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High School Curriculum Guide

2012- 2013

CONTENTS
3

Curriculum Overview

3
4

The International School Academic Diploma


The International Baccalaureate
Programmes Summarized
IB Middle Years Programme
IB Diploma Programme
The International Baccalaureate Middle
Years Programme - Grades 9 and 10
High School Effort Grade
MYP Subject Groups
I. Myp Language A
Ii. Myp Language B
Iii. Myp Humanities
Iv. Myp Sciences
V. Myp Mathematics
Vi. Myp Arts
Vii. Myp Health & Social And Physical
Education
Viii. Myp Technology
The International Baccalaureate Diploma
Programme Grades 11 and 12
DP Subject Groups
I. Dp Group 1: Language A
Ii. Dp Group 2: Second Language
Iii. Dp Group 3: Individual And Societies
Iv. Dp Group 4 - Experimental Sciences
V. Dp Group 5 - Mathematics
Vi. Dp Group 6 The Arts
Vii. Sports Leadership Grade 11 Pe
Viii. Lifetime Sports Grade 12 Pe

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4
5
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Curriculum Overview

The International School Academic Diploma

All high school students are working towards gaining the school-based High School Diploma.
This diploma is equivalent to a High School Diploma (U.S.) and is usually a pre-requisite for
admission to colleges in North America.
To qualify for graduation and the award of the High School Academic Diploma a student must
satisfy the following requirements:
The completion of eight semesters in Grades 9 through 12 to a satisfactory standard.
The completion of an Extended Essay (IB) by IB Diploma students.
The accumulation of 25 credits, which include:
Subject

Credits

English or Language A

Social Science

Mathematics

Science

Second Language

Creative Studies

Physical Education & Electives

Community, Action and Service

Theory of Knowledge

Explanations / Other Specific Requirements

A unit of credit will be given upon successful completion (Grade 3 or higher) of each class
meeting at least four class periods per week for a full academic year during which the students
must have been in attendance for 85% of instruction per semester. A half credit will be given
for successful completion of a class meeting fewer than four class periods per week for a full
academic year. A repeated course will not be sanctioned with a second credit.
The transcripts of incoming students shall be evaluated by the Administration. Credits from
similar schools may be transferred. The evaluation of credits will be based on certified, previous school records. Academic accomplishments at other schools shall be converted to equivalent credits.
Students must pass English (A or B) in both 11th and 12th grades.
IB Diploma students must take the TOK course in Grades 11 and 12, while IB Certificate students satisfy TOK requirements by completing the Grade 11 course through they can earn additional credit by completing the Grade 12 course.
English B counts towards the English requirement.
Successful completion of C.A.S will gain 0.25 credits per semester.
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

11th and 12th grade students must take a minimum of six courses each year.
A maximum of seven credits may be earned towards the diploma in each ninth and tenth grade.
Physical Education and Health and Social Education must be taken for every semester of attendance in grades 9 and 10. Physical education must be taken in grades 11 and 12.
In exceptional circumstances some of these requirements may be waived or individual students, particularly one-year seniors, may be exempted from certain requirements at the
schools discretion, subject to the approval of the Headmaster and notification to the Board of
Management.

The International Baccalaureate Programmes


Summarized
All students in Grades 9 through 12 pursue the International Baccalaureate programmes as
well as working towards the High School Diploma:

IB Middle Years Programme

Students in grades 6-10 follow the International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IBMYP). This programme requires students to study eight subject groups plus complete a Personal
Project and spend time on Community and Service projects.

IB Diploma Programme

In grades 11 and 12, most students follow the IB Diploma Programme (DP). This programme
requires students to complete internal assessment and external examinations in 6 subjects (3
at HL, 3 at SL) plus a course in Theory of Knowledge, an extended essay, and time spent on
Creativity, Action and Service (CAS) projects.
Students may also follow an IB Certificate programme which does not require the completion
of 3 subjects at Higher Level (HL). They will still attend the CAS and ToK courses but are not
examined; they do not submit an extended essay.

High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

The International Baccalaureate Middle Years


Programme - Grades 9 and 10
The International Baccalaureate Middle Years Programme (IBMYP) is a five year programme
for students in Grades 6 to 10 (IBMYP Years 1 to 5). It is part of the IB continuum of courses,
preceded by the Primary Years Programme, for children to Grade 5, and followed by the
Diploma Programme, which is a pre-university course for Grades 11 and 12.

Three fundamental concepts of the MYP are:

Holistic Education
The MYP is based around traditional school subjects, but rejects the fragmentation that results
when people assume that subjects have no relation to each other. Students are encouraged to
look at knowledge in an interdisciplinary way, approaching issues and solving problems with
knowledge obtained from a variety of sources.
Intercultural Awareness
This goes beyond mere tolerance towards the ideas and artifacts of other cultures. It is positive, empathetic movement towards others, a readiness to act co-operatively in genuine exchange and shared effort. The aim is to show respect for cultural differences while promoting
what are seen to be universal human values, so fostering understanding among young people,
enabling future generations to live more peacefully and productively than we do today.
Communication
The MYP stresses the importance of clarity of expression, of listening to others, of appreciating
different cultures and ways of thinking through the learning of languages, and other aspects
of the programme.

Subject Groups

At ISHCMC in Grades 9 & 10 we offer:


Language A English, Korean and Vietnamese and Mother Tongue Option*.
Language B French,English and in Grade 9 Mandarin.
Mathematics
Sciences Chemistry, Biology, and Physics
Humanities - History and Geography
The Arts - Music, Drama and Visual Arts
Technology
Physical Education
*Students have the opportunity to take Mother Tongue lessons during the Language B timetabled slot instead of a foreign language. This involves the parents finding a teacher/tutor
who is available at the same time slot as the Language B lesson. Following acceptance by the
IBMYP of the course taken by the student it is possible for this course to be listed on the students Record of Achievement.

Areas of Interaction

The areas of interaction give the MYP its distinctive core and support holistic learning. These
areas are common to all disciplines and are incorporated into the MYP so that students will
become increasingly aware of the connections between subject content and the real world,
rather than considering subjects as isolated areas unrelated to each other or to the world. The
MYP presents knowledge as an integrated whole, emphasizes the acquisition of skills and selfawareness, and the development of personal values.
Consequently, students are expected to develop an awareness of broader and more complex
global issues. In every year of the MYP, students are required to experience and explore each
of the five areas of interaction:
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Approaches to learning (ATL), in which students take increasing responsibility for their
learning, organised around the following questions:
- How do I learn best?
- How do I know?
- How do I communicate my understanding?
Community and service, through which students become aware of their roles and their responsibilities as members of communities, organised around the following questions:
- How do we live in relation to each other?
- How can I contribute to the community?
- How can I help others?
Human ingenuity looks at human contributions resulting from the instinct to create, innovate, develop, or transform our lives or our world, based on these questions:
- Why and how do we create?
- What are the consequences?
Environments aims to help students to see the links between economic, political, cultural
and social issues, to develop positive and responsible attitudes, and to gain the motivation,
skills and commitment to contribute to their environments. It does this by asking:
- Where do we live?
- What resources do we have or need?
- What are my responsibilities?
Health and social education deals with physical, social and emotional health and intelligence, key aspects of development leading to complete and healthy lives, by asking:
- How do I think and act?
- How am I changing?
- How can I look after myself and others?
The areas of interaction are explored through the subjects, thereby fulfilling their integrative
function. Some aspects, however, may also be approached as separate modules and interdisciplinary projects throughout the MYP. Student participation in the areas of interaction culminates in the personal project (see below).

Interdisciplinary Units

As well as working on subject-specific units of work, students also work on interdisciplinary


units, involving learning objectives and assessment criteria from more than one subject. The
integrity of the academic disciplines is maintained, as are subject-specific objectives, but the
intention is that the students will develop a realisation that most real-life problems require
insights from a variety of disciplines.

Community and Service

All students in the Grades 9 and 10 are required to meet the requirements of the service program. These are listed below.
Much of the community service work will be directed and overseen by the school, but parents
are encouraged to support their children in community involvement outside of school. You
can learn more about the activities being offered at the Parent Information Evening in Term 1
of each school year.
1. You must participate in a variety of both Community and Service activities.*
2. You must participate in at least two long-term projects per year.
3. You must meet each of the 6 ISHCMC C&S Outcomes. **
4. You must provide evidence of the above in IB Manager.
5. You must share your experiences through your portfolio at Student-Led Conferences.
*Community Activities require active involvement in the ISHCMC community. Most athletic,
artistic and academic extracurricular activities fall into this category.
Service Activities help others who are in need. The purpose of these activities is to help other
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

people and the planet. All Global Issues Network groups are service activities.
**The Community & Service Outcomes are:
1. Undertake new challenges
2. Work collaboratively with others
3. Show perseverance and commitment
4. Engage with issues of global importance
5. Contribute to the community
6. Increase my awareness of other cultures
Students are required to meet all outcomes before the end of year 10.
In order to qualify for the MYP Certificate, all students in Grades 9 & 10 must fulfill the requirements of the ISHCMC Community and Service programme. Each year students are required to:
participate in both service and community activities,
participate in at least two long-term activites,
meet each of the six ISHCMC Community and Service outcomes,
provide evidence of these activities using ManageBAC,
Share these experiences at the Student-Led Conference. Some of the community service work
in Grades 9 and 10 will be directed and overseen by the school, but parents are encouraged to
support their children in community involvement outside of school as much as possible.

The Personal Project

The personal project is undertaken in the final stages of the MYP Programme, and at ISHCMC
will be started during Term 4 of Grade 9 and completed in Grade 10. It is an independent piece
of work that is intended to be the students sustained involvement with and experience of the
five areas of interaction. Students are expected to apply methods and techniques developed
through approaches to learning, and illustrate their appreciation of at least one of the other
areas of interaction.
The personal project can take various forms, such as:
an original work of art (visual, dramatic or performance)
a written piece of work on a special topic
a piece of creative writing
an original science experiment
an invention, or specially designed object or system
the presentation of a developed business, management or organisational plan.
All personal projects must include a structured piece of writing which includes:
a title page
a table of contents
an introduction (goal, area of interaction focus, outline of process)
a description of the process
an analysis of research (including references)
a conclusion
a bibliography
appendices (if appropriate)
Each student works with a qualified person in the school who acts as a supervisor for the personal project, providing appropriate guidance and vouching for the authenticity of the work
submitted.

Assessment and Reporting

IBMYP does not set formal examinations within the MYP, but moderates the assessment tasks
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

that ISHCMC sets (see External Moderation). Assessment tasks are varied and include a wide
variety of opportunities for students to express their learning. Assessment is criterion- referenced, which means that students are not compared with each other, but are assessed according to subject specific criteria. Students achievement on the criteria determines their MYP
Grade. (See MYP General Grade Descriptors).

External Moderation

Assessed work completed by ISHCMC Grade 10 students sent to the IB Curriculum and Assessment Centre for validation of the grades and nature of the assessment tasks. This ensures
that the assessment of the work is compatible with international standards.

IBMYP Certificate

The IB will issue an IBMYP certificate to each student who satisfies the following conditions.
The student must:
gain at least a 2 in each IBMYP subject
gain at least a 3 for the personal project
have participated in the IBMYP programme for at least 2 years
have met the schools expectations for community and service
have gained a total of 36, out of a possible 63, from 8 subject groups and the personal
project combined (where two subjects from the same subject group are studied, the
higher of the two grades is counted towards the final total).

IBMYP Record of Achievement

All students registered in Grade 10 will receive a Record of Achievement. It will indicate
achievement in each subject, based on achievement on subject criteria. The following grade
descriptors apply to student achievement in all subject areas:

IBMYP General Grade Descriptors

The general grade descriptors below illustrate the IBMYP 1-7 scale. These are not specific to
any particular subject-group criteria; rather, they serve to make a generalized statement about
the skills and knowledge mastered by the student.
NA - Not able to be assessed due to level of English language proficiency and understanding.
S - Satisfactory completion ungraded course.
Grade 1 - Minimal achievement in terms of the objectives.
Grade 2 - Very limited achievement against all the objectives. The student has difficulty
in understanding the required knowledge and skills and is unable to apply them fully in
normal situations, even with support.
Grade 3 - Limited achievement against most of the objectives, or clear difficulties in some
areas. The student demonstrates a limited understanding of the required knowledge and
skills and is only able to apply them fully in normal situations with support.
Grade 4 - A good general understanding of the required knowledge and skills, and the
ability to apply them effectively in normal situations. There is occasional evidence of the
skills of analysis, synthesis and evaluation.
Grade 5 - A consistent and thorough understanding of the required knowledge and skills,
and the ability to apply them in a variety of situations. The student generally shows evidence of analysis, synthesis and evaluation where appropriate and occasionally demonstrates originality and insight.
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Grade 6 - A consistent and thorough understanding of the required knowledge and


skills, and the ability to apply them in a wide variety of situations. Consistent evidence
of analysis, synthesis and evaluation is shown where appropriate. The student generally
demonstrates originality and insight.
Grade 7 - A consistent and thorough understanding of the required knowledge and
skills, and the ability to apply them almost faultlessly in a wide variety of situations.
Consistent evidence of analysis, synthesis and evaluation is shown where appropriate.
The student consistently demonstrates originality and insight and always produces work
of high quality.
The school reports fully to parents twice a year, with each student receiving a level of achievement on the above 1 to 7 scale, for each academic subject. The awarded level of achievement is
based on student achievement on subject specific criteria. Interim reports are sent in October
and March. In addition, there are parent-teacher-student conferences, providing an opportunity for discussion of the progress of each child in each subject. Parents are also welcome to
make an appointment with a subject teacher or with the Head of Section at any mutually convenient time. Parents may also be invited in to discuss particular issues, if a childs progress
gives cause for concern.
In addition to these conferences we hold Student-Led Conferences in the second semester.
These conferences give students the opportunity to formally share with their parents the work
they have completed throughout the year and the progress they have made to meet the goals
they set for themselves at the start of semester one.
Subjects and Time Allocation
SUBJECT (Grades 9/10)

PERIODS PER WEEK

Language A

Language B

Mathematics

Science (Biology, Chemistry, Physics)

4-8

Humanities (History, Geography)

4-8

The Arts

Health, Social and Physical Education

Technology

High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

High School Effort Grade

Needs
Improvement

Inconsistent

Satisfactory

Good

Excellent

10

Approach to
work

Participation

Attitude

Organisation

Despite encouragement and good


opportunities, I never
participate in discussions or activities. I
rarely, ask or answer
a question and am
reluctant to do so.

I regularly cause disruptions or am distracted


and need to be reminded to focus and engage
in activities. I never
encourage peers and
show no enthusiasm
and poor concentration
in lessons.

I am never punctual and I do


not use my time effectively.
I never arrive to class with
all required resources and
am rarely ready to start the
lesson. My homework and
other assignments are usually late or incomplete and
I rarely give reasons for the
delay. I often have to be reminded to submit my work.

My homework and assignments are usually


incomplete or rushed.
My work is not structured or neat. I do not
reflect upon my work
to set clear goals.

Despite encouragement, I usually only


participate in discussions or activities if
prompted. I occasionally ask or answer
questions but do not
demonstrate initiative
to do so.

I am often distracted
and occasionally need to
be refocused.
My behaviour may
sometimes stop others
from learning or working and I do not always
concentrate. I sometimes encourage peers
and work with some
enthusiasm.

I am frequently late to class


and/or do not use my time
effectively. I frequently arrive
to class without required
resources and am sometimes
ready to start the lesson. My
homework and other assignments are occasionally late
and incomplete. I sometimes
fail to give reasons for the
delay. I occasionally need to
be reminded to submit my
work.

My homework and
assignments are
sometimes complete
but with a minimal
amount of effort or
detail. My work is frequently not structured
or neat. I rarely reflect
upon my work to set
clear goals.

I sometimes participate in discussions


or activities. I ask
thoughtful questions
and am also prepared
to answer questions
and contribute, sometimes through my
own initiative.

I am consistently focused on activities and


I am rarely distracted
in lessons. I work well
with and encourage my
peers and work with
enthusiasm. I usually
ask for assistance when
I need it.

I rarely arrive to class late


and use my time effectively.
I usually arrive to class with
the required resources and
am usually ready to start the
lesson. My homework and
other assignments are almost
always in on the due date
and complete. I never have
to be reminded to submit my
work.

My homework and assignments are usually


complete with evidence of good effort
and detail. My work
is neat and an attempt
is made to structure
it. I sometimes reflect
upon my work to set
clear goals.

I participate positively in most discussions


or activities. I ask
thoughtful questions
and am also prepared
to answer questions
and contribute often
through my own
initiative.

I remain focused on
activities without having to be reminded. I
am never distracted in
lessons. I am usually a
caring and positive role
model and work well
with others. I always
encourage peers and
work with enthusiasm. I
ask for assistance when
I need it.

I rarely arrive to class late


and use my time effectively.
I usually plan ahead and set
myself goals effectively. I
rarely arrive to class without
all the required resources
and am always ready to start
the lesson. My homework
and other assignments are
almost always in on the due
date and complete. I never
have to be reminded to submit my work. I usually catch
up on work from lessons I
missed.

My homework and
assignments are usually complete with
evidence of very good
effort and detail. My
work is neat and usually well structured.
I consistently reflect
upon my work to set
clear goals.

I am proactive and
always participate
positively in discussions or activities. I
ask thoughtful questions and work very
hard to make quality
contributions. I show
excellent initiative
and am prepared
to step outside my
comfort zone and
take risks.

I am always focused on
activities. I am highly
motivated and committed to improving
myself. I work well with
others and I am always
a caring and positive
role model. I always encourage peers and work
with high levels of enthusiasm. I am proactive
in asking for assistance
when I need it.

I am punctual and always


use my time effectively. I
plan ahead and set myself
goals effectively. I always arrive to class with all required
resources and am always
ready to start the lesson.
My homework and other
assignments are always in on
the due date and complete.
I never have to be reminded
to submit my work. I always
catch up on work from lessons I missed.

My homework and
assignments are
always complete with
evidence of exceptional effort and detail
beyond expectations.
My work is always
neat and well structured. I always reflect
upon my work to set
clear goals.

High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

MYP Subject Groups


I. MYP LANGUAGE A
Language A is considered to be the students best language, first language or mother tongue.
However, at ISHCMC, where English is the language of instruction, students may study English as Language A, even though it may not be their first language.
Students in Grades 9 and 10 will have the opportunity to study Language A in one of English,
Korean or Vietnamese. Students with two strong languages may study Language A English as
well as Language A Korean or Language A Vietnamese. Students taking two Languages A do
not need to take a Language B to receive the MYP Certificate.
Aims
The aims of teaching and study of Language A are to encourage and enable the student to:
use the language as a vehicle for thought, creativity, reflection, learning and selfexpression
use language as a tool for personal growth, social interaction a for developing relationships within the international community
comprehend more clearly aspects of their own culture and those of other cultures by
exploring the interdependence of human beings through a variety of works
explore the many facets of the language through the use of media and information
technology
develop the skills involved in speaking, listening, reading, writing and viewing in a
variety of contexts
respond appropriately to a variety of texts
read widely to promote a lifelong interest in language and literature
develop a critical and creative approach to studying and analyzing literature
develop language skills through interdisciplinary work
consider the role of literature both culturally and historically
reflect on the learning process in various ways and at various stages
empathize with real people and fictional characters as and when appropriate
Language:
The pragmatics of language is predominantly taught within the context of literature and media study, along with some specialized textbook study.
Writing:
Students undertake a wide range of writing tasks, including creative, persuasive, and analytical. Particular focus is placed on using appropriate language and register for the task in hand,
in preparation for the Diploma.
Reading:
A range of poetry, plays and novels are studied, with a focus on how writers use language to
create meaning, character, and tone. Additionally, the issue of influencing and manipulating
people through language is addressed.

