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Integrated Skills in English (ISE)

Guide for Teachers ISE I (B1)


Reading & Writing | Speaking & Listening

Trinity College London


www.trinitycollege.com
Charity number 1014792
Patron HRH The Duke of Kent KG
Copyright 2015 Trinity College London
Published by Trinity College London
First edition, January 2015

Contents

Contents
ISE I Reading & Writing exam
Overview of the ISE Reading & Writing exam 

Who is ISE Reading & Writing for?


Introduction to ISE Reading & Writing tasks
Glossary of reading skills for ISE I
Glossary of writing aims for ISE I
Candidate profile

6
7
8
8
9

Content of ISE I Reading & Writing

10

Task 1 Long reading


Task 2 Multi-text reading
Task 3 Reading into writing
Task 4 Extended writing

10
11
12
12

Preparation ideas for ISE I Reading & Writing

13

Task 1 Long reading: Skimming travel information


Task 2 Multi-text reading: Reading about time
Task 3 Reading into writing: The best ways to learn a language
Task 4 Extended writing: Writing about a seasonal celebration

13
18
23
30

ISE I Speaking & Listening exam


Overview of the ISE Speaking & Listening exam
Who is ISE Speaking & Listening for?
Introduction to ISE Speaking & Listening tasks
Glossary of speaking aims for ISE I
Glossary of listening skills for ISE I
Candidate profile

36
36
37
39
39
40

Content of ISE I Speaking & Listening

41

Topic task
Conversation task
Independent listening tasks

41
42
43

Preparation ideas for ISE I Speaking & Listening

44

Topic task: Using music to help with topic preparation


Conversation task: Developing conversations rules and regulations
Independent listening task 2: Facts about elephants

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46
51

Appendices
Appendix 1 Sample topic form

56

Appendix 2 Sample Reading & Writing exam paper

57

Appendix 3 Information on the Speaking & Listening exam

68

Appendix 4 Suggested grammar for ISE I

72

Foreword
Trinitys Integrated Skills in English (ISE) exam assesses all four language skills reading, writing,
speaking and listening. In the ISE exam, all four skills are tested in an integrated way, reflecting
how skills are used in real-life situations.
This guide will:
give you a brief overview of the two modules of the ISE I exam Reading & Writing and
Speaking & Listening
offer some practical advice for preparing students for each task in the exam
provide some example activities that you can use in the classroom.
For more classroom activities to help prepare your students for ISE as well as the exam specifications
documents see www.trinitycollege.com/ISE
Please note that ISE IV has a different format see www.trinitycollege.com/ISE for details.

ISE I Reading
& Writing exam

ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Overview of the ISE Reading & Writing exam


Trinitys ISE Reading & Writing exam tests reading and writing skills through an integrated approach,
reflecting the way reading and writing interact in the real world. The ISE Reading & Writing exam is
currently offered at four levels of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) from A2
to C1. The purpose of the exam is to assess candidates skills in reading and writing in the English
language in a context which reflects their real world activity and their reason for learning English.
The reading texts reflect the range of sources a student may encounter in an educational or academic
context and the way that they need to find, select and report relevant and appropriate information.
The writing tasks reflect the kind of activities a student does in a school or college context, such as
essay writing.

Who is ISE Reading & Writing for?


The intended candidate is a young person or adult, typically at secondary school or college who is
using English as a second or foreign language as part of their studies in order to develop their skills
and improve their knowledge of a range of subject areas. The typical ISE candidate is aged between
11 and 19, but may be older.
Candidates at the lower levels of the exam (ISE Foundation and ISE I) are generally young people or
adults in school or college who are taking ISE as part of their preparation for entrance into university
or as evidence to progress to a higher level of English study within their mainstream or English
language school. At the higher levels of the exam (ISE II and ISE III), candidates are typically young
people or adults preparing for further education who are required to prove their English language
proficiency levels within an educational context.

ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Introduction to ISE Reading & Writing tasks


The Reading & Writing exam consists of four tasks.
Task 1 is the Long reading task, where candidates read a single text and answer 15 questions. The
aims of this task are to understand the main idea of a paragraph or text and to understand specific
information at sentence, phrase and word levels.
Task 2 is the Multi-text reading task, where candidates read three texts (in ISE Foundation) or four texts
(in ISE I, II and III) and answer 15 questions. The aims of this task are to understand the main idea of a
paragraph or text, to understand specific information at sentence, phrase and word levels and to find
specific information in different texts in order to create a text summary.
Task 3 is the Reading into writing task, where candidates produce a piece of writing based on the three
or four texts in Task 2.
Task 4 is the Extended writing task, where candidates produce a piece of writing in response to a question.
ISE Foundation

ISE I

ISE II

ISE III

CEFR level

A2

B1

B2

C1

Time

2 hours

2 hours

2 hours

2 hours

Task 1

Long reading
300 words
15 questions

Long reading
400 words
15 questions

Long reading
500 words
15 questions

Long reading
700 words
15 questions

Task 2

Multi-text reading
3 texts
300 words
15 questions

Multi-text reading
4 texts
400 words
15 questions

Multi-text reading
4 texts
500 words
15 questions

Multi-text reading
4 texts
700 words
15 questions

Task 3

Reading into writing Reading into writing Reading into writing Reading into writing
70100 words
100130 words
150180 words
200230 words

Task 4

Extended writing
70100 words

Extended writing
100130 words

Extended writing
150180 words

Extended writing
200230 words

Please see overleaf for glossaries of reading skills and writing aims for ISE I.

ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Glossary of reading skills for ISE I


Reading for general
comprehension

Reading texts which are related to your subjects and interests

Skimming

Reading to get the general meaning of the paragraph, text or infographic


(illustration with text)
Identifying the main conclusions in clear signposted texts
Recognising general arguments

Reading for gist

Reading to get the main idea of the paragraph, text or infographic


(illustration with text)

Scanning

Reading to find specific key words or information in a paragraph, in a text


or in an infographic

Careful reading to
understand specific
facts, information
and significant points

Reading to understand specific, factual information at the word, phrase


or sentence level
Reading to understand important points in a text
Identifying which information is factual and which information is opinion
Identifying which information is key information and which information is
a supporting example or detail

Careful reading to
understand specific
information and its
context

Reading to understand specific factual information at the sentence level


Identifying the specific information needed

Deducing meaning

Guessing the meaning of unknown sentences, phrases and words from


their context
Reading to recognise significant points in a text at the sentence level

Summarising

Summarising factual information on familiar subjects


Gathering information from longer different texts or different parts of a
text to create a simple text summary
Collecting short pieces of information from different texts and summarising
them for somebody else
Paraphrasing short written texts in a simple way

Summarising

Read to understand specific factual information at word, phrase, sentence


and paragraph levels
Read to get the main idea of the paragraph, text or infographic
Use this information to create a simple text summary

Glossary of writing aims for ISE I

Reading for writing

Showing understanding of reading texts


Identifying common themes in reading texts
Summarising or paraphrasing ideas from reading texts

Task fulfilment

Answering the question fully


Using the correct number of words to answer the question
Showing awareness of the reader and the purpose for writing

Organisation and structure

Presenting ideas and arguments clearly


Using the best format to fulfil the task
Structuring the writing appropriately, eg using beginnings and
endings and using paragraphs

Language control

Using a range of grammar and vocabulary


Using grammar and vocabulary accurately
Using spelling and punctuation accurately

ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Candidate profile
Reading
A candidate who passes ISE I can understand texts on familiar subjects or those of personal interest.
In task 1 and task 2 they are assessed on their ability to read across several texts and demonstrate a
range of reading skills including skimming, scanning, reading for gist, specific information, main ideas
or purpose, and summarising.
A candidate who successfully passes ISE I Reading can:
understand main ideas and specific information/facts in a range of factual and descriptive longer
texts, and infographics on familiar subjects or those of personal interest
identify specific information in written texts
deduce the meaning of unknown sentences, phrases and words from their context
write short summaries of information in the texts.

Reading into writing


A candidate who successfully passes ISE I Task 3 Reading into writing can:
select relevant content from the text in task 2
identify connections between multiple texts in task 2
adapt the information in task 2 to use in the writing component of task 3.

Writing
In task 3 and task 4, candidates are assessed on their ability to write according to four categories:

Reading for writing


Task fulfilment
Organisation and structure
Language control.

A candidate who successfully passes ISE I Task 3 Reading into writing and Task 4 Writing can:
convey information and ideas on abstract and concrete topics
write connected texts on a range of familiar subjects of interest, by putting different short
components into a linear sequence
write short, simple essays on topics of interest
summarise, report and give opinions about factual information on familiar routine and non-routine
topics with some confidence
paraphrase short, written passages in a simple fashion.
These reading and writing profiles are based on the level Independent User, B1, of the Council of
Europes Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). The candidate profile above is a
simplified version for quick reference for teachers.

ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Content of ISE I Reading & Writing


Task 1 Long reading
Task

One reading text followed by 15 questions.

Text

Genre: The text is factual and descriptive. It is the type of text that the candidate
sees in their own educational context.
Subject areas for ISE I:

Travel
Money
Fashion
Rules and regulations
Health and fitness
Learning a foreign language

Festivals
Means of transport
Special occasions
Entertainment
Music
Recent personal experiences

Text length

400 words (approximately), divided into five paragraphs.

Number of
questions

15 questions.

Question
types

Title matching (Questions 15)


These require the candidate to choose the most appropriate title for each paragraph
of the text. The text has five paragraphs and there are six titles to choose from.
Some useful reading subskills to practise for this section are:
skimming
reading for gist.
Selecting the true statements (Questions 610)
These require the candidate to select the five true statements from a list of eight
possible answers. Five statements will be true according to the text and three will be
false. Some useful reading subskills to practise for this section are:
reading for general comprehension
careful reading to understand specific facts, information and significant points
careful reading to understand specific information and its context
deducing meaning
scanning.
Completing sentences (gap fill) (Questions 1115)
In this section, the candidate completes sentences with a word or phrase taken
from the text (up to three words).
The candidate must demonstrate that they understand specific, factual
information at the word and/or phrase level. Some useful reading subskills to
practise for this section are:
careful reading to understand specific information and its context
careful reading to understand specific facts, information and significant points
deducing meaning.

10

Assessment

Each question is worth one mark.

Timing

Candidates are recommended to spend 20 minutes on this part of the exam.

ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Task 2 Multi-text reading


Task

Four reading texts followed by 15 questions.

Text

Genre: The four texts are factual and descriptive. They are the type of texts that
the candidate sees in their own educational context. One text is a mainly visual
representation of information with some writing (for example a diagram, drawing,
map, table taken from a textbook, an encyclopaedia, or an online discussion).
Subject areas for ISE I:

Travel
Money
Fashion
Rules and regulations
Health and fitness
Learning a foreign language

Festivals
Means of transport
Special occasions
Entertainment
Music
Recent personal experiences

All four texts are on the same topic and are thematically linked.
Text length

400 words (approximately) across the four texts.


One text is mainly visual with some written language.

Number of
questions

15 questions.

Question
types

Multiple matching (Questions 1620)


In this section, the candidate chooses which text the sentence refers to. Some useful
reading subskills to practise for this section are:
skimming
reading for gist.
Selecting the true statements (Questions 2125)
In this section, the candidate selects the five true statements from a list of eight
possible answers. Five statements will be true according to the text and three will
be false.
The candidate must demonstrate that they understand specific, factual information
at the sentence level.
Some useful reading subskills to practise for this section are:
careful reading to understand specific facts, information and significant points
careful reading to understand specific information and its context
deducing meaning
scanning.
Completing summary notes from a bank of options (gap fill) (Questions 2630)
In this section, the candidate completes sentences with a word or phrase taken
from the text (up to three words). Ten possible answers are given, out of which the
candidate selects the correct five. Some useful reading subskills to practise for this
section are:
careful reading to understand specific information and its context
careful reading to understand specific facts, information and significant points
deducing meaning
summarising.

Assessment

Each question is worth one mark.

Timing

Candidates are recommended to spend 20 minutes on this part of the exam.

11

ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Task 3 Reading into writing


Task

A writing task in which the four texts from task 2 are used to answer a question.
The question will give three points that the candidate should include in their answer.
The answer should only include information from the texts in task 2. Candidates
must use their own words as far as possible.
There is space for planning.
The candidate should go back and check their answer when they have finished.

Task focus

This section assesses the candidates ability to:


identify information that is relevant to the writing task and the main conclusions,
significant points and common themes across the texts
paraphrase/summarise short pieces of information
incorporate such information in a short and simple answer to suit the purpose
for writing.

Output length 100130 words.


Genre

The writing genre will be one of the following:


descriptive essay
discursive essay
article (magazine or online).

Timing

Candidates are recommended to spend 40 minutes on this part of the exam.

Task 4 Extended writing


Task

A writing task in which the candidate responds to a prompt.


The prompt will have two content points that the candidate should use in their response.
There is space for planning the response. The candidate should go back and check
the response when they have finished.

Task focus

This section assesses the ability to produce a narrative, descriptive or instructional


text following the instructions. The target language function that the candidates
are expected to use is to express simple facts and personal opinions in some
detail, coherently.

Output length

100130 words.

Genre

The writing genre will be one of the following:


descriptive essay
discursive essay
article (magazine or online)
informal email
informal letter
formal letter or email
review.

Timing

Candidates are recommended to spend 40 minutes on this part of the exam.

For a sample ISE Reading & Writing exam, please see Appendix 2.

12

ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Preparation ideas for ISE I Reading & Writing


Task 1 Long reading: Skimming travel information
Level: ISE I
Focus: Task 1 Long reading
Aim: Reading comprehension practice
Objectives: Familiarity with reading comprehensions
Skill: Skimming
Topic: Travel
Language functions: Giving reasons, expressing obligation and necessity
Lexis: Travel
Materials needed: White board, one worksheet per student and pens
Timing: 1 hour

Procedure
Preparation
Print or copy the worksheet (one per student). Be ready to write the questions below (see point 4 below)
on the board.

In class
1. Explain to the students that they are going to practise some techniques to help them with the
Reading & Writing exam, task 1, reading comprehension of the ISE I exam.
2. Write READING in large letters on the board, ask the students to tell you what words they think of
when they see the word reading. Write some good examples on the board (eg books, English,
newspapers, computers, magazines, TV, etc).
3. Explain to the students that there are so many things around us that we read, reading is
really important.
4. Write the following questions on the board:

What do you read in [your language]


How fast do you read?
What do you usually do while reading?
What do you read in English?
How fast do you read in English?
What would you like to read in English?
Why is reading important?

5. Put the students into pairs or small groups and ask them to discuss these questions for around
10 minutes.
6. Ask the students for feedback to the questions. Write some good answers on the board.
7. Now explain to the students that today they are going to work on their reading speed. Tell the
students that this is important as in the exam they will need to read quickly.
8. Explain to the students that in task 1 of the reading exam, students will have to answer five
questions. More specifically, students will have to label the paragraphs with appropriate headings.
Tell the students that this uses skimming technique, which is a speed-reading technique. So, you
read something very quickly and find out information.
9. Give each student one worksheet. Tell the students that they are going to focus today on skimming.
Explain to the students what skimming is.

13

ISE I Reading & Writing exam


In class skimming
This is when you read a text fairly quickly to get the general idea of it and the main points
10. Ask the students to skim texts AE on the worksheet and to give each text an appropriate heading.
Give the students approximately 15 minutes. Go through the answers in open-class. Write up the
correct answers on the board.
11. Now ask the students to skim texts AF on the worksheet and to answer the questions. Give the
students approximately 15 minutes. Go through the answers in open-class. Write up the correct
answers on the board.

Extension activity
For students who finish the task early, tell them to ask and answer questions about text F (the
temperature chart), for example:
What is the temperature in December in C?
What is the average rainfall in January in inches?
In their English books, the students can find a text to skim and explain the main points of to
their partner.

Further support activity


Students finding the task difficult can be given extra time to complete the worksheet or they can be
asked to read and complete only one or two of the exercises.

Homework
Ask students to practise their skimming techniques in their daily lives. Ask them to find a newspaper
and practise finding the main events as quickly as they can.

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ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Student worksheet: Skimming travel information


Below are six texts which you are going to skim read. Once you have read the texts, give each one an
appropriate heading, then answer the questions.

Text A
1. Read the text and add an appropriate heading.
2. Answer the questions below.
Heading:
Today, many people prefer to travel independently. Firstly, they decide where they want to go and then
think about the details, such as how long they want to stay, where they want to stay, how they will get
there, how much it will cost, when they will go and what they need to take.
Answer the following questions
1. How do people like to travel these days?

2. What do they decide on first?


3. How many other details are mentioned in the text?

Text B
1. Read the text and add an appropriate heading.
2. Answer the questions below.
Heading:

The time you go depends on what you want to do. For example, if you want to do outdoor activities
such as walking, cycling or canoeing then you need to choose a time when the weather is dry. If you
prefer a more relaxed holiday spent sunbathing and swimming then the weather should not be too hot.
Answer the following questions
1. What does the time you go depend on?
2. What are some examples of outdoor activities?

3. What do you do on a relaxing holiday?

Text C
1. Read the text and add an appropriate heading.
2. Answer the questions below.
Heading:

Most people take too much when they travel, travelling light is the key! Remember you will have to
carry it and heavy luggage soon becomes a nightmare. Take enough clothes (but not too many), a
towel, soap, shampoo and your travel documents and money.
Answer the following questions
1. What do most people take when they travel?
2. What is the best solution?

3. Which six items should you take with you?

15

ISE I Reading & Writing exam


Text D
1. Read the text and add an appropriate heading.
2. Answer the questions below.

Heading:

Monalos is a lively, noisy place, suitable for young people and those who do not like peace and quiet. The
information centre is in the main street (number 50, High Street), and their phone number is 324-5698.
They are open every day from 10am to 8pm except Sundays when they are open from 1pm to 4pm.
Answer the following questions
1. What is the address of the information centre?
2. What is their phone number?

3. What time are they open on Fridays?

4. What time do they close on Sundays?

Text E
1. Read the text and add an appropriate heading.
2. Answer the questions below.
Heading: Some interesting

The area covers over 2,000 miles and has around 100,000 inhabitants. The coastline is over 500 miles
long and there are 54 islands, 22 of which are inhabited. The highest mountain is 3,007ft, and the
deepest lake is 700ft below sea level.
Answer the following questions
1. What is the area?

2. How many people live there?

3. How long is the coastline?

4. How many islands do people live on?

5. What is the highest point?

6. What is the lowest point?

Text F
Look at the following temperature chart and find the answers.
Average temperatures and rainfall

Jan

Feb

Mar

Apr

May

C/F

6/43

7/45

9/48

11/52

mm

146

109

83

inches

5.8

4.3

3.3

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

14/57 16/61

17/63

17/63

90

72

63

55

3.5

2.8

2.1

1.8

Oct

Nov

Dec

15/59 12/5

9/48

7/45

22

36

47

120

132

0.9

1.2

1.6

4.0

5.2

Monalos

1. What is the average temperature in September in C?


2. How much rain falls in February in mm?

16

3. How many inches of rain do they receive in May?

4. What is the average temperature in August in F?

ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Answer key Skimming travel information


Appropriate headings
Text A Planning a trip
Text B When to go
Text C What to take
Text D Monalos information
Text E Possible answers facts, information, details...
Text A
1. Independently
2. Where they want to go
3. How long they want to stay, where they want to stay, how they will get there, how much it will cost,
when they will go, what they need to take. Six other details are mentioned in the text.
Text B
1. What you want to do
2. Walking, cycling, canoeing
3. Sunbathing and swimming
Text C
1. Too much
2. Travel light
3. Clothes, a towel, soap, shampoo, travel documents, money
Text D
1. Number 50, High Street
2. 3245698
3. From 10am to 8pm
4. 4pm
Text E
1. 2,000 miles
2. 100,000 people
3. 500 miles long
4. 22
5. 3,007ft
6. 700ft below sea level
Text F
1. 15
2. 109
3. 2.8
4. 63

17

ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Task 2 Multi-text reading: Reading about time


Level: ISE I
Focus: Task 2 Multi-text reading
Aims: Read for gist and specific information
Objectives: To think about time, learn new words about time, read short texts for main ideas and
read short texts to find true and false information
Skill: Skimming and scanning
Topic: Time
Language functions: Giving information, explaining and describing
Lexis: Related to time
Materials needed: Worksheet, map of the world with time zones, a picture of a sundial, a clock or a
picture of a clock and a picture of the date line on a map
Timing: 45 minutes

Procedure
Preparation
1. Get a map of the world which shows the world divided into time zones and put it on the board.
2. Get a picture of the date line on a map.
3. Draw a picture of a clock or a sundial on the board or show a real clock and a picture of a sundial.
4. Print or copy one worksheet per student.

