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(Tf.n)...

(3He,d).
(p.cx)...

156

TECHNICALREPORTS SERlESNo.

Handbook on
Nuclear Activation
Cross-Sections
INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY, VIENNA, 1974

HANDBOOK ON
NUCLEAR ACTIVATION
CROSS-SECTIONS

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Printed by the IAEA in Austria


June 1974

TECHMCAL REPORTS SERIES No. 156

HANDBOOK ON
NUCLEAR ACTIVATION
CROSS-SECTIONS
Neutron, Photon and Charged-Particle
Nuclear Reaction Cross-Section Data

INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY


VIENNA, 1974

HANDBOOK ON NUCLEAR ACTIVATION CROSS-SECTIONS


IAEA, VIENNA, 1974
STI/DOC/10/156

FOREWORD
This Handbook contains data on cross-sections for thermal, epithermal
and fast neutron induced nuclear reactions as well as for those induced by
charged particles and photons. It is issued for users in various nuclear
application fields, with the main emphasis on activation analysis, but also
with an eye to radioisotope production and radiobiological protection.
To
some extent the compilations are also useful in reactor technology.
Activation analysis, which has made rapid progress during the last
decade, is widely used in such spheres as medicine and biology, environmental control, industry, agriculture and forensic investigations. Thus
the main part of this collection consists of cross-section data needed for
these purposes.
In the early days of activation analysis the thermal neutron played the
most predominant role as the bombarding particle responsible for inducing
radioactivity. Today the thermal neutron is probably still the particle
most used for such purposes. However, epithermal and fast neutrons are
becoming increasingly important as projectiles in nuclear analytical
chemistry.
Thermal and epithermal neutrons are usually produced in reactors,
whereas fast neutrons sire emitted from isotopic sources (e. g. 252Cf-sources)
or generated in 14-MeV neutron generators of the Cockcroft-Walton or
neutron generators of the Van de Graaff type.
For photon actvation analysis, various electron accelerators producing
bremsstrahlung in heavy materials are used. In some instances a hospital
betatron can be used for such studies.
Neutron and photon activation analysis is mainly used for bulk analysis
inasmuch as the intensity or energy of the bombarding particles or radiations is usually not changed in any essential way when passing the sample.
On the other hand, charged particles at low or intermediate energies are
stopped in a metal surface. For this reason charged particles are mainly
used for surface analysis, i.e. the determination of an element in a surface or of its concentration profile just below a surface. In charged particle activation analysis, accelerators of various types are used, the
Van de Graaff type being perhaps the most common,
As a rule of thuma, reactions induced with photons, charged particles
or 14-MeV neutrons are mainly used for the analysis of light elements,
whereas thermal and epithermal neutrons are applied in the analysis of
intermediate or heavier elements.
With a specific analytical problem in mind, the analytical chemist has
to select the most suitable nuclear reaction for solving his problem, and a
knowledge of cross-section values or excitation functions is essential. A
handbook containing the various types of cross-section values is thought to
be valuable for a first survey, particularly for scientists and technicians
in developing countries who may not always have easy access to the desired
information.

Many scientists have contributed to the preparation of this Handbook.


The editors, Mr. D. Brune of Aktiebolaget Atomenergi, Studsvik, Sweden,
and Mr. J. J. Schmidt of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section, Vienna, wish to
express their sincere gratitude to these scientists for their valuable contributions and co-operation.

CONTENTS
2200 m / s NEUTRON ACTIVATION CROSS-SECTIONS
R. S h e r

Introduction
References to Introduction
Table I. Thermal cross-section values

1
2
3

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS


H. A l b i n s s s o n

15

Introduction . . .
References to Introduction
Table of infinite-dilution resonance integrals
References to Table
TABLES AND GRAPES OF CROSS-SECTIONS FOR (n,p), (n.or)
AND (n,2n) REACTIONS IN THE NEUTRON ENERGY
REGION 1 - 37 MeV
M. B o r m a n n , H. N e u e r t , W . Scobel

P a r t i : Tables of cross-sections (range: 13. 9 - 15.1 MeV)


Introduction
References to Introduction
Table I. 14-MeV (n,p) cross-sections
Table II.

14-Me V (n, <*) cross-sections

15
17
18
81

87

87
87
90
91
105

Table III. 14-MeV (n,2n) cross-sections

113

References to Tables I - III

130

Part 2: Graphs of excitation functions (range 1-37 MeV)


Introduction
References to Introduction
Graphs of (n, p) cross-sections
Graphs of (n, a) cross-sections
Graphs of (n, 2n) cross-sections
References to graphs

139
139
140
141
185
212
270

CROSS-SECTIONS FOR FISSION NEUTRON SPECTRUM


INDUCED REACTIONS
A. C a l a m a n d

273

Introduction
Review of integral measurements for (n,p), (n, a), (n,2n)
and (n,n') reactions
Estimated average fission neutron cross-sections for
(n, p), (n, a) and (n, 2n) reactions

273
273
275

Table I.
Table II.

Adopted standards
Integral (n,p) cross-sections averaged in the
uranium-235 thermal fission neutron spectrum
Table III. Integral (n, a) cross-sections averaged in the
uranium-235 thermal fission neutron spectrum
Table IV. Integral (n,2n) cross-sections averaged in the
uranium-235 thermal fission neutron spectrum
Table V. Integral (n,n') cross-sections averaged in the
uranium-2 35 thermal fission neutron spectrum
Notes to Tables II-V
References to Tables II-V
Table VI. Estimated average cross-sections for (n,p), (n,o)
and (n, 2n) reactions in a fission neutron spectrum . .
EXCITATION FUNCTIONS FOR CHARGED-PARTICLE-INDUCED
NUCLEAR REACTIONS IN LIGHT ELEMENTS AT LOW
PROJECTILE ENERGIES
J. L o r e n z e n , D. B r u n e

280
282
294
299
304
305
307
310

325

Introduction
Graphs of excitation functions
Conventions and symbols
Proton
Deuteron
Alpha
Helium-3
Yield curves
References to graphs

325
327
327
328
348
379
391
431
436

Appendix 1: Excitation functions of charged-particle-induced


reactions at higher energies
Systematics
Table Al-I. Characteristic data for the excitation
functions
Figures Al-1 to Al-13

437
437
438
447

Appendix 2
Table A2-I. (P,Y) resonances as a function of proton
energies ranging from 163 keV to 3. 0 MeV . .