ENGLISH
Grade 9
Print and Visual Texts:
Through the MYP Units of Work, the following texts are examined:
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Advanced Grammar in Use

Martin Hewings

Things Fall Apart

Chinua Achebe

Maos Last Dancer

Li Cunxin

A Step from Heaven

An Na

Julius Caesar

William Shakespeare

Global Tales

Naidoo, Donovan, Hicks

Selected speeches

Various

I am Sam

(Dir.) Jessie Nelson

Flowers for Algernon

Craig

The Killers Tears

Bondoux

Animal Farm

Orwell

Grade 10
Print and Visual Texts:
Through the MYP Units of Work, the following texts are examined:
Advanced Grammar in Use

Martin Hewings

Assorted Poems

S.T. Coleridge

Journey to JoBurg

Beverly Naidoo

The Village by the Sea

Anita Desai

Lord of The Flies

Golding

Fielas Child

Dalene Matthee

Macbeth

William Shakespeare

Romeo and Juliet

William Shakespeare

The Shawshank Redemption

(Dir.) Frank Darabont

Wag the Dog

(Dir.) Barry Levinson

Brave New World

Huxeley

KOREAN
Grade 9
Print and Visual Texts:
Through the MYP Units of Work, the following texts are examined:
Novel

Author

Bom Bom

Kim Yoo Jung

A Lucky Day

Hyun Jin Gun

Snowy Road

Lee Chung Joon

Shower

Hwang Soon Won

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Poems

Poets

Azalea, Cho Hon

Kim So Wol

Nah Gue Nae, Chung No Ru

Park Mok Wol

The Flag, A Rock

Yoo Chi Hwan

Chu IL Seo Jung, Dessin

Kim Kwang Gyun

World Novels

Authors

Animal Farm

George Orwell

My Uncle Jules

Guy de Maupassant

Jane Eyre

Charlotte Bronte

Essays

Authors

Touching Winds

Lee Hyo Jung

Non-Possession

Bub Jung

Praise the Youth

Min Tae Won

Dramas and Scenarios

Authors

On the Field

Lee Hyo Jung

Shrie

(Dir.) Kang Jae Gyu

Grade 10
Print and Visual Texts:
Through the MYP Units of Work, the following texts are examined:
Novels

Authors

Dongbak Flower

Kim Yoo Jung

Captain Lee

Jun Kwang Yong

Memil Flower

Lee Hyo Seok

The Way to Sampo

Hwang Seok Young

Poems

Poets

A Mirror, Flower Tree

Lee Sang

Flowing River, Sunshine Whispering

Kim Young Ran

Choo Chun Sa, With Chrysanthemum

Seo Jung Joo

Seo Si, Another Hometown

Hwang Seok Young

World Novels

Authors

Jane Eyre

Charlotte Bronte

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Essays

Authors

A Longing for an Unknown Place

Jeon Hae Rin

Gandhis Spinning Wheel

Kim Jong Chul

Korea in the 19th Century

Isabella Bishop

Dramas and Scenarios

Authors

Writing Paper

Lee Guen Sam

Seo Pyun Jae

(Dir.) Lim Gon Tak

VIETNAMESE
Grade 9
Print and Visual Texts:
Through the MYP Units of Work, the following texts are examined:
Chuyen Nguoi Con Gai Nam Xuong

Nguyen Du

Truyen Kieu

Nguyen Du

Ben Que

Nguyen Minh Chau

Con Co

Che Lan Vien

Mua Xuan Nho Nho

Thanh Hai

Sang Thu

Huu Thinh

Tieng Goi Noi Hoang Da

Jack London

Mua Len Trau

(Dir.) Nguyen Vo Nghiem Minh

Cua De Danh

(Dir.) Do Thanh Hai

Kinh Van Hoa

(Dir.) Nguyen Minh Chung

Grade 10
Print and Visual Texts:
Through the MYP Units of Work, the following texts are examined:
101 Truyen Ngay Xua

(Ed.) To Hoai

Tuc Ngu Ca Dao Dan Ca Viet Nam

(Ed.) Vu Ngoc Phan

Nhung Chiec Am Dat

Nguyen Tuan

Co Huong

Lo Tan

Ben Que

Nguyen Minh Chau

Thoi Tho Au

Macxim Gorki

David Copperfeild

Charles Dickens

Thi Nhan Viet Nam 1932-1941

(Ed.) Hoai Thanh, Hoai Chau

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Co Tich Viet Nam 9

(Dir.) Huynh Phuc Dien

Co Tich Viet Nam 16

(Dir.) Nguyen Minh Chung

Bao Gio Cho Den Thang Muoi

(Dir.) Dang Nhat Minh

Chim Phong Sinh

(Dir.) Tran Quang Dai

Assessment
There are three criteria with which students are assessed.
Language A Assessment Criteria
Criterion A

Content

Maximum 10

Criterion B

Organisation

Maximum 10

Criterion C

Style and Language Mechanics

Maximum 10

Grade Boundaries
Grade

Boundaries

04

59

10 14

15 19

20 23

24 27

28 30

*Please note that the information in this table is correct at the time of going to print, but is subject to
change. For up-to-date information please visit the IBMYP Curriculum section of the ISHCMC portal.

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

II. MYP LANGUAGE B


Introduction
The primary aim of Language B is to encourage students to gain competence in a modern language other than their mother tongue, with the long-term goal of proficiency in the additional
language being studied.
The programme concentrates on the four skills of speaking, writing, listening and reading and
place a strong emphasis on intercultural awareness. Learning an additional language expands
students cognitive and analytical abilities, fosters communication and encourages an understanding of, and respect for, students own countries and cultures and those of others.
Language B is offered at:
Phases 5-6(English only) for students who are excellent but not native speakers.
Phases 3-4(English, Mandarin,French) for students who have exited Phase 2.
Phases 1-2(French and Mandarin)for students who are beginners or who are at the
Phase 1 or 2 level.
Aims
The aims of the study of a modern foreign language are to:
Enable the student to use the language effectively as a means of practical communication, providing a sound base of communication skills necessary for future study, work
and leisure.
Enable the student to understand the nature of language and the process of total language learning, which comprises the integration of linguistic, cultural and social components.
Enable the student to develop an appreciation of a variety of literary and non-literary
texts.
Offer insight into the cultural characteristics of the communities where the language(s)
is (are) spoken.
Encourage an awareness and understanding of the perspectives of people from other
cultures.
Promote involvement with different communities where relevant.
Provide access to varied sources of information.
Foster curiosity, a lifelong interest and enjoyment in language learning.

Language B phases

From September 2012 or January 2013, the language B subject group will be organized into
six phases. The phases represent a developmental continuum of additional language learning
(language B).
Depending on their prior additional language learning experiences, students may:
Start their MYP language B course in any phase on the continuum
Exit their MYP language B course from any phase on the continuum
The pathways to further study are multiple. Phases 4, 5 and 6 allow for a smooth transition
from MYP language B to DP group 2 courses and, for a number of students, to group 1 courses.
The MYP framework for language B reflects the concepts and skills of the presumed knowledge for these DP courses. Generally speaking, students will move from Language B to Language A upon successful completion of phase 6 in Language B.
Students continuing on to the DP will have developed not only an inquiring and reflective approach to language learning but also critical thinking and literacy skills that they will be able
to apply and extend in group 1 and group 2 courses.

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Phase 1
Emergent communicators in phase 1 understand and respond to simple phrases, statements
and questions. They identify basic messages, facts, opinions, feelings and ideas presented in
oral, visual and written language and demonstrate their comprehension in simple oral and
written phrases. They can give basic information in a limited range of everyday situations,
using oral and written language appropriate to a very limited range of social and cultural contexts. They begin to understand that language use is connected to a purpose and an audience.
Phase 2
Emergent communicators in phase 2 understand and respond to simple spoken and written
texts. They identify messages, facts, opinions,feelings and ideas presented in oral, visual and
written language and can show their comprehension in short oral and written tasks. They
interact to share information in a limited range of familiar situations, using basic language
appropriate to a limited range of social and cultural contexts. They are aware that language
varies according to what is being used for andto whom they are addressing themselves.
Phase 3
Capable communicators in phase 3 understand and respond to a limited variety of spoken
and written texts. They understand specific information, can identify main ideas and some
detail presented in oral, visual and written language and demonstrate their comprehension in
a limited range of oral and written forms. They engage in conversationand write structured
text to express their ideas, opinions and experiences on a range of familiar and some unfamiliar
situations, in a limited range of social and culturalcontexts. They understand that they can
speak and write in different ways for different purposes and audiences.
Phase 4
Capable communicators in phase 4 understand and respond to a variety of spoken and written
texts. They interpret specific information, main ideas and some detail presented in complex
oral, visual and written language, draw conclusions and recognize implied opinions and
attitudes in texts read and viewed. They engage in conversation and write structured text to
share informative and organized ideas on topics of personal interest and global significance,
in a range of social and cultural contexts. They can communicate substantial informationcontaining relevant anddeveloped ideas and justified opinions on events, experiences and some
concepts explored inclass. They identify aspects of format and style, and speak and write with
a clear sense of audience and purpose.
Phase 5
Proficient communicators in phase 5 analyse specific information, ideas, opinions and attitudes presented in oral, visual and written language. They draw conclusions, infer information and recognize implied opinions and attitudes. They respond and react to questions and
ideas in a range of spoken,visual and written texts. They engage actively in conversations in
social and some academic situations to provide substantial information containing relevant
and focused ideas supported by examples and illustrations. They organize information and
ideas into a clear and effective structure to express their understanding and opinions on topics of personal interest and global significance. They interpret aspects of format and style,
and are able to adapt register and style of language to suit the context of the task.
Phase 6
Proficient communicators in phase 6 evaluate the important information, details and ideas presented in spoken, written and visual language, in social and academic contexts. They analyse
the information, draw conclusions and make inferences about ideas, opinions and attitudes
implied in a wide range of spoken, visual and written texts. They engage actively in conversations in social and academic situations to contribute substantial information and give detailed
analysis and explanation. They organize information and ideas logically and effectively to
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

communicate their understanding, opinions and perspectives to a wide range of audiences,


and for a variety of social and academic purposes.

English B Standard
Phase 4 - 5
Skills
Reading may include the close study of novels, films, plays, poems and magazine or newspaper articles. Comprehension is assessed throughout the course and students must practice
the skills of note taking, summarizing and writing concisely about a range of topics, in short
periods of time.
Speaking includes oral presentations, group and pair work and participation in class discussions. There is an emphasis on effective essay writing.
Writing skills are developed through journals, book and film reviews, descriptive, opinionative, analytical and creative writing.
Listening skills are developed through the use of a variety of audio-visual material and interaction in class
Units:
Greeting and Meeting
Dear Sir, Madam, Hi Friend
Crime doesnt pay
I have a dilemma
Once Upon A Time
Music Tells
Changing Places
Inventions Saved Us

Social English, cultural values and expectations


Short writing structures such as letter writing, email,
messaging.
Reading analyzing and writing Crime fiction & nonfiction
Identifying and solving everyday situations and
problems.
Grammar, vocabulary and style of Childrens Literature.
A study of language, culture, individuals and society
in music.
Dreams, ambitions, challenges. Life is a journey.
Past, present and future innovation.

Core Texts
Headway Pre-Intermediate Students book & Workbook
Headway Intermediate - Students book & Workbook (selected units)
A wide range of newspaper, magazine & Internet resources
One novel and a film study.
Note-taking, summarizing, and a variety of writing and speaking structures are an ongoing focus in this course.
Phase 5 -6
Reading includes the study of novels, short stories, films, plays, poems and some non-fiction,
selected from the Language A list. In depth text interpretation of a range of text types is developed throughout the course. Personal reading is an extremely important aspect of the course
as this is one of the main ways for students to increase their vocabulary and improve their
writing style. Students are expected to read regularly outside class.
Speaking may include oral presentations, group and pair work and participation in class dis18

High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

cussions based on the literary and other texts studied during the course.
Writing includes the development of a variety of skills, in particular, formal literary analysis,
journal, creative writing, book and film reviews and persuasive writing. Language is primarily taught through the study of text and writing, but areas of difficulty are focused on as the
need arises.
Listening skills are not separately assessed, but are further developed in class discussion in
all units. Listening skills are especially important in the film and media units which are also
parallel to Language A.

Mandarin B Standard
Skills
Reading may include textbook passages, short stories, online resources and magazine/newspaper articles. Students must demonstrate comprehension skills throughout the course and
will be assessed through reading comprehension tasks.
Speaking includes oral presentations, group works, pair conversations, role plays and participation in class discussions.
Writing skills are developed through in classroom essays, long term assignments, creative
writings and presentations etc.
Listening skills are developed through listening comprehension exercise, videos and interaction with both teacher and peers in class.
Phase 1 -3
About China: its language, geography and food
Summer Holidays
Travel
World famous cities
Family Tree
Pets
Personality
Local community
Volunteer work
Traditional festivals
Communication and media
Education and career
Environment and technology
Core text
Chinese Made Easy 4

French B
Skills
Reading may include textbook passages, short stories, simplified novels and magazine/newspaper articles. Students must demonstrate comprehension skills throughout the course, for
example, identifying information, dealing with unfamiliar language, drawing conclusions and
identifying opinions, attitudes and writing styles etc.
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Speaking may include formal and informal exchanges such as role-plays, discussions,
debates, pair work interviews, interpretation of an illustrated text and presentations.
Writing skills are developed through tasks such as letter writing, advertisements, essays,
creative writing, interpretation of an illustrated text and presentations etc.
Listening may include podcasts and radio reports, speeches songs or any other recorded
information. Viewing may be part of the listening task. Students will develop the ability to
respond to the information they hear and see.

Standard

Phase 1 - 2
Greeting & Introductions
Home and family
Expressing preferences
Free time activities
In town
School and daily routine
Food and drink
Core text
Encore Tricolore 1, Nelson Thornes, U.K.
French magazines. Bonjour Allons-y
Internet resources
Phase 2 - 3
The above topics are developed further with the addition of:
Young People
Town and Country
Transport
Our planet
Education
Food
Shopping in town
The Family
Eating out
City life
Health and sport
Core text
Encore Tricolore 4, French Magazines Les dossiers de IActualite , Okapi, Go.
Phase 3 - 4
Travel & tourism / French culture
Media
Health
Future Plans
Dealing with Problems
Core Text
Encore Tricolore 5
Authentic materials e.g. newspapers, Les dossier de IActualite, Phosphore, Go.
Grade 10 Units
The above topics are developed further with the addition of:
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Language B Assessment Criteria


ASSESSMENT CRITERIA
Criterion A

Oral communication

Maximum 8

Criterion C

Reading Comprehension

Maximum 8

Criterion D

Writing

Maximum 8

Grade Boundaries
Grade

Boundaries

0-3

4-7

8-12

13-17

18-22

23-27

28-32

*Please note that the information in this table is correct at the time of going to print, but is subject to
change. For up-to-date information please visit the IBMYP Curriculum section of the ISHCMC portal.

ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE (EAL) EAL should be in a separate


category as it is a different department; EAL is NOT part of Language B

Aims
The English as an Additional Language Support programme in Grades 9 and 10 is an integral
part of the curriculum at ISHCMC but it is not a recognized MYP subject and, as such, is not assessed by MYP Criteria. Respect for and understandings of cultural differences, recognition of
the unique linguistic needs of each student, and sensitivity to the cultural adjustment process,
are fundamental to its philosophy.
The main aims of the programme are:
To help students gain better access to the curriculum.
To support students in developing their English language skills to the level required for
successful participation in the social, cultural and academic life of the school.
Content
The programme concentrates on improving students reading comprehension, writing skills,
vocabulary development and oral/aural skills. The programme needs to be flexible enough
to accommodate changing student needs. So, although there is a general curriculum outline
for each grade level, each lesson and unit of work is adapted to meet the particular needs and
abilities of students in each class at any given time.
The programme currently includes some in-class language support. This means that an EAL
Support teacher goes into subject classes to support students with the language needs of specific lessons and/or topics.
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Assessment
EAL Support teachers use a variety of assessment techniques to provide students and their
parents with feedback on English language skills development.
Individual portfolios of selected writing assignments are used to keep a cumulative record of
students progress that are then passed on to following teachers at the end of the year. These
are periodically shared with students to foster self-evaluation and confidence as they witness
their progress over a period of time.
Portfolios may contain examples of first attempts at writing through to final drafts, posters,
class activities such as reading comprehension and literature responses, as well as formal endof-unit assessment tasks and self-reflections.
Portfolios are supplemented by teacher observations and grading records of oral/aural progress. These may include details of oral presentations, student participation in discussion and
debate, dramatic role play, the re-telling or reading aloud of fiction and non-fiction texts, plus
cooperative group work.

III. MYP HUMANITIES


Introduction
MYP humanities encourages learners to respect and understand the world around them and
equips them with a skills base appropriate for a learner in the 21st century. MYP humanities
involves inquiring into historical, contemporary, geographical, political, social, economic, religious, technological and cultural contexts that influence and have an impact on individuals,
societies and environments. This encourages learners, both students and teachers, to consider
varied local and global contexts. MYP humanities defines itself as incorporating disciplines
traditionally found in the humanities, such as history and philosophy, as well as disciplines
found in the social sciences, such as economics, geography, sociology and politics. Through the
MYP humanities framework, knowledge and conceptual understanding, as well as thinking
critically and communication, contribute to the development of the student as a whole.
All subject groups in the MYP share a common foundation through the attributes of the International Baccalaureate (IB) learner profile and with the fundamental concepts of the MYP
holistic learning, intercultural awareness and communication.
Aims
The aims of all MYP subjects state what a teacher may expect to teach and what a student
may expect to experience and learn. These aims, therefore, suggest how the student may be
changed by the learning experience.
The aims of the teaching and learning of MYP humanities are to encourage and enable the
student to:
Appreciate the range of human and environmental commonalities and diversities
Understand the interactions and interdependence of individuals, societies and environments in different contexts
Understand how both environmental and human systems operate and evolve over
time
Identify and develop a concern for human and environmental well-being
Act upon opportunities to be a responsible global citizen
Develop effective inquiry skills to achieve conceptual understanding in humanities.