In class
1. Tell the class that in todays lesson they are going to read about time and that the aim of the lesson is
to read different texts to find out key information about the topic. Tell the class that this is an essential
skill for completing task 2 of the Reading & Writing exam. Tell the students that they will also be asked
to talk about the topic in detail.
2. Now ask the class:
How can we find out what time it is? Point to the clock.
We can use a clock and...? The students could respond with, A watch, a phone, the internet, the
radio, the TV. Write the vocabulary on the board.
3. Ask the class:
Did people always have watches and clocks in the past? The students might respond, No, they used
the sun/the stars or they might describe some other instrument like a sundial.
4. Show the class the picture of the sundial and write the word sundial on the board. Ask the class:
How can you tell the time with a sundial? [Answer: Because it has hours marked on it and the sun
makes a shadow on the correct hour.]
5. Ask the class:
Whats the time in our town/city now? Show them the map with the time zones
6. Now ask:
Is it the same time in the UK (or USA) now? [Answer: No, different countries have different times
and sometimes even different days. Tell the class what time it is in the UK (or USA).]
7. Show the class the date line map and explain that the day changes from one side of the date line to
the other. Tell the class which country is on a different day to the day in your country. Write up time
zones and date line on the board.

18

ISE I Reading & Writing exam


8. Hand out the worksheet (one per student). Tell the class to read questions 15 about time on the
worksheet. Then tell the class to read the texts and try to find the answer for question 1 only. Give
the class time to read and check their choice of answer with their partner. Check the answer in
open-class. Tell the class that the answer to question 1 is text D. It is about a line that separates two
consecutive calendar days. Point to the date line picture again.
9. Tell the class to read and find the answers for the other questions. Give them about 10 minutes.
When they have finished, ask them to check their answers with their partner.
10. Ask the class for the answers and write up the correct answers on the board. 2 = A, 3 = C, 4 = B,
5 = D. Ask the class to show you the line(s) in the text where they found the answers.
11. Tell the students that they are now going to complete exercise 2. Look at number 1 together as a
class. Ask the students to find out if number 1 in exercise 2 is true or false. Then tell the class that
number 1 is true because the time converter can tell you past times.
12. Give the students five minutes to complete the rest of exercise 2. Tell the students to check their
answers with their partner and then write up the answers on the board and check the lines/texts
where the students found the answers.
13. Tell the class that underlining key words and phrases in the text will help them with the answers to
the true and false questions in the exam.

Extension activity
Ask students who finish early to find six new words in the texts and look them up in their dictionaries.

Further support activity


For students finding the tasks more difficult, write in some of the answers for exercise 2 on the
worksheets so that students only need to write T or F for four sentences.

Homework
Find three countries that are in different time zones to your country and also have different calendar
days. Or find three other instruments that can tell the time and describe them. Or find out what people
traditionally do on ships when they cross the date line.

19

ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Student worksheet: Reading about time


Exercise 1
Read questions 15 below and then read the four texts (AD). You can use the letters more than once.
Which text:
1. describes where the world is divided into different days?

2. explains the way many countries change times in different seasons?

3. gives information about early instruments to tell the time?

4. allows you to quickly find out the time in another city?


5. notes that different countries have asked to have the same calendar day as neighbouring countries?

Text A
Many countries, and sometimes just areas of countries, adopt daylight saving time (also known
as summer time) during part of the year. This usually means putting the clocks forward by an
hour near the start of spring and putting them back in autumn. Daylight saving was proposed by
Benjamin Franklin in 1784 but it only started seriously in Europe in 1916 to help to conserve fuel,
and energy. Most countries around the equator do not adopt daylight saving time because the
seasonal difference in sunlight is very little.

Text B

Time Zone Converter Time Difference Calculator


Find the time difference between several cities with the Time Difference Calculator.
The Time Zone Converter provides time zone conversions taking into account daylight saving
time (DST), local time zone and accepts present, past or future dates.
Select time and place to convert from:
Day _ _ Month _ _ Year _ _ _ _ Hour _ _
Location _ _

Minutes _ _

Select places to convert to:


Location _ _

Text C
Pre-historic man used to tell the time by the sun and the stars. Later, the sundial, a round disc
marked with hours and an upright stick that makes a shadow on the marks, was used. The
hourglass was also popular in ancient times. The hourglass was made of two round glass bulbs
connected by a narrow neck of glass. When you turn the hourglass upside down, sand particles
inside fall from the top to the bottom bulb of glass.

Text D
The International Date Line sits on the 180 line of longitude in the middle of the Pacific Ocean,
and is the imaginary line that separates two consecutive calendar days. It is not a perfectly
straight line and has been moved slightly over the years to accommodate needs (or requests) of
varied countries in the Pacific Ocean. It bends to include all of Kiribati, Samoa, Tonga and Tokelau
in the Eastern Hemisphere.
20

ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Exercise 2
Read the sentences below. Then read the texts again and decide which statements are True and which
are False. Put T for True or F for False against the statements.
1. You can find out what time it was in another city in 1999 if you use the Time Converter.
2. You do not need to move an hourglass to tell how much time has passed.
3. Daylight saving helps people turn off their lights earlier.
4. The international date line curves around countries.
5. Daylight saving began in 1784.
6. The date line is not a real line.
7. Near the equator, daylight saving is useful.
8. You can tell the time on a sundial by looking at where the shade is on the numbers.

21

ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Answer key
Exercise 1
1=D
2=A
3=C
4=B
5=D
Exercise 2
1=T
2=F
3=T
4=T
5=F
6=T
7=F
8=T

22

ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Task 3 Reading into writing: The best ways to learn a language


Level: ISE I
Focus: Task 3 Reading into writing
Aims: Writing a planned essay of 100130 words based on three reading texts
Objectives: Finding important information, writing a plan based on given information and writing
an essay step-by-step
Skill: Understanding and identifying specific information, writing notes and formulating an essay
using notes
Topic: Learning a foreign language and essay writing
Language functions: Describing, explaining and making suggestions based on short reading texts
in written form
Lexis: Learning a foreign language
Materials needed: One worksheet per student
Timing: 1 hour

Procedure
Preparation
1. Print or copy one worksheet per student.

In class
1. Explain to the class that they are going to learn some techniques for helping them with Task 3 Reading
into writing, of the ISE I writing exam. Tell students that they are going to read three short texts about
learning a foreign language and then write a 100130 word essay about what they have read.
2. Ask the students about how they feel about learning a foreign language. What do they find easy or
difficult? What are the best ways to learn?
3. Ask the class to read text 1 which offers advice, suggestions, tips and techniques for learning a
foreign language. Give the students three minutes to read the text.
4. Now, with a partner or in a small group of up to four students, ask the students to find and write
down one important word from each of the five points made in the text.
[Possible answers: vocabulary, grammar, apps, friend, films]
5. Now ask the students to remember as much as they can about each point and tell their partner.
6. Now ask the class to read text 2 which shows the different stages of learning to speak a second
language. Give the students approximately five minutes to do this.
7. With a partner or in a small group of up to four students, ask the students to find and write down
some important information from each of the five categories (6 months, 1 year, 12 years, 24 years,
5 years)
[Possible answers: 6 months silence: very few words understood or spoken; 1 year few words
spoken and used; 12-years sentence use; 24 years good sentence use; 5 years advanced, very
good use of sentences]
8. Now ask the students to do the same with text 3. Find and write down an important piece of
information from each of the five students.
[Possible answers: Pablo some English every day, Silvia reading, Tom Skype, Anna vocabulary,
Darius films]
9. Now with their partner or in a small group, ask the students to discuss what they wrote down and
try to remember as much as they can.

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ISE I Reading & Writing exam


10. Now explain to the students that they are going to practise writing notes, then writing an essay
step-by-step, using the texts they have read.
11. Tell the students to read the exam question and discuss exactly what they need to do with their partner.
12. It is important for students to practise how to write a plan and think carefully about the writing
process. With this in mind, work your way through the different exam question stages (on the
worksheet) with the students.

Extension activity
The more advanced students can write the essay by themselves.

Further support activity


Students finding the task difficult can practise making their own sentences using the key words from
the texts. They can also be given the keywords to help them with this.

Homework
Ask students to research the best ways to learn a foreign language and to write a short essay on the
information they have found.

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ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Student worksheet: The best ways to learn a language


Text 1
1. Read text 1 in three minutes. Find and write down one important word from each of the five points.
2. Now read it again and try to remember as much as you can about it and tell your partner.

Learning a language advice, suggestions, tips and techniques


Apps, films, friends and Skype
1. Vocabulary: try to remember around 2,000 basic words and phrases. Make it fun with 5 to 10
minutes of memorisation each day. You will improve rapidly, try it with a friend!
2. Learn the grammar, take it step-by-step and practise forming sentences.
3. Find free language learning apps on your phone, you can learn the language anywhere you are.
4. Find a friend to practise with. You can speak together which will improve your confidence and ability.
You can also do this over Skype.
5. Learn from films, find a film you want to watch and watch it in English. You can learn a lot from this.

Text 2
Read text 2 in five minutes. Find some important information from each of the five categories
(6 months, 1 year, 12 years, 24 years, 5 years) and write it down.

Stages of learning to speak a second language


6 months

1 year

12 years

24 years

Silent stage

Can speak a little

Starting to speak in
sentences

Can speak in
Can speak very
sentences well,
well, Advanced
Intermediate level level

Uses very few


words

Uses a few words

Uses basic
sentences

Uses a range of
sentences

Can understand
and respond,
making mistakes,
but this is good as
it means there is
improvement

Uses the
Can communicate
language to
very well
communicate well

Can understand Can understand


some words
and respond a little

5 years

Uses a wide range


of sentences

Text 3
1. Read text 3 in five minutes. Find and write down an important piece of information from each
student (Pablo, Silvia, Tom, Anna, Darius).
2. Discuss what you wrote down with your partner or in a small group. Try to remember as much as you can!