460
460

Appendix 3: Bibliography

473

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS
B. B u l o w , B. F o r k m a n

475

Introduction
References to Introduction
Graphs of cross-sections
Symbols
Contents list of graphs

475
485
485
485
486

2200 m / s NEUTRON ACTIVATION


CROSS-SECTIONS
R. SHER
Stanford University,
Stanford, Calif.,
United States of America
ABSTRACT. 2200 m/s neutron activation cross-sections for a large number of isotopes of interest to
neutron activation analysis are presented. In addition to the cross-sections, values are given for the half-lives
of the activities formed and the cross-sections for activation of isomeric and ground-states, if these are both
of interest.

INTRODUCTION
The following table of thermal cross-section values is based primarily
on recent compilations by N. Holden [1] and D. T. Goldman et al. [2], Only
isotopes of potential interest in thermal neutron activation analysis are
included, but these fall into two classes: those of intrinsic interest because
they are likely to be the materials being analysed, and those whose activation is likely to bs an important source of background. Of course, many
elements can fall into either class.
All entries are cross-sections at a neutron energy of 0. 02 53 eV (neutron
velocity of 2200 m/s). In most cases, the values are based on measurements
of the activation cross-section, but occasionally values inferred from
absorption cross-sections are used.
In many cases, Holden's values differ somewhat from those of Goldman
et al. , partly because of the inclusion of later data, and partly because of
differing judgements as to best values of the mean and error spread of
several measurements. As a general rule, when later data made the values
of Goldman et al. obsolete, Holden's values were given greater weight; when
differences between the two sets were due to different evaluations of the
same data, those of Goldman et al. were used for the most part. This simply
reflects the present author's greater familiarity with the latter. In some
cases the data were re-evaluated.
The error limits should not be taken too literally in most cases. Often
a set of several measured values falling far outside their individually quoted
limits of error had to be reconciled, and in the spirit of Goldman et al.
many of the quoted error limits simply represent a rough indication of the
spread of the individual measurements. Because of this, they are often
considerably larger than the uncertainties claimed by individual experimenters.
To include a complete bibliography of the original cross-section measurements would have encumbered an already lengthy table. Measurements up
to about 1966 are referenced in BNL-325 [3]; references to more recent
results can be found in bibliography and data compilations such as CINDA [4]
and the NEA Neutron Data Compilation Centre Newsletter [5], or can be
obtained from the various neutron data centres 1 .
1
National Neutron Cross-Section Center, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, L. I., N. Y. 11973, USA.
NEA Neutron Data Compilation Centre, F-91190 Gif-sur-Yvette, B. P. No 9, France.
Centr po Jadernym Dannym, F.ziko-Energeticheskij lnstitut, Obninsk, Kaluga oblast, USSR.
Nuclear Data Section, IAEA, 1010 Vienna, Austria.

SHER

Table I lists, in addition to the cross-sections, the half-lives of the


activities formed and the cross-sections for activation of isomeric and
ground-states, if these are both of interest.
Unless otherwise noted, cross-section values refer to the effective
activation of the state, not its direct formation. Thus, for example, in
164
Dy, where the 1. 2 5-min isomer decays to the 2. 3-hour ground-state,
the cross-section value for the ground-state listed is the sum of the formation
cross-sections to the two levels. In a few cases, the isomeric state has
other modes of decay besides the transition to the ground-state; for those
the contribution to the ground-state activation cross-section is corrected
by the branching ratio. The principal cases for which the ground-state
activation cross-section is not given by the sum of its direct-formation
cross-section plus the isomeric-state cross-section are those in which the
half-life of the isomeric state is comparable to or longer than that of the
ground-state, and those in which the isomeric state does not decay to the
ground-state. These instances, carry the notation "direct formation", if
there is possible ambiguity.
Not all of the entries in the table are of equal importance, of course.
However, the increasing use in neutron-activation analysis of high-resolution
detectors and the increasing sophistication of sample preparation and separation techniques make it desirable to include many isotopes whose activities
admittedly will be seldom seen.
No attempt has been made to list the radioactive properties of the activation products other than half-lives, since these are easily available in
sources such as Lederer et al. [6].

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
I am greatly indebted to N. Holden and to D. T. Goldman, J. R. Stehn,
and P. Aline for permission to use their compilations. They should not
be blamed for any errors in the table, for which I take full responsibility.

REFERENCES TO INTRODUCTION
[ 1] HOLDEN, N . , "Recommended values of thermal-neutron cross sections and resonance integrals for the
1972 chart of the nuclides", March 1973 version (unpublished).
[2] GOLDMAN, D . T . , ALINE, P . , SHER, R., STEHN, I . , "2200 m/sec absorption cross sections" (unpublished).
[3] BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY, Neutron Cross Sections, 2nd Edn, Brookhaven National Lab.
Rep. BNL-325 (1958), with Supplements 1960 and 1966.
[4] CINDA 71, An Index to the Literature on Microscopic Neutron Data, published by IAEA on behalf of the
four CINDA centres, IAEA, Vienna (1971).
[ 5] NEA Neutron Data Compilation Centre Newsletter, NEA, Saclay.
[6] LEDERER, C M . , HOLLANDER, J . M . , PERLMAN, I . , Table of Isotopes, 6th Edn, Wiley, New York (1968).

THERMAL NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

TABLE I. THERMAL CROSS-SECTION VALUES


Element
Carbon
Nitrogen

Oxygen

,
. e
Isot
P
13,,

Abundance
(Percent)

Product
Ha If-Life

1.11

5730 years

14,,,

99.63

18

"0

n,Y

(barns)

-3
(0.9 0.2) x 10

5730 years (14C) (ap = 1.82 0.03)


(24 8) x 10' 6

0.37

7.2 sec

0.204

26.8 sec

-3
(0.16 0.01) x 10

Fluorine

" F

100

11.2 sec

-3
(9.8 0.7) x 10

Sodium

23

Na

100

15 hours

0.528 0.005

Magnesium

26

Mg

Aluminum

27

Silicon

30

Phosphorus
Sulfur

A1
Si

31 p

34

36,.