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

GEOGRAPHY
Content
The Geography course is divided into core topics on the natural environment and human environment. The topics to be investigated include:
Grade 9
Weather, Climate and Ecosystems What makes the weather what it is? How do people relate to it, especially in its extremes?
Population and Migration What makes populations grow or not? What makes people move? How globalized are you?
Fresh Water Is there enough water for our thirsty world? How can people manage
fresh water re-sources in rivers and underground aquifers sustainably?
Plate tectonics When and where is the earth not solid and stable? How do people deal
with volcanoes and earthquakes?
Grade 10
Development What and where is it? Is it all about money? How do you make it happen?
Leisure and Tourism How does it affect development, both economic and cultural?
Agriculture: The Business of Growing How can this hungry world be fed?
Industry Where can you put what kind of factory?
Settlements and Urbanization Why are cities where they are? Can they be grown sustainably?
Impacts of War (interdisciplinary unit focusing on war in Indochina and other examples) How do geographers aid the study and mitigation of the impacts of war?
Core Texts:
The New Wider World, 3rd Edition, David Waugh
New Key Geography for IGCSE, 2nd Edition, David Waugh and Tony Bushell

HISTORY
Content
This course examines a range of themes and events in modern history and allows students
some scope to choose topics of personal interest.
Grade 9
Crime and Punishment (crime and punishment in England from the middle ages to
the 19th century; attitudes towards capital punishment in various countries in the 20th
century)
Call to War (long-term and short-term causes of the American Civil War and the First
World War)
Money, Money, Money (the boom and depression in the United States 1920s-1930s;
comparison with either the German hyperinflation of 1923 or the Asian financial crisis
of 1997-8)
Industry and Empire (the industrial revolution in Britain; the British empire in India in
the 19th century; the opium trade and the opening of China; the New Imperialism and
the scramble for Africa).
Grade 10
Revolutions (economic, social and political change in Russia from the 1860s to 1917;
comparison with a non-European revolution of the students choice)
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Clash of Ideas (Democracy, Fascism and Communism: the Second World War in Europe and the early Cold War; the Korean War)
Human Rights and the State (Totalitarianism; Cambodia under Pol Pot in the 1970s;
comparison with another totalitarian regime of the students choice)
Impacts of War (an interdisciplinary unit which focuses on war in Indochina in the
1960s and 1970s and allows students to develop a group project drawing on other examples of their own choice)
Texts
Schools History Project Crime and Protest. Todd, Allan and Whittock, Martyn. Heinemann, 2009.
GCSE Modern World History (e-learning edition). Walsh, Ben. Hodder Murray, 2005.
Assessment
Individual assessment tasks may focus on one or more of the Humanities criteria. At the end
of the course, the overall level achieved in each of the criteria will be assessed.
Humanities Assessment Criteria
Criterion A

Knowledge and Understanding

Maximum 8

Criterion B

Investigating

Maximum 8

Criterion C

Thinking Critically

Maximum 8

Criterion D

Communicating

Maximum 8

Grade Boundaries for Grades 9 and 10


Grade

Boundaries

1
2

NOT YET

SPECIFIED

BY THE

IBO

6
7
*Please note that the information in this table is correct at the time of going to print, but is subject to
change. For up-to-date information please visit the IBMYP Curriculum section of the ISHCMC portal

24

High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

IV. MYP SCIENCES


Introduction
The sciences emphasize the role of inquiry and encourage the development of scientific inquiry skills and transferable thinking skills.
Aims
The sciences aim to help students appreciate the links between science and everyday life as
well as the dynamic interactions between science and society. The aims of the teaching and
study of sciences are to encourage and enable students to:
develop inquiring minds and curiosity about science and the natural world
acquire knowledge, conceptual understanding and skills to solve problems and make
informed decisions in scientific and other contexts
develop skills of scientific inquiry to design and carry out scientific investigations and
evaluate scientific evidence to draw conclusions
communicate scientific ideas, arguments and practical experiences accurately in a variety of ways
think analytically, critically and creatively to solve problems, judge arguments and
make decisions in scientific and other contexts
appreciate the benefits and limitations of science and its application in technological
developments
understand the international nature of science and the interdependence of science,
technology and society including the benefits, limitations and implications imposed by
social, economic, political, environmental, cultural and ethical factors
demonstrate attitudes and develop values of honesty and respect for themselves, others, and their shared environment

Content

The following topics will be studied:


Grade 9
Students elect to follow either one or two sciences during the course of their first two years of
High School. The following topics make up the course in each science:
Biology
Cells and the organization of living things, Diet and health, Digestion,
Transport systems in humans, Gaseous exchange in animals, Respiration, Photosynthesis, Transport systems in plants, Support and movement in plants and animals, Homeostasis.
Chemistry
States of Matter, Structure of the Atom, Metals & Non-metals, Periodic
Table, Atoms and Ions, Bonding, Structures of Compounds, Rates of
reactions, Acids and Bases, The Mole, Electrolysis.
Physics
Forces and Motion, Kinetic Energy and Momentum, Strength of Solids,
Gravity, Particles in Motion, Energy Transfer, Heat Transfer, Energy Resources.
Grade 10
Students continue in Grade 10 following their chosen science course. The following topics
make up the course in each science:
Biology
Responding to changes in the Environment, Reproduction, Human Reproduction, Inheritance, Evolution, Ecology and cycles in the environment.
Chemistry
Oxidation and Reduction, Ammonia, Fertilizers and the chemical industry, Burning, Pollution and Acid Rain, Geology, Water, Water treatment and non-aqueous solvents, Petroleum and organic chemistry,
Plastics, Plants, Impurities, food hygiene and medical implications, Re25

High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Physics

activity series and metals, Cells, Metals and alloys, Colloids.


Electricity, Magnetism, Electrical energy, Waves, Light and Sound,
Atomic Physics and radioactivity.

Core Texts
IGCSE Chemistry, Harwood
IGCSE Biology, Jones and Jones
IGCSE Physics, CIE by Bradley and Sunley
Assessment
Students will be assessed using the MYP Assessment Criteria. Students will carry out practical work and write formal laboratory reports, take summative end-of-unit tests and produce
extended written work on topical science issues. A variety of other assessments will also be
carried out. The MYP criteria are outlined below. Criterion A, One World, looks at the effect
that science has on our society and the students appreciation of the positive and negative
social impact of certain science issues. Criterion B, Communication, focuses on the ability of
the student to put across their viewpoint and other scientific information. Criterion C, Scientific Knowledge and Concepts is concerned with assessing the students ability to apply what
they have learned, especially to unfamiliar situations. Criterion D, Scientific Enquiry looks
at the practical skills of the student and their ability to plan investigations and evaluate their
method. Criterion E, Processing Data assesses the individuals competence in manipulating
raw data to find patterns. Finally, Criterion F, Attitudes in Science is concerned with the work
ethic of the student and how they interact with each other and their environment.
Science Assessment Criteria
Criterion A

One world

Maximum 6

Criterion B

Communication in science

Maximum 6

Criterion C

Knowledge and understanding of


science

Maximum 6

Criterion D

Scientific inquiry

Maximum 6

Criterion E

Processing data

Maximum 6

Criterion F

Attitudes in science

Maximum 6

Grade Boundaries for Grades 9 and 10

26

Grade

Boundaries

05

6 11

12 18

19 24

25 28

29 32

33 36

*Please note that the information in this table is


correct at the time of going to print, but is subject to change. For up-to-date information please
visit the IBMYP Curriculum section of the ISHCMC portal.

High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

V. MYP MATHEMATICS
Introduction
Students will have the opportunity to study two courses: Mathematics and Extended Mathematics. All students should have the opportunity to develop skills and understanding of
concepts from the Extended Mathematics topics. The decision of the topics and timing of the
extension topics will be made by the teacher and will be influenced by the readiness of the
students and the time available to cover the extended material.
The Mathematics content covers basic areas of Mathematics deemed necessary for students to
continue their study in grades 11 and 12, and it is designed for those whose area of interest lie
in other areas of the curriculum. The Extended Mathematics curriculum, which covers all of
the content in more depth and has additional topics, is available for those students who wish
to continue their study of Mathematics in Mathematics Standard or Higher Level in grades 11
and 12. Any student wishing to continue to do the IB diploma and study Mathematics Standard or Higher Level Mathematics should do as much of the extended course as possible.
In the rare cases where a student is an extremely strong mathematician and succeeding in
other areas of the Diploma programme, he/she will be able to enter for Mathematics HL and
Further Mathematics SL as an additional subject and supported in his/her studies by a member of the Mathematics department. For the grade 11 students of 2012-13 the Further Mathematics course will be at HL.
Calculators: The Mathematics Faculty suggest the purchase of the CASIO FX 9860 series, which
are priced at around 2 million VND.
Aims
The aims of the teaching and study of mathematics are to enable our students to:
recognize that mathematics permeates the world around us
appreciate the usefulness, power and beauty of mathematics
enjoy mathematics and develop patience and persistence when solving problems
understand and be able to use the language, symbols and notation of mathematics
develop mathematical curiosity and use inductive and deductive reasoning when solving problems
become confident in using mathematics to analyse and solve problems both in school
and in real-life situations
develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to pursue further studies in
mathematics
develop abstract, logical and critical thinking and the ability to reflect critically upon
their work and the work of others
develop a critical appreciation of the use of information and communication technology in mathematics
appreciate the international dimension of mathematics and its multicultural and historical perspectives.
Content
The following topics will be studied:

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Grade 9
Number

Number Extension
Algebra

Algebra Extension

Geometry and Trigonometry


Geometry and Trigonometry Extension
Statistics and Probability
Statistics and Probability
Extension
Discrete Mathematics

Surds
Rational Numbers
Standard Form.
Irrational Numbers and Approximation
Surds with binomial denominators
Linear Relations
Integer Exponents and Laws of Indices
Simultaneous Equations
Quadratic factorisation
Indices including fractional indices
Quadratic Equations and Quadratic Functions
Simultaneous Equations
Other Functions
Transformations
Mensuration (include Accruacy of Measurements)
Trigonometric Ratios
Analytical Geometry (distance and mid-point)
Trigonometric Graphs
Inter-quartile Range
Measures of location and dispersion
Estimating Probability of successive events
Standard Deviation
Normal Distribution
Binomial Probability
Algorithms

Core text
Mathematics for the International student 9 MYP 4: Haese and Harris publication
Grade 10
Number
Number Extension
Algebra

Algebra Extension

28

Problems with Approximate and Real values


Surds and Radicals
Irrational Numbers and Approximation
Variation
Logarithms
Simultaneous Equations
Inequalities (only linear)
Graphs of Special Functions (including Domain and
Range)
Expansion and Factorisation of Linear and Quadratic Expressions
Integer and negative exponents
Matrices
Logarithms
Higher-level relations, functions and their graphical
representations exponential, logarithmic
Inverse and Composite Functions
Arithmetic and Geometric Series
Inequalities

High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Geometry and Trigonometry

Volume and Surface Area of Pyramids


Trigonometry
Congruence and Similarity
Circle Theorems
Similarity and Congruence Theorems
Deductive Geometry (including Circle properties)
Vectors
Non-right angled Trigonometry
Cumulative Frequency
Probability of successive trials
Univariate Data Analysis
Conditional probability
Bivariate Data analysis
Logic
Directed Networks

Geometry and Trigonometry


Extension
Statistics and Probability
Statistics and Probability
Extension
Discrete Mathematics
Discrete Mathematics Extension

Core text
Mathematics for the International student 10 MYP 5 Pre-Studies: Haese and Harris publication
Mathematics for the International student 10 MYP 5 Plus: Haese and Harris publication
MYP Mathematics Assessment Criteria
Knowledge and Understanding

Maximum 8

Application and Reasoning

Maximum 8

Communication

Maximum 6

Reflection and Evaluation

Maximum 6

Grade Boundaries for Grades 9 and 10


Grade

Boundaries

0-4

58

9 12

13 17

18 21

22 25

26 28

*Please note that the information in this table is correct at the time of going to print, but is subject to
change. For up-to-date information please visit the IBMYP Curriculum section of the ISHCMC portal.

29

High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

VI. MYP ARTS


Introduction
The Arts are a form of human expression through activity. They are a powerful medium for
the exploration of the human condition, our society and our world. Students are provided
with the opportunity to learn about the Arts as well as experiencing the processes, skills and
techniques required to be a practicing artist.
Aims
Participation in the Arts should enable students to:
experience and develop curiosity, interest and enjoyment in their own creativity and
that of others
explore through the processes of visual and performing arts
acquire and develop skills needed for the creation of visual and performing art work
use the language, concepts and principles of visual and performing arts
communicate their thoughts and ideas through visual and performing arts
create visual and performing art work
reflect on, appreciate and evaluate their work and the work of others
develop receptiveness to visual and performing art forms across time, place and cultures, and perceive the significance of these art forms as an integral part of life

VISUAL ARTS
Introduction
The Visual Arts promote distinctive and unique ways of understanding and developing an
individuals creative and perceptive abilities in, for example, drawing, painting, printmaking,
sculpture and photography. Particular emphasis is placed on developing skills in drawing,
painting, printmaking, sculpture and photography.
Our goals are to provide a holistic approach to the development of the individual student, to
allow students to investigate and appreciate art from different cultures and environments, and
to actively involve students in the development of original artworks.
Aims
Students are expected to:
Develop a conceptual understanding of the production of visual artworks.
Develop the skills and techniques required to produce successful visual artworks.
Develop knowledge and understanding of the art form(s) studied
Apply knowledge, understanding, skills and strategies to develop and elaborate ideas,
themes or compositions
Reflect on the themes and issues encountered during the course, and to evaluate creative development and processes
Develop an aesthetic, cultural and critical awareness of the visual arts.
The Developmental Workbook
The Developmental Workbook is a written record of the students development as an artist,
encouraging experimentation and critical thinking. It should include:
Visual and written independent research
Critical appreciation of the visual, functional and aesthetic qualities of the art forms
studied
Awareness of cultural, historical and social context of the work
Experimentation studio research with a variety of media, developing technical practices.
Development of ideas from concept to resolved composition.
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Content
Grade 9
Students use the developmental workbook throughout the creative cycle to reflect
upon, evaluate and appraise work in order and to support and promote the creative
development of ideas.
Students extend subject specific vocabulary to show aesthetic and critical awareness.
Students develop visual and oral presentation skills. Present work formally and informally.
Students develop understanding of how historical developments and cultural perspectives have shaped the arts.
Students develop an understanding of themes and issues that can be studied through
the arts.
Students explor e the art elements and design principals structured activities.
Students develop an understanding the design process and develop skill in elaborating
ideas, themes and compositions to a point of realisation.
Students build on observational and experimental drawing skills using a variety of
media.
Students build on skills in Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, Printmaking and Digital art
and are introduced to Performance Art.
Grade 10
Students continue to use the developmental workbook throughout the creative cycle to
reflect upon, evaluate and appraise work in order to support and promote the creative
development of ideas.
Students continue to extend subject specific vocabulary to show greater aesthetic and
critical awareness.
Students continue to develop visual and oral presentation skills. Present work formally
and informally.
Students continue to develop understanding of how historical developments and cultural perspectives have shaped the arts.
Students continue to develop an understanding of themes and issues through the
arts.
Students continue to build on extended observational and experimental drawing skills
using a variety of media.
Students begin to apply the art elements and design principles in their work.
Students further develop their students understanding of the design process, developing and elaborating ideas, themes and compositions to a point of realisation.
Students show greater skill in Drawing, Painting, Sculpture, Printmaking and Digital
art and are introduced to Installation art.
Students use materials with greater sensitivity and demonstrate an increased understanding of their characteristics.
Students develop skills in mixed media work.
Assessment
Assessment takes place in two forms; Process assessment in the developmental workbook
and Summative Assessment in the final product or artwork.
The MYP Arts criteria are used to assess student learning. See end of Arts section.

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

MUSIC
Introduction
The study of Music in Grades 9 and 10 will develop students skills in relation to the three main
areas of Music: performing (both as a soloist and in an ensemble), listening and composing.
Students will consolidate their theoretical knowledge from earlier grades, be given
opportunities for performing in a range of situations and will further develop their
understanding of compositional processes and musical genres across a wide range of
styles and cultures.
Aims
To enable candidates to acquire and consolidate a range of musical skills, knowledge
and understanding, through the activities of listening, performing and composing.
To assist candidates to develop a perceptive, sensitive and critical response to the main
historical periods and style of Western music.
To help candidates recognise and understand the music of various non-Western traditions, and thus help form an appreciation of cultural similarities and differences.
To provide the basis for an informed and lasting love and appreciation of Music.
To provide a foundation for further study in Music for those candidates who wish to
continue Music at IB Diploma.
Grade 9 Content
Listening
Students will begin a glossary of musical terms, and start to use them when writing
and/or talking about musical extracts.
Students will learn specific vocabulary relating to the Baroque and Classical Western
Art Music periods, as well as a range of World Music cultures, e.g.. Indonesian gamelan,
Indian raga and Caribbean steel pan music.
Students will begin to identify and analyse a wide range of musical styles and genres.
Students will begin to learn rhythmic dictation in simple time, as well as 4-bar melodic
dictation in a major key.
Students will begin their analysis of a specific Set Work, e.g.. Bachs Brandenburg Concerto no. 2, and will analyse it in terms of harmony, melody and so on.
Performing
Students will nominate a solo instrument/voice and will begin to develop their technical competence on this instrument, challenging themselves in terms of the level of piece
selected.
Students should rehearse regularly with a private teacher.
Students will perform solo and ensemble pieces in workshops at regular intervals
throughout the course; these performances will be recorded and assessed.
Students will learn how to analyse their own, and peers performances to make them
better for the next time.
Students should learn a wide range of musical styles, so they can present varied performances.
Students will be given the opportunity to perform in concerts, assemblies, etc.
Composition
Students will begin to learn the skills necessary to compose in a wide range of styles,
including programmatic composition, pentatonic and whole tone scale pieces and
waltzes.
Students will learn and develop appropriate notation skills, including the ability to use
computer software in writing scores.
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Students will be set specific compositional tasks over the course: each one will concentrate on a specific aspect of musical theory, with the aim that students learn the art of
composition as an ongoing and developing language of expression.
Grade 10 Content
Listening
Students will develop and extend their glossary of musical terms from Grade 9, and be
encouraged to use them confidently and fluently when writing and/or talking about
musical extracts.
Students will extend their specific vocabulary knowledge, including words relating to
the Romantic and Modern periods of Western Art Music, as well as other World Music
cultures e.g. Australian aboriginal music, the panpipe music of the Andes and Spanish
flamenco.
Students will learn to identify and analyse a wide range of musical styles and genres
with greater confidence and accuracy.
Students will develop their rhythmic and melodic dictation skills, with examples in
compound time and longer melodic extracts including minor keys.
Students will continue to study a specific Set Work, e.g.. Bachs Brandenburg Concerto
no. 2, and will analyse it in terms of harmony, melody and so on.
Students will develop all the above skills to write a Musical Investigation project on a
musical subject of their choice.
Performing
Students will continue to develop their technical competence on their solo instrument,
aiming to improve at each workshop performance.
Students should continue to rehearse regularly with a private teacher and in their regular ensemble groups.
Students will continue to perform solo and ensemble pieces in workshops at regular
intervals throughout the course; these performances will be recorded and assessed.
Students will learn how to analyse their own, and peers performances to make them
better for the next time.
Students should learn a wide range of musical styles, so they can present varied performances.
Students will be given the opportunity to perform in concerts, assemblies, etc.
Composition
Students will develop and extend their compositional skills, focusing on particular
forms and styles, for example ternary and rondo, a song and compositions for a wider
range of instruments.
Students will develop their notation skills, concentrating on specific articulation, dynamics and tempo markings to enhance their work.
Students will continue to be set specific compositional tasks over the course: each one
will concentrate on a specific aspect of musical theory, with the aim that students learn
the art of composition as an ongoing and developing language of expression.
Students will develop a final portfolio of work which will consist of 3 contrasting compositions: these will be edited and revised so that they represent the best the student
can offer. These pieces will be notated, performed, recorded and assessed. They will
also include a written commentary explaining the process of composition.
Assessment
Assessment takes place in two forms; Process Assessment i.e. the Developmental / Research
Workbook and Summative Assessment i.e. the final product or piece.
The MYP Arts criteria are used to assess student learning. See end of Arts section.
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

DRAMA

Introduction
Positive experience in Drama develops imagination and makes students more sensitive and responsive to the natural and man made world. It also enhances self-esteem and builds confidence.
The High School Program provides a detailed understanding of a range of theatrical forms
enabling students to gain a broad knowledge of performance through various social, historical
and cultural contexts. It also enables students to evolve a wide range of performance skills and
acquire a sophisticated awareness of how to shape and structure a performance. Students are
expected to analyse and discuss dramatic techniques, forms and theories using appropriate
language and they should understand and show initiative in planning and self-evaluation in
the development of Performance.
Aims
Students are expected to:
Develop an appreciation of a variety of performance styles
Gain a wide knowledge of dramatic techniques and apply them to their practical work.
Explore a range of issues acknowledging the connections made with the Areas of Interaction.
Develop a cultural and critical understanding of theatrical forms and theories.
Develop the knowledge to perform and direct plays in a confident and skillful way.
Develop an awareness of the impact of Theatre on todays world.
Developmental Workbook
The developmental journal is a record of the students development as a performer and encourages experimentation and critical thinking. It should include:
A record of the process of creation.
Research of theatre in Cultural and Historical contexts.
The application of approaches to learning skills in its presentation, such as legibility,
organisation and referencing.
Written refection and evaluation.
Content
Grade 9
Students will explore 4 core units of study:
Brechts Epic Theatre an exploration of how Theatre can be used to educate and not
just entertain its audience.
Devising Theatre this unit investigates how Theatre can be created to reflect or change
our societies and express ideas.
Realism an introduction to using Stanislavskys acting techniques to create believable
characters on stage. It explores a text and culminates in an evening performance to the
ISHCMC community.
Shakespeare for Beginners this unit develops familiarity and confidence in understanding the world of Theatres most memorable playwright. Students will extend their
presentational and analysis skills by exploring a range of monologues and plays.
Grade 10
Students will explore 5 core units of study:
Physical Theatre Using techniques of Physical Theatre to explore the text Kafkas
Metamorphosis.
Commedia del Arte experiencing this style of improvised Theatre which combines
physical and verbal comedy and slapstick clowning performance.
From Page to Stage This unit explores a theatrical text in detail and culminates in an
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

evening performance to the ISHCMC community.


