the game
of Crapless Craps. It is assumed that you
have made your way through Seven Days of
Crap! before beginning with this manual.
Technically, the copyrighted version of this
unusual game is known as Craps No More
but we all just call it Crapless. THATS THE POLITEST
THING WE CALL IT.

Craps No More was invented in the Seventies, and first appeared in Las Vegas at the
Stratosphere casino. Nothing more is known
of the games history or invention. AND WE WOULD
LIKE TO KEEP IT THAT WAY.

The Game of Crapless Craps


The idea behind Crapless Craps is that the
craps numbers, 2, 3, and 12, become points,
just like any other point. To make the layout
symmetrical, the 11 is no longer a Come Out
roll winner its just another point as well.
Actually, that does more than make the layout symmetrical. By taking away winning 11s
on the Come Out roll, we take away a significant chance for the players to win. Instead of
a guaranteed win, the 11 becomes a very
hard point to hit its a loss two-thirds of the
time. This more than balances out any advantages the player gets from the crapless
nature of the game.
Since everything but a 7 is a point on the
Come Out roll, and 7 is a winner, there is no
way to lose on the Come Out roll. This is a

big selling point for players, and makes the


game popular.
Base Bets
The bets on Crapless Craps are similar (in
some cases identical to) the bets on regular
Craps. Crapless is actually simpler to deal
than the regular game, because there are
fewer allowable bets.
Pass Line
On the Come Out roll, a 7 is a Pass Line win,
and any other number becomes the point.
Once the point is established, the rules are
the same as regular Craps. If a 7 rolls before
the point, the Pass Line wagers lose. If the
point rolls before a 7-out, the Pass Line wagers win. Pass Line wagers can have odds
attached to them, as in regular Craps. The
10x odds limit applies as well. If the point
wins, the odds wagers are paid True Odds.
The True Odds including new point numbers
are as follows:
Point: 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12
Odds: 6-1 3-1 2-1 3-2 6-5 6-5 3-2 2-1 3-1 6-1
Come Bets
Come bets work the same way on Crapless
as they work on regular Craps. Winning
Come bets are paid True Odds, using the expanded True Odds listed above.
Place Bets
Place bets are allowed on Crapless Craps. It
is possible to place the extended point numbers as well as all the usual numbers.
A Place bet wins if its number rolls before the
7 rolls, and loses if a 7 rolls before its number. No other rolls affect the wager.

Place bets are paid House Odds, not True


Odds. House Odds are slightly reduced values, as shown below:
Point:
2
3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12
Odds: 11-2 11-4 9-5 7-5 7-6 7-6 7-5 9-5 11-4 11-2

Like in regular Craps, Place bets on the 6 & 8


must be divisible by 6. Place bets on the 2 &
12 must be divisible by 6 as well. (6 is the
lowest even number higher than 5, and $5 is
the table minimum.) Likewise, Place bets on
the 3 and 11 must be divisible by 8
(Technically, they could be divisible by 4, but
thats below the table minimum.) THIS IS HONESTLY
THE HARDEST PART OF
THING ELSE IS EASY.

CRAPLESS CRAPS TO UNDERSTAND. EVERY-

As with regular Craps, Place bets are often


made in groups: The Inside numbers are 5,
6, 8, and 9, the Outside numbers are 4,5, 9,
and 10. On Crapless, we also have the
Extreme Outside numbers, which are the 2,
3, 11, and 12.
Buy Bets
Buy bets work exactly as in regular Craps.
The 2, 3, 11, and 12 can be bought in the
same manner as any other Buy bet. A 5%
vigorish is charged according to the standard
procedures. Buy bets are paid True Odds,
using the extended True Odds table above.

Dont Pass & Dont Come


Dont exist. WHICH MAKES LIFE A LITTLE EASIER, DOESNT IT?.
The reason that they dont exist is that since
there are no craps numbers, there is no way
to bar the 12, and make it a push. Which
means that there is no way to take away the
house advantage when turning house-biased

Pass Line and Come bets around and allowing the players to make them.
Lay Bets
Lay bets are allowed on Crapless Craps, and
they are the opposite of Buy bets, just like on
regular Craps. They are the only dont side
bet which exist in Crapless Craps. The reason that they are allowed when the others are
not is that the house cut of a Buy bet is made
via the vig, and not via a flat bet underneath
the odds bet.
Lay bets win if a 7 comes up before their
number, and lose if their number comes up
first. Winning Lay bets get paid Reverse
True Odds, using an extended table:
Point: 2 3 4 5 6 8 9 10 11 12
Odds: 1-6 1-3 1-2 2-3 5-6 5-6 2-3 1-2 1-3 1-6

Just like on Craps, the odds are reversed,


and the vig is reversed too the vig is not 5%
of the wager, its 5% of the amount the wager
could win. The vig is still paid when the bet is
made, only the calculation differs. As always,
if a lay bet is taken down by its owner, his vig
is returned.
Field Bets
Field bets are allowed on Crapless Craps,
and work just like they do on regular Craps.
Big 6 & Big 8
The Big 6 & Big 8 bets are allowed on Crapless Craps, and work just like they do on regular Craps. They remain a really bad idea.

Prop Bets
Although the 2, 3, 11, and 12 are now points,
they can also be wagered on in the prop area, in all the ways that they could be wagered
on in regular Craps. Even the Any Craps
wager remains, since the 2, 3, and 12 are still
called the crap numbers.

