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Requirements for Grading Individual Student

Philosophy of Man
By: Prof. Jose B. Pedrena, Jr.
Do the following:
A. Enabling Activities: (For Prelim Grading Period Only) (1st Week 6th Week)
1. Critical Paper #1 (What do you think is still the significance of philosophy today, when what used
to be the realm of philosophy has now spread into the hands of the sciences?)
Forum- Every student is required to raise ones opinion regarding what can be the Filipinos question/s
that can be a starting point of Filipino philosophy since the earliest civilizations who established their
own philosophies started with questions.
Man and the world: the Pre-Socratic Philosophers
Group Activity- Comparison Chart: Compare the pre-socratic philosophers and choose one from the
different accounts of the origin of the world (the Genesis story in the Bible, the Big-Bang theory, etc.)
Man in the Ancient Time: Plato and Aristotle
2. Critical Paper #2 (Which philosopher do you think has a more convincing account of reality?
Aristotle or Plato? Explain.)
Man and God: St. Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas
3. Critical Paper #3 (Do you think that Aquinas account for the existence of God is logical to
believe in todays society? Why or why not?)
Individual Activity- Draw or illustrate God in a short bond paper. Everyone is expected to present and
explain his own work.
For Midterm Activities (to be submitted on the 12th Week of the Semester)
Man and Reason:
Empiricism vs. Rationalism: Descartes and Hume
Man and His Limits:
German Idealism: Immanuel Kant &. G.W.F. Hegel
4. Critical Paper #4 (Do you think that Kant and Hegel oppose each other, that is, Hegel opposes
Kant, or that he actually supplements and complements Kant? Explain.)
Existentialism: Soren
Kierkegaard, Jean-Paul
Sartre, and Friedrich

Nietzsche
5. Critical Paper #5 (What do you think is the power or limit of Existentialism as a philosophy?)
Man and His Rights:
Liberalism: Benthams Utilitarianism and John Rawls Theory of
Justice
6. Critical Paper #6 (Which of the two political philosophies do you think is more applicable to the
Philippines today? Cite concrete examples.)
For Final Activities (to be submitted on the 18th Week of the Semester)
Man and the Universe:
That Thou Art: Hindu Philosophy
The Origin of Buddhism:
The Principles of Buddhism, The Four Noble Truths and The Eightfold Path
7. Critical Paper #7 (Can Hinduism or Buddhism actually be considered as a philosophy or are they
merely religion? Why or why not?
Man as a Moral Project:
Confucius and the School of Literati
Man and his Nature:
Meng Zi: Human Nature as Good
Xun Zi: Human Nature is Evil
Man and Nature: Lao Zi and the School of Dao
Man and the Law: Shang Yang, Han Fe Zi and the School of Fa
8. Critical Paper #8 (The Filipino has a similar concept of Heaven and Earth in both
Confucianism and Daoism, more commonly known to us as Gulong ng Palad but why do you
think does it work to the Chineses advantage, while it works to our disadvantage? Prove your
answer.)
Philosophy in the Philippines:
Dr. Alfredo P. Co: The
Filipinos Eastern Roots
Fr. Roque Ferriols: Pagbigkas ng Meron
Dr. Florentino Timbreza: Pagkatao
9. Critical Paper #9 (As a Filipino, what do you think is a uniquely Filipino way of transacting with
the world that can be a starting point of Filipino philosophy? Cite examples.)

Performance Tasks: (Finals) (To be Submitted on or before the 18 th Week of the Semester)
There will be two performance tasks (which are interconnected) for the whole semester. The first will
be submitted on Week 13. The second will be submitted on the final examination week.
1. ABTRACT
Write an abstract. A detailed guideline is provided below.
2. FINAL PAPER
Write a Final Paper (Minimum of 7 pages) Based on the following guide questions, and relate
STRICTLY one philosopher discussed in order to address such issues (be sure to cite at least one
primary work and another secondary work):
If artificial intelligence were placed in a body that looked and acted human, would it actually be human?
Would androids differ in any important way from the humans who created them? What does it mean,
exactly and fundamentally, to be human? Based on your philosophical assumptions, do you think
Deckard is human or a replicant?