Advice from language learners


I asked some successful students for their suggestions on how to improve language learning. This is
what they said:
@Pablo Speak or listen to some English every day, listen to some English music and sing the words!
@Silvia I think reading is the best way, look online for something youre interested in.
@Tom I use Skype, sometimes I message my friends, sometimes we talk.
@Anna I think learning vocabulary is the most important, I sit with my dictionary and write down new
words and then I try to remember them. Often, I do this with my friends, its fun!
@Darius I love English films, I listen carefully to them and try to remember the pronunciation of the
words and sentences!

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ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Example exam question: The best ways to learn a language


Read the following exam question
Your school is doing a project on the best ways to learn English and you have been asked to write a short
essay for your English teacher (100130 words) about some useful suggestions, how long learning a
language takes and how students can improve. Use the information you read in the previous exercises to:
describe some of the techniques given to improve your English
explain approximately how long it takes to learn a foreign language
suggest how you think students can best improve their learning of a foreign language.
Plan your essay before you start writing. Think about what you want to say and make some notes in
the box below:

Writing a plan
It is important to organise your ideas. You need to spend around 10 minutes writing notes in the box given.
1. Write notes on the first part of the question (spend only three minutes on this).
Describe some of the techniques given to improve your English.
Planning notes:

2. Now decide which are the important ideas.


3. How many ideas are good to use for around 40 words?
4. Write the first part of the essay

26

ISE I Reading & Writing exam


5. Now write notes on the second part of the question. Spend only three minutes on this
Explain approximately how long it takes to learn a foreign language
Planning notes:

6. How many ideas do you have?


7. Which ones are you going to use?
8. Now write the second part of the essay

9. Now write notes on the third part of the essay. Spend only three minutes on this:
Suggest how you think students can best improve their learning of a foreign language
Planning notes:

27

ISE I Reading & Writing exam


10. How many ideas do you have?
11. Which ones are you going to use?
12. Now write the third part of the essay

28

ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Model answer for best ways to learn a foreign language


Some of the useful suggestions about how to learn a foreign language are learning vocabulary,
learning grammar step-by-step, using language apps on phones, practising with a friend and watching
films in English.
It takes around 5 years to learn to speak a second language to an advanced level. At 6 months very
few words are used, at 1 year, more words are used, from 12 years sentences are used with mistakes.
From 24 years is intermediate level, and a range of sentences are used.
My own suggestions are to speak some English every day, or listen to some music you like. You can
find a friend to practise with and have fun with vocabulary memory games. I also like to watch films
in English and copy the words and sentences.

29

ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Task 4 Extended writing: Writing about a seasonal celebration


Level: ISE I
Focus: Task 4 Extended writing
Aims: Writing a planned essay of 100130 words based on three reading texts
Objectives: Finding important information, writing a plan based on given information and writing
an essay step-by-step
Skill: Understanding and identifying specific information, writing notes and formulating an essay
using notes
Topic: Learning a foreign language and essay writing
Language functions: Describing, explaining and making suggestions based on short reading texts
in written form
Lexis: Learning a foreign language
Materials needed: One worksheet per student
Timing: 1 hour

Procedure
Preparation
Print or copy the worksheet. Search online for a map of Europe and pictures of a maypole and dancers.

In class
1. Tell the class they are going to prepare for and practise the writing part of the ISE exam. First, they
are going to talk about celebrations in summer in Sweden then read two paragraphs and write their
own paragraphs like they will do in the exam.
2. Tell the class they are going to read about a celebration that happens in Sweden in the summer.
Show students the map of Europe and ask them where Sweden is on the map. Point to Sweden on
the map. Look at its position in Northern Europe. Ask the class what kind of weather they think
Sweden has. Tell the class that Sweden has many hours of daylight in summer but in winter there
are many hours of darkness because it is so far north. Ask the class what they think Swedish people
might do in the middle of summer when there are many daylight hours. [The students could answer:
Go outside for most of the day and night, eat something special , do some sport or play some
special games.] Put their answers on the board.
3. Give out the worksheet. Tell the class to read the text and see if what they suggested about
midsummer in Sweden is what happens. Get answers from the class about the paragraphs they
have read. [The students could answer: Swedes go outside and sail boats, they eat special food and
drink, they dance.] Point to the picture of the maypole and dancers and say, they have some special
belief about girls who are not yet married.
4. Now ask the students to read the text again and do exercise A. Give them five minutes to do this. In
pairs, get the students to check their answers for exercise A. Then in open-class, check the answers
and write up the correct answers on the board. Teach some new vocabulary, for example bays,
cottages, spicy.
5. Ask the students to do exercise B. Give them five minutes to do this. In pairs, get the students to
check their answers for exercise B. Then in open-class, check the answers and write up the correct
answers on the board.
6. Now ask the class which celebrations they have in their country and in which seasons. Write two or
three on the board. Then put the students into groups of four and get them to talk together about
when the celebration is and what they do, eat and drink at each celebration and the reasons why
they like the celebrations or not.
7. Get some feedback and write some of their ideas on the board.

30

ISE I Reading & Writing exam


8. Tell the class to look at the first paragraph again and find the verbs that show what people do at the
celebration. Put the answers (drive, sail, dance, eat) on the board.
9. Then ask the class if it is true or only possible that the girl will dream of her husband. Ask the
students what language they can use to say that something might happen in the future but we are
not sure. Put on the board, The girl will dream of her husband if she puts the flowers under her
pillow. Make another similar sentence about a celebration in your country, for example, I will enjoy
Carnival a lot if the weather stays calm.
10. Then ask the class to tell you again and underline which phrases in the second paragraph help us
express our opinion. They should look at the answers to question 6 on the worksheet.
11. Tell the class they have 15 minutes to write 150180 words about a celebration in a season in their
country. They can use the paragraphs and the language on the worksheet as models. In the first
paragraph they should describe what happens at the celebration. In the second paragraph they
should give their opinion about the celebration.
12. Give the class 10 minutes to write. Then ask pairs to exchange their work and to read their partners
work and tell them if they have the same opinion or not.
13. Take in the work for correction.

Extension activity
Students who finish early can write about a second celebration and give their opinions.

Further support activity


Students finding the task difficult should use the prompts on the board to write about the celebration
that you have discussed as a class. Help them by writing up more full sentences and the phrases to
express opinion.

Homework
Students can ask their parents or friends in different classes about seasonal celebrations and what
their opinion is about the celebration. They can report back in class.

31

ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Student worksheet: Writing about a seasonal celebration


Read the text below and answer the questions.

Celebrating Midsummer in Sweden


This festival is as close as possible to 24th June, the longest day of the year. It is a very old
celebration and modern Swedes drive to summer cottages to stay, or sail to bays on the coast to
celebrate. People in traditional dress dance around a maypole a tall pole decorated with flowers.
After the dancing, people eat marinated fish with a strong, spicy drink. It is thought that if a girl
who isnt yet married picks different flowers and puts them under her pillow at Midsummer shell
dream about her future husband.
I think that the festival allows people in Sweden to relax and enjoy themselves outside during
the long light days of Midsummer. It also means that the traditional dances, food and drink are
remembered. In my opinion this festival also helps keep families in touch with one another and it
helps Swedes know how their great-grandparents lived. However, I believe that thinking a girl will
dream about her future husband if she puts flowers under her pillow is a rather silly idea.

1. Which paragraph describes the festival?


2. Which paragraph gives the writers opinion?
3. What order does the following information appear in the text?

food that people eat


the date of the festival
a belief that people share
what people do nowadays at Midsummer

4. Why does the writer have the opinion that the Midsummer Festival is positive?

5. Does the writer have any negative opinion of the Midsummer Festival?

6. What phrases does the writer use to express his/her opinion?

7. How does the writer talk about a possible future event?

32

ISE I Reading & Writing exam

Answers
1. First paragraph
2. Second paragraph
3. 2, 4, 1, 3
4. Because he/she thinks that families can spend time together, know how their great-grandparents
lived and remember what people used to eat and drink many years ago.
5. Yes, because he/she thinks that the belief about putting flowers under your pillow to dream about a
future husband is silly.
6. I think that In my opinion I believe
7. The girl will dream if she puts (Subject + will + base verb) if + (present simple)

33

34

ISE I Speaking
& Listening exam

35

ISE I Speaking & Listening exam

Overview of the ISE Speaking & Listening exam


Trinitys ISE Speaking & Listening exam tests speaking and listening skills through an integrated approach,
reflecting the way the two skills interact in the real world. The ISE Speaking & Listening exam is currently
offered at four levels of the Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR) from A2 to C1. The
purpose of the exam is to assess candidates English language skills in speaking and listening in a context
which reflects their real world activities and their purpose for learning English.
The integrated speaking and listening tasks reflect the kind of activities a student will do in the
school or college context. Additionally, the recordings used in the Independent listening task reflect
the way that students find, select and report relevant and appropriate information in an educational
or academic context.

Who is ISE Speaking & Listening for?


The intended candidate is a young person or adult, typically at secondary school or college who is
using English as a second or foreign language as part of their studies in order to develop their skills
and improve their knowledge of a range of subject areas. The typical ISE candidate is aged between
11 and 19, but may be older.
The candidate, at the lower levels of the exam (ISE Foundation and ISE I), would generally be a young
person or adult in school or college who would be taking ISE as part of their preparation for entrance
into university or as evidence to progress to a higher level of English study within their mainstream
or English language school. At the higher levels of the exam (ISE II and ISE III) the candidates are
young people or adults preparing for further education where they are required to prove their English
language proficiency levels within an educational context.

36

ISE I Speaking & Listening exam

Introduction to ISE Speaking & Listening tasks


The Speaking & Listening exam consists of several tasks and increases in length as the level increases.
The table below shows the progression across the levels.
ISE Foundation ISE I

ISE II

ISE III

CEFR level

A2

B1

B2

C1

Time

13 minutes

14 minutes

20 minutes

25 minutes

Topic task

4 minutes

4 minutes

4 minutes

8 minutes

Collaborative task

4 minutes

4 minutes

Conversation task

2 minutes

2 minutes

2 minutes

3 minutes

Independent listening task

6 minutes

7 minutes

8 minutes

8 minutes

1 minute

2 minutes

2 minutes

Examiner administration time 1 minute

The Topic task (ISE Foundation, ISE I, ISE II, ISE III)
What is the Topic task?
Before the exam, the candidate prepares a topic of his or her own choice and in the exam, this topic is
used as a basis for a discussion.
What language skills can the candidate demonstrate in the Topic task?
The Topic task provides the candidate with the opportunity to:

talk about a topic which is of personal interest or relevance to them and which they feel confident about
have a degree of autonomy and control over this task
show they can link sentences together to talk about a subject at some length
demonstrate the language functions of the level
show that they can engage in a one-to-one, unscripted discussion with an expert speaker of English
demonstrate that they can understand and respond appropriately to examiner questions and points.