Introduction to Asian Theatrical Styles In this unit students explore a range of Asian
Theatre styles and cultures including Japanese, Chinese, Indian and Indonesian.
Theatre Sports This is a fun and challenging competition which encourages students
to demonstrate their improvisational, comedy and team work shills that they have
learned throughout the course.
Assessment
Assessment takes place in two forms: Process Assessment demonstrated through the Developmental Workbook and through their Engagement in all tasks, and Summative Assessment,
which can be the final product (an essay or presentation) or performance. Student self-assessment in a written or discussion format is an integral part of the learning process in the MYP
Drama Program. Students will use the Developmental Workbook throughout the creative process to reflect upon, evaluate, assess and appraise work and to support and promote creative
development. Students will also develop a detailed understanding of the technical aspects of
theatre such as set design, lighting and sound through a variety of tasks.
The MYP Arts criteria are used to assess student learning.
Arts Assessment Criteria
The following MYP Arts criteria are used to assess student learning in Visual Arts, Music and
Drama:
Criterion A

Knowledge and Understanding

Maximum 8

Criterion B

Application

Maximum 10

Criterion C

Reflection and Evaluation

Maximum 8

Criterion D

Artistic Awareness and Personal


Engagement

Maximum 8

Grade Boundaries for Grades 9 and 10


Grade

Boundaries

03

48

9 13

14 20

21 25

26 30

31 34

*Please note that the information in this table is correct at the time of going to print, but is subject to
change. For up-to-date information please visit the IBMYP Curriculum section of the ISHCMC portal.

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

VII. MYP HEALTH & SOCIAL AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION


Introduction
The Physical Education, and Health and Social Education programme fosters the students
individual development in the areas of physical, social and emotional health. The curriculum
and activities embrace the cultural diversity of the school and recognize the importance of
providing authentic and life long skills for students to live a healthy and productive life.
Aims
The aims of the Grade 9 and 10 MYP Physical Education programme are to enable students to:
Appreciate and understand the value of physical activity and its relationship to living
a healthy lifestyle
Work to their optimal level of physical fitness and develop the skills necessary to maximize their fitness potential
Develop an understanding and appreciation of movement as a creative medium connected to communication, and expression
Develop the motor skills necessary to participate successfully in a variety of physical
activities
Experience enjoyment and satisfaction through physical activity
Develop both their personal and social skills
Show knowledge and understanding in a variety of physical activities and evaluate
their own and others performances
Demonstrate the ability to reflect upon their own physical activity experiences and
performances
Content
Grade 9
Physical Education
Fitness Personal Assessment
Volleyball
Movement Education: Composition of an Aerobics Routine
Swimming
Track and Field
Basketball
Soccer
Racquet sports and Striking Games

Health and Social Education


Study Skills and the Human Brain
Sports Nutrition
Gender Development
Self and Relationships
Challenges and Adversity
Substance Abuse and Dependency: Alcohol
Core texts:
Personal, Health and Physical Education, Book 4, 3rd Edition, Lees and Lees
Grade 10
Physical Education
Fitness Personal Assessment
Soccer
Movement Education: Composition of a Dance Routine (Cultural Fusion)
Swimming
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Track & Field


Basketball
Racquet Sports and Striking Games
Volleyball

Health and Social Issues


Careers Unit
Conflict and Conflict Resolution
Body Image
Drug awareness and dependency
Core texts
Active Outcomes 2 PDHPE Stage 5, Proctor, Ruskin, Harper
Assessment
A variety of formative and summative assessment tasks are given for each unit. In Physical
Education classes, assessment tools include; individually based fitness grams, self/peer assessments, video analysis, attitude and effort rubrics, and skills checklists. In Health and Social
Education, assessment tasks include individual and cooperative assignments/projects, role
playing, discussions and quizzes. In both contexts the focus of all our assessments tasks are to
find various ways to maximize and analyze our students understanding and development.
Assessment Criteria
Criterion A

Knowledge and Understanding

Maximum 8

Criterion B

Movement Composition

Maximum 6

Criterion C

Performance and Application

Maximum 10

Criterion D

Social skills and Personal Engagement Maximum 8

Grade Boundaries for Grades 9 and 10


Grade

Boundaries

05

6 10

11 15

16 20

21 24

25 28

29 32

*Please note that the information in this table is correct at the time of going to print, but is subject to
change. For up-to-date information please visit the IBMYP Curriculum section of the ISHCMC portal.

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

VIII. MYP TECHNOLOGY


Introduction
The technology programme in Grades 9 and 10 is a compulsory study that continues to develop concepts and skills covered in Grades 6 to 8. It consists of a practical approach to learning,
taught over 4 periods per week, in using technology as a tool.
Within the MYP, students are required to develop and continually apply the variety of technology skills involved in inventing, creating, constructing, testing, modifying and evaluating
solutions to real problems. Students are also required to adapt to new experiences and be able
to approach problems with appropriate skills and techniques.
MYP technology is organised into three branches:
Information
Materials
Systems
Technology deals with all three branches, stressing their inter relatedness. All technology work
is based upon the design cycle a model of learning and work organisation incorporating
knowledge, research, skills and design principles in problem-solving contexts.
Students will begin each year with work on the design cycle, initially concentrating on the
Create stage but gradually developing their skills and understanding in the other areas.
Aims
Technology at ISHCMC is designed to create a balance between the imparting of skills, the
acquisition of techniques and knowledge, and the growth and awareness of the students personal responses.
The aims of technology are to:
encourage an awareness of the impact of technology on society and the environment
develop an appreciation of the international and intercultural aspects of technology
provide a variety of technological information and ideas
encourage curiosity, ingenuity, resourcefulness and discrimination
stimulate self-confidence through the knowledge and application of technology
develop practical skills through the creation of products/solutions
promote effective, informed, appropriate communication
foster responsibility for designs, decisions, actions and assessment
promote effective cooperation and respect for individual differences when responding
to technological challenges
develop logical-thinking skills.
As well as the knowledge necessary to work towards these aims, the students will also acquire
a number of skills.
Practical skills
the ability to complete given tasks.
Analytical skills
the collection, interpretation and use of information.
Organizational skills
the planning of work and meeting deadlines.
Social skills
the communication of ideas.
Content
Across their time in Grades 9 and 10, students will have opportunities to work in many of the
following areas:
Animation
Electronic music
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Desktop Publishing
Graphic Design
Simulations And Modeling (Programming)
At the end of Grade 10 students embark on an open project. Here, they can choose their own
area of interaction and work independently to solve a real-life problem.
Assessment
Students are assessed for each unit on all aspects of the design cycle (Investigate Design
Plan Create Evaluate Attitudes in Technology). Students are assessed on written assignments such as process journals and reflective evaluations as well as on the final product
created for each unit.
MYP Technology Assessment Criteria
Criterion A

Investigate

Maximum 6

Criterion B

Design

Maximum 6

Criterion C

Plan

Maximum 6

Criterion D

Create

Maximum 6

Criterion E

Evaluate

Maximum 6

Criterion F

Attitudes in Technology

Maximum 6

Grade Boundaries for Grades 9 and 10


Grade

Boundaries

05

69

10 15

16 21

22 26

27 31

32 36

*Please note that the information in this table is correct at the time of going to print, but is subject to
change. For up-to-date information please visit the IBMYP Curriculum section of the ISHCMC portal.

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

The International Baccalaureate Diploma


Programme Grades 11 and 12
The academic programme for Grades 11 and 12 has the International Baccalaureate Diploma
Programme as its core curriculum and is designed as a comprehensive and academically demanding curriculum, which is recognized internationally as an excellent preparation for university. Based on the educational tradition of no single country, it represents the desire to provide
students of different linguistic, cultural and educational backgrounds with the intellectual, social
and critical perspectives necessary for the adult world that lies ahead in todays global society.
To qualify for the award of an IB Diploma students must choose six subjects. The selection
of three subjects at Higher Level (HL) and three at Standard Level (SL) requires students to
engage in the study of Languages, Sciences, Mathematics, and Individuals and Societies over
a two year period. It is a deliberate compromise between the preference of specialization in
some countries and the breadth often preferred in others. The intent is that students should
learn how to learn, how to analyse, reach considered conclusions about languages, literature,
society and the scientific nature of our global environment. The six subjects must be chosen by
selecting one from each of the following groups:
NB Two subjects may be taken from Group 1 instead of one from Group 1 and one from Group
2 (All subjects listed are available at Higher and Standard levels unless otherwise indicated).
Subject Groups

Subjects

Language A1

English Literature A, English Language and Literature A ,


Vietnamese Literature A, Korean Literature A, Chinese Literature A, Self-Taught Literature A SL

Second Language

English A2, English B, French B, Spanish Ab Initio SL

Individuals & Society

History, Geography, Business & Management, Information


Technology in a Global Society (ITGS)

Experimental Sciences

Physics, Biology, Environmental Systems & Societies SL

Mathematics

Mathematics Higher Level, Mathematics SL, Mathematical


Studies (SL only)

The Arts & Electives

Visual Arts, Music, Theatre, Chemistry, Business & Management

In addition to these academic subjects IB Diploma students are also required to:
Write an Extended Essay
Study the Theory of Knowledge (ToK) course
Carry out activities in the Creativity, Action and Service (CAS) programme
Physical Education is not required for the IB Diploma but there is a school requirement for all
students of two lessons per week.

Conditions for the Award of an IB Diploma

Each of the six academic subjects is graded on a 1 to 7 scale (1 is poor, 7 is excellent) based on
coursework and the final examination. A maximum of three bonus points are awarded according to the combined standard of a students ToK and Extended Essay work. Therefore, the
maximum points total is 45. To qualify for the IB Diploma the student must achieve a minimum of 24 points (other conditions may apply), submit an Extended Essay and have fulfilled
the CAS and ToK requirements.
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

The IB Certificate Programme

Some students will find they are better suited to an IB Certificate course. This means they do
not follow the full IB Diploma programme. They may take five or six subjects, some at Higher
Level, if advised, and take part in the TOK and CAS programmes. The student must however
qualify for the ISHCMC Diploma and may take a balance of IB courses and sit for individual
subjects at the examination session. Grades are awarded for each subject taken and an IB certificate is awarded on successful achievement in the examination of a specific course.

CORE COMPONENTS: CAS, TOK & EXTENDED ESSAY


CREATIVITY, ACTION, SERVICE (CAS)
Nature
Creativity, action, service (CAS) is at the heart of the Diploma Programme. It is one of the three
essential elements in every students Diploma Programme experience. It involves students in
a range of activities alongside their academic studies throughout the Diploma Programme. A
successful completion of CAS is one of the requirements for obtaining the IB diploma.
The three strands of CAS, which are often interwoven with particular activities, are characterized as follows.
Creativity: arts, and other experiences that involve creative thinking.
Action: physical exertion contributing to a healthy lifestyle.
Service: an unpaid and voluntary exchange that has a learning benefit for the student.
CAS enables students to enhance their personal and interpersonal development through experiential learning. At the same time, it provides an important counterbalance to the academic
pressures of the rest of the Diploma Programme. A good CAS programme should be both
challenging and enjoyable, a personal journey of self-discovery. Each individual student has a
different starting point, and therefore different goals and needs, but for many their CAS activities include experiences that are profound and life-changing.
Aims
The CAS programme aims to develop students who are:
Reflective thinkers. Students should gain a better understanding of their strengths and
limitations, identify goals and devise strategies for personal growth.
Willing to accept new challenges and new roles.
Aware of themselves as members of communities with responsibilities towards each
other and the environment.
Active participants in sustained, collaborative projects.
Balanced. Students should enjoy and find significance in a range of activities involving
intellectual, physical, creative and emotional experiences.
Activities and Projects
Students are required to complete a minimum of three activities for both creativity and service
and be involved in at least one service project involving teamwork for a minimum of three
semesters.
Larger scale activities of this sort may provide excellent opportunities for students to engage
with issues of global importance. (GIN, Loreto, East Meets West, Operation Smile, Habitat
for Humanity). An ideal project would also integrate creativity and action.
The school will offer a range of opportunities for CAS; however, all students should be involved in CAS activities that they have initiated themselves.
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

An activity must meet all four of these criteria to be considered to be a CAS activity.
Real, purposeful activities, with significant outcomes
Personal challenges the tasks must extend students and be achievable in scope
Thoughtful consideration, such as planning, reviewing progress and reporting
Reflection on outcomes and personal learning

Events
ISHCMC being very involved in the local community, students should participate in one
of the social events organized or supported by the school (Family Fun Day, LoretoFest,
Christmas Charity Bazaar, Terry Fox Run, International Day, Gala concert, New Zealand
Festival, Big Day Out, etc.).
Time
In the course of their CAS work, students should develop a number of personal skills
in order to fulfil a range of personal outcomes. In order to have sufficient time in which
to do this, they should aim to spend the equivalent of half a day per school week with a
reasonable balance between creativity, action and service. Hour counting, however, is
not encouraged.
Off campus
Students need to have parents fill in a Parental Agreement Form before they can start on
an activity off campus.
Evaluating: Learning outcomes
The most important aspect of evaluation is self-evaluation by the student.
As a result of their CAS experience as a whole, including their reflections, students should be
able to demonstrate that they have met each of the following learning outcomes:
Increased their awareness of their own strengths and areas for growth.
Undertaken new challenges.
Planned and initiated activities.
Worked collaboratively with others.
Shown perseverance and commitment in their activities.
Engaged with issues of global importance.
Considered the ethical implications of their actions.
Developed new skills.
In order to meet the CAS requirement, students will be expected to have provided evidence of
having fulfilled each of these by the completion of the diploma programme.
This focus on learning outcomes emphasizes that it is the quality of a CAS activity (its contribution to the students development) that is of most importance.
Documentation
ISHCMC has a subscription to IB Manager, a web-based system designed to help IB schools
better manage their IB programme.
It is very important to document ongoing activities and reflections. This documentation can
take many forms (journal, blog, website, videos, album, etc.).
By the end of the programme, students must provide 10 sample pages from their ongoing
documentation. These sample pages, which may, for example, be printouts from electronic
logs, must include the list of the principal activities undertaken and evidence of both planning
and reflection.

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Students documentation should provide evidence for:


Their initial goals and plans for their CAS programme
The CAS activities that they have undertaken
Their plans for each activity or project
Their reflections on each activity (before, during and afterwards)
Which learning goals have been achieved and how
From this documentation, it should be possible for the reader to tell what happened, why it
happened, how it happened, what its value was and what students learned from it.
Procedure
1. Think carefully about how the activity fits into the overall CAS programme.
2. Add a CAS activity in IB Manager, describe it and target the learning outcomes. These
will help students decide if the activity really is a CAS activity.
3. Carry out the activity after its pre-approval by the CAS Coordinator (and approval by
parents if off campus).
4. Reflect continuously on the activity and document reflections.
5. Request supervisor evaluation.
Reflection
Reflection is a skill. Like any other skill, it is developed by practice.
The fundamental questions for any activity are:
What did I plan to do?
What did I do?
What were the outcomes, for me, for the team I was working with, and for others?
The answers to these questions can be complex. Most activities will involve a combination of
these.
Deeper questions
As students develop their skills of reflection, students should consider some of the following
in their journal:
How did I feel?
What did I perceive?
What did the activity mean to me?
What value did the activity have?
What did I learn from this activity?
How could this new insight be applied more widely?
There is no point in writing lengthy accounts about relatively routine experiences.
CAS meetings
Throughout your CAS programme, students will meet with their Homeroom teacher who will
give them formative feedback on their progress and offer guidance on future activities.

Timeline
11th grade, beginning of 1st semester: First consultation with Homeroom teacher.
Set goals for the CAS programme
11th grade, beginning of 2nd semester: Second consultation with Homeroom teacher
Provide evidence for learning outcomes and reflective work
12th grade, beginning of 1st semester: Third consultation with Homeroom teacher
Provide evidence for learning outcomes and reflective work
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

12th grade, beginning of 2nd semester: Fourth consultation with Homeroom teacher
Submit final documentation.
EXTENDED ESSAY
The purpose of this essay is to develop skills in the methods of critical research. Students select a topic for research that is linked to one of their subjects, most usefully the one they plan
to study at university. With the guidance of a teacher advisor they work over several months
to produce an essay of a maximum of four thousand words. This is assessed by an external
examiner.
THEORY OF KNOWLEDGE (TOK)
The purpose of the course is to enable students to step back from the immediate demands of
their six subjects and to ask some fundamental and critical questions about knowledge. What
are the different means by which we acquire knowledge? Are all forms of knowledge equally
valid? Are there types of knowledge beyond the empirical and logical forms? To what extent
do values constitute a form of knowledge? Theory of Knowledge is, above all, a course in
rigorous, critical thinking. It is assessed in two ways:
An essay on a given title which is assessed externally.
A presentation which is assessed internally.

The Award of Bonus Points


Bonus points may be awarded at the IB examination depending on the combined standard
of a students ToK and Extended Essay work. According to the quality of work produced for
each, a candidate will be awarded one of the five grades, A E. The following matrix shows the
number of bonus points awarded for all possible combinations of the five grades:
Theory of Knowledge
A

+3

+3

+2

+2

Extended

+3

+2

+1

+1

Essay

+2

+1

+1

+1

For example, a candidate who achieves a grade of B for Theory of Knowledge and a grade of
C for the Extended Essay will be awarded one bonus points. Candidates who achieve a grade
E in either Theory of Knowledge or the Extended Essay will be awarded an F for their bonus
points score. The award F is a failing condition for the Diploma.