RUBRIC FOR PERFORMANCE TASKS:

GRADING RUBRIC FOR CRITIQUE PAPER PHILOSOPHY OF MAN FINAL


REQUIREMENT:
A Philosophical Film Review/Analysis of Blade Runner (Ridley Scott, 1982) [under the light of at least one
philosophical school]

Categories

Exemplary

Accomplished

Demonstrates the mastery Demonstrates some


of pertinent philosophical grasp of philosophical
schools, concepts, and
schools, and mentions
arguments. Provides an key concepts and
accurate exposition of the argument, as well as
philosophical views
citing textual support
Philosophical
involved, citing textual when necessary, but has
Grounding
support when necessary, a minimal exposition of
and fully explains key
the philosophical views
(15pts)
terms using own words. and its connection on
the whole thought of the
paper.
13-15 pts.
9-12 pts.

Developing

Beginning

Mentions some
philosophical texts,
key concepts and
argument of
pertinent
philosophical
schools, but the
connection towards
the whole thought
of the paper has
not been
established.

Fails to
demonstrate any
grasp of the
pertinent
philosophical
school, concepts
and argument,
provides inaccurate
exposition of the
philosophical views
involved and/or no
citation at all.

4-8 pts.

1-3 pts.

Grasp of the
Material

Cites themes, plots, and Themes, plots, and


scenes that are relevant as scenes are relevant but
points of reflection.
were not used as points
Excellent interpretation of reflection. Excellent
of the movie as a whole. interpretation of the
movie as a whole.

(10pts)
13-15 pts.

9-12 pts.

Minimal themes,
plots, and scenes
cited in order to
establish points of
reflection. Minimal
interpretation of
the movie as a
whole.

No themes, plots,
nor scenes cited in
order to reflect on.
No interpretation of
the movie as a
whole.
1-3 pts.

4-8 pts.
Has a clear overarching
aim and a logical
organizational plan
working towards that
direction. Uses
Coherence /
transitional arguments to
Logical
provide continuity of
Organization
thought; the central aim
is established.
(15pts)

Has an overarching aim


and a logical
organizational plan
working towards that
direction, but some
details being mentioned
are not necessary or
illogical, thus,
interrupting the
continuity and
coherence of thoughts.

9-10 pts.
7-8 pts.

Writing
(10pts)

Employs correct
formatting and grammar.
Demonstrates a
sophisticated writing
style that is able to
present ideas precisely
and concisely; does not
contain unnecessary,
vague, or irrelevant
content. Has good
documentation.

Correct formatting and


most of the time, correct
grammar is observed.
Writing style is able to
properly convey ideas;
mostly does not contain
unnecessary, vague, or
irrelevant content. Has
good documentation.

7-8 pts.
9-10 pts.

Has a vague
overarching aim
and organizational
plan working
towards messy
directions, with
many unnecessary
details jumping
from one point to
another, leading to
central aim but a
hodgepodge of
ideas.
4-6 pts.

Has no clear
overarching aim,
illogical
organizational plan
and inadequate
transition. Hence
there is no
continuity of
thought and the
central aim is never
established.

Incorrect
formatting and
contains many
grammatical errors.
Writing style
makes it a struggle
to understand the
ideas being
conveyed;
sometimes contain
unnecessary,
vague, or irrelevant
content. Has
problematic
documentation.

Riddled with
incorrect
formatting and
grammar. Writing
style fails to
present ideas
precisely and
concisely because it
contains sentences
that are either too
simplistic or too
inflated. Has bad
documentation,
which fails to
acknowledge
sources properly.

1-3 pts.

4-6 pts.
1-3 pts.

RUBRIC FOR ABSTRACT:

Categories

GRADING RUBRIC FOR ABSTRACT


Exemplary
Accomplished
Developing

Coherence / Has a clear overarching


Logical
aim and a logical
Connection of organizational plan

Has an overarching aim


and a logical
organizational plan

Has a vague
overarching aim
and organizational

Beginning
Has no clear
overarching aim,
illogical

ideas

working towards that


direction. Uses
transitional arguments to
provide continuity of
thought; the central aim
is established.