Can the candidate bring notes with them?


In the ISE Foundation and ISE I exams, candidates are required to complete a topic form which they give
to the examiner at the beginning of the exam. The topic form contains notes that helps to support the
candidate in their preparation for the exam and also in their discussion of the topic with the examiner,
It is important to tell the candidate that the examiner will choose the sequence in which the points on
the topic form are discussed, not the candidate. The topic form is also used by the examiner to ask
questions of the candidate. This encourages spontaneous conversation and discourages recitation by
the candidate.
In the ISE II exam, candidates do not need to complete a topic form but they are encouraged to bring
notes or mind maps with them to the exam.
In the ISE III exam, the candidate must prepare a formal handout to accompany their formal topic
presentation. They must give the handout to the examiner.

Level

Support

ISE Foundation

Topic form with four points

ISE I

Topic form with four points

ISE II

Candidate may use notes or a mind map

ISE III

Formal handout must accompany presentation

For example topic forms see Appendix 1.

37

ISE I Speaking & Listening exam

The Collaborative task (ISE II and ISE III only)


What happens in the Collaborative task?
The examiner reads the candidate a prompt. The candidate responds to the prompt by starting,
leading and maintaining the interaction. For example, the candidate can ask questions to find out
further information, respond to information and comments from the examiner, demonstrate skills in
turn-taking in a conversation, etc. It is essential for the candidate to interact and collaborate with the
examiner. The candidate should not wait for the examiner to lead the conversation and monologues
from the candidate will receive a low mark.
What is the examiners prompt?
The prompt presents a dilemma, some circumstances, or an opinion. The candidate then needs to
take the initiative to find out more about the background of the examiners circumstances or position
and engage the examiner in a sustained discussion about his/her circumstances or views. All of the
examiners prompts are prepared in advance by Trinity. Examiners are all trained to add their own
standardised backstory to the prompt in order to personalise it and support the interaction. By asking
the examiner for further information in the Collaborative task, the candidate finds out more about the
examiners backstory and the prompt.
What language skills can the candidate demonstrate in the Collaborative task?
The task provides the opportunity for the candidate to demonstrate his or her ability to take control
through the use of questioning techniques and language functions like requesting information, getting
clarification and asking for further detail. The Collaborative task gives the candidate the opportunity to
show that they can initiate turns in the conversation and control the direction of the interaction. This
task requires an authentic exchange of information and opinions, with the language functions listed at
each grade arising naturally out of the task.
There is no Collaborative task at ISE Foundation or ISE I.

The Conversation task (ISE Foundation, ISE I, ISE II, ISE III)
What is the Conversation task?
The Conversation task is a meaningful and authentic exchange of information, ideas and opinions. It
is not a formal question and answer interview. In this task, the examiner selects one subject area for
discussion with the candidate.
What are the possible subjects for discussion?
The subject areas have been carefully selected to offer a progression through the levels from the
concrete subjects at ISE Foundation to the abstract at ISE III. The list of subject areas is on page 42.
What about the interaction in the Conversation task?
The examiner will ask some questions, but at each ISE level the candidate is expected to take more
responsibility for initiating and maintaining the conversation. The candidate is also expected to ask the
examiner questions in order to develop the interaction. These questions should arise naturally out of
the conversation.

The Independent listening task


What is the Independent listening task?
Listening skills are tested in an integrated way together with speaking skills in the Topic task,
Collaborative task and Conversation task. The Independent listening task is different. In this task, the
candidate has the opportunity to demonstrate the kind of listening skills that are required in lectures
and lessons, for example. In this Independent listening task, the candidate listens to recordings and
responds to questions. The candidate then gives written responses and also answers questions in
conversation with the examiner, depending on the level.
What is the procedure for the Independent listening task?
The examiner plays one or two recordings to the candidate, and the candidate writes the answers to
some questions on a worksheet, or they respond to prompts from the examiner about what they have
heard. The candidate listens to the same recording(s) twice.
While the candidate is listening to the recordings, they are encouraged to take notes to support their
listening and study skills. However, the candidates notes are not assessed as part of the exam.
38

ISE I Speaking & Listening exam

Glossary of speaking aims for ISE I


Communicative
effectiveness

Responding appropriately to interaction


Initiating and maintaining conversation

Interactive listening

Showing understanding of other speakers


Following the speech of others

Language control

Using a range of grammar and vocabulary


Using grammar and vocabulary accurately
Avoiding making errors which effect the understanding of the listener

Delivery

Using clear and understandable pronunciation


Using stress and intonation

Glossary of listening skills for ISE I


Intensive, bottom-up
listening

Listening to find specific key words and facts in simple recordings

Intensive listening
in detail to gather as
much information as
possible

Understanding specific, factual information at the word and/or phrase


level
Listening for explicitly stated ideas and information

Intensive listening
for detailed
understanding

Listening to understand all or most of the information the recording


provides

Extensive listening
for gist, for main
ideas and for global
understanding

Listening to get the topic and main ideas of the recording

Deducing meaning

Guessing the meaning of unknown words from their context

39

ISE I Speaking & Listening exam

Candidate profile
A candidate who successfully passes ISE I can:

Speaking
initiate, maintain and close simple, unprepared one-to-one conversations on topics that are familiar
or of personal interest
communicate with some confidence on familiar routine and non-routine subjects or topics of
personal interest
express personal opinions and exchange information on everyday topics that are familiar or of
personal interest (eg family, hobbies, work, travel and current events)
maintain a conversation or discussion but with some errors
describe one of a variety of familiar subjects, presenting it as a linear sequence of points, with
reasonable fluency
give detailed accounts of experiences, describing feelings and reactions
describe dreams, hopes and ambitions
describe events, real or imagined
give reasons and explanations for opinions, plans and actions
demonstrate a basic repertoire of language and strategies to help keep a conversation
or discussion going
repeat back part of what someone has said to confirm mutual understanding and help keep the
development of ideas on course
ask someone to clarify or elaborate what he or she has just said

Listening
follow clear speech in one-to-one conversations in a generally familiar accent, although they will
sometimes have to ask for repetition of particular words and phrases
understand factual information about common everyday topics, identify general messages and
specific details
understand the main points of familiar topics, eg work, school, leisure including short narratives
follow a clearly-structured lecture or talk on a familiar topic
understand the information content of the majority of slow and clear recorded audio material,
eg radio news, on familiar topics or topics of personal interest
identify unfamiliar words from the context on familiar topics or topics of personal interest
take notes as a list of key points while listening to a simple and clear lecture on a familiar topic
These speaking and listening profiles are based on the level Independent User, B1, of the Council
of Europes Common European Framework of Reference (CEFR). The candidate profile above is a
simplified version for quick reference.

40

ISE I Speaking & Listening exam

Content of ISE I Speaking & Listening


Topic task
Task type and format

The Topic task is an integrated speaking and listening task. The candidate
prepares a topic for discussion including a topic form with four points,
which they may use as a prompt.
The examiner uses the same form to ask questions of the candidate about
their chosen topic.
The candidate is prompted to discuss their topic by the examiner using the
topic form. The examiner chooses the sequence in which the topic points
are discussed.

Timing

4 minutes

Task focus and


language functions

The candidate is expected in this task and throughout the speaking exam
to show their ability to use the language functions of the level. These
functions are:
describing past actions in the indefinite and recent past
describing the future informing and expressing intention
giving opinions and preferences
giving reasons
describing consequences with (un)certainty
expressing obligation
asking for opinions
asking for information

Examiner role

The examiner uses the topic form to pose questions to the candidate. The
examiner will ask questions to elicit the language functions of the level. The
examiner is also expected to interrupt the candidate where appropriate to
discourage recitation and encourage spontaneous conversation.

41

ISE I Speaking & Listening exam

Conversation task
Task type and format

The Conversation task is an integrated speaking and listening task.


The examiner selects one conversation topic from a list and asks the
candidate questions to start a conversation about the topic.

Timing

2 minutes

Task focus and language


functions

The candidate is expected in this task and throughout the speaking


exam to show their ability to use the language functions of the level.
These functions are:
describing past actions in the indefinite and recent past
describing the future informing and expressing intention
giving opinions and preferences
giving reasons
describing consequences with (un)certainty
expressing obligation
asking for opinions
asking for information.

Examiner role

The examiner uses the list of subject areas and their own test plans to
ask questions and elicit the target language functions of the level (see
sample exam for example stem questions).

Subject areas for


conversation

Assessment

This task is assessed together with the Topic task in four categories:

42

Travel
Money
Fashion
Rules and regulations
Health and fitness
Learning a foreign language
Communicative effectiveness
Interactive listening
Language control
Delivery

ISE I Speaking & Listening exam

Independent listening tasks


Task 1
Task

Candidates listen twice to basic information (descriptive or narrative)


and respond in one or two words to six questions asked by the examiner.
The recording is approximately 1 minute 15 seconds long.

Total task time

3 minutes 15 seconds (approximately)

Task focus

Intensive, bottom-up listening


Intensive listening in detail to gather as much information as possible

Examiner role

The examiner plays the recordings and reads an instructional rubric


and questions (see sample exam in Appendix 3). The examiner is permitted to
repeat instructions.

Assessment

Each correct answer is worth one mark

Task 2
Task

The candidate will be provided with a listening exam form which they can use
to write notes on. The worksheet contains some additional information to show
the candidate approximately how many points to listen for.
Candidates listen twice to a factual text (exposition). They report firstly the gist
of what they have heard. Then they report six facts from the recording and
orally answer four examiner questions about the recording.
The recording is approximately 1 minute 30 seconds long.

Timing of task

3 minutes 45 seconds (approximately)

Task focus

Extensive listening for gist, for main ideas and for global understanding
Intensive listening in detail to gather as much information as possible
Intensive listening for detailed understanding

Examiner role

The examiner plays the recordings and reads an instructional rubric. The
examiner asks a gist question and also four follow-up questions in response to
the facts reported by the candidate.