Chlorine

37

C1

11.17
100
3.09
100
4.22
0.014
24.47

9.5 min

-3
(38 + 3) x 10

2.3 min

0.232 0.003

2.62 hours

0.105 0.005

14 .3 days

0 .190 0 .010

88 days

0 .034 0 .005

5 .06 min

0.7 sec3 8 Cl m (5 3) x 10" 3


37 min3 8 C1 9

Argon

Potassium

36j

'Ar

0.337

34 days

38'Ar
40'Ar

0.063

269 years

41,

99.6
6.88

0 .15 0. 03

1.83 hours
12.4 hours

0.43 0.01
6 2
0.8 0.2
0.65 0.03
1.48 0.03

SHER

TABLE I (cont. )
Element

Calcium

Scandium

Isotope

Abundance
(Percent)

Product
Half-Life

a n > Y (barns)

44

Ca

2.06

165 days

1.1 0.3

46

Ca

0.0033

4.53 days

0.7 0.2

48

Ca

0.18

8.8 minutes

1.1 0.1

45

Sc

100

20 sec 4 6 Sc m
46

83.8 days Sc

10 4
9

25 + 2

Titanium

50 T i

5.34

5.8 minutes

0.179 .003

Vanadium

51V

99.76

3.76 minutes

4.90 0.05

Chromium

50

Cr
54,Cr

4.31

27.8 davs

16.0 + 0.5

2.38

3.5 minutes

0.38 0.04

Manganese

55,

100

2.58 hours

13.3 0.1

Iron

54

Fe

5.82

2.6 years

2.5 0.4

58

Fe

0.33

45 days

1.14 0.05

59,
Co

100

10.5 min 6 0 Co m

19.9 0.91

Cobalt

Mn

5.26yrs
60

60

Co 9

37.5 0.2

10.5 min 99 minutes

( 60 Co g

5.26 yrs 99 minutes

2.0 0.2)

( Co

58 + 8)

Nickel

64

Ni

1.16

2.56 hours

1.50 0.05

Copper

63

Cu

69.09

12.8 hours

4.4 0.2

65,
Cu

30.91

5.1 minutes

2.20 0.05

THERMAL NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

TABLE I (cont. )
Element

Zinc

Isotope
64

;:n

68

;:n

Abundance
(Percent)

48.89
18.57

Product
Half-Life
245 days

0.82 0.01
69

13.8 hrs Zn
69

Ga11iurn

Zn

69Ga
71Ga

0.62

(90 10) x 10" 3 (dir. form.)

60.4

21.1 minutes

1.7 0.2

39.6

36 usec

72

Ga m

20.52

20 msec

71

0.15 0.05

4.7 0.3

Ge m

0.28 0.07

71

11.4 days Ge
74

Ge

36.54

Arsenic
Selenium

Ge

7.76

0.52 0.06

77

0.09 0.02

54 sec Ge

11 hrs " G e 9

0.07 0 .02 (dir . formation)


4.4 0 . 2

100

26. 5 hours

74

<;e

0.87

120 .4 days

76

5;e

9.02

78

s;e

23.52

3.9 min

80

,e

49.82

57 min

77

17. 5 sec

79

81

55 + 5
Se

Se m

81

Se

21 2
0.33 0 .04

Se m

18. 6 min
9.19

0.16 0.03

As

Se

3.5 0.13

75

75

82

48 sec7 5 Ge m
82 min Ge

76

(9 1) x 10" 3

2.4 min7 1 Zn 9

14 hrs Ga
70
'Ge

0.07 0.01
1.0 0.2 (dir. formation)

3.97 hrs7 1 Zn m

72

Germanium

57 min Zn
70

a n > y (barns)

0.08 0 .01
9

0.54 0 .04 (dir . formation)

70 sec

83

Se m

3
(6 1) x 1 0 '

25 min

83

Se9

(39 3)

io- 3

(dir. form.)

SHER

T A B L E I (cont. )
Element
Bromine

,,.
Isotope
79
Br

81

Br

Abundance

Product
Half-Life

(percent)

50.54

49.46

4.38 hrs

80

Br m

17.6 min

80

82

6.1 min

78
'Kr

0.35

55 sec

78

Br

82

Br

8.4 + 0.3 (direct

'Kr

82

Kr

84,Kr

2.27

11.56
56.90

13 sec

81

Krm

0.2 0.05

Kr m

4.6 0.7

83

20 4

85

Strontium

W..3T

76 minutes

Rb

72.15

1.05 rain

S4 r
Sr

0.56

Yttrium

89

94
96

Kr g

(42 4) x 10" 3 ( d i r . form.)


-3
(60 20.) x 10'

86

Rb ra

(50 "* S) x JO" 3


0.45 * 0.02

17.8 minutes

0.12 0.03

70 min

0.57 0.05
85

2.'83 hr-s

82.56

52- days.

100

3.1 hrs
64

Zirconium

0.10 0.03

18.65 days 8 6 Rb 9

64 days
8.6.
Sr
88.
Sr

Kr

"Kr

87,Rb
in
(5 x 10 10 yrs) 27.85

Kr m

85

TO.76 yrs

Rubidium

3.0 0.3

4.7 0.7

1.86 hrs
4.4 hrs

formation)

2.7 0.3
9

34.9 hrs
80

(barns)

2.6 0.2

Br m

35.34 hrs
Krypton

Sr9

87

Sr

0.3 Q.1 { d i r e c t formation)


m

0.8 Q.1

1} X: 1
90

Ym

hours9 (

(1.0 0.2) x 10-3


1.2 0.1

Zr

17.40

65 days

(75 8) x lO"3

Zr

2.80

17 hours

0.05 0.01

THERMAL NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

TABLE I (cont. )
(barns)

(Pedant)
Niobium

Molybdenum

93

'"Mo
100

Ruthenium

Rhodium

Nb

Mo

96

100

23.78

Ha-Ufe
94

6 . 3 min

0.14 + 0.02

9.63

14 .6 minutes

0.20 0.05

Ru

5.51

2. 9 days

0.21 0.02

102

Ru

31.61

39 .6 days

1.3 0.1

104

Ru

18.58

4 . 44 hours

0.47 0.20

103

Rh

TOO

106

Pd

108

4. 41 min 1 0 4 Rh m
104

Pd

"Op.

I'd

sec 10 V

4.7 min109Pdm

11.81

51.82
48.18

106

Cd

1.22
28.86

J.S8

Pd

]11

Pd 9

12 2
(20 15) x 10' 3
0.36 0.05 ( d i r . form.