Selecting a Programme
When planning a course of study students should bear the following in mind:
A student can qualify for the Bilingual Diploma if they take two Language A1 courses or if
they take a Language A1 in a language other than English and study the rest of their Diploma subjects in English.
To gain the IB Diploma a student must have at least one Language A1.
Self-Taught Language A1 should be the students mother tongue language and may be studied at SL only, usually instead of English A1.
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Candidates may not take the same language in both Groups 1 and 2.
Payment for IB examinations is separate from school fees.
The school reserves the right to withdraw courses for which there is not a minimum enrolment of five students.
Placement of Students in Grades 11 and 12
The guidelines below have been established in order to provide students with a programme
of studies that is consistent with their academic and personal needs.
The grades attained during grade 10, including semester 1, interim reports, semester 2 and
their overall MYP Certificate score, are considered as a guide to a students ability to successfully complete the IB Diploma.
There are 3 categories of Study:
1) IB Diploma Student
Students may be placed in a programme of study leading to the IB Diploma, following
successful completion of the MYP programme at ISHCMC or its equivalent elsewhere.
The status will be subject to continual monitoring by individual teachers and the students suitability for their chosen course will be reviewed after the 1st semester report
and at the end of Year 11.
The standards for Higher level subjects are stringent and the following guidelines apply:
Grade 6 - 7 at the end of the MYP course prepares a student to study a Higher level
subject.
Grade 4 5 at the end of the MYP course prepares a student to study a Higher level
subject on a probationary basis.
2) IB Diploma Probationary Student
Students may be placed on a probationary basis in the Diploma programme
Their status will be continually monitored by individual teachers and the students suitability for their chosen course will be reviewed after the 1st Interim report with a further
review after the 1st and 2nd semester reports.
3) IB Certificate / ISHCMC Diploma Student
Students may select a programme of studies not leading to the IB Diploma.
Students will be continually monitored by faculty and will be encouraged to sit 6 Standard
level subjects or a limited combination of Standard & Higher level subjects. Students may also
choose to sit a limited number of external examinations while still studying the full 6 subjects
giving them the opportunity to complete graduation requirements.
Parent/Teacher Conferences and Parent Information Evenings will give parents an opportunity to discuss the students progress with teachers and the effect that the grades which the
student is attaining may have on their status in specific courses. In addition, parents and students may request a Parent/Teacher Conference whenever a concern arises.
Specific considerations for placements
Only students who have studied IB MYP Extended Maths, or an equivalent, can be
considered for the Mathematics higher level course in the IB Diploma.
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Students who have not studied a subject previously who wish to take that subject in
Grade 11 can select that subject at a standard level or at a probationary higher level
status.
Unless external grades indicate otherwise, students entering the School late in Grade
10 or during the first semester of Grade 11 will be considered probationary IB Diploma
students.
General considerations when it comes to the placement of students:
Effort grades attained by student showing academic intent
Recommendation from EAL Department
Recommendation from Counsellor
Recommendations to the Headmaster from the Head of High School, the IB Coordinator and relevant Grade 10 subject teachers.

Further study
The Counsellor is available to give guidance about tertiary programmes and assist with
application to colleges and universities in different countries. The Counselling Resources
Library contains useful reference books about the required entry standard for specific universities from around the world. It is advisable to contact universities directly as prerequisites
can change.
Students with the IB Diploma have entered more than 700 universities in some 70 countries.
Many colleges in the U.S. readily accept students with the IB, and may give credit for Higher
Level IB courses. They recognize that applicants who have taken the IB are well prepared for
university study and that their willingness to complete such a rigorous course speaks well of
their academic potential.
Different universities have different entrance requirements. The best sources of information
are the prospectuses from universities. Copies of the prospectuses of many of the worlds
universities are available in the Counselling Resource Library. If a university prospectus is
not available, it can be obtained by writing to the university concerned or viewed on the
university website. Addresses of all universities around the world are also available and the
Counsellor is available for advice and help.

Calendar
The two-year programme is organized so that the workload is paced as follows:
Grade 11

Grade 12

Semester 1
IB Orientation Weekend
Community Service (CAS)
Fieldtrips/Fieldwork

Semester 1
Completion of Extended Essay
Completion of Coursework in groups 1,3,5

Semester 2
Extended Essay
CAS Community Service Trip
Group 4 Project
Fieldtrips/Fieldwork

Semester 2
Completion of CAS activities
Completion of coursework in Groups 2,4,6
IB Examination revision
IB Trial Examinations
IB Final Examinations
Graduation

A more detailed timeline of assessments is provided to students in their academic planners


early in the programme. An academic calendar is issued to parents and students prior to the
start of each school year that gives times of assessments, reports and parent evenings.
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Support Services for Grades 11 and 12 students


EAL: EAL students take the English Language B SL or HL course. This course is designed
for speakers of English as another language and fulfils the English requirement of the IB
Diploma.
Special Education Needs (SEN): Students in Grades 11 and 12 must be able to cope with
the academic curriculum offered without support. This means that only limited EAL inclass support or SEN help is available for students in these grade level.

DP Subject Groups
I. Dp Group 1: Language A

Language A: Literature This is a high level literary analysis course offered in English and
Vietnamese.
Language A: Literature And Language This course includes both literature components
and cultural/media components, offered in English, Korean and Mandarin.

LITERATURE A

Higher Level study 13 texts, and Standard Level 10 texts. The majority of texts are chosen from
the IB Prescribed List of Authors, and works in translation must be included.
Both courses are divided into 4 Parts
Part 1: Literature in Translation(25%)
2 works at Standard level, 3 at Higher. Pupils write one essay (1200-1500) based on one
of the studied texts.
Part 2: Detailed Study (15%)
2 works at SL, 3 at HL. Assessed by recorded oral commentary (SL), and recorded oral
commentary plus discussion (HL)
Part 3: Literary Genres (25%)
3 works at SL, 4 at HL, all of the same genre. Assessed by examination (essay)
Part 4: Options (15%)
3 works at SL, 4 at HL. Assessed by Oral presentation. Works studied may include film
treatments, graphic novels and a range of contemporary genres.
The final examination consists of two papers. Paper 1 is an Unseen Commentary, and Paper 2
an essay based on the Part 3 works. These two papers comprise 50% of the final grade.

Language and Literature A

Course Outline
Part 1: Language in cultural context
Texts are chosen from a variety of sources, genres and media.
Part 2: Language and mass communication
Texts are chosen from a variety of sources, genres and media.
Part 3: Literaturetexts and contexts
SL: Two texts, one of which is a text in translation from the prescribed literature
in translation (PLT) list and one, written in the language A studied, from the
prescribed list of authors (PLA) for the language A studied, or chosen freely.
HL: Three texts, one of which is a text in translation chosen from the prescribed
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literature in translation (PLT) list and one from the prescribed list of authors
(PLA) for the language A studied. The other may be chosen freely.
Part 4: Literaturecritical study
SL: Two texts, both of which are chosen from the prescribed list of authors (PLA)
for the language A studied.
HL: Three texts, all of which are chosen from the prescribed list of authors (PLA)
for the language A studied.
Assessment
Paper 1: Textual analysis (1 hour 30 minutes)
The paper consists of two unseen texts.
Students write an analysis of one of these texts. (20 marks) 25%
Paper 2: Essay (1 hour 30 minutes)
In response to one of six questions students write an essay based on both the literary
texts studied in part 3. The questions are the same at HL but the assessment criteria are
different. (25 marks) 25%
Written task
Students produce at least three written tasks based on material studied in the course.
Students submit one written task for external assessment. (20 marks)
This task must be 8001,000 words in length plus a rationale of 200300 words. 20%
Individual oral commentary (15%)
Students comment on an extract from a literary text studied in part 4 of the course.
(30 marks). Students are given two guiding questions
Further oral activity (15)
Students complete at least two further oral activities, one based on part 1 and one based
on part 2 of the course.
The mark of one further oral activity is submitted for final assessment. (30 marks)
This component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB
at the end of the course. 30%

(PTA)
A(PLA)

A(PLA)
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

25%

20
25%
25
20%
20
10001200240360

15%
30

15%

30

TIENG VIET A

(Ch dnh cho lp 11 i vi lp 12: vui lng tham kho sch hng dn nm trc)
Nm nay, hai kha hc mi s thay th kha hc A1 v A2 c, p dng cho lp 11. Tn ca hai kha mi
ny l Ngn Ng A: Vn Hc, v Ngn Ng A: Vn Hc v Ngn Ng. C hai kha hc u dnh cho
Nhm 1 v c gi tr ngang bng cc cp ca Ngn Ng cng nh kh v mt hc thut.
Ngn Ng A: Vn Hc s thay th A1 c v tip tc l kha phn tch vn hc cp cao.
Ngn Ng A: Vn Hc v Ngn Ng s thay th A2 c. Mn ny bao gm c vn hc v vn ha/
truyn thng.
Nm nay, Vn Hc A a ra c ting Anh v ting Vit. Vn Hc v Ngn Ng c p dng cho ting
Anh, ting Hn Quc v ting Quan Thoi.
VAN HOC A
Cp Cao s hc 13 ch , cp Tiu Chun s hc 10 ch . Phn ln cc ch c chn t
danh sch cc tc gi bt buc ca chng trnh IB v km theo c cc bi tp v chuyn ng.
C hai kha hc u c chia lm 4 phn
Phn 1: Vn Hc trong chuyn ng (25%)
2 tc phm cho cp Tiu Chun, 3 tc phm cho cp Cao. Hc sinh vit 1 bi tiu lun (t
1200 n 1500 t) da trn mt trong nhng ch hc.
Phn 2: Nghin cu chi tit (15%)
2 tc phm cho cp Tiu Chun, 3 tc phm cho cp Cao. nh gi bng cch din gii
bng li qua bng ghi m (cp Tiu Chun), v din gii bng li qua bng ghi m km theo
bnh lun (cp Cao)
Phn 3: Cc th loi vn hc (25%)
3 tc phm cho cp Tiu Chun, 4 tc phm cho cp Cao, tt c cng mt th loi. nh
gi bng cch kim tra vit (tiu lun).
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Phn 4: Ty chn (15%)


3 tc phm cho cp Tiu Chun, 4 tc phm cho cp Cao. nh gi bng cch thuyt trnh.
Tc phm c th km phim nh, tiu thuyt v cc th loi ng i
Kim tra cui kha gm 2 bi thi. Bi thi 1 l mt bi bnh lun khng c chun b trc, v Bi thi 2
l mt bi tiu lun da trn mt trong cc tc phm t phn 3. Hai bi thi ny chim 50% tng im s.
VAN HOC VA NGON NG A
Phn 1: Vn hc trong bi cnh vn ha
Cc ch c chn a dng t ngun gc, th loi v phng tin.
Phn 2: Vn hc v thng tin i chng
Cc ch c chn a dng t ngun gc, th loi v phng tin.
Phn3: Vn hc Ch v bi cnh
Cp Tiu Chun: Hai ch , mt trong hai ch khng phi l ch nguyn ng t cc tc
phm bt buc c dch v mt l tc phm c vit bng ngn ng ang hc trong cc tc
phm bt buc cho Vn Hc A, hoc t do chn.
Cp Cao: Ba ch , mt trong ba ch khng phi l ch nguyn ng t cc tc phm bt
buc c dch. Cc ch cn li c t do chn.
Phn 4: Vn hc Ph bnh
Cp Tiu Chun: Hai ch , c hai u c chn t cc tc phm bt buc cho Vn Hc A
Cp Cao: Ba ch , tt c u c chn t cc tc phm bt buc cho Vn Hc A
anh gia
Bi thi 1: Phn tch nguyn bn (1 gi 30 pht)
Bi thi gm hai ch khng c chun b trc.
Hc sinh vit phn tch mt trong hai ch ny. (20 im) 25%
Bi thi 2: Tiu lun (1 gi 30 pht)
Hc sinh tr li mt trong su cu hi v vit mt bi tiu lun da trn c hai ch hc trong phn
3. Cc cu hi ging nh cp Cao nhng tiu chun nh gi khc (25 im) 25%
Bi Vit
Hoc sinh hon thnh t nht ba bi vit da trn nhng bi hc
Hc sinh np mt bi vit cho vic nh gi t bn ngoi (20 im)
Bi vit ny khong 800 n 1000 t cng thm 200 n 300 t ni ln l do, c s chn ch ny. 20%
Thuyt trnh c nhn (15%)
Hc sinh bnh lun mt on trong mt ch hc trong phn 4 ca chng trnh (30 im). Hc
sinh c cho hai ch nh hng
Hot ng bn cnh vic thuyt trnh (15%)
Hc sinh phi hon thnh t nht hai hot ng nh km, mt da trn phn 1 v mt da trn phn 2
ca chng trnh
im ca mt hot ng s c a vo nh gi cui k.(30 im)
Phn ny c quyt nh ni b bi gio vin v gim kho IB bn ngoi vo cui kha. 30%

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Ii. Dp Group 2: Second Language


Language B (English, French, Spanish Ab Initio)
Introduction
Group 2 consists of three language courses accommodating the different levels of linguistic
proficiency that students have when they begin. There is a single set of group 2 aims, which are
common to all the courses, but the assessment objectives are differentiated according to what
the students are expected to be to able to demonstrate at the end of each course.
The aims of group 2 are to:
1. develop students intercultural understanding
2. enable students to understand and use the language they have studied in a range of
contexts and for a variety of purposes
3. encourage, through the study of texts and through social interaction, an awareness and
appreciation of the different perspectives of people from other cultures
4. develop students awareness of the role of language in relation to other areas of knowledge
5. develop students awareness of the relationship between the languages and cultures
with which they are familiar
6. provide students with a basis for further study, work and leisure through the use of an
additional language
7. provide the opportunity for enjoyment, creativity and intellectual stimulation through
knowledge of an additional language.

Language B SL/HL (English, French)

Language B is a language acquisition course developed at two levelsstandard level (SL) and
higher level (HL)for students with some background in the target language. While acquiring a language, students will explore the culture(s) connected to it. The focus of these courses
is language acquisition and intercultural understanding.
The language B syllabus approaches the learning of language through meaning. Through the
study of the core and the options at SL and HL, plus two literary works at HL, students build
the necessary skills to reach the assessment objectives of the language B course through the
expansion of their receptive, productive and interactive skills.
SL and HL are differentiated by the recommended number of teaching hours, the depth of
syllabus coverage, the study of literature at HL, and the level of difficulty and demands of assessment and assessment criteria. The corewith topics common to both levelsis divided
into three areas and is a required area of study.
Communication and media
Global issues
Social relationships
In addition, at both SL and HL, teachers select two from the following five options.
Cultural diversity
Customs and traditions
Health
Leisure
Science and technology
Also, at HL, students read two works of literature.
Topics
The course comprises five topics: three from the core and two chosen from the five options.
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At least two aspects must be covered in each of the five topics that make up the course.
Additionally, at HL students must read two works of literature.
For example, a course could be structured as follows.
Topic Aspects covered
Communication and media Advertising Bias in media
Global issues Global warming Migration
Social relationships Language and identity Social structures
Health Diet and nutrition Drug abuse
Science and technology Ethics and science Impact of IT on society
Assessment component: LANGUAGE B SL
External assessment 70%
Paper 1 (1 hour 30 minutes): Receptive skills
Text-handling exercises on four written texts, based on the core. 25%
Paper 2 (1 hour 30 minutes): Written productive skills
One writing exercise of 250400 words from a choice of five, based on the options. 25%
Written assignment: Receptive and written productive skills
Intertextual reading followed by a written exercise of 300400 words plus a 100-word
rationale, based on the core. 20%
Internal assessment
Internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB. 30%
Individual oral (810 minutes)
Based on the options: 15 minutes preparation time and a 10-minute (maximum)
presentation and discussion with the teacher. 20%
Interactive oral activity
Based on the core: Three classroom activities assessed by the teacher. 10%
Assessment component: LANGUAGE B HL
External assessment 70%
Paper 1 (1 hour 30 minutes): Receptive skills
Text-handling exercises on five written texts, based on the core. 25%
Paper 2 (1 hour 30 minutes): Written productive skills
Two compulsory writing exercises.
Section A: One task of 250400 words, based on the options, to be selected from a choice
of five.
Section B: Response of 150250 words to a stimulus text, based on the core. 25%
Written assignment: Receptive and written productive skills
Creative writing of 500600 words plus a 150-word rationale, based on one of the literary
texts read. 20%
Internal assessment
Internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by the IB. 30%
Individual oral (810 minutes)
Based on the options: 15 minutes preparation time and a 10-minute (maximum)
presentation and discussion with the teacher. 20%
Interactive oral activity
Based on the core: Three classroom activities assessed by the teacher. 10%

Spanish Ab Initio (Standard level only)


Introduction
The Spanish ab initio course is a two year course designed for students with little or no prior
experience of the language they wish to study. All final decisions on the appropriateness of the
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course for which students are entered are taken by coordinators in liaison with teachers, using
their experience and professional judgment to guide them. The most important consideration
is that the language ab initio course should be a challenging educational experience for the
student.
Aims
The overall objective of this course is for students to achieve communicative competence in a
variety of everyday situations.
At the end of the Spanish Foundation course candidates will be expected to demonstrate the
ability to:
Communicate information and some basic ideas clearly and effectively, in a limited
range of situations
Understand and use accurately the essential spoken and written forms of the language
in a limited range of situations.
Understand and use a limited range of vocabulary in common usage.
Show an awareness of some elements of the culture(s) related to the language studied.
Content
The three themes (individual and society, leisure and work, urban and rural environment) are
made up of a series of 20 topics. These serve as the foundation for the acquisition of the language and the study of different text types. Through the study of the three interrelated themes,
students will develop the skills necessary to fulfill the assessment objectives of the Spanish ab
initio course.
Individual and society environment
Daily routines
Education
Food and drink
Personal details, appearance and character
Physical health
Relationships
Shopping

Leisure and
work
Employment
Entertainment
Holidays
Media
Sport
Technology
Transport

Urban and rural


Environmental concerns
Global issues
Neighbourhood
Physical geography
Town and services
Weather

Resources
Listos 1, Listos 3
Ponte al dia
Descubre 1 & 2
GCSE Vocabulary
Accion Gramatica
Internet sites
IB past examination papers
Films, music and other audiovisuals
Internal Assessment
Individual Oral (25%)
This is a three-part oral internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated by an IB
examiner in the second year of the course.
Part 1: Presentation of a visual stimulus (from a choice of two) by the student
Part 2: Follow-up questions on the visual stimulus
Part 3: General conversation including at least two questions on the written assignment
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

External Assessment
Paper 1: Text Handling (30%)
This is a final, external examination consisting of questions based on a number of written
texts.
Paper 2: Written Production (25%)
This is also a final external examination consisting of 2 short pieces of writing (one of at least 60
words and the other of at least 120 words), for example, an informal or formal letter, a brochure
or flyer, fax or email and an advertisement, based on topics students have studied.
Written Assignment (200 - 300 words, 20%)
The written research assignment takes place in the second year of the course under supervised conditions, lasting approximately two hours. Students will choose a topic that involves
comparing a cultural aspect of a Spanish-speaking country to their own culture. Students may
bring their resources(2-4) into the class on the day of the assignment. The essay will describe
the topic, compare it to their own culture, and reflect on what they have learned. This paper is
externally moderated by the IBO.