Assessment

This task is subjectively marked using a rating scale, which means that the
examiner decides the mark. The examiner takes into account how many facts are
reported correctly whether the candidate answered immediately or was hesitant.

For a sample ISE Speaking & Listening exam, please see Appendix 3. You can also view a sample exam
at www.trinitycollege.com/ISE

43

ISE I Speaking & Listening exam

Preparation ideas for ISE I Speaking & Listening


Topic task: Using music to help with topic preparation
Level: ISE I
Focus: Topic task
Aims: To listen to different pieces of music, and then express and request opinions and impressions
Objectives: To formulate a wide variety of questions after listening to pieces of music and to
answer questions relating to pieces of music
Topic: Music
Language functions: Giving reasons, opinions and preferences, describing the future, informing
and expressing intentions, asking for information and opinions
Grammar: Present perfect tense including: for, since, ever, never, just connecting clauses using
because, will referring to the future for informing and predicting
Lexis: Vocabulary specific to the topic of music
Materials needed: Music playing device (mobile phone, MP3, computer, radio, TV, CD player, iPod),
three or more pieces of music
Timing: 1 hour

Procedure
Preparation
1. Prepare three pieces of music to play to students, preferably from a range of music for example,
pop, rock, classical, heavy metal (on CD, on a mobile phone, computer etc).
OR
2. Ask students to bring in one piece of music to play on their own devices, for example, their mobile
phones, their iPods or their MP3 players.
3. If any students play a music instrument, you could ask them to play a short piece of their favourite music.

In class
1. Write on the board in large letters MUSIC. Ask for words that the students think of when they see
this word, for example, happy, sad, loud, romantic, pop, CD, money, famous, concerts, party, disco
etc. Write some of these words on the board.
2. Explain to the students that they are going to listen to some pieces of music and to practise
asking and answering questions about them. This will help them to speak more naturally, which is
something that they need to do this in the topic task of the exam. Tell the students that they will be
using music to help them with their ideas.
3. Write PIECE 1 on the board
4. Play piece 1. Ask students to listen and be ready to tell everyone their opinion.
5. Ask students questions about the music, for example, Have you ever heard this piece of music?,
When did you last hear it?, Did you like it? Why/why not? (Try to exploit the language requirements
of ISE I).
6. In groups of four, ask students to think of as many questions as they can about that piece of
music using these prompts Do you? What kind of? Who is? Have you ever? When you were
younger? If you have a choice, what? What were you doing the last time you? What music might
you? What do you need to..? Do you prefer?
7. Ask students to write down 10 questions on a piece of paper.
8. Write PIECE 2 on the board
9. Play piece 2. Ask students to listen and be ready to ask and answer questions as above (in number 6).
44

ISE I Speaking & Listening exam


10. Students ask each other their questions, taking it in turns in their groups of four.
11. Students exchange their question papers (as in number 7) with another group.
12. Write PIECE 3 on the board.
13. Explain to the students they are going to work in pairs this time so that they can talk to a different
person, in a smaller group (a good idea at this stage would be to move students around, so they are
working with different people).
14. Play piece 3.
15. Students ask and answer their questions in pairs.
16. Now bring the class back together as a group. Ask them a few general questions, for example:

Which piece of music did they prefer, and why?


When is music important?
Do people of different ages listen to different music? Why?
Did you listen to different music when you were younger?

17. Explain that music is often chosen as a topic for ISE I and four questions need to be filled in on the
topic form. Draw an example of a topic form on the board and ask which questions from this activity
could be used.
18. Ask students to think of their own questions based on a piece of music or a music group they like.
Then, in pairs, practise asking and answering these questions. Explain that the topic part of the
exam lasts for up to four minutes.
19. Finally, ask the students if they enjoyed listening to music in their English class. Did it help to inspire
them to think of questions? Would they have chosen different pieces of music? Why?

Extension activity
The more advanced students can be asked to think of their favourite piece of music and describe it to
the class. While the students are describing their favourite music, the class have to ask questions and
try to guess what it is.

Further support activity


Students finding the task difficult can be asked to practise forming questions with the stems: Do you
like...? What kind of music...? When do you...? When did you...? How often do you...?

Homework
Listen to a piece of music of your choice and write down some questions about it. Then, practise
answering questions with a classmate or friend. Prepare a piece of music to play to the class and write
down some questions to ask the class.
Also be prepared to tell the class why you chose this piece of music.

45

ISE I Speaking & Listening exam

Conversation task: Developing conversations


rules and regulations
Level: ISE I
Focus: Conversation task
Aims: Introducing students to making conversation in preparation for the ISE I exam and raising
awareness of the language functions of the grade
Objectives: Students will brainstorm aspects of the sample topic of Rules and regulations and
think about how the language functions of the grade can be incorporated
Topic: Rules and regulations
Language functions: This activity is designed to use all language functions specified for ISE I
(see student worksheet)
Grammar: Zero and first conditionals, using if and when, modals such as must, need to, might and
dont have to
Lexis: Vocabulary connected to the topic of rules and regulations
Materials needed: Blackboard/whiteboard, flipchart or computer with projector to write up
students ideas during brainstorming session, student worksheet (one per student) and pens

Procedure
Preparation
1. Read through the stages in the lesson and note down your own ideas about rules and regulations for
the activities.
2. Print or copy one student worksheet per student.

In class
1. Introduce the students to the topic and aim of the lesson. They will be talking about one of the
exam topics Rules and regulations and developing conversations using the language functions
specified for the exam.
2. Give out the student worksheet and introduce the class to the functional language requirements of
the exam. Provide examples of the functions and check any necessary grammar.
3. Divide the class into groups of three.
4. The first few activities can be carried out using the classs first language. Ask groups to think
about a number of questions about rules and regulations. Some examples might be What rules
and regulations can they think of? Where are such rules found? Are there too many rules and
regulations? Why do people need rules and regulations? Try to encourage students to be creative
with their ideas. You could write some or all of the elicited questions on the board and ask the
students to copy them down.
5. Brainstorm the topic of rules and regulations with the class on the whiteboard and develop
vocabulary ideas. For example, you could discuss school rules, the rules for a sport, or legal
requirements for driving. Aim at developing a list of different ideas.
6. Ask each group to choose one idea and write notes about it. Feedback in open-class to see what one
of the groups has written.
7. Ask each group to choose a different topic related to rules and regulations and discuss it. Ask two
members of the group to have a conversation about the topic while the third observes and makes
notes. At this stage, students can still use their first language.
8. Ask the groups to write down key English words and phrases needed in the discussion.
9. Students now continue/repeat the previous conversation using English. Two other students now
carry on the conversation while a new student takes the role of observer.
46

ISE I Speaking & Listening exam


10. After all members of each group have practised talking about the topic and acting as an observer,
bring the class together and focus on the ISE I language functions (See student handout). If
necessary review the grammar needed for some or all of the language functions for example,
present perfect for describing events in the indefinite and recent past or modal verbs for expressing
obligation and necessity.
11. Finally, ask the groups to revisit their conversations about rules and regulations, now using language
from the different language functions.

Extension activity
For students who finish the activities early, divide the members of the group into other groups and get
them to share their ideas with their new groups.

Further support activity


For students who are finding the activity more challenging, provide examples related to the topic of
rules and regulations for each of the language functions.

Homework
Set a short writing task maybe ask students to list rules and regulations for a sport.
To provide regular practice for the ISE exam listening task, repeat this activity with classes regularly
as they prepare for the exam. Each time select a different ISE exam topic.

47

ISE I Speaking & Listening exam

Student worksheet: Developing conversations


rules and regulations
ISE I Language functions

48

Describing the future informing and predicting


Expressing preferences
Describing events in the indefinite and recent past
Giving reasons
Stating the duration of events
Quantifying
Expressing and requesting opinions and impressions
Expressing intention and purpose
Expressing obligation and necessity
Expressing certainty and uncertainty
Describing past actions over a period of time

ISE I Speaking & Listening exam

Independent listening task 1: New Years Eve


Level: ISE I
Focus: Independent listening task 1
Aims: Students practise listening to a factual text and completing a form representing notes from
the recording.
Objectives: Students report facts that are partly derived from understanding whole utterances
and partly inferred from content words recognised.
Topic: Special occasions
Language functions: Describing the future (informing and predicting), expressing preferences
describing events in the indefinite and recent past, giving reasons, stating the duration of events,
quantifying, expressing intention and purpose and describing past actions over a period of time.
Grammar: Present perfect tense, connecting clauses using because, will referring to the future
for informing and predicting, adjectives and adverbials of quantity, expressions of preference,
zero and first conditionals using if and when, past continuous tense and infinitive of purpose.
Lexis: Vocabulary related to special occasions
Materials needed: Whiteboard, paper and pens, recording of audio script or audio script for
teacher to read from, one copy of worksheet per student and copies of audio script for students
who may find the task difficult.
Timing: 45 minutes

Procedure
Preparation
1. Pre-record the audio using three different people speaking if possible. If necessary you can read out
the audio script yourself in class at a normal pace.
2. Print or copy one worksheet per student.

In class
1. Tell the students that they are going to practise listening to a factual text and completing a form
representing notes from the audio, like in task 1 of the ISE I listening exam. Tell them the audio is
about New Years Eve.
2. Elicit the date of New Years Eve and ask a student how they celebrated it last year. Ask questions to
elicit more information, such as where they spent it, who with, what they ate, what they wore, and
whether they respected any traditions. Write the questions on the board if necessary.
3. In pairs, tell the students to ask each other about their last New Years Eve. Encourage them to talk
for five minutes.
4. Tell the students they are going to hear about New Years traditions in three different countries. Ask
the students the first time they listen to write the three countries. Play the recording or read the audio
script. Repeat if necessary and then elicit the answers in open-class. Write answers on the board.
5. Give out a worksheet to each student. Ask the students, in pairs, to try to complete as much of
the worksheet as possible from memory. If they dont know an answer, encourage them to make a
logical guess.
6. Play the recording again and students complete the worksheet. Ask the students to compare their
answers with their partners.
7. Go through the answers as a class, repeating any parts of the audio that were problematic.
8. Write the following discussion questions on the board:
Which of the three countries would you rather spend New Years Eve in? Why?
Which of the traditions do you like the most/least? Why?
Do you know any New Years traditions from any other countries?
49

ISE I Speaking & Listening exam


9. Put students into small groups and encourage them to talk for 10 minutes answering the discussion
questions on the board. While students are speaking, write up errors on the board. Once the
students have completed the task, briefly elicit some answers, comment on their progress and then
address the errors.