2.42 fflin

T08

Ag 9

253 days

110

24.2 sec

110

Ag

37 2
4.7 C

Ag 9 89 4

6.5 hours
43 days

-3

0.17 0.02

5.5 hrs " ' p d " 1

53.5 hrs
Ttt, Cd

(13 2) x 10

26.71

TO9

11 1
139 5 (dire

22

22 min
Silver

Rh

27.33

13,47hrs

Cadmium

0.15 0.10

67 hours

43 sec
Palladium

Nb m

1.0 0.5

115

Cd

115

3.4 hrs

117

2,4 hrs

];17

Cd 9

(36 7) x 10' 3
0.300 0.015

(27 5) x 10" 3

Cd 9

(50 8) x 10' 3

Cd

SHER

TABLE I (cont. )
Element
Ind i um

Isotope
113

In

Abundance
(Percent)
4.28

Product
Half-Life
114

50 day

a
(barns)
n.Y

Inm

7.8 2.0

72 s e c 1 1 4 l n 9
115

Tin

In

112

Sn

95.72

0.96

116

2.2 sec

118
120
122
124

116

Inm

14 sec

116

20 min

113

113

Sn

14.30

14 day

Sn

24.03

250 day

Sn

32.85

27 hours

4.72

40 min

Sn

5.94

9.7 min

121

Sb

57.25

119

123

Tellurium

Sb

42.75

0.089

42 4
0.35 0.08
0.71 0.10
(6 2) x 10 '

(8 2) x 10 " 3

0.15 0.02

Sn m

0.14 0.02

Sn

Sn

122

Sb m

122

Sb9

(55 10) x 10 ' 3


6.2 0.2

Sb

93 sec

124

Sbmi

(30 8) x 1 0 ' 3

60 day

124

Sb9

4.0 0.2

121

154 day

121

18.71

109 day
9.4 hour

69 min

Te9

127

0.34 0.06
2.0 0.3
1.1 0.5

(40 25) x 10 " 3

Tem

0.125 0.023

127

1 2

129

x 10 ' 3

(15 4 )

Tem

1 2

58 day

34 day

Te m

123

117 day

m2

4 2

21 min

4.61

31.79

161 5

124

17 day
2.46

91 10

0.14 0.03

125

2.8 days

Snm

125

4.2 min

Sng

Sn

123

Sn

In

Snm

117

9.4 day
Antimony

In

54 min

115 day
116

3.0 1.0
m

Te9

0.9 0.15

(15 2) x 1 0 ' 3

Te 9

0.155

0.040

THERMAL NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

TABLE I (cont. )
Element

r
Isot

.
Pe

Tellurium
(cont.)

34.48

Iodine

Xenon

Abundance
(Percent)

124
Xe
128

Xe

130
Xe
132

Xe

Product
Half-Life
131

30 hour

Xe

136
Xe

Cesium

133

Cs

130

132

Ba

Ba

134
136

100

25 minutes

6.2 0.2

0.096

17 hours

100 20

1.92
4.08
26.89

8 day 1 2 9 X e m

10.44
8.87
100

Cerium

0.101

0.097
2.42

0.43 0.10
m

0.34 0.08

2.26 day 1 3 3 Xe m

0.53 0.10

11.8 day

131

Xe

133

Xe

0.05 0.02 ( d i r . form.)

9.2 hours

0.23 0.02

3 .9 minutes

0.16 + 0.05

134

2.9 hour

Cs m

134

Cs9

15 min

131

Ba m

12 day

131

Ba9

133

7. 2 year

135

29 hour

Ba

30.0 1.5
2.5 0.3
11 3

Ba m

137

2.6 0.2

8.5 1.0
0.16 0.02

(10 1) x 1 0 " 3

Ba

7.81

Ba

71.66

82 .9 minutes

0.35 0.15

139

La

99.911

40 .2 hours

9.0 0.3

136

Ce

0.193

34 .4 hour

138

Lanthanum

Ba

0.02 0.01
0.2 0.1

2.05 year

Barium

Te m

(barns)

25 min 1 3 1 T e g

5.27 day
134

n, Y

2. 55 min

9. 0 hour
138

Ce

0.250

55 sec

Ba

137

137

139

Ce m

Ce9

Ce

140 day 1 3 9 Ce 9

0.95 0.25
6.3 1.5 ( d i r . formation)
(15 5) x 1 0 ' 3
1.1 0.3

10

SHER

TABLE I (cont. )
Element
Cerium
(cont.)

Praseodymium

Isotope

Abundance
(Percent)

Product
Half-Life

Samarium

Ce

88.48

33 days

0.58 0.06

142

Ce

11.07

S3;7 hours

1.1 0.3

100

14.6 min

141pr

142

Pr m

142

Pr 9

3.9 0.5
11.5 1.0

146

Nd

17.22

11.1 days

1.4 0.2

148

Nd

5.73

1.8 hours

2.5 0.2

150

Nd

5.62

12 minutes

1.3 0.3

144

Sm

3.09

340 days

0.7 0.3

150

Sm

7.44

87 years

102 5

152

Sn,

26.72

47 hours

210 10

sm

22.71

23 minutes

5.5 1.1

Eu

47.82

96 min

152

9 hour

152

154

Europium

(barns)

140

19.2 hour
Neodymium

151

Eumi

152

12 year
153

Eu m 2

Eu

3.8 1.9
2800 300
5300 300

Eu

52.18

16 years

400 100

152

Gd

0.20

242 days

1100 100

158

Gd

24.87

18 hours

3.5 1.0

160

Gd

21.90

3.7 minutes

0.77 0.04

Terbium

159

Tb

100

72.1 days

25 5

Dysprosium

158

Dy

0.090

144 days

96 20

164

Dy

28.18

1.26 min

Gadolinium

Hoi mi urn

165

Ho

100

165

Dy m

2100 400

139 min

165

Dy

2600 200

26.9 hr

166

Ho 9

61. .5 + .2..0

11

THERMAL NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

TABLE I (cont. )
Element
Erbium

Isotope

0.136

75 minutes

160 + 30

llr

1.56

10.3 hours

13 + 5

IEr

27.07

9.4 days

1.9 0.2

IIr

14.88

7.52 hours

6 1

Tm

100

130 days

106 + 5

0.135

32 days

169

168 y b
Yb

31.84

101 hr

176 v b

12.73

1.9 hr

177

97.41

3.69 hr

176

Lum

155 day

177

Lu

6.7 day

177

Lu9

175

Lu

I.U

2.59

174

Hf

0.18

70 days

177

Hf

18.50

4.3 sec

178 H f

Tantalum

3200 400
175

176

Hafnium

(barns)

llr

174

Lutetium

164

170

Ytterbium

Product
Half-Life

162

168

Thulium

Abundance
(Percent)