(10pts)

working towards that


direction, but some
details being mentioned
are not necessary or
illogical, thus,
interrupting the
continuity and
coherence of thoughts.

9-10 pts.
7-8 pts.

Writing
(5pts)

Employs correct
formatting and grammar.
Demonstrates a
sophisticated writing
style that is able to
present ideas precisely
and concisely; does not
contain unnecessary,
vague, or irrelevant
content. Has good
documentation.

Correct formatting and


most of the time, correct
grammar is observed.
Writing style is able to
properly convey ideas;
mostly does not contain
unnecessary, vague, or
irrelevant content. Has
good documentation.

4 pts.
5 pts.

plan working
towards messy
directions, with
many unnecessary
details jumping
from one point to
another, leading to
central aim but a
hodgepodge of
ideas.
4-6 pts.

organizational plan
and inadequate
transition. Hence
there is no
continuity of
thought and the
central aim is never
established.

Incorrect
formatting and
contains many
grammatical errors.
Writing style
makes it a struggle
to understand the
ideas being
conveyed;
sometimes contain
unnecessary,
vague, or irrelevant
content. Has
problematic
documentation.

Riddled with
incorrect
formatting and
grammar. Writing
style fails to
present ideas
precisely and
concisely because it
contains sentences
that are either too
simplistic or too
inflated. Has bad
documentation,
which fails to
acknowledge
sources properly.

1-3 pts.

3-2 pts.
1 pt.

RUBRIC FOR CRITICAL PAPERS:

Categories

GRADING RUBRIC FOR CRITICAL PAPERS


Exemplary
Accomplished
Developing

Demonstrates the
mastery of pertinent
philosophical schools,
concepts, and
arguments. Provides an
accurate exposition of
the philosophical views
Philosophical
involved, citing textual
Grounding
support when necessary,
and fully explains key
(10pts)
terms using own words.

Demonstrates some grasp


of philosophical schools,
and mentions key concepts
and argument, as well as
citing textual support when
necessary, but has a
minimal exposition of the
philosophical views and its
connection on the whole
thought of the paper.
7-8 pts.

Mentions some
philosophical
texts, key
concepts and
argument of
pertinent
philosophical
schools, but the
connection
towards the whole
thought of the
paper has not been
established.

9-10 pts.

Beginning
Fails to
demonstrate any
grasp of the
pertinent
philosophical
school, concepts
and argument,
provides
inaccurate
exposition of the
philosophical
views involved
and/or no citation
at all.

4-6 pts.
1-3 pts.
Coherence /
Logical

Has a clear overarching Has an overarching aim and Has a vague


aim and a logical
a logical organizational
overarching aim

Has no clear
overarching aim,

organizational plan
plan working towards that
working towards that
direction, but some details
direction. Uses
being mentioned are not
transitional arguments to necessary or illogical, thus,
Connection of provide continuity of
interrupting the continuity
ideas
thought; the central aim and coherence of thoughts.
is established.
(10pts)
7-8 pts.
9-10 pts.

Writing
(5pts)

Employs correct
Correct formatting and
formatting and grammar. most of the time, correct
Demonstrates a
grammar is observed.
sophisticated writing
Writing style is able to
style that is able to
properly convey ideas;
present ideas precisely mostly does not contain
and concisely; does not unnecessary, vague, or
contain unnecessary,
irrelevant content. Has good
vague, or irrelevant
documentation.
content. Has good
documentation.
4 pts.
5 pts.

and organizational
plan working
towards messy
directions, with
many unnecessary
details jumping
from one point to
another, leading to
central aim but a
hodgepodge of
ideas.
4-6 pts.

illogical
organizational plan
and inadequate
transition. Hence
there is no
continuity of
thought and the
central aim is
never established.

Incorrect
formatting and
contains many
grammatical
errors. Writing
style makes it a
struggle to
understand the
ideas being
conveyed;
sometimes contain
unnecessary,
vague, or
irrelevant content.
Has problematic
documentation.

Riddled with
incorrect
formatting and
grammar. Writing
style fails to
present ideas
precisely and
concisely because
it contains
sentences that are
either too
simplistic or too
inflated. Has bad
documentation,
which fails to
acknowledge
sources properly.