Extension activity
Students who are able to complete the worksheet after listening just once can be asked to write down
as many extra details as possible during the second listening.

Further support activity


Students who struggle during the first listening can be provided with the audio script during the
second listening.

After class
Ask the students to research other countries New Year traditions on the internet. Tell the students to
prepare three interesting facts about the country of their choice, which they can then share with the
class in the next lesson.

50

ISE I Speaking & Listening exam

Independent listening task 2: Facts about elephants


Level: ISE I
Focus: Independent listening task 2
Aims: To listen for key information and then answer questions about the information
Objectives: To listen for key information, to remember key information, to write down key
information, to repeat key information orally and to ask questions about key information
Topic: Elephants
Language functions: Talking about numbers and units of measurement
Grammar: Can to express ability, present simple and making questions (especially wh questions).
Lexis: Numbers and units of measurement
Materials needed: Two or three pictures of elephants, one worksheet per student, paper and
pens (for students to write their answers).
Timing: 50 minutes

Procedure
Preparation
Find two or three pictures of elephants with tusks from the internet or from a book and put them on
the board.

In class
1. Tell the class that they are going to learn to listen for important information about elephants and
then ask and answer some questions with their partners about the information. Point to the pictures
on the board and ask what the class knows about elephants. For example, you could ask: What kind
of ears do they have?, Do they have a nose? [Answer: Yes, its called a trunk] What are the white
things on their faces called? [Answer: Tusks] How do they get their food?, What do they eat? and
Where do they live?
2. Write all new words on the board. Practise the pronunciation of the new words.
3. Tell the class you are going to read them some information about elephants and you will read the
information two times. They must listen for key information.
4. Read the following text quite slowly and emphasise the bold words:
Read: There are two main kinds of elephant... the Asian elephant and the African elephant... Stop
reading and say in this case, two main kinds of elephant is key information.
5. Continue reading: Elephants use their tusks and trunks to get food They use the tusk to dig up
food and the trunk to suck up water. An elephant drinks about 210 litres of water every day and an
elephants trunk can grow to be about two metres long. (Repeat the information)
6. Ask the class to tell you one piece of information that they heard, for example two kinds of
elephants or drinks 210 litres of water every day. Then, put the students in pairs and tell them to
write down three other pieces of information that they heard. Once the students have completed
this task, ask the class to give you the key information and write it on the board.
7. Ask the students some questions about the key information you have written on the board. For
example: What do elephants use to get food? How do elephants get water? How much water do
they drink?
8. Tell the class you are going to read some more information about elephants. Again, they must listen
for key information.
Read: Elephants often live in forests... They eat grasses, fruits and roots... And an adult elephant can
eat about 136 kilos of food in one day. Elephants can live to be 70 years old. They can hear another
elephant calling through its trunk eight kilometres away. (Repeat this information for a second time).
51

ISE I Speaking & Listening exam


9. Tell each student to write down three pieces of new information on his/her own. Then tell the
students to share their information with their partner. Ask the class to give you the new information
and write up more key facts on the board, for example: live in forests, eat fruit, eat 136 kilos of
food, 70 years old, 8 kilometres away.
10. Write up one question on the board about the information that is on the board: For example:
Where do elephants live? Then, ask one pair of students to demonstrate, using the question and
the answer on the board. For example, one student asks Where do elephants live? and the partner
responds in forests. Then all the students should practise asking and answering in pairs, using the
information on the board for the answers.

Extension activity
Ask students to read the extra information about elephants on the worksheet. Then ask them to make
questions that would help them to find out this extra information.

Further support activity


Make sure that the students who are finding the task more difficult write down all of the information
that you write on the board. Write up more questions to help them. They can use these extra questions
with their partner.

Homework
Ask the students to find out three more facts about elephants. Write the questions for the facts
that you can ask your class, for example, fact: Male elephants do not live in a group, they live alone.
Question for the class: Do male elephants live in a group or not?

52

ISE I Speaking & Listening exam

Student worksheet: Facts about elephants


What are the questions?
Write the correct question for the information.
Example:
Elephants cant see very well, but they have a very good sense of smell.
Question: Can elephants see well?
1. Each elephant foot has five toes.
Question:
2. Elephant brains weigh five kilos.
Question:

3. Baby elephants are about one metre tall.
Question:
4. Female elephants live in groups all their lives.
Question:
5. Elephants large ears help them to keep cool in hot weather.
Question:

53

ISE Speaking & Listening exam

Answer key
1. How many toes does each elephant foot have?
2. How heavy is an elephants brain?
3. How tall are baby elephants?
4. Where do female elephants live?
5. What do elephants ears help to do?/What are elephants ears for?

54

Appendices

55

Appendix 1 Sample topic form

Appendix 1 Sample topic form

Integrated Skills in English Topic form ISE I


Any Name
ISE I

Registration no: xxxxxx:xxxxxxxx

Centre: Any Centre

Session: 52015

Centre no: xxxxxx

Examination date: 21/05/15

Title of topic:

My volleyball club

Why I enjoy playing

The rules what you

volleyball

must and must not do

Main points
to discuss
about my topic

How long Ive played

Our plans for the next

volleyball

six months

The information on this form must be presented to the examiner during the examination.

56

Appendix 2 Sample Reading & Writing exam paper

Appendix 2 Sample Reading & Writing exam paper


SAMPLE

ISE I

Integrated Skills in English I


Time allowed: 2 hours
This exam paper has four tasks. Complete all tasks.

Task 1 Long reading


As part of your studies you are going to read about transport. Read the following text and answer
the 15 questions on page 3.

The first underground train

Paragraph 1
Today there are underground train systems in over 40 countries. For example, you can take
underground trains in Paris, New York and Tokyo. Modern underground systems use electric
trains, and they are clean, safe and quiet. They usually arrive on time. There are no traffic jams.
Most people are happy to use them. But the first underground train systems were quite different
from the modern systems we see in big cities all around the world.
Paragraph 2
The first underground trains ran in London in 1863. It was a very busy city and the streets were
full of traffic. There were too many people, horse carriages, houses and buildings. There just
wasnt enough space above ground, and so people decided to put the trains underground. But
unlike today, there were no electric trains in 1863 and all of the trains used steam engines
which made power from fire and water.
Paragraph 3
In 1863, all of the trains used steam engines. Because these engines were powered by very hot water
and fire, the tunnels were smoky, steamy, and noisy. People wanted some fresh air, but it was difficult
to get it into the tunnels and stations. The tunnels were dark, too. The train cars and stations were
made of wood, and lighted with gas. Sometimes there were accidents because of fires.
Paragraph 4
Before the London Underground opened, people were very scared about the idea of going into
underground tunnels. Many were afraid of the tunnels full of the smoke, the steam and the noise
from the train engines. And indeed, travelling in the tunnels of the first underground system was
a very noisy, dark, and smelly experience. But on the first day, the new London Underground
carried 40,000 passengers. It was very quick, and the trains ran every 10 minutes. The people of
London fell in love with their new train system.
Paragraph 5
The London Underground had three classes of travel. First class was the most expensive and
most comfortable. Second class was less expensive but still comfortable. Third class was the
opposite of first class. When the London Underground opened, the third class tickets were the
most popular. About 70% of the tickets sold were these cheap tickets for ordinary working
people. Nowadays the prices have gone up, but the underground experience around the world is
definitely cleaner and quieter!

page 2

This exam paper has four tasks. Complete all tasks.

57

Appendix 2 Sample Reading & Writing exam paper

ISE I

SAMPLE

Questions 15 (one mark per question)


The text on page 2 has five paragraphs (15). Choose the best title for each paragraph from AF
below and write the letter (AF) on the lines below. There is one title you dont need.
1.

Paragraph 1

A Why the first underground train system was built

2. Paragraph 2

B Tickets for the first underground system

3. Paragraph 3

C Peoples feelings about the first underground train system


D What the first underground system was like

4. Paragraph 4

E Railroads of the first underground system

5. Paragraph 5

F Modern underground train systems

Questions 610 (one mark per question)


Choose the five statements from AH below that are TRUE according to the information given in
the text on page 2. Write the letters of the TRUE statements on the lines below (in any order).
6.

A The stations and tunnels of the first underground system were smoky.

7.

B The first underground trains were late because of traffic jams.

8.

C There were three types of tickets for the first underground trains.

9.

D The first underground trains were built in Paris.

10.

E At first, people were worried about using the first underground trains.
F The first underground train stations were made of wood.
G Ordinary working people could not buy first class underground tickets.
H The ticket prices today are still cheap for ordinary working people.

Questions 1115 (one mark per question)


Complete sentences 1115 with a word, phrase or number from the text (maximum three words).
Write the word, phrase or number on the lines below.
trains.

11. In 1863, there werent any

12. Steam engines used the power of

13. Thousands of people used the London Underground on


lights.

14. The old London Underground used


15. When the London Underground opened, most of the tickets sold were the
.

Turn over page

58

page 3

Appendix 2 Sample Reading & Writing exam paper

SAMPLE

ISE I

Task 2 Multi-text reading


As part of your studies you are going to read about rivers. In this section there are three short
texts for you to read and some questions for you to answer.
Questions 1620 (one mark per question)
Read questions 1620 first and then read texts A, B, C and D below the questions.
As you read each text, decide which text each question refers to. Choose one letter A, B, C or D
and write it on the lines below. You can use any letter more than once.
Which text
16. makes negative comments about the activities of local people and businesses?
17. reports a good news story about recent improvements to a river environment?
18. shares lots of practical ideas from different people about how to improve a local river?
19. calls for more political action and public education to protect a nearby river?
20.shows some changing patterns in the state of health of a particular river?
Text A
From: Eva
Sent: 11 November 2014 19:37
To: editor@eveningnews.co.uk
Subject: River Mle
Dear Editor
The River Mle causes health problems in the city, so we need to take action. Although the other local
factories have stopped putting waste into the river, the paper factory is still breaking pollution laws,
and should have to pay big fines.
The mud of the riverbed needs to be taken away because its polluted with chemicals. Politicians are
scared to say this, because it brings jobs to the city, but it is obvious that the paper company should pay.
Also, people need to be educated: drinks bottles and plastic bags wouldnt be such a problem if
people reused or recycled them.
Yours
Eva Strauss

Text B
The River Tollen: Yearly report on the results of pollution

20

Waste from
factories
up 6.4%

page 4

Oxygen (O2)
levels in water
down 3.5%

Fish numbers
down 3%

Water birds
down 2.4%

Rubbish
up 14%

Chemicals from
farms in riverbed
up 5.5%

This exam paper has four tasks. Complete all tasks.