18.6 sec

1 7

Hf

13.75

5.5 hour

Hf

35.24

42.3 days

Ta

.100

16.5 min

30.64

38.41

^ V

18 3
7 2
2050 50

1.1 + 0.1
52 6
0.34 0.03
12.6 0.7

182

182

Tam

Ta9

1.6 - n i n 1 8 6 ^
75 day

186,

5.5 1.0

Hfm

180

Yb 9

65 + 5

178

27.14

1T5 day

Yb

390 + 55

179

W1

185

W9

23.9 hours

(10 2) x 1 0 ' 3
22 1

(2.4 0.4) x 1<T3


1.8 0.2
37 2

12

SHER

TABLE I (cont. )
Element
Rhenium

Isotope
185

Re

187

Re

Abundance
(Percent)
37.07
62.93

Product
Half-Life
90 hours

184

0s

0.02

189

0s

16.1

190

0s

26.4

18.7 min

Iridium

Re

188

Re9

94 days
9.9 min

0s

13 hour

191

0sm

191

192

0s

41.0

31 hours

191

Ir

37.3

75 year

0s

Platinum

2.0 1.0
75 4

(0.26 0.03) x 10" 3


12 6
16+6
1.6 0.4

192

Irm2

1.4min 1 9 2 lr m >
74 day

>

3000 600
190

15 day

(barns

110 5
188

16.7 hour
Osmium

n,y

192

Ir9

0.4 0.2
610 60
925 50

193

Ir

62.7

17.4 hours

110 15

192

Pt

0.78

4.3 day 1 9 3 P t m

2 1

194

Pt

32.9

4.1 day 1 9 5 P t m

(87 13) x 10" 3

196

Pt

25.3

80 min

197

197

18 hour
198

Pt

Gold

197

Au

Mercury

196

Hg

7.21

Ptm
Pt9

(60 20) x 10' 3


0.8 0.1

30 minutes

3.7 0.2

100

2.7 days

98.8 0.3

0.146

24 hour

197

Hg m

120+15

65 hour

197

Hg 9

3000, 100 (dir- form.)

198

Hg

10.02

43 min

202

Hg

29.80

46.9 days

4.9 0.2

204

Hg

6.85

5.5 minutes

0.43 0.10

199

Hg

0.02 0.01

13

THERMAL NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

TABLE I (cont. )
Element
Thallium

Isotope
2O3.n
205- n

Lead
Bismuth
Thorium
Uranium

Plutonium

208

!>b

209,.

232

Th

Abundance
(Percent)

(barns)

3.8 years

10 1

70.50

4.19 minutes

0.5 0.2

3.30 hours

(20 10) x 10' 3

100

5.0 days

(19 + 2) x

100

22.2 minutes

7.4 0.1

52.3

0.72

238L

99.27

Fu

29.50

235L,

239

Product
Half-Life

io- 3

( a f = 580 2)
23.5 minutes

2.720 + 0. 025
(a f = 742 3)

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS


H. ALBINSSON
The Swedish Research Couacil 1 s Laboratory,
Studsvik, Nykbping, Sweden
ABSTRACT. A compilation is given of infinite'dilution resonance integrals (1/v contribution included).
Most results have been obtained from experiments, although in some cases evaluated data have also been
included. The resonance -integral values have been normalized to conform to various standards, mainly tho.se
from 197Au and M C o .

INTRODUCTION
The present compilation of values of infinite-dilution resonance integrals
is based on two sources: (1) a print-out of resonance-integral references from the NEA Neutron Data Compilation Centre, and (2) a listing of
IAEA references. For most nuclei new results have been added to those
presented earlier by Drake [1]. References to some older papers have not
been included, however, if newer and more precise data were available.
Generally, progress reports or laboratory reports have not been considered,
unless they were presented by Drake or as references in journals. Some
earlier resonance-integral values given in journals have also been omitted
if they were superseded by more recent data in laboratory reports. If these
were not of official character, however, such information has not been used
in the present compilcition.
Readers interested in a full coverage are, of course, referred to
CINDA 73 and its supplement [2].
Presentation of data in the table
The compilation is presented in the form of a table, which is arranged
as follows:
Column 1 (Isotope): The relevant target nucleus is presented in a standard
manner, such as 52 Cr ; which stands for the element chromium of mass 52.
If the mass number is not given, the notation stands for natural chromium,
m and g attached to an element symbol indicate a metastable state and the
ground-state of the nucleus, respectively. As far as a metastable state is
concerned it is further specified in the last column (Comments) if necessary.
Column 2 (Ref.): The resonance integrals are taken from bibliographical
references, a list of which follows the table.
Column 3 (Symbol): Symbol refers to the resonance integral quantity, the
value of which is given in column 4. The following notations have been used:
I

= Reduced resonance integral, i.e. with the 1/v component subtracted, taken over the whole epi-Maxwellian spectrum

RI = Resonance integral above the cadmium cutoff, i. e. normally


above 0.5 eV
15

16

ALBINSSON

Column 4 (Value): Here are given the values of I or RI, depending on the
notation in column 3, expressed in units of barns.
Column 5 (Method): The following notations are used to indicate the method
for obtaining the resonance integral:
act

= activation, with or without the cadmium method, absolute


activation, or cadmium ratio relative to thermal activation

abs

= absorption

react
= from reactivity measurements
pile osc
= comparison of pile-oscillator reactivity to a standard
mass spec = comparison of irradiated and non-irradiated material
using the mass-spectrometer method
calc
= calculated from measured capture cross-sections
t of f
= from time-of-flight measurements using a fast chopper
rec

= recommended in the reference

eval

= evaluated in the reference

Column 6 (Comments): As the standards for the resonance integrals may vary
from one experiment to another, most of them are presented. This is done
in a way similar to that used by Drake [1], i.e. Au (1558) means that in the
particular experiment presented in the reference the standard for RI was
gold with the value of 1558 barns (see also below). If the RI or I values in the
literature are not given in a direct form, as presented in column 4, but for
example as the ratio of RI/CJ 0 , this is mentioned here. For simplicity, aQ
stands for the absorption cross-section at the energy of 0.0253 eV. The RI
(or I) value given in column 4 is then the one obtained by multiplying the RI/cr0
(or I/erg) ratio by the relevant cross-section value found in Sher1 s article [3]
in this Handbook. In a few cases the results of the experiments are expressed
as Westcott So values [4], i.e. Sfl= 21-Iir- l/ag, where I is the reduced resonance
integral and oQ is the absorption cross-section at the energy of 0.0253 eV.
The RI and I values are also obtained here by usingthe pertinent value of a given
by Sher [3].

Standards used in the table


Unless otherwise stated in column 6, the resonance-integral values are
given so as to conform to the conventions used by Drake [1], namely:
(1) The resonance integral is defined by

RI -/a(E, f
(2) The cadmium cutoff energy, E c , is set at 0.5 eV.
(3) The 1/v contribution is taken from Macklin and Pomerance [5] as 0.44 aQ.