1-3 pts.

3-2 pts.
1 pt.

GUIDELINES FOR WRITING THE FINAL PAPER:

1. Provide the background of your study in your introduction, that is, how you see the movie.
What is it about? What is the main philosophical message being carried out here, and provide
a brief methodology of how your paper will be written, as well your aim or target conclusion.
Your introduction is an extended, more informed, version of your abstract.
2. The body of your text will contain an explication of your outline. Our outline must come
together in order to answer your main problem, which is given as a guide question above.
3. The conclusion must contain a brief summary of your findings/answer, and an analysis of
what you have discovered; that is, its significance and/or implication.

1.
2.
3.

GUIDELINES FOR WRITING THE ABSTRACT:


(The abstract is supposed to give the reader a concise but complete understanding of what your
research paper is going to be about)
Provide the background of your study in the first paragraph. How does your problem come about? What
is the circumstance upon which your main problem is situated?
In the second paragraph, you can introduce your main problem, and the aim of your study or your main
thesis. What question does your study try to answer? What does your study want to prove? And why?
In the last and third paragraph you are supposed to state the methodology or to enumerate the steps you
will undertake in order to argue your point. How will you demonstrate that your claim is logical and
correct? This paragraph may include the outline (this is especially important for the instructor to review

4.

the plausibility of the study) of your paper, your intended conclusion and its brief explanation.
Your conclusion, in essence, should be able to describe the implications of your research, that is, to
provide an analysis of your main claim.
GRADING SYSTEM:
The student will be graded according to the following breakdown:
GRADE ALLOCATION PER TERM
FINAL GRADE DISTRIBUTION
Per Term Distribution
Assessments- 25%
Prelim : 30%
Critical papers- 25%
Midterms : 30%
Major exam or Performance task- 50%
Finals
: 40%
TOTAL : 100%

TOTAL:

: 100%

OTHER REQUIREMENTS:
Aside from the requirements mentioned above, students are required to do the following:
Regular class attendance
Personal copy of the readings, either printed copy or stored in a gadget. It will be checked regularly.
Compiled copy of readings will be provided
In every academic paper submitted, the student is required to attach a plagiarism checker report from
http://plagiarisma.net/
CLASS POLICIES:
Aside from the stated class policies in the NU students handbook, students are expected to follow these
rules:
Any student who violates policy on academic honesty will automatically receive a zero. These
include cheating, plagiarism, and data fabrication.
Advanced reading of assigned texts and other materials
Timely submission of assigned tasks.

REFERENCES:
Primary Texts:
(1965). The Upanishads. Mascaro, J. (Trans.). Harmondsworth, England: Penguin Books.
Aquinas, Thomas. (1948). Summa Theologica (Complete English Ed.). Westminster, Md.: Christian
Classics.
Aristotle. (1986). De Anima: On The Soul. H. Lawson-Tancred (Trans.). Penguin Classics.
Harmondsworth, Middlesex, England: Penguin Books.
Aristotle. (2011). Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. R. C. Bartlett & S. D. Collins (Trans.). Chicago:
University of Chicago Press.
Augustine. (1961). R. S. Pine-Coffin (Trans.), Confessions. Harmondsworth, Middlesex, England:
Penguin Books.
Augustine. (2003). City of God. Penguin classics. London: Penguin Books.