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Iii. Dp Group 3: Individual And Societies


HISTORY SL/HL

The aims of the History courses at SL and HL are to:


Promote an understanding of history as a discipline, including the nature and diversity
of its sources, methods and interpretations
Encourage an understanding of the present though critical reflection upon the past
Encourage an understanding of the impact of historical developments at national. Regional and international levels.
Develop an awareness of ones own historical identity through the study of the historical experiences of different cultures.
Course Content
One prescribed subject
Either
Prescribed subject 2: The Arab-Israeli conflict 1945-79
Last years of the British Mandate; UNSCOP partition plan and the outbreak of civil
war.
British withdrawal; establishment of Israel; Arab response and 1948/49 war.
Demographic shifts: the Palestinian diaspora 1947 onwards; Jewish immigration and
the economic de-velopment of the Israeli state.
Suez Crisis of 1956: role of Britain, France, the United States, the USSR, Irael and the
UNO.
Arabism and Zionism; emergence of the PLO.
Six Day War of 1967 and the October War of 1973: causes, course and consequences.
Role of the United Stated, USSR and UNO.
Camp David and the Egyptian-Israeli Peace Agreement.
Or
Prescribed subject 3: Communism in crisis 1976-89
The struggle for power following the death of Mao Zedong (Mao Tse-tung), Hua
Guofeng (Hua Kuofeng), the reemergence of Deng Xiaoping (Teng Hsiao-ping) and
the defeat of the Gang of Four
China under Deng Xiaoping: economic policies and the Four Modernizations
China under Deng Xiaoping: political changes, and their limits, culminating in Tiananmen Square (1989)
Domestic and foreign problems of the Brezhnev era: economic and political stagnation;
Afghanistan
Gorbachev and his aims/policies (glasnost and perestroika) and consequences for the
Soviet state
Consequences of Gorbachevs policies for Eastern European reform movements:
Polandthe role of Solidarity; Czechoslovakiathe Velvet Revolution; fall of the
Berlin Wall.
Two 20th century history topics
Both of:
Topic 3: Origins and development of authoritarian and single-party states
Asia and Oceania: China Mao; Indonesia Sukano
Europe Hitler

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

and
Topic 4: Nationalist and independence movements in Africa and Asia
Movemensts: Africa Ghana. Rhodesia/Zimbabwe; Asia India and Pakistan, Indochina.
Leaders: Ho Chi Minh (Vietnam), Jinnah (Pakistan), Gandhi (India), Mugabe (Zimbabwe), Nkrumah (Ghana)
Higher Level: additional topics
HL option 4: Aspects of the history of Asia and Oceania
Impact of the World Wars on South and Southeast Asia to the mid 20th century
Government of India Acts 1919 and 1935 and the response of nationalists.
Gandhi, Nehru and Indian nationalism: non-cooperation, civil disobedience and Quit
India.
Jinnah: the growth of Muslim separatism.
Factors contributing to independence and partition of the South Asian subcontinent:
1947 Independence Act and its effects in India and Pakistan; Sri Lanka 1948.
Legacy of Japanese occupation in Southeast Asia.
Growth of modern nationalism: Indonesia (Dutch East Indies), Vietnam, Cambodia.
Laos (French Indo-China).
Case study on one country in South or Southeast Asia (other than one already named
in this section); political, social and economic effects of the First World War and/or the
Second World War. (Burma)
The Republic of China 1912-49 and the rise of Communism
The 21 Demands (1915); New Culture Movement; the Treaty of Versailles (1919); the
May Fourth Movement (1919).
Yuan Shikai (Yuan Shih-kai); warlordism; ideology and policies.
Chinese Communist Party (CCP): leadership, ideology and policies.
The First United Front (1924-7); Second United Front (1936-45).
The Fifteen-Year war (1931-45) between China and Japan.
Chinese Civil War and the Communist victory (1946-9).
China: the regional superpower from mid 20th century to 2000
Establishment of the Communist state 1949-1961; the role of Mao.
Transition to socialism; successes and failures in social and economic developments
1949-61.
Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution: causes and effects, political, social and cultural
impact.
Foreign affairs 1949-76: Sino-American relations; establishment and breakdown of SinoSoviet relations/conflicts; China as a global power.
China after Mao: the struggle for power, Gang of Four and leadership of Deng Xiaoping (Teng Hsiao-ping) 1976-97; political and economic developments; Jiang Zemin
(Chiang Tse-min).
Chinas impact on the region: relations with other states; Hong Kong and its return to
China; economic, political and social developments in Nationalist China (Taiwan).

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Assessment
Higher Level
Paper 1 ( 20 %) 3 prescribed topics from 20th century topics
Candidate answers 4 questions on ONE topic. 1 Hour
Paper focuses on Historical skills / knowledge in regard to sources.
Paper 2 (25%) Broad/specific essay questions on all 6 20th century Topics
Candidate answers 2 questions from two different topics. 1.5 hours
Paper 3 (35%) Essay question on Regional topics.
Candidate answers 3 question 2.5 hours
Internal Assessment (20%)
Standard Level
Paper 1 ( 30 %) 3 prescribed topics from 20th century topics
Candidate answers 4 questions on ONE topic. 1 hour. This paper focuses on Historical
skills / knowledge in regard to sources.
Paper 2 (45%) Broad/specific essay questions on all 6 20th Century topics
Candidate answers 2 questions from two different topics. 1.5 hours
Internal assessment (25%)
Information on Internal Assessment
The internal assessment is a Historical Investigation carried out by the student which demonstrates application of skills and knowledge. Topics should be flexible, need not be syllabus
related, and reflect students interest. All topics must be approved by the teacher.
Ideas for topics
Historical topic/theme using various primary and secondary sources.
Topic based on Fieldwork i.e. museum, archaeological site, etc...
Discussion of an historical topic based on documents.
Local history project.
Project based on oral interviews.
Historical investigation based on the interpretation of an art work (Film, Novel, Opera, etc.)
Requirements & Format
Plan of investigation 2 marks State subject, reasons for choice, and methods used in
the report
Summary of evidence 5 marks Summary of all sources
Evaluation of Sources 4 marks A critical evaluation of the Sources (at least two) with
reference to origins and value and limitations
Analysis 5 marks Historical importance of the subject, historiographical issues and
critical analysis of topic.
Conclusion 2 marks Conclusion must be clearly stated and consistent with evidence
presented
List of sources & words limit 2 marks Bibliography and length

GEOGRAPHY SL/HL

Geography is a dynamic subject that is firmly grounded in the real world and focuses on the
interactions between individuals, societies and the physical environment in both time and
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

space. It seeks to identify trends and patterns in these interactions and examines the processes
behind them. It also investigates the way that people adapt and respond to change and evaluates management strategies associated with such change. Geography describes and helps to
explain the similarities and differences between spaces and places. These may be defined on a
variety of scales and from a range of perspectives.
Within group 3 subjects, geography is distinctive in that it occupies the middle ground
between social sciences and natural sciences. The Diploma Programme geography course
integrates both physical and human geography, and ensures that students acquire elements of
both scientific and socio-economic methodologies. Geography takes advantage of its position
between both these groups of subjects to examine relevant concepts and ideas from a wide
variety of disciplines. This helps students develop an appreciation of, and a respect for, alternative approaches, viewpoints and ideas.
Geography aims
In addition to the common aims of all Group 3 subjects, the geography syllabus at SL and HL
enables students to:
Develop an understanding of the interrelationships between people, places, spaces and
the environment
Develop a concern for human welfare and the quality of the environment, and an
understanding of the need for planning and sustainable management
Appreciate the relevance of geography in analysing contemporary issues and challenges, and develop a global perspective of diversity and change.
Distinctions between Higher Level (HL) and Standard level (SL)
All students do the Core Theme Patterns and Change (HL/SL)
SL students study two optional themes; HL students study three optional themes, providing further breadth
HL students study the HL extension Global Interactions and examine, evaluate
and synthesize the prescribed concepts, which by their nature are complex, contestable
interlinked and require holistic treatment. This provides further depth at HL.
Course Content
Part 1: Core themepatterns and change (SL/HL)
There are four compulsory topics in this core theme.
1. Populations in transition
2. Disparities in wealth and development
3. Patterns in environmental quality and sustainability
4. Patterns in resource consumption
Part 2: Optional themes (SL/HL)
There are seven optional themes. Two optional themes are required at SL. Three optional
themes are required at HL.
1. Freshwaterissues and conflicts
2. Oceans and their coastal margins
3. Extreme environments
4. Hazards and disastersrisk assessment and response
5. Leisure, sport and tourism
6. The geography of food and health
7. Urban environments
Part 3: HL extensionglobal interactions (HL only)
There are seven compulsory topics in the HL extension.
1. Measuring global interactions
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2. Changing space the shrinking world


3. Economic interactions and flows
4. Environmental change
5. Sociocultural exchanges
6. Political outcomes
7. Global interactions at the local level
Fieldwork (SL/HL)
Fieldwork, leading to one written report based on a fieldwork question, information collection
and analysis with evaluation.
External Assessment SL 75%, HL 80%
SL:
Paper 1 Syllabus content: Core theme (1 hour 30 minutes) 40%
Paper 2 Syllabus content: Two optional themes (1 hour 20 minutes) 35%
HL:
Paper 1 Syllabus content: Core theme (1 hour 30 minutes) 25%
Paper 2 Syllabus content: Three optional themes (2 hours) 35%
Paper 3 Syllabus content: Higher level extension (1 hour) 20%
Internal Assessment SL 25%, HL 20%
Fieldwork, leading to one written report based on a fieldwork question, information collection
and analysis with evaluation.
Texts
Planet Geography, 5th ed., Stephen Codrington
Geography, an Integrated Approach, 4th ed., David Waugh
Geography for the IB Diploma, Oxford IB Study Guide, Garrett Nagle and Briony Cooke
A variety of specialized texts and current case studies

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY IN A GLOBAL SOCIETY


Introduction
The Diploma programme Information Technology in a Global Society (ITGS) course is the
study and evaluation of the impact of information technology on individuals and society. It
explores the advantages and disadvantages of the use of digitised information at the local and
global level. ITGS provides a framework for the student to make informed judgments and decisions about the use of information technology (IT) within social contexts.
Although ITGS shares methods of critical investigation and analysis with other social sciences,
it also considers ethical questions found in the study of philosophy. Students come into contact with IT on a daily basis because it is so pervasive in the world in which we live. This
widespread use of IT inevitably raises important questions about social and ethical issues that
shape our society today.
Aims
Develop an understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of new technologies
as methods of expanding our knowledge of the world at the local and global level.
Promote an understanding of the social significance of information technology for individuals, communities and organisations.
Analyse and evaluate the ethical considerations arising from the widespread use of
information technology at the local and global level.
Recognise that people can hold diverse opinions about the impact of information technology on individuals and societies.
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Objectives
Understand and critically examine the global impact of IT developments.
Demonstrate a knowledge and understanding of the social and ethical implications of
IT systems and developments at the local, national and global level.
Analyse and evaluate the social and ethical implications of IT developments
Analyse and evaluate relevant examples of the global impact of IT in a portfolio of individually researched studies.
Design and apply IT solutions to a problem set in a social context through a project.
Express ideas clearly and coherently with supporting arguments and examples.
Content
Students are required to study all sections below:
Social and Ethical Issues relevant to the use of Information Technology.
Reliability
Integrity
Security
Privacy and Anonymity
Authenticity
Intellectual Property
Equality of Access
Control
Globalisation and Cultural Diversity
Policies and Standards
People and Machines
Information systems in a social context.
Hardware and networks
- Systems Fundamentals
- Networks
Software applications
- Software Fundamentals
- Databases and Spreadsheets
- Word Processing and Desktop Publishing
- Images, Sound and Presentations
- Modeling and Simulations
- Tutorials, Training and Wizards
Communications systems
The Internet
Personal and Public Communications
Integrated systems
Robotics
Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems
Assessment
Comparison of HL and SL Assessment Models

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Higher Level

Standard Level

External assessment
Paper 1 (common
paper)

Paper 2

Paper 3

35%
2 hour 15 minutes
Seven structured questions in
three sections.
20%
1 hour 15 minutes
This paper consists of one unseen
article.
25%
1 hour 15 minutes
Four questions based on a preseen case study

40%
1 hour 45 minutes
Five structured questions
30%
1 hour 15 minutes
This paper consists of one unseen
article.

Internal assessment
Project

Teaching hours

20%
30 hours
IT product, report and log book
240

30%
30 hours
IT product, report and log book
150

BUSINESS AND MANAGEMENT SL/HL


Aims
Promote the importance of exploring business issues from different cultural perspectives
Encourage a holistic view of the world of business
Enable the student to develop the capacity to think critically about individual and organizational behaviour
Enhance the students ability to make informed business decisions
Enable the student to appreciate the nature and significance of change in a local, regional and global context
Promote awareness of social, cultural and ethical factors in the actions of organizations
and individuals in those organizations
Appreciate the social and ethical responsibilities associated with businesses operating
in international markets.
Difference between hl and sl
The HL course in Business and Management differs from the SL course in Business and Management in terms of the:
hours devoted to teaching (240 hours for HL compared to 150 hours for SL)
extra depth and breadth required (topic 6 for HL students and the HL extension units)
nature of the learning outcomes (more higher-order skills for HL)
nature of the internal assessment task
nature of the examination questions
Syllabus overview
Topic 1: Business Organisation and Environment
1.1 Nature of business activity
1.2 Types of organisation
1.3 Organisational objectives
1.4 Stakeholders
1.5 External environment
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

1.6 Organisational planning tools


1.7 Growth and evolution
1.8 Change and the management of change - HL only
1.9 Globalisation
Topic 2: Human Resources
2.1 Human resource planning
2.2 Organisational structure
2.3 Communication
2.4 Leadership and management
2.5 Motivation
2.6 Organisational and corporate cultures HL only
2.7 Employer and employee relations HL only
2.8 Crisis management and contingency planning HL only
Topic 3: Accounts and Finance
3.1 Sources of finance
3.2 Investment appraisal
3.3 Working capital
3.4 Budgeting HL only
3.5 Final accounts
3.6 Ratio analysis
Topic 4: Marketing
4.1 The role of marketing
4.2 Marketing planning
4.3 Product
4.4 Place
4.5 Promotion
4.6 Place (distribution)
4.7 International marketing
4.8 E-commerce
Topic 5: Operations Management
5.1 Production methods
5.2 Costs and revenues
5.3 Break-even analysis
5.4 Quality assurance
5.5 Location
5.6 Innovation HL only
5.7 Production planning
5.8 Project management HL only
Topic 6: Business Strategy HL ONLY
Stage 1: Strategic analysis
Stage 2: Strategic choice
Stage 3: Strategic implementation

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Assessment HL

Syllabus content
Method

External
Paper 1
All 6 topics
Based on a case study
issued in advance.
Section A (HL/SL)
Students answer two of
three structured questions. (30 marks)
Section B (HL/SL)
Students answer one compulsory structured question including evaluative
skills. (20 marks). Section
A and section B are common to both HL and SL
students. HL students
also have a section C.

HL - SECTION C
Students answer one
compulsory question
focusing on strategic
decision making through
the use of extension material. (30 marks)
Total marks
80 marks
Component time
2 hours
Weighting

40%

Assessment
Paper 2
All 6 topics

Internal Assessment

HL Section A

Any topic from the


full HL syllabus
Research Project

Students answer one


of two structured
questions based on
stimulus material
with a quantitative
element. (25 marks)

Research proposal
and action plan a
working document
not part of the actual
report, but part of
planning.

HL Section B

Report that addresses an issue facing


Students answer two an organisation or
of three structured
analyses a decision
questions based on
to be made by an
stimulus material.
organisation.
(50 marks)
(Maximum 2,000
words) (25 marks)

75 marks
2 hours

25 marks
15 hours

35%

25%

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Assessment SL

Syllabus content
Method

External
Paper 1
All 5 topics

Assessment
Paper 2
All 5 topics

Internal Assessment

50 marks
1 hours

60 marks
1 hours

25 marks
15 hours

35%

40%

25%

Based on a case study


issued in advance.
Section A (HL/SL)
Students answer two of
three structured questions. (30 marks)
Section B (HL/SL)
Students answer one
compulsory structured
question including evaluative skills. (20 marks)
Section A and section
B are common to both
HL and SL students. SL
students do not have a
section C.

Total marks
Component time
Weighting

64

Any topic from the


HL/SL core syllabus
SL Section A
Written CommenStudents answer one tary
of two structured
Written commenquestions based on
tary based on three
stimulus material
to five supporting
with a quantitative
documents about a
element. (20 marks)
real issue or problem
facing a particular
SL Section B
organisation.
Students answer two (Maximum 1,500
of three structured
words)
questions based on
(25 marks)
stimulus material.
(40 marks)

High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

IV. DP GROUP 4 - EXPERIMENTAL SCIENCES


Experimental science subjects are classified under group 4 in the IB hexagon. Here at ISHCMC
we offer students three courses in science, from which they will be able to select one or two.
Physics and biology are timetabled together, so that students may choose one or the other.
Chemistry is offered as an elective subject, enabling students to choose a second science subject, should they wish to do so.
All science courses in the IB diploma programme share a common structure. Firstly, there are
two possible levels, standard and higher level.
At standard level the subjects are similar to, but more demanding, than IGCSE courses, for
example, and therefore at a level that most well-motivated students can achieve.
At higher level the subjects are much more demanding and the syllabus content is designed to
enable students to then enter university courses in the individual science subjects.
Syllabus organisation in each of the sciences includes the following:
A core of material that is studied at both Higher and Standard Level.
Additional core material that is taken at Higher Level only.
A range of options at both Standard and Higher Level which allow certain chosen areas
of the subject to be studied in more depth.
A programme of practical work which is assessed throughout the course.
An extended practical project, known as a Group 4 project, involving all three science subjects, to which devote s minimum of ten hours of research per science subject studied.
Aims
All Diploma Program experimental science courses aim to:
Provide opportunities for scientific study and creativity within a global context which
will stimulate and challenge students
Provide a body of knowledge, methods and techniques which characterize science and
technology
Enable students to apply and use a body of knowledge, methods and techniques which
characterize science and technology
Develop an ability to analyze, evaluate and synthesize scientific information
Engender an awareness of the need for, and value of, effective collaboration and communication during scientific activities
Develop experimental and investigative scientific skills
Develop and apply the students information technology skills in the study of science
Raise an awareness of the moral, ethical, social, economic and environmental implications of using science and technology
Develop an appreciation of the possibilities and limitations associated with science and
scientists
Encourage an understanding of the relationships between scientific disciplines and the
overarching nature of the scientific method.

ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS AND SOCIETIES


This course, offered at Standard Level only, aims to provide students with a sound understanding of the interrelationships between the environment (and its systems) and people (both
individuals and societies). Students are encouraged to reflect upon a range of current environmental issues, from the individual to the global level.

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Content: Standard Level


Systems and models (5 hours)
The ecosystem (31 hours)
Human population, carrying capacity and resource use (39 hours)
Conservation and biodiversity (15 hours)
Pollution management (18 hours)
The issue of global warming (6 hours)
Environmental values systems (6 hours)
Assessment
Throughout the course students will complete a minimum of thirty hours practical work. This
may include laboratory work, fieldwork investigations in the school and local area, simulations, presentations and surveys. This accounts for 20% of the final grade, while the remaining
80% is assessed through two unseen examinations sat at the end of the course.