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

17

(4) Normalization standards for the resonance integrals of 191Au and 59Co
are respectively:
RI (197Au) = 1550 b
RI (59Co) = 75. 0 b
The corresponding 2200-m/s cross-sections have been chosen from Sher [3]
as:
o0 (197Au) = 98.8 b
CT (S9Co)

= 37.5 b

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The author is greatly indebted to Dr. J.J. Schmidt, from the IAEA
Nuclear Data Section, and to Drs. N. Tubbs and A. Schett, from the NEA
Neutron Data Compilation Centre, for quickly supplying the necessary
listings.
REFERENCES TO INTRODUCTION
[1}
[2]
[3]
[4]

DRAKE, M.K., Nucleonics 24 8(1966)108.


CINDA 73 and SUPPLEMENT, An Index to the Literature on Microscopic Neutron Data, IAEA, Vienna(1973).
SHER, R., "2200 metre/sec neutron activation cross-sections", this Handbook.
WESTCOTT, C.H., WALKER, W.H., ALEXANDER, T.K., "Effective cross sections and cadmium ratios
for the neutron spectra of thermal reactors", 2nd Int. Conf. Peaceful Uses At. Energy (Proc. Conf. Geneva,
1958) 16, UN, New Ycrk (1958) 70.
[5] MACKLIN, R. L., POMERANCE, H. S., "Resonance capture integrals", 1st Int. Conf. Peaceful Uses At.
Energy (Proc. Conf. Geneva, 1955) 5, UN, New York (1956) 96.

18

ALBINSSON

T A B L E OF I N F I N I T E - D I L U T I O N R E S O N A N C E I N T E G R A L S

Isotope

Value (b)

Method

Comments

RI

28

pile osc

Au (1558)

RI

32.2

react

Li (32.2). Reactor measurements, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

RI

react

Li (32.2). Reactor measurements, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

RI

react

Li (32.2). Reactor measurements, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

RI

calc

Calculated from measured


cross-section relative to
aQ (23Na)

RI

2.3

0.5

react

Li (32.2). Reactor measurements, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

RI

0.041

0.001

act

Au (1551). RI/o o measured

RI

0.023

0.005

act

Resonance parameters 2.7


to 1 500 keV

27 000

act

Co (69.9). Cd thickness
coefficient 2.293

pile osc

Au (1588)

18

19

Symbol

Li

14

Ref.

280

4.8

40

2.4

(8. 5 0.4) x 10~4

22

Na

RI

23

Na

RI

0.251

RI

0.37

0.01

act

Au (1551). RI/o o measured

RI

0.291

0.012

act

Au (1550)

7, 11

0.07

0.01

act

Au (1490). RI - 0.312

0.07

0.01

act

Au (1490). RI - 0.311

RI

0.514

act

Au (1607)

0.080

act

Au (1514). RI - 0.317

10

203 000

0.012

19

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope
23
Na
(cont.)

Ref.
40

Symbol
Rl

Value (b)
0.32

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI - 0.31

Mg

"Mg

23

FOR

A1

0.03

Comments
Au (1551). E c - 0.2 eV

Na
pile osc

Au

(1558)

0.020

pile osc

Au

(1513). RI - 0.07

0.036

0.002

act

Au

(1551). RI/o

0.008

0.012

pile osc

Au

(1513). RI - 0.025

Rl

0.92

12

0.045

RI

10

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI - 0.030 FOR


27

Method

measured

26,
Mg

RI

0.19

pile osc

Au (1558)

RI

0.17

act

Au (1558)

12

<0.08

pile osc

Au (1513)

RI

0.25

act

Au (1551) . RI/o measured

10

0.066

act

Au (1514). RI - 0.17

13

RI

0.159

act

Cd-ratio and o

0.009

calculate

used to

RI

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI - 0.17

Si

RI

0 .58

pile osc

Au (1558)

4, 7

RI

0 .69

act

Au

(1551). RI/a

Au

(1558)

Au

(1558)

osc

Au

(1558)

pile O 8 C

Au

(1558)

react

Li (32.2). Reactor roeasurements, not corrected

measured

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI - 0.6


31

RI

RI

0.092

act

RI

0.64

pile

Cl

RI

12.1

RI

12.8

<2

pile

1.7

osc

for deviation from 1/E

20

ALBINSSON

Isotope

Ref.

ci
(com.)

14

35

37

Symbol
RI

Value (b)
14.0

0.7

<20

15

RI

Cl

RI

0.213

79

0.35

10

0.12

Calculated from measured

act

Co (69.9)

0.009

act

Au (1551). RI/c

0.10

act

Au (1510). RI - 0.37

0.06

act

Au (1514). RI 0.31

RECOMMENDED VALUES: RI = 0.17 FOR

measured

37,
Cl AND

0.12 FOR

calc

Comments

capture cross-section

Cl

40.
Ar

Method

Cl

16

RI

0.42

act

Au (1534)

RI

1.13

pile osc

Au (1558)

RI

3.5

react

Li (32.2). Reactor meas-

1.1

urement, not corrected for


deviation from 1/E

41

RI

1.37

0.06

act

17

RI

1.35

0.06

calc

18

RI

1.09

act

Au (1551). RI/o

measured

E c - 0.68 eV
a = 1.2 + 0.1
o

10

0.77

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI = 1.28 FOR

Ca

0.15

act

Au (1514). RI - 1.40

pile osc

Au (1558)

RI

1.87 '

44

Ca

19

RI

0.56

0.01

act

Co (69.9)

46

Ca

RI

0.32

0.12

act

Au (1550)

48

Ca

RI

0.90

0.01

act

Au (1551). RI/o

measured
0

21

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope
45

Sc

Ref.

Symbol

Value (b)

RI

10.2

Method

act

Comments

Au (1558). Cd ratio relative to thermal activation

RI

13

act

Au (1551). RI/a measured


o

RI

10.7

0.9

act

Au (1550)

pile osc

Au (1558)

react

Li (32.2). Reactor meas-

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI - 11

Ti

RI

3.2

RI

3.8

0.9

urement, not corrected for


deviation from 1/E

50

Ti

51

RI

5.5

10

RI

0.4

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured


o

0.038

0.011

act

Au (1514). RI - 0.12

3.3

0.8

react

Li. (32.2). Reactor meas-

urement, not corrected for


deviation from 1/E

12

RI

2.15

RI

3.0

50

RI

2.45

<1.6

pile osc

Au (1513). RI < 2.1

act

Au (1558)

0.1

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured


o

0.03

act

Neutron energy range


1-50

000 eV

20

0.36

0.10

act

E c - 0.68 eV. RI - 2.52

10, 7

0.48

0.09

act

Au (1514). RI - 2.64

23

RI

4.10

0.40

act

18

RI

2.62

act

E c - 0.68 eV
a

- 4.5 0.5
0

RECOMMENDED VALUE I I I - 2 . 7

22

ALBINSSON

Isotope

Ref.