Co, Alfredo. (2009). Across the Philosophical Silk Road: A Festschrift in Honor of Alfredo P. Co (Volume
6: Doing Philosophy in the Philippines and Other Essays.) Espana, Manila: University of Santo Tomas
Publishing House.
Confucius. (1979). The Analects (Lun yu). D. C. Lau (Trans.). Harmondsworth: Penguin Books.
Descartes, R. (1950). Library Of Liberal Arts: Vol. 19. Discourse On Method. New York: Macmillan.
Descartes, R. (2010). Meditations On First Philosophy. Seattle, Wash.: Pacific Publishing Studio
Ferriols, R (2002). Pambungad sa Metapisika. Office of Research and Publications, Ateneo de Manila
University: Quezon City.
Hegel, G. W. F. (1975). Hegel's Logic: Being Part One Of The Encyclopaedia Of The Philosophical
Sciences (1830). Oxford: Clarendon Press.
Hegel, G. W. F. (1977). Phenomenology of Spirit. A. V. Miller & J. N. Findlay (Trans.). Oxford
paperbacks. Oxford England: Clarendon Press.
Hegel, G. W. F. (1991). Elements Of The Philosophy Of Right. H. B. Nisbet (Trans.). A. W. Wood (Ed.).
Cambridge England: Cambridge University Press.
Hegel, G. W. F. (2004). The Philosophy Of History. J. Sibree (Trans.). Mineola, N.Y.: Dover Publications.
Hume, D. (1977). An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding. Indianapolis: Hackett Pub. Co.
Hume, D. (2000). A Treatise Of Human Nature. D. F. Norton & M. J. Norton (Eds.). Oxford Philosophical
Texts. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Kant, I. (1996). Critique Of Practical Reason. T. K. Abbott (Trans.). Amherst, N.Y.: Prometheus Books.
Kant, I. (1998). Critique Of Pure Reason. P. Guyer & A. W. Wood (Eds. & Trans.). Cambridge:
Cambridge University Press.
Kierkegaard, S. (1985). Fear And Trembling. A. Hannay (Trans.). Penguin classics. Harmondsworth,
Middlesex, England: Penguin Books.
Kierkegaard, S. (1988). H. V. Hong & E. H. Hong (Trans.), Kierkegaard's Writings: Vol. 11. Stages On
Life's Way: Studies By Various Persons. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press.
Laozi. (1963). Tao Te Ching. D. C. Lau (Trans.). London: Penguin Books.
Nietzsche, F. (2009). Thus Spoke Zarathustra (A Thrifty Book): a Book for All and None. Blacksburg, VA:
Thrifty Books.
Nietzsche, F. W. (1966). Beyond Good And Evil: Prelude To A Philosophy Of The Future. W. A.
Kaufmann (Trans.). New York: Vintage Books.
Nietzsche, F. W. (1967). On The Genealogy Of Morals. W. A. Kaufmann & R. J. Hollingdale (Trans.).
New York: Vintage Books.
Nietzsche, F. W. (1967). The Will To Power. W. A. Kaufmann & R. J. Hollingdale (Trans.). New York:
Vintage Books.
Plato. (2007). Six great dialogues. B. Jowett (Trans.). Dover Thrift Editions. Mineola, N.Y.: Dover
Publications.
Sartre, J. P. (1956). Being And Nothingness: A Phenomenological Essay On Ontology. H. E. Barnes
(Trans.). New York: Washington Square Press.
Sartre, J. P. (1958). No Exit: A Play In One Act. New York: Samuel French.
Timbreza, F. (2002). Paghahanap ng Kabuluhan. De La Salle University Press: Manila.
Secondary Texts:
Co, A. (1993). Ancient Chinese Philosophy: The Blooming of a Hundred Flowers. UST Publishing
House: Manila.
Co, A.(2003). Philosophy of The Compassionate Buddha: Under The Bo-Tree-- On The Lotus Flower.
Manila: University of Santo Tomas.
Crowell, S (ed.). (2012). The Cambridge Companion to Existentialism. Cambridge University Press: New
York.
Dreyfus, H. L., & Kelly, S. (2011). All Things Shining: Reading the Western Classics to Find Meaning in
a Secular Age. New York: Free Press.

Guyer, P. (2014). Kant (second ed.). Routledge philosophers. London: Routledge, Taylor & Francis
Group.
Kenny, A. (2010). A New History of Western philosophy: in four parts. Oxford: Clarendon Press/Oxford
University Press.
Magill, F (ed.). (1991). Masterpieces of World Philosophy. Collins Reference: United Stated and United
Kingdom.
Tiwald, J., & Van Norden, B. W. (Eds.). (2014). Readings in Later Chinese Philosophy: Han Dynasty to
the 20th Century. Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Company, Inc.
Electronic Source:
Wu, Joseph S. Basic Characteristics of Chinese Culture. Thome Fang Institute.
http://www.thomehfang.com/suncrates3/1wu.html.