BIOLOGY
Underpinning the Biology syllabus are the linking themes of structure and function, universality versus diversity, equilibrium within systems, evolution and genetic inheritance.
Content - Biology: Standard Level
Core Topics
Statistical analysis
Cells
The Chemistry of Life
Genetics
Ecology and Evolution
Human Health and Physiology Option Topics
Physiology of Exercise
Ecology and Conservation
Content - Biology: Higher Level
All Core Topics from the standard level curriculum in addition to the following Additional
Higher Level Topics:
Nucleic Acids and Proteins
Respiration and Photosynthesis
Human Reproduction
Defence Against Infectious Disease
Nerves, Muscles and Movement
Excretion
Plant Science Option Topics
Ecology and Conservation
Neurology and Behaviour

PHYSICS

Physics is the most fundamental of the experimental sciences as it seeks to explain the universe
itself, from the very smallest particles - which may be truly fundamental - to the vast distances
between galaxies.
Content - Physics: Standard Level
Core Topics
Physical Measurement
Mechanics
Thermal Physics
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Oscillations And Waves


Electric Current
Fields And Forces
Atomic Physics
Energy Power And Climate Change

Content - Physics: Higher Level


All Core Topics from the standard level curriculum in addition to the following Additional
Higher Level Topics:
Measurement and Uncertainties
Advanced Mechanics
Advanced Thermal Physics
Advanced Waves
Electromagnetism
Quantum Physics
Digital Technology

CHEMISTRY

Chemistry is an experimental science that combines academic study with the acquisition of
practical investigative skills. It is called the central science, as chemical principles underpin
both the physical and environment in which we live and all biological systems.
Content - Chemistry: Standard Level
Core Topics
Quantitative Chemistry
Atomic Structure
Periodicity
Bonding
Energetics
Kinetics
Equilibrium
Acids and bases
Oxidation and reduction
Organic chemistry
Measurement and data processing
Content - Chemistry: Higher Level
All Core Topics from the Standard Level curriculum are studied in greater depth giving the
students further insight into the subject matter.
Assessment
For all Group 4 subjects, both the Standard and Higher Levels, written examinations form 76%
of the total grade in each subject. Three papers are to be completed by the candidates, two on
the core syllabus and one on options topics. The examinations for Higher Level students are
longer, as these students have covered a larger amount of course content. The remaining 24%
of the assessment for the IB Sciences is derived from the assessed practical work, including the
Group 4 project.

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

V. DP GROUP 5 - MATHEMATICS
Introduction
Students should consult their Grade 10 Mathematics teacher for advice on which level of
Mathematics they should study in Grades 11 and 12. All students will need to have a suitable
calculator for the course. The school recommends a Casio CFX 9860 model. As the IB has strict
rules on the calculators used, students who wish to use one different to those recommended
above must consult their Mathematics teacher for advice.

Mathematical Studies

Mathematical Studies caters for students with various backgrounds and abilities. It is designed
to build confidence and encourage an appreciation of mathematics in students who do not anticipate a need for mathematics in future studies and for whom this will be their last formal
mathematics course. The Mathematical Studies course concentrates on mathematics which can
be applied to contexts related as far as possible to other curriculum subjects, to common world
occurrences and to topics that relate to home, work and leisure situations.
Aims
Having followed the Mathematical Studies course, students will be expected to:
Know and use mathematical concepts and principles
Read and interpret a given problem in appropriate mathematical terms
Organise and present information/data in tabular, graphical and/or diagrammatic
forms
Know and use appropriate notation and terminology
Formulate a mathematical argument and communicate it clearly
Select and use appropriate mathematical techniques
Demonstrare an understanding of both the significance and reasonableness of results
Recognise patterns and structures in a variety of situations and make generalisations
Recognise and demonstrate an understanding of the practical application of mathematics
Use appropriate technological devices as mathematical tools.
The Course
Mathematical Studies is a two-year course. During the two years students must study seven
topics. In addition they must produce an individual piece of project work based on an area of
the syllabus studied, involving the collection and/or generation of data, and the analysis and
evaluation of this data.
Core Text
Haese and Harris, Mathematics for the international student Mathematics SL
Students are required to posses their own IB recognised graphic calculator.
Grade 11 2012-2013 Content
Number & Algebra
SI and other basic units of measurement
Use of graphing calculators
Sets of the number systems, significant figures and scientific notation
Rounding and computation errors
Arithmetic and geometric sequences and series
Linear equalities and inequalities and associated word problems
Quadratic equations, their factorisation and graphing with a graphical calculator
Geometry and Trigonometry
Trigonometric ratios
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

The sine and cosine rules and their applications


Standard forms of linear equations and their graphs (y = mx+c and ax+by+d = 0)
Simultaneous equations
Applications of coordinate geometry in 2-D and 3-D
Angle between two lines
3-D trigonometry
Statistics
Discrete and Continuous data
Box-and-whiskers and stem-and-leaf plots
Histograms, cumulative frequency curves
Measures of central tendancy
Statistical Applications
Measures of dispersion
Bivariate data: Scatter plots, regression analysis, correlation coefficients
Chi squared test for independence
Normal Distribution
Mathematical models
Functions, mappings and relations
Linear models f(x) = mx + c
Quadratic models
Exponential models and their application in solving equations
Models using functions of the form f(x) = axm +bxn +, m,n Z
Sets, Logic and Probability
Venn diagrams, sets and their application
Frequency diagrams, statistical measures and measures of spread
Basic concepts of symbolic logic
Probability and Venn diagrams
Conditional probability
Grade 12 2013 - 2014 Content
Statistical Applications
Measures of dispersion
Bivariate data: Scatter plots, regression analysis, correlation coefficients
Chi squared test for independence
Normal Distribution
Sets, Logic and Probability
Logic
Truth tables and logical equivalence
Using graphical calculators to solve a combination of functions
Financial Number and Algebra
Currency conversions and financial tables
Simple and compound interest
Use of loan charts to determine payments
Introductory Differential calculus
Gradient between two points
Derivative of polynomial functions
Equations of tangents to a curve
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Increasing and decreasing functions


Local Maximum and minimum points, stationary points.
Grade 12 2012-2013 Content
Sets, Logic and Probability
Logic
Functions
Functions, mappings and relations
Trigonometric functions and their applications
Graphs and properties of exponential functions
Using graphical calculators to solve a combination of functions
Financial Mathematics
Currency conversions and financial tables
Simple and compound interest
Use of loan charts to determine payments
Introductory Differential calculus
Gradient between two points
Derivative of polynomial functions
Equations of tangents to a curve
Increasing and decreasing functions
Local Maximum and minimum points
Assessment
Students are to be assessed on each topic using both formative and summative techniques,
including a formal end-of-semester examination. The systematic progress of project work will
be assessed, and related to deadlines, for both internal and external purposes.
Continual assessment
50%
Examination
30%
Portfolio project
20%

Mathematics Standard Level

This course of Mathematics caters for students who anticipate a need for a sound mathematical background in preparation for their future studies. Concepts are included because they
underpin important mathematical processes or because they are essential to any further study
in mathematics. The students most likely to select this subject will be those who expect to go
on to study subjects which have a significant mathematical content, for example, chemistry,
economics, geography, psychology and business administration.
Aims
Having followed the Mathematics Standard Level course, students will be expected to:
Know and use mathematical concepts and principles
Read, interpret and solve a given problem in appropriate mathematical terms
Organise and present information and data in tabular, graphical and/or diagrammatic
forms
Know and use appropriate notation and terminology
Formulate a mathematical argument and communicate it clearly
Select and use appropriate mathematical strategies and techniques
Desmonstrate an up understanding of both the significance and reasonableness of results
Recognise patterns and structures in a variety of situations and make generalisations
Demonstrate an understanding of and the appropriate use of mathematical modeling.
Use appropriate technological devices as mathematical tools.
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

The Course 2012- 2014 (new syllabus)


Students must study seven topics. In addition they must produce an individual Exploration,
which is a piece of written work that involves investigating an area of mathematics.
Core Texts
Haese and Harris, Mathematics for the international student Mathematics SL
Students are required to possess their own IB recognised graphic calculator.
Grade 11 Content
Algebra
Arithmetic and geometric sequences and series
Exponents and Logarithms, change of base and the natural base e
The Binomial Theorem
Functions and Equations
Functions: f(x): -> f(x)
Composite and inverse functions
Standard forms of linear and quadratic equations and their graphs
Transformations (translations, reflections and dilations) of graphs
Linear and quadratic simultaneous equations, discriminant and graph plotting
Absolute value, reciprocal, (asymptotes), exponential and logarithmic functions
Application of graphing skills and solving equations that relate to real-life situations
Circular Functions and Trigonometry
Radian measure, arcs and sectors
The trigonometric ratios
Double angle formula,
Graphs of composite trigonometric functions
Solution of trigonometric equations
Calculus
Rates of change and the process of differentiation
The product, quotient and chain rules
Derivatives of trigonometric, exponential and logarithmic functions
Rates of change and application to maximum and minimum problems
Tangents, normals and curve sketching
Graphical behavior of functions
Grade 12 2013-2014 Content
Calculus
Kinematics and calculus
Integration and standard integrals
Definite integrals and their application to problem solving
Vector Geometry
Scalar and vector quantities
Vector equations of lines in two and three dimensions
The scalar product and resultants
Lines in planes and in three dimensions
Coincident and parallel lines

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Statistics and Probability


Frequency diagrams, statistical measures and measures of spread
Cumulative frequency
Linear correlation of bivariate data
Probability and Venn diagrams
Conditional probability and probabilities with and without replacement
Expected values for Discrete Random variables
Binomial Distribution
The Normal Distribution
Assessment
Students are to be assessed on each topic using both formative and summative techniques,
including se-mester exams and a formal mock examination. One exploration will be assessed
for both internal and ex-ternal purposes.
The Course 2011- 2013 (old syllabus)
Students must study seven topics. In addition they must produce at least two pieces of individual Portfolio work based on different areas of the syllabus.
Core Texts
Haese and Harris, Mathematics for the international student Mathematics SL
Students are required to possess their own IB recognised graphic calculator.
Grade 12 2012 - 2013 Content
Calculus
Kinematics and calculus
Integration and standard integrals
Definite integrals and their application to problem solving
Graphical behaviour of functions
Vector Geometry
Scalar and vector quantities
Vector arithmetic and the unit vector
The scalar product and resultants
Lines in planes and in three dimensions
Coincident and parallel lines
Statistics and Probability
Frequency diagrams, statistical measures and measures of spread
The Normal Distribution
Probability and Venn diagrams
Conditional probability
Expected values for Discrete Random variables
Binomial Distribution
Assessment
Students are to be assessed on each topic using both formative and summative techniques,
including semester exams and a formal mock examination. Regular portfolio assignment work
with deadlines will be assessed for both internal and external purposes.
Continual assessment
Examination
Portfolio assignment
72

50%
30%
20%

High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Mathematics Higher Level

Mathematics Higher Level caters for students with a good back ground in mathematics who
are competent in a range of analytical and technical skills. The majority of these students will
be expecting to include mathematics as a major component of their university studies, either
as a subject in its own right or within courses such as physics, engineering and technology.
Others may take this subject because they have a strong interest in mathematics and enjoy
meeting its challenges and engaging its problems.
Aims
Having followed the Higher Level course, students will be expected to:
Know and use mathematical concepts and principles
Read, interpret and solve a given problem in appropriate mathematical terms
Organise and present information and data in tabular, graphical and/or diagrammatic
forms
Know and use appropriate notation and terminology
Formulate a mathematical argument and communicate it clearly
Select and use appropriate mathematical strategies and techniques
Demonstrate an understanding of both the significance and reasonableness of results
Recognise patterns and structures in a variety of situations and make generalisations
Demonstrate an understanding of and the appropriate use of mathematical modeling.
Use appropriate technological devices as mathematical tools.
The Course
Mathematics Higher level is a two-year course. During the two years students must study six
compulsory Core topics and one of four Optional topics. In addition they must produce an
individual Exploration, which is a piece of written work that involves investigating an area of
mathematics.
Core Text
Haese and Harris, Mathematics for the international student Mathematics HL
Advanced mathematics reference library.
Students are required to posses their own IB recognised graphic calculator.

Grade 11 Content
Number & Algebra
Arithmetic and Geometric sequences and series. Convergent series
Exponents and Logarithms
Counting principles, including Permutations and Combinations The Binomial Theorem
Mathematical Induction and forming conjectures
Circular Functions and Trigonometry
Radians
Trigonometric ratios
Compound angle identities
Inverse trigonometric function and graphs
Algebraic and graphical methods for solutions
Sine and Cosine Rules and the area of a triangle. Applications in 3-D problems
Function and Equations
Relations and functions
including odd and even functions
Graphs of functions
Transformations of graphs
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

Rational functions x ax + b and its graph


cx + d
Absolute value, exponential, logarithmic and trigonometric functions
Inverse, composite functions and rational functions
Polynomials, The Remainder and Factor Theorems
Quadratics and the discriminant, and sum and product of roots
Inequalities and Absolute value functions
Calculus
Differentiation and second derivatives
Tangents, normals and curve sketching
Tangents, normals and curve sketching
Derivatives of trigonometric and logarithmic functions and their inverses
Maximum and minimum value and related rate problems
Application to mathematical modeling
Grade 12 Content
Calculus
Indefinite integration and solving for c
Standard integrals. The definite integral
Volumes of revolution about the x-axis and y-axis
Kinematics
Integration by substitution and by parts
Statistics
Frequency diagrams and statistical measures. Measures of spread
Basic and Conditional probability
Combined events
Discrete and continuous random variables. Mean and variance
The Binomial, Poisson and Normal Distributions
Algebra
Complex numbers. Representation in the complex plane
Polar forms of complex numbers. Locus in a complex plane
Polynomials over a complex field
Vector Geometry
Scalar and vector quantities. Vector arithmetic
Scalar product of two vectors
Vector equations of a line in two or three dimensions
Coincident, parallel, intersecting and skew lines
Resultants and the vector product
Vector equation of a plane
Line and plane geometries. Intersections and distances
Vector representation of transformations
Option Topic
Students are required to study one of the following extended topics:
Statistics and Probability
Sets, Relations and Groups
Calculus
Discrete Mathematics
The choice of topic will depend upon the majority interest of the class
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

The Course 2012-13 (old syllabus)


Mathematics Higher level is a two-year course. During the two years students must study six
compulsory Core topics and one of five Optional topics. In addition they must produce at least
two pieces of individual Portfolio work based on different areas of the syllabus.
Core Text
Haese and Harris, Mathematics for the international student Mathematics HL
Advanced mathematics reference library.
Students are required to possess their own IB recognized graphic calculator.
Grade 12 Content
Calculus
Indefinite integration and solving for c
Standard integrals. The definite integral
Integration by parts and The Reduction formula
Geometric and statistical applications of integration
Differential equations and their solutions. Application to mathematical modeling
Statistics
Frequency diagrams and statistical measures. Measures of spread
Basic and Conditional probability
Discrete random variables. Mean and variance
The Binomial, Hypergeometric and Normal Distributions
Number and Algebra
Complex numbers. Representation in the complex plane
Polar forms of complex numbers. Locus in a complex plane
Polynomials over a complex field
Matrices and Transformations
Matrices and matrix operations
2 by 2 through to n by n matrices
Simultaneous equations
Vector Geometry
Scalar and vector quantities. Vector arithmetic
Unit vectors and the scalar product
Resultants and the vector product
Lines in two and three dimensions
Line and plane geometries. Intersections and distances
Vector representation of transformations
Standard transformations. Determinants
Option Topic
Students are required to study one of the following extended topics:
Statistics and Probability
Sets, Relations and Groups
Series and Differential Equations
Analysis and Approximation Discrete Mathematics
The choice of topic will depend upon the majority interest of the class
Assessment
Students are to be assessed on each topic using both formative and summative techniques,
including semester exams and a formal mock examination. Regular portfolio assignment work
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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

with deadlines will be assessed for both internal and external purposes.
Continual assessment
Examination
Portfolio assignment

50%
30%
20%

Further Mathematics Standard Level (grade 12 2012 - 2013)

This course caters for students with a good background in mathematics who have attained
a high degree of competence in a range of analytical and technical skills, and who display
considerable interest in the subject. Most of these students will intend to study mathematics
at university, either as a subject in its own right or as a major component of a related subject.
The course is designed specifically to allow students to learn about a variety of branches of
mathematics in depth and also to appreciate practical applications.
The nature of the subject is such that it focuses on different branches of mathematics to encourage students to appreciate the diversity of the subject. Students should be equipped at this
stage in their mathematical progress to begin to form an overview of the characteristics that
are common to all mathematical thinking, independent of topic or branch.

Further mathematics SL Total 150 hrs

The course consists of the study of one geometry topic and the four mathematics HL option
topics. Students must also be familiar with the topics listed as presumed knowledge and in the
core syllabus for the mathematics HL course.

Geometry syllabus content 30 hrs

Requirements
Students must study all the sub-topics in this topic, as listed in the syllabus details.
Topic 1Geometry

Mathematics HL options syllabus content 120 hrs

Requirements
Students must study all the sub-topics in all of the following topics as listed in the syllabus
details. Students will be presumed to have studied one of the option topics as part of the
mathematics HL course. Consequently, this portion of the further mathematics SL course is
regarded as having a total teaching time of 120 hours, not 160.
Topic 2Statistics and probability 40 hrs
Topic 3Sets, relations and groups 40 hrs
Topic 4Series and differential equations 40 hrs
Topic 5Discrete mathematics 40 hrs
Further Mathematics Higher Level 2012-2014 (new syllabus)
This course caters for students with a good background in mathematics who have attained
a high degree of competence in a range of analytical and technical skills, and who display
considerable interest in the sub-ject. Most of these students will intend to study mathematics
at university, either as a subject in its own right or as a major component of a related subject.
The course is designed specifically to allow students to learn about a variety of branches of
mathematics in depth and also to appreciate practical applications.
The nature of the subject is such that it focuses on different branches of mathematics to encourage students to appreciate the diversity of the subject. Students should be equipped at this
stage in their mathematical progress to begin to form an overview of the characteristics that
are common to all mathematical thinking, independent of topic or branch.