Cr

Symbol

Value (b)

Rl

2.04

RI

2.6

1.1

Method

Comments

pile osc

Au (1558)

react

Li (32.2). Reactor measurement, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E.

21

RI

1.5

0.1

23

RI

1.58

0.16

calc
Calculated from data from
pure isotopes

50

Cr

52
Cr

53 Cr

54
Cr

21

RI

7.4

0.4

calc

22

RI

10.4

0.4

act

Co (69.9)

RI

7.8

0.4

act

Au (1551). RI/o

23

RI

8.58

0.86

act

21

RI

0.43

0.04

calc

23

RI

0.22

0.03

act

21

RI

8.4

0.7

calc

23

RI

10.75

1.00

act

23

RI

0.03

0.01

act

measured

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI - 2.0 FOR Cr


50
RI - 8.5 FOR
Cr
55

Mn

24

RI

14

abs

Au (1558)

25

10.3

pile osc

Au (1540). RI - 16

RI

10.7

pile osc

Au (1558)

RI

11.7

1.5

react

Li (32.2)

12

4.5

2 .5

pile osc

Au (1513). RI - 10.5

23

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

Ref.

55
Mn
(com.)

Sjinbol

RI
74

Value (b)

13.8

0.8

7.8

Method

Comments

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured


o

abs

Au (1525). RI - 13.7

28, 7

RI

14.2

26

RT.

15.0

RI:

14.1

act

Au (1490)

27

R]

14.6

act

Au (1500)

147

RX

18.1

act

Au (1530)

13

Rl

15.6

act

Cd-ratio and o used to


o
calculate RI

Rl

17.6

act

Au (1607)

29

RI

13.9

0.7

act

Au

40

RI

12.8

1.1

act

Au (1551) E

18

RI

13.4

0.5

act

5.7

1.7

148

1.4

1.2

= 0.55 eV

act

- 0.2 eV

- 0.68 eV

RI - 11.6. Mn bath method

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI - 14

Fe

58

Fe

RI

2.17

RI

2.3

12

RI

25
4, 7

pile osc

Au (1558)

react

Li (32.2). Reactor measuremerits, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

1.86

pile osc

Au

(1513)

1.0

pile osc

Au

(1540). RI - 2.14

RI

1.7

act

Au

(1551). RI/o

0 .4

0 .1

measured
0

RI

1.18

0 .07

act

Au

(1550). a
0

- 1.23

24

ALBINSSON

Isotope

Ref.

58
Fe
(cont.)

30

Symbol

Value (b)
0.58

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI - 1 . 2 FOR


58

Co

31

RI

58

0.16

Method

Comments

act

Au ( 1 4 9 0 ) . RI = 1 . 1 5

act

Co (75). Measured 9.0 h

Fe

5
2.5 x 10

isomer only

150

RI

(5.5 2 .2) x l O 5

act

9. h isomer

149

(7.6 1 .6) x l O 5

act

T 13.3 h for the decay


curve (Tj^ 2 = 9.4 h)

59

Co

RI

76.1

RI

77

RI

70

67

50

24

RI

32
33

act

Au (1551). RI/a measured

act

Au (1550)

rec

pile osc

Au (1540). RI = 66.7

74.6

abs

Au (1558)

RI

72.1

act

Au (1535)

RI

73.2

act

Au (1565)

pile osc

Au (1558)

react

Li (32.2). Reactor meas-

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI = 75.0 FOR

Ni

RI

4.03

RI

3.2

59

Co

0.5

urement, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

25

1.0

pile osc

Au (1540). RI - 1.04

60

Ni

23

RI

2.10

0.21

act

62

Ni

19

RI

9.6

3.5

act

Co (69.9)

RI

0.77

0.03

act

Au (1551). RI/o

measured
0

25

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope
64:

Ni

Ref.

Symbol

10, 7

Value (b)
0.44

0.14

Method

Comments

act

Au (1514). RI - 1.1

pile osc

Au (1558)

react

Li (32.2). Reactor meas-

(com.)
RECOMMENDED VALUE RI -

Cu

0.9

FOR ""*Ni

RI

4.15

RI

3.7

0.8

urement, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

63

Cu

Cu

25

2.2

12

1.2

35

2.6

112

RI

3.3

RI

pile osc

Au (1540). RI - 3.85

0.5

pile osc

Au (1510). RI - 3.07

0.3

calc

RI = 4.31

0.3

react

B std

3.82

act

Au (1558)

RI

4.68

act

Au (1558)

3.09

0.15

act

Au (1490). RI - 5.12

11

3.17

0.18

act

Au (1490). RI - 5.42

RI

5.7

0.3

act

Au (1551). RI/a

10, 7

2.5

0.2

act

Au (1514). RI - 4.4

40

RI

5.6

0.5

act

Au (1551). E

151

RI

4.2

act

Au (1555)

RI

2.42

act

Au (1558)

1.38

0.40

act

Au (1490). RI - 2.64

11

1.39

0.22

act

Au (1490). RI - 2.63

RI

2.6

0.2

act

Au (1551). RI/o

10

1.17

0.12

act

Au (1514). RI - 2.2

measured

- 0.2 eV

measured

ALBINSSON

26

Isotope

Ref.

Symbol

Value (b)

Method

Comments

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI - 3.8 FOR Cu


63

RI - 5.0 FOR

RI
Zn

Cu

- 2.5 FOR

RI

RI

3.4

Cu

0.8

pile osc

Au (1558)

react

Li (32.2). Reactor measurements , not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

64

Zn

36

1.6

0.2

pile osc

Au (1510). RI - 2.2

RI

1.8

0.1

act

Au (1551). RI/a Q measured

RI

1.43

0.10

act

Au (1550)

30

0.67

0.14

act

Au (1490). RI - 0.91

37

1.50

act

Measured S

- 2.06 0.03

S (Au) - 17.7. RI - 1.8


o

68

Znm

42

RI

1.34

0.06

act

Co (37.5)

RI

0.22

0.02

act

Au (1551). RI/o

measured
0

68

Zn*

RI

0.25

0.03

act

Au (1550)

30

0.17

0.03

act

Au (1490). RI - 0.24

37

3.30

act

Measured S

- 3.72 0.14

SQ

72

Zn

38

RI

0.07

(Au) - 17.7. RI - 3.74

eval

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI - 2.8 FOR Zn


RI - 1.6 FOR

64

RI - 0.24 FOR

Ga

RI

11.7

Zn

68

Zn
2.7

react

Li (32.2). Reactor measurements, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

27

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope
69,

Ga

Ref.