Conclusion
Congratulations, you have now completed
the Eighth Day of Crap course. This means,
of course, that you now know even more crap
than you knew before!

Ninth Day Of Crap!


By H. M. Dain Lybarger

Introduction
This brief document is intended to introduce
the reader to a brand new Craps wager, the
Fire Bet. WHAT WILL THEY THINK OF NEXT?

The Fire Bet


The Fire Bet is a side wager that can be
made by any player on specially marked
Craps tables. There is a flame-shaped marker outside the perimeter of the Pass Line
where wagers can be placed. There is a
matching flame-shaped marker in front of the
Boxperson for each player on the table.
A Fire Bet can only be made on a new shooters initial Come Out roll. A player who wants
to make a Fire Bet places his money on the
flame-shaped marker at his spot. The
(current) table minimum and maximum wagers for the Fire Bet are $1 and $5. Before a
point is established, the base dealer will
move the wager onto the flame-shaped marker corresponding to that player in the Prop
Area. Once the shooters initial point is established, a Fire Bet cannot be called off, taken down, increased, reduced, or altered.
A Fire Bet is a wager on how many different
points an individual shooter can make before
Sevening Out. The possible points are 4, 5,
6, 8, 9, and 10. As each point is made by the
shooter, a specially marked puck is placed on
the number on the table. If an alreadymarked point is made again by the shooter, it
does not affect the Fire Bet.

The Fire Bet is paid based on the total number of different points hit by the shooter during his turn with the dice. The payouts are as
follows:
4 Different Points made pays 40 for 1
5 Different Points made pays 200 for 1
6 Different Points made pays 500 for 1
Surveillance will be called by the Pit staff
whenever the 4th Fire Bet marker is placed on
a table. If the 5th and / or 6th point is hit, Surveillance will conduct a review to make certain that everything was done correctly before
the wagers are paid.

Conclusion
Congratulations, you have now completed
the Ninth Day of Crap course. This means,
of course, that you are now completely full of
crap!

Tenth Day Of Crap!


By H. M. Dain Lybarger

Introduction
Just when you thought that the game of
Craps couldnt get any stranger In this
document, you will learn about an obscure
Craps wager called the Put Bet.

The Put Bet


There are actually two kinds of Put Bet. The
first type is a surrogate Pass Line wager: The
flat wager (and its associated odds) are permitted to be placed on the layout just like a
Pass Line after the point has been established. This is the equivalent of pressing a
wager of zero on the Pass Line.
The second type of Put Bet is identical to a
Come Bet with Odds in terms of how it wins
and loses, and how much it pays. It has exactly the same table limits and maximum
odds limits. Its component parts are on and
off in exactly the same fashion (i.e. the Odds
portion of the wager is off on the Come Out
Roll). The only difference is in how the wager
is made: A Come Bet is placed in the Come
area, and when the dice are next rolled, the
dice determine which of the Come Numbers
becomes the point for that wager. Once its
point has been established, Odds can be
placed on the wager. By contrast, Put Bets
are assembled as a flat bet with Odds from
the very beginning, and are passed to the
Base Dealer who puts them on a Come Number selected by the player. Thats it.
Since Put Bets dont have a Come Out Roll,
they dont gain the advantage of the possibility of their flat wager portion winning at that
time. On the other hand, on Craps games

where 10x Odd or greater are allowed, the


ratio of odds-to-flat wager is high enough to
offset the removal of the initial potential win.
This makes the wager more attractive than a
standard Come Bet. Since the player can
choose the number he is betting on, he can
choose the payout odds with which he is
most comfortable an added attraction.
In fact, on a Craps table with 10x or greater
Odds where Put Bets are allowed, there is
no reason to make a standard Come Bet at
all. This is bad from the casinos point of
view, because the hold on Put Bets is noticeably less than the hold on Come Bets.

Conclusion
Congratulations, you have now completed
the Tenth Day of Crap course. This means,
of course, that you realize that from the casinos point of view, Put Bets are the worst
sort of crap!

Eleventh Day Of Crap!


By H. M. Dain Lybarger

Introduction
This very brief document is intended to introduce the reader to a new kind of Craps
game, Lonestar Craps (property of Olympia
Dice), and a pair of brand new Craps wagers,
the Low Dice Bet and the High Dice Bet. WHEN
I ASKED WHAT WILL THEY THINK OF NEXT?, I DIDNT EXPECT THIS...

The Low Dice and High Dice Bets


A regular Craps table has spaces in the hook
marked Big 6 and Big 8. A Lonestar Craps
table removes those, replacing them with the
Low and High spaces. The two wagers work
the same way, differing only in the numbers
which pay out.
A check placed on the Low space is a wager
that a 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6 will come up on the next
roll of the dice. The payout is 1-1 for a 3, 4,
5, or 6, and 5-1 if a 2 rolls.
A check placed on the High space is a wager
that a 8, 9, 10, 11, or 12 will come up on the
next roll of the dice. The payout is 1-1 for an
8, 9, 10, or 11, and 5-1 if a 12 rolls.

Conclusion
Congratulations, you have now completed
the Eleventh Day of Crap course.
AND IT CERTAINLY IS A BUNCH OF CRAP!