59

Appendix 2 Sample Reading & Writing exam paper

ISE I

SAMPLE

Text C

The city is getting millions from the government to improve the River Lamm! How should it
spend the money?
Paul: Ive always thought that the river would be great for kayaking so how about a
watersports centre for people to do things like that?
Marcus: It would be great to see people using the river for transport, like in the old days.
Divna: Fear stops a lot of people going to the river! Even a little lighting along the
riverbank would help people to feel safe.
Alex: Id like to see one of the old factories become a museum of the citys
industrial history.
Inge: @Alex And some quality waterside cafs would attract visitors too.
Simone: @Divna I agree security cameras too, to protect people from criminals!
Alex: @Inge Hopefully theyll close that fast food place that would mean less litter
on the ground!
Text D

GREEN CITY NEWS


In the yearly Big Clean-up on the River Vico, 50
students picked up rubbish from the banks of the
river, and several local companies got together
to clear the river of fridges, bikes and other large
items! We criticise supermarkets on this site
sometimes, but they let staff have time off work to
plant trees along the river, so well done to them!

Science student Martina Keller took part in the


Clean-up. She told us, In the five years since this
started, you can see the change the rivers clear
again now, not black, like it used to be! Plants
are growing on the bottom of the river again, and
well see a lot more fish and birds, Im sure.

Questions 2125 (one mark per question)


Choose the five statements from AH below that are TRUE according to the information given
in the texts above. Write the letters of the TRUE statements on the lines below (in any order).
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.

A The Big Clean-up and tree-planting projects are improving the


River Vico.
B Waste paper and cardboard are causing serious pollution in the
River Mle.
C Some people dont go to the River Lamm because they are worried
about safety.
D The water quality on the River Tollen has continued to improve.
E The Big Clean-up Project on the River Vico takes place once a year.
F On the River Tollen rubbish has increased more than farm or
factory pollution.
G Money needs to be raised for improvements to the River Lamm.
H The paper factory near the River Mle is an important local employer.

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60

page 5

Appendix 2 Sample Reading & Writing exam paper

SAMPLE

ISE I

Questions 2630 (one mark per question)


The summary notes below contain information from the texts on pages 4 and 5. Find a word or
phrase (maximum three words) from texts AD to complete the missing information in gaps 2630.
Write your answers on the lines below.
Summary notes
The main causes of river pollution:
industrial pollution, eg waste from factories
agricultural pollution, eg (26.)
dumping large domestic items, eg fridges, bikes
household rubbish, eg (27.)
Ideas for improving the riverside environment:
developing sporting facilities, eg (28.)
encouraging transportation, eg pleasure boats, canal boats
creating public eating places, eg (29.)
designing visitor attractions , eg museum of industrial history
making the riverside a safer place, eg (30.)
getting local community involved, eg Big Clean-up, plant trees

page 6

This exam paper has four tasks. Complete all tasks.

61

Appendix 2 Sample Reading & Writing exam paper

ISE I

SAMPLE

Task 3 Reading into writing


You are doing a project on the environment and you need to write a short essay for your teacher
(100130 words) about the problem of river pollution in a city or town.
Use the information you read in Task 2 (pages 46) to:
w describe some problems from river pollution in a town or city
w explain some steps that can be taken to help clean up a polluted river and
w suggest how you think people can be encouraged to look after their local river better.
You should plan your essay before you start writing. Think about what you want to say and make
some notes to help you in this box:
Planning notes

(No marks are given for these planning notes)

Now write your essay of 100130 words on the lines below. Try to use your own words as far as
possible dont just copy sentences from the reading texts.

Turn over page

62

page 7

Appendix 2 Sample Reading & Writing exam paper

SAMPLE

page 8

ISE I

This exam paper has four tasks. Complete all tasks.

63

Appendix 2 Sample Reading & Writing exam paper

ISE I

SAMPLE

When you have finished your essay, spend 23 minutes reading through what you have written. Make
sure you have answered the task completely. Remember to check how you made use of the reading
texts, as well as the language and organisation of your writing.

Turn over page

64

page 9

Appendix 2 Sample Reading & Writing exam paper

SAMPLE

ISE I

Task 4 Extended writing


You have been talking about studying in class. Write an article (100130 words) for a website for
students about different ways to study. You should:
w give examples of ways you prefer to study and
w explain why these ways work for you.

You should plan your article before you start writing. Think about what you want to say and make
some notes to help you in this box:
Planning notes

(No marks are given for these planning notes)

Now write your article of 100130 words on the lines below.

page 10

This exam paper has four tasks. Complete all tasks.

65

Appendix 2 Sample Reading & Writing exam paper

ISE I

SAMPLE

Turn over page

66

page 11

Appendix 2 Sample Reading & Writing exam paper

SAMPLE

ISE I

When you have finished your article, spend 23 minutes reading through what you have written.
Make sure you have answered the task completely. Remember to check how you made use of the
reading texts, as well as the language and organisation of your writing.

End of exam
Copyright 2015 Trinity College London

67

Appendix 3 Information on the Speaking & Listening exam

Appendix 3 Information on the Speaking & Listening exam


Videos of sample Speaking & Listening exams may be viewed at www.trinitycollege.com/ISE

Task 1
Examiner rubric:
Youre going to hear a short talk about an animal called a giraffe.
You will hear the talk twice. As you listen, write down some notes about what you hear, if you want
to. After, I will ask you six questions on some facts about the giraffe.
Are you ready?

Questions
1. Where do giraffes get water from?
2. How fast can giraffes run?
3. After how long can a baby giraffe stand up?
4. What happens to baby giraffes after 10 hours?
5. How long do giraffes live for?
6. How do you know the age of a giraffe?
Below is an example of the listening exam form.

Integrated Skills in English ISE I


Listening exam form
Candidate name:
Task 1 Write some notes about the information in the talk if you want to:
w

Extra notes

68

Appendix 3 Information on the Speaking & Listening exam

Audio script
Giraffes are often five-and-a-half metres tall and not surprisingly, are the tallest animals on the planet.
Their height is useful for eating from trees, but drinking is difficult for giraffes. Fortunately, giraffes do
not need to drink everyday as they get most of the water they need from the plants they eat.
They eat most of the time and often sleep about two hours a day. They can run up to fifty-five
kilometres an hour and are so powerful that they can kill a lion by kicking it.
Female giraffes have babies standing up and so the babies fall one-and-a-half metres to the ground.
They are not hurt by the fall and after only 30 minutes the baby giraffes can stand by themselves.
Amazingly, after 10 hours, the baby giraffes can run around with their mothers.
Giraffes live up to 25 years in the wild. You can tell the age of a giraffe from its spots.
As a giraffe gets older, its spots get darker. They really are beautiful animals. [fade out...]

Answer key
1. From plants/the plants they eat
2. (Up to) 55 kilometres an hour
3. They are standing up
4. They can run around (with their mothers)
5. (Up to) 25 years
6. (By/from) its spots

69

Appendix 3 Information on the Speaking & Listening exam

Task 2
Examiner rubric:
Youre going to hear a short talk about science. You will hear the talk twice. The first time, just listen.
Then Ill ask you to tell me in a few words what the speaker is talking about.
Are you ready?
Turn over your paper. Now listen to the talk again. Write down some notes about what you hear, if you
want to.
Then Ill ask you to tell me six pieces of information about how children learn to speak. Are you ready?
Below is an example of the listening exam form.

Integrated Skills in English ISE I


Listening exam form
Candidate name:
Task 2 Write some notes about the information in the talk if you want to:
w

Extra notes

70

Appendix 3 Information on the Speaking & Listening exam

Audio script
Babies begin to speak at about one year old. To start with they learn words very slowly. For some time
they only know about 50 words mainly words for objects and people, then when they are about 18
months old their vocabulary suddenly begins to grow very fast. They begin to use verbs and adjectives
and they may learn as many as 10 new words every day. Some people say that this is because children
suddenly recognise what a word is, they realise that each word refers to something in the real world.
It is strange that children do not need to hear a word many times. Sometimes they have only heard it
two or three times before they begin to use it. By the time they are six years old children can use about
6,000 words and they can understand about 14,000.

Answer key
What the talk is about: How babies learn language/to speak (any broadly similar formulation
is acceptable)

Begin speaking at one

When does a baby begin to speak?

Learn words slowly

How quickly does a baby learn new words?

Knows 50 words at first

How many words does a one year old child know?

Knows words for objects and people What are a childs first words about?

Vocab grows fast at 18 months

What happens when a child is about 18 months old?

Learn 10 new words a day at 18


months

How many words can an 18 month old child learn a day?

Suddenly recognise what a word


is/refers to real world

Why does a childs vocabulary suddenly grown at 18


months?

Dont have to hear many times

Do children have to hear a word often in order to learn it?

Use 6,000 words by the age of six

How many words can a child use at the age of six?

10

Understand 14,000 words by the


age of six

How many words can a child understand at the age


of six?

71

Appendix 4 Suggested grammar for ISE I

Appendix 4 Suggested grammar for ISE I


The list below gives some suggested grammar for students to practice when preparing for an
ISE exam. This list is intended to be for guidance only and is not a list of forms the candidate
must produce in the test.

Language requirements
Grammar
Present perfect tense including use with for,
since, ever, never, just

Expressions of preference, e.g. I prefer, Id rather

Connecting clauses using because

Present continuous tense for future use

Will referring to the future for informing


and predicting

Past continuous tense

Adjectives and adverbials of quantity,


eg a lot (of), not very much, many

72

Zero and first conditionals, using if and when

Modals connected to the functions listed above,


eg must, need to, might, dont have to
Infinitive of purpose