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Further mathematics HL Total 240 hrs


The course consists of the study of linear algebra and geometry topic and the four mathematics
HL option topics. Students must also be familiar with the topics listed as presumed knowledge
and in the core sylla-bus for the mathematics HL course.
Further Mathematics syllabus content 96 hrs
Requirements
Students must study all the sub-topics in this topic, as listed in the syllabus details.
Topic 1 Linear Algebra
Topic 2 - Geometry
Mathematics HL options syllabus content 144 hrs
Requirements
Students must study all the sub-topics in all of the following topics as listed in the syllabus
details. Students will be presumed to have studied one of the option topics as part of the
mathematics HL course. Conse-quently, this portion of the further mathematics SL course is
regarded as having a total teaching time of 144 hours, not 192.
Topic 2Statistics and probability 48 hrs
Topic 3Sets, relations and groups 48 hrs
Topic 4Calculus 48 hrs
Topic 5Discrete mathematics 40 hrs

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VI. DP GROUP 6 THE ARTS


VISUAL ARTS

Aims
Students who study Visual Arts at either Higher Level or Standard Level are expected to:
Explore opportunities to make personal, sociocultural and aesthetic experiences meaningful through the production and understanding of art.
Develop an inquiring and integrated approach towards visual arts in their various historical and contemporary forms.
Promote visual and contextual knowledge of art forms from various cultures.
Demonstrate the pursuit of quality through experimentation and purposeful creative
work in various expressive media.
Learn about themselves and others through individual and where appropriate collaborative engagement with the visual arts.
Develop greater sensitivity and responsiveness to the natural and man made world.
Build self-esteem and confidence in problem solving and sequencing the development
of ideas.
Develop insight and understanding into the values and attitudes of other cultures and
historical times.
Explore a variety of skills, techniques and processes in a range of art forms and mastery
in those they are interested in.
Grade 11 Content
Higher Level and Standard Level

Studio Work
Students create artworks in response to a structured program involving two units of work.
The first, Temples is designed to engage students with the built environment and various
cultures. The second, Self and Identity, permits a more personal exploration of the internal
world of the individual.
Students demonstrate through purposeful exploration an inquiring and integrative approach to a variety of visual phenomena.
Students learn to synthesize art concepts and skills in works that are personally socioculturally and aesthetically meaningful.
Students learn to resolve formal and technical problems encountered in studio practice.
Students develop technical skill and an appropriate use of a range of media.
Students produce works of art with imagination and creativity through individual and,
where appropriate, collaborative work.
Investigation Workbooks
Students learn to develop and maintain a visual and written record which documents independent and personal research, critical analysis of art from various cultures; exploration of the
historical and cultural contexts of more than one culture; experimental investigation of visual
qualities and expressive forms and evidence of growth through reflection.
Students demonstrate clearly in visual and written terms how personal research has led to an
understanding of the topics or concepts being investigated.
Students learn to analyze critically the meaning and aesthetic qualities of art works using an informed vocabulary.
Students show awareness of the cultural, historical and social dimensions of themes in
more than one cultural context.
Students examine the visual and functional qualities of art from their own and other
cultures for meaning and significance.
Students develop the interrelationship between the Investigation Workbook and Studio Work.
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Grade 12 Content
Higher Level and Standard Level

Studio Work
Students create a collection of artworks to a self directed theme or concept which is personally
meaningful. They build on what they have learnt and developed in Grade 11.
Students create a body of work that is exploratory, creative and imaginative.
Students create a body of work that is thoughtful, powerful and significant.
Students create a body of work where subject matter, artistic ideas and techniques are
combined well to produce a coherent outcome.
Students create work that is well planned; its form is the result of the thoughtful application of the art elements and principles of design.
Students create work that shows technical skill and effective use of medium.
Investigation Workbook
Students continue to maintain and develop a visual and written record which documents independent and personal research, critical analysis of art from various cultures; exploration of
the historical and cultural contexts of more than one culture; experimental investigation of
visual qualities and expressive forms and evidence of growth through reflection.
Students create workbooks that show independent research, both visual and verbal,
with outcomes that are clearly understood.
Students examine the meaning and significance of art from various cultures.
Students investigate socio-cultural and historical contexts, in more than one culture.
Students show a thorough, wide ranging and experimental investigation of visual
qualities and expressive forms.
Students show a close relationship between the investigation workbooks and the studio work in which reflection and research support experimentation and successful artistic planning.
Assessment
Studio Work
Higher Level & Standard Level
Exhibition and interview. 60%

External Assessment

The studio component is externally assessed by a visiting examiner and externally moderated
by the IBO. Students design and mount their exhibition and discuss their work in a 30-40 minute oral exam with the examiner.

Investigation Workbook
Higher Level & Standard Level
Investigation Workbooks
40%

Internal Assessment

The Investigation component is internally assessed by the teacher and externally moderated
by the IBO.
Students compile a Candidate Record Booklet containing a personal statement of no more than
300 words, a photographic record of their Studio Work and a selection of scanned pages from
their Investigation Workbooks. This document is what is examined for external and internal
assessment.
IBDP Visual Arts will give students a folio of Art work that is suitable for entry into many Art
and Design fields at tertiary level study.

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

MUSIC

Aims
To give students the opportunity to explore and enjoy the diversity of music throughout the
world.
To encourage students to develop perceptual skills through a breadth of musical experiences,
where they will learn to recognise, speculate, analyse, identify, discriminate and hypothesise
in relation to music.
To enable students to develop creatively their knowledge, abilities and understanding
through performance and composition.
To assist students to develop their potential as musicians, both personally and collaboratively, to the full.
To develop their performance skills through solo and/or ensemble music making.
To develop their compositional skills through the exploration and investigation of musical
elements (HL students only).
To use appropriate musical language and terminology to describe and reflect their critical
understanding of music.
To develop perceptual skills in response to music.
To know and understand music in relation to time and place.
Grade 11 Content
Higher Level and Standard Level:
Musical Perception and Analysis (50%)
Students will learn how to analyse using the 10 musical parameters of melody, rhythm,
harmony, tempo, texture, tone/timbre, instrumentation, orchestration, mood and dynamics.
Students will begin their study of a Prescribed Work, set by the IB. It changes every 2
years. Currently the set work is Purcells Dido and Aeneas.
Students will begin their study of a wide range of musical genres and styles, including the Medieval, Renaissance and Baroque periods of Western Art Music, a variety of
World Music cultures and Fusion.
The Prescribed Work and the Listening examples are equal to 30% of the total marks
Musical Investigation (20%): students will choose and begin their preparation for an
independent study into the relationship between two identifiable and distinct musical
cultures, one from the Western world, and one from a World Music culture. They will
focus on one piece from each genre. They will then present their research as a media
script, for one of the following mass media: TV, radio, magazine article, website, PowerPoint, etc.
N.B. Higher Level students will study both Solo Performance and Composition; Standard
Level students have 3 options: Solo Performance, Group Performance or Composition.
Solo Performance (25% for HL; 50% for SL)
Students will nominate an instrument/voice.
Throughout the course, students will practice and perform a wide range of styles of
pieces.
One of these will be recorded every half-term or so.
Students are expected to have private individual lessons from a local teacher for the
duration of the course.
Students are occasionally permitted to play in a small ensemble as one of their final
pieces can be an ensemble piece.

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Group Performance (SL ONLY; 50%)


Students following this option are expected to be active, participating members of a
musical ensemble which performs in public at least twice during the course.
The ensemble may perform music of any style or genre; however, it should demonstrate a range of musical styles as far as possible.
Ensembles may rehearse in or outside of school.
Students not studying for the IB Music course may also be involved in the ensemble, or
students from other Grades, or from outside school.
No professional musician may be a member of the ensemble.
Ensembles should rehearse regularly, ideally once a week.
The two public performances will be recorded, and should last from 15 30 minutes in
total.
Composition (HL 25%; SL 50%)
Students will learn how to compose in a variety of styles, including Minimalism, the
use of ostinato techniques, a set of themed miniatures and a song. Students will develop compositional skills through practice and experiment.
Throughout the course, they will be set a new compositional task every 5 weeks or so:
each one will deve lop new skills in terms of melody, harmony and so on.
Students may compose for any ensemble; however, all compositions chosen for the
final portfolio have to be recorded, so practicality has to be a consideration!
Students are encouraged to keep all their drafts and a record of any changes they made
to their initial intentions.
All compositions will be performed where possible and evaluated using the IB criteria.
Grade 12 Content
Musical Perception and Analysis (50%)
Students will continue their study of the Prescribed Work, begun in Grade 11. They will
practice timed essays in preparation for the final written exam.
Students will continue to study a wide range of Musical genres and styles, including
the Classical, Romantic and Modern periods of Western Art Music, other World Music
cultures, Popular music and Jazz.
Musical Investigation (20%): students will complete their project. There is a 2000 word
limit.
Solo Performance (25% for HL; 50% for SL)
Students will continue to practice, record and evaluate pieces in the same manner as
Grade 11.
They are encouraged to consider all the IB criteria in selecting their pieces, especially
with regard to their repertoire.
Students will eventually have to submit a recording of the best of these performances,
from any they have recorded during the course (approximately 22 minutes total for HL;
18 minutes total for SL).
Students are expected to continue having private individual lessons from a local teacher for the duration of the course.
Group Performance (SL ONLY; 50%)
Students will continue to rehearse and perform with their ensemble. Hopefully the
members of the group can remain the same throughout the course. If one or two members of the ensemble leave, it is up to the IB Music student to find suitable replacement(s).
Students will eventually have to submit a recording of the best of their public performances, from any they have recorded during the course (approximately half an hours
worth of music).
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Composition (HL 25%; SL 50%)


Students will continue to write compositions every 5 weeks or so. During Grade 12 a
certain amount of freedom is encouraged to allow the student to specialize in certain
styles. However, tasks will still be set by the teacher, including film music, a piece for
small ensemble, the use of sonata form and a Theme and Variations.
At the end of the course, a final portfolio is created, which consists of three contrasting
compositions for HL and two contrasting compositions for SL.
Full written statements and recordings need to accompany the pieces for the portfolio,
as well as all rough drafts and final scores. Computer programmes are encouraged in
the presentation of scores and recordings, for example Sibelius and Guitar Pro.
Assessment

Higher Level
External Assessment: 50%
Listening Paper: 2 and a half hours
30%
- Two question on the Prescribed Work (in an essay style) using a clean copy of the score.
- Four questions on unprepared musical extracts, to be answered in note-form. Extracts
may or may not be accompanied by scores.
- Each candidate has their own CD for this paper and will use their own personal CD
player for the exam.
Musical Investigation:
20%
A written media script for a specific audience, of 2000 words, investigating the relationships between two musical genres.
Internal Assessment 50%
Solo Performance:
25%
Presentation of approx. 22 minutes of solo recitals, on a tape.
Composition:
25%
Three contrasting compositions (5 15 minutes total when performed), with recordings
and a written statement.

Standard Level
External Assessment: as for HL.
Internal Assessment
ONE of the following options:
Solo Performance
50%
Presentation of 15 minutes of solo recitals, on a CD.
Group Performance
50%
Presentation of two public performances, on a tape, (15 30 minutes).
Composition
50%
A portfolio with 2 contrasting compositions, recordings, scores and written statements.
N.B.

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It is preferable that students would have studied Music in Grades 9 and 10 before attempting the IB course, particularly IB Higher Level. This is due to the compulsory
analysis of the Prescribed Work, and the general standard of theory required coping
with this subject at this level.
Students should be able to read music fluently, or be willing to learn extremely quickly
at the start of the course.
Any student who wishes to consider this course should speak to the Music teacher to
establish their experience and suitability.

High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

THEATRE
Aims
The aims of the Theatre course at HL and SL are to enable students to:
Experience and participate in a wide and varied range of Theatre activities and develop
proficiency in one or more areas of Theatre technique
Become familiar with forms of Theatre from different cultures
Explore different Theatrerical traditions in their historical and social contexts
Develop academic skills appropriate for the study and understanding of Theatre
Become reflective and critical practitioners of Theatre
Develop the confidence to explore and experiment and to work individually and collaboratively on innovative projects which should involve challenging established notions of theatre
Understand the dynamic, holistic and evolving nature of theatre and the interdependencies of all aspects of this art form
Content
The Theatre course consists of three interrelated areas taught in Grades 11 and 12 for both
Higher and Standard Level. These are:

Theatre in the Making


The focus on Theatre in the making is on the process of Theatre making rather than the presentation of Theatre. It encompasses the acquisition and development of all skills required to
create, present and observe Theatre. It is exploratory it its nature. Theatre in the making also
encourages students to explore and experience a variety of Production Roles which include;
spectator, performer, dramaturg, ensemble and director.
Theatre in Performance
The focus of Theatre in performance is the application of skills developed in Theatre in the
making. This involves students in various aspects of presenting theatre. In Grade 11 and 12
there will be a range of performance opportunities which range from; original devised performances, monologues and duologues, presentations and whole class productions.
Theatre in the world
The focus of Theatre in the world is on practical and theoretical exploration of a range of theatre traditions and cultural practices around the world. Throughout the course students will
explore a variety of styles which range from: Early Western and Commedia DellArte to Asian
Theatre. They will also complete individual research on other traditions. In Grade 11 and 12
students will explore a range of major practitioners of Theatre in order for them to explore
their contrasting styles, philosophies and techniques. Some of the practioners studied in the
course are: Stanislavski, Brecht and, Boal
Assessment
For Higher and Standard level

External assessment (50%)


Research Investigation (25%)
Students are required to produce a Research Investigation with supporting visual materials. For higher level it should be 2,000-2,500 words, for standard level it is 1,500-1,700
words.
Practical Performance Proposal (25%)
Students are required to produce a proposal of 250 words with supporting visual materi83

High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

als (for higher level students also need to include a report of 1,000-1,250 words).
Internal Assessment (50%)
Theatre Performance and Production Presentation (25%)
Students are required to create an oral presentation lasting 30 minutes for higher level
and 20 minutes for standard level. It must contain 7-10 supporting visual images.
Independent Project Portfolio (25%)
Students are required to produce a portfolio of 2,000 words for standard level and 3,000
words for higher level on their independent project and its connection to their experiences course. The project itself could range from the devising and creating of a students
own piece of theatre to a workshop which teaches theatre skills to a specific audience.
As well as these specific tasks, students are also required to complete a detailed process journal
of their experiences on the course. This is essential for the successful completion of all of the
prescribed assessment tasks.
N.B.
It is essential that students realize that they must be involved in at least two formal Theatre
productions outside class time. This requires serious commitment from any student wishing
to undertake the course.

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

VII. SPORTS LEADERSHIP GRADE 11 PE


Aims
In Grade 11 we will focus on developing student leadership skill through sport. This course is
entitled Sports Leadership and offers opportunities for students to enhance their leadership
skills and apply them to a variety of different sporting activities, as well as contribute to the
students personal and social education. Further, students will learn through doing and being
involved in organizing, planning, and running various sporting activities within the school
community.
Content
Develop basic team building, communication, decision making, and problem solving
skills
Plan, organize, implement, and run individual leadership initiatives
Assist in school sporting activities (House activities, After School Activity programme,
Sports Day, Swim Galas)
Proposal writing and event planning
Peer teaching
Principles and practice in delivering basic sport and fitness sessions
Understand fair play and the role of officials in sport
Demonstrate leadership skills in a variety of sports
Assessment
Students are not assessed on performance, yet are assessed based on participation and effort,
and they will receive either a Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory standing. Assessment tools include
both student self-evaluations and reflections and teacher observations. Further, students can
use there experiences for Community and Service credit.

VIII. LIFETIME SPORTS GRADE 12 PE


Aims
In Grade 12 we will build on the basic skills that have been acquired in the previous years. This
course is entitled Lifetime Sports and offers several different sports as electives. This course
is focused on participation and gaining the necessary knowledge and skills to pursue chosen
physical activity interests beyond school. Moreover, the Lifetime Sports programme fosters
students engagement and responsibility for making their own activity choices.
Content
Aerobics
Bowling and Billiards
Badminton
Ultimate Frisbee
Golf
Tennis
Weight Training and conditioning
Game
Assessment
Students are not assessed on performance, yet are assessed based on participation and effort,
and they will receive either a Satisfactory or Unsatisfactory standing. Assessment tools include
both student self-evaluations and reflections and teacher observations.

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Academic Honesty in the High School at the


International School Ho Chi Minh City
* Internal Policy *
The International School Ho Chi Minh City believes that instruction in academic and personal
honesty is a fundamental part of a students education. Honesty and integrity are basic, desirable character traits as recognised in our Code of Conduct. Academic dishonesty is generally
defined as cheating or creating a false impression of ones work and performance.
It is expected that you as an ISHCMC student will demonstrate academic honesty at all times.
You will be taught and encouraged not to do any of the following:
Copy another persons work;
Let someone copy your work or assist in their cheating in any way;
Look at another persons paper and copy their answers;
Talk with another student during a test or examination;
Use hidden notes on a test or examination;
Share information about what is on a test or examination with other students;
Make up or change actual laboratory data;
Have someone do your work for you, including a tutor or your parents. Your role is to
come up with the ideas and written work. It is not all right to let your parents/tutor do
the work for you.
Copy directly from the Internet, by cutting and pasting someone elses work into your
work; this is plagiarism;
Reword someone elses words and not give them credit for the ideas, and thereby pass
someones ideas off as your own; this is plagiarism;
Use a foreign language translator to change from one language to another and then use
that translation as if it were in your own words; this is plagiarism;
Turn in an old project done by you or someone else;
Let your partner do all of the work on a project and then put your name on the project
as if you had done an equal share of the work;
Forge another persons signature, including a parents signature; or
Perform any act of dishonesty in regard to your academic achievement.
You should assume that all work, including homework, is to be done individually unless the
teacher states that working together on a particular assignment is permitted.
Role of Teachers
Your teachers will educate you about the seriousness of cheating and plagiarism. In
each of your subjects, your teachers will explain to you the right ways to use someone
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elses ideas in your work. If you are not sure whether a particular behaviour is cheating
or plagiarism, discuss the matter with your teacher. They want to support you in your
learning.
Our school librarian will be happy to help you. Dont hesitate to ask the librarian questions.
If a teacher recognizes cheating or plagiarism, or even suspects such a case, he/she will
take immediate steps to deal with it. Each case will be treated individually.
Role of Students
Write in your own voice, not just in your own words. Make your work personal. Express the ideas you have.
It is always acceptable to use ideas from someone else, as long as you give that person
credit for those ideas. Always make sure to credit where you got the information you
are using, both in the body of your written work and in your bibliography page at the
end.
Be organized so that you dont produce work at the last minute. Last minute work often lends itself to cutting corners, and cutting corners can lead to academic dishonesty.
Give yourself time to do the work properly.
When you do research, keep good records of where you have found the information
you will use.
Always include a bibliography page which lists all of your sources of information (Internet web pages, books, magazine articles, and so on).
How do you get caught?
New computer technology makes it very easy to find out if you have copied something
directly from the Internet.
Teachers talk to one another and may learn of your cheating from another teacher.
Teachers remember work that was turned in by other students in the past. When correcting papers and exams, they do not forget what other students have written.
Teachers know your style of writing. They often recognize what was actually written
by you and what someone else probably wrote.
Consequences of Academic Dishonesty in High School:
First time: The teacher will explain through verbal and/or written feedback why the students
work is in-appropriate, and the student will be required to redo the work until that work meets
the criteria for honest work. In the Diploma Programme, the DP coordinator will be informed
and conduct an interview. The stu-dent will be warned that repeated behavior will threatened
their continuation in the Diploma Programme.
Second time: A note will be placed in the students planner by the subject teacher, explaining
to the parents that the child is having difficulty with Academic Honesty. The work will need
to be resubmitted, looking for improvement following the feedback and support given by the
teacher. The student will also be required to complete a Student Reflection Sheet, which will
also contain a section for feedback from the students parents. The overall grade for the work
submitted may be reduced at the discretion of the teacher. In the Diploma Programme the coordinator will be informed and take appropriate measures.
Third time: The student will be referred to the High School Principal who will determine
further consequences. These consequences could include detention or suspension, or removal
from the Diploma Programme.

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ACKNOWLEDGEMENT OF
ACADEMIC HONESTY POLICY
HIGH SCHOOL
I have read and understood the Academic Honesty Policy for High School students of International School Ho Chi Minh City. My teachers have given me opportunities to ask questions in
order that I completely understand the policy and how it may affect me.
My signature below means that I will do my best to submit work that is my own, following the
guidance given by my teachers. I am aware of the consequences involved if I am academically
dishonest while I am a student at the International School of Ho Chi Minh City.
Students Name: Homeroom:
Students Signature:
Date:
I have discussed this policy with my child and I also understand the consequences of
Academic Dishonesty in the High School at ISHCMC.
Parents Name:
Parents Signature:
Date:

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Reflection on Academic Honesty


You have been asked to write a report or reflection on your academic honesty by your teacher.
By answering the following questions you should be able to understand how to complete the
work without breaking school rules on academic honesty.
Student: Homeroom:
Subject:

Teacher:

Assignment / Task:

1. Explain what it is that you have done that breaks the school rules on academic honesty
and why you did this (it might be a good idea to both read through the rules and include
quotations from them as relevant):

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High School Curriculum Guide, International School Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

2. How was your dishonesty uncovered?

3. What steps and strategies will you now use as you resubmit the work in order to follow
the policy on academic honesty?

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28 Vo Truong Toan Street, An Phu Ward,


District 2, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
Tel: (84-8) 38989100 - Fax: (84-8) 3898 9382
Email: admissions@ishcmc.edu.vn
www.ishcmc.com