72,
Ga

Value (b)

RI

12.3

RI

10.5

14.8

RI

21.6

RI

12.7

45

29 .1

38

R:t

25.7

45
71
Ga

Symbol

Method

Comments

act

Au (1558)

1.9

act

Au (1551). RI/o

1.5

act

Au (1514). RI - 15.5

act

Au (1558)

0 .3

act

Au (1551). RI/o

2.9

act

Au (1514). RI - 31.2

measured

measured

eval

69,
Ga
71
RI - 25 FOR
Ga

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI - 13 FOR

Ge

RI

3.5

2.9

react

Li (32.2). Reactor measurements, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

72

Ge

38

RI:

73

Ge

38

Rl

74

Ge

38

RI

0.36

RI

0.83

0.79

39

0.55

eval

34.1

eval

eval

0.03

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured


o

act

Measured I/a

RI- 1.02

0
76

Ge

76

38

RI

0.18

Ge

RI

0.8

0.1

act

Au (1551). RI/o o measured

76

Ge*

39

1.99

0.36

act

Measured I/o . RI - 2.1


o

77

Ge

38

RI

7.01

RECOMMENDED VALUE R I - 0 . 9 FOR

eval

eval
Ge

28

ALBINSSON

Isotope

75

As

Ref.

Symbol

41

Value (b)

63

Method

p i l e osc

RI 65 7
Au (1558)

108

RI

61. 5

act

38

RI

60. 53

eval

RI

42

Comments

act

Au (1551). RI/o

measured
o

40

RI

45
76

As

38

RI

77
As

38

RI

68

15

act

Au (1551). E

59

act

Au (1514). RI - 61

216. 1

= 0.2 eV

eval

68. 25

eval

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI - 63 FOR 75 As


Se

RI

9.6

1.2

react

Li (32.2). Reactor measurements, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

74

Se

42

RI

589

43

RI

12

act

Co (37.5)

504

act

Measured S - 10.3 0.1


o
RI - 528

451

act

Au (1551). RI/o

76

Se

38

RI

42.08

eval

77

Se

38

RI

28.89

eval

46

14

eval

38

RI

7.09

43

3.6

78

Se

measured

eval

0.1

act

is
3.9 min7 9 Se . Measured
S m - 12.3 0.3. RI - 3.7
o

29

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

Ref.

79 Se

38

SO
Se

38

Symbol

RI

Value (b)

Comments

eval

55.48

43

1.30

46

1.3

RI

0 .50

Method

0 .02

act

Measured So 2 .65 0.02


RI - 1.31

rec
0 .02

act

Au (1551). RI/o
57 min

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI 5 0 0 FOR

RI

118

Se

measured

*Se

RI 1.30 FOR

Br

81

Se

14

react

Li (32.2). Reactor measurements, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

79

Br

RI

153

RI

155

act

Au (1558)

act

Au (1551). RI/o

measured
0

81

Br

10

92

108

RI

38
43

act

Au (1514). RI - 96

98.8

act

Au (1558)

RI

59.61

eval

65

10

10

act

Measured S

- 24.3 0.4

RI - 66

RI

45

44

RI

56

10

50

108

RI

50.6

34

RI

41.3

act

eval

act

Au (1514). RI - 51

act

Au (1558)

act

Au (1558)

1.0

Au (1551). Rl/a

measured

ALBINSSON

30

Isotope

Ref.

82
Br

38

Symbol

Value (b)
90.46

RI

RECOMMENDED VALUES R I -

RI

1 2 5 FOR

Method

Comments

eval
79

50 FOR

Br

Br

^Kr

47

RI

58.8

82

38

RI

191.5

eval

46

190

eval

38

RI

217.3

eval

46

150

eval

38

RI

3.60

eval

46

eval

4.4 hrs

46

eval

10.76 yrs

38

RI

8.16

eval

48

RI

1.8

38

RI

0.48

eval

46

eval

RI

9.0

83

84

85

Kr

Kr

Kr

Kr

^Kr

Rb

2.8

1.0

2.3

mass spec

mass spec

react

E c - 0.4 eV

Absorption. RI - 200

Absorption. RI - 240

83

Krm
83

Kr9

- 0.54 eV

Li (32.2). Reactor measurement, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

85

Rb

38

RI

7.00

37

7.34

eval

0.68

act

Measured S

- 18.4 0.6.

(Au) - 17.7. RI - 7.5

RI

3.56

0.20

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured.


86

31

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

Ref.

85
Rb
(com.)

Symbol

Value (b)

RI

0.97

RI

8.0

42

RI

24 .7

Rb

38

RI

43.6

87
Rb

38

RI

2.47

RI

1.9

86

46

Comments

0.03

act

Au (1551). RI/o

0 .9

act

Au (1550)

1.7

act

Co (37.5)

measured.

eval

eval

0.1

act

Au (1551). RI/a Q measured

pile osc

Au (1558)

react

Li (32.2). Reactor meas-

2.3

RECOMMENDED VALUES R I -

FOR

85,,

Rb

RI - 2.3 FOR
Sr

Method

RI

17.1

RI

10.0

Rb

2.6

urement, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

84

Sr

"Sr

6.7

1.3

act

RI - 7.0

RI

7.8

0.8

act

Au (1551). RI/o

RI

7.6

1.0

act

Au (1550). o - 0.80
o

38

RI

3.35

RI

4.56

49

eval

0.24

act

Au (1551). RI/o

measured
0

46

3.0

rec

87

Sr

46

88

Sr

38

RI

0.05

eval

46

0.06

rec

100

measured

rec

ALBINSSON

32

Isotope

89

90

91

Ref.

Symbol

Value (b)

Method

Sr

38

RI

0.36

eval

Sr

38

RI

0.41

eval

Sr

38

RI

0.62

eval

Comments

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI - 7.5 FOR8 4 S r


89V

RI

0.84

act

38

RI

0.68

eval

RI

0.89

act

Au (1558)

Au (1551). RI/c

measured

3.1 hrs ' V


46

0.3

45

0.44

rec
0.06

act

Au (1514). RI - 0.97.
64 hrs 9 0 Y 9

91

38

RI

2.61

eval

38

RI

1.94

eval

38

RI

0.99

eval
90..m.

Zr

RI

2.9

RI

3.7

0 .5

pile osc

Au (1558)

react

Li (32.2). Reactor measurement, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

36

0.60

25

1.06

50

RI

1.1

0 .06

0 .2

pile osc

Au (1510). RI = 0.65

pile osc

Au (1540). RI = 1.08

act

Neutron energy range


1-50

000 eV

33

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

Ref.

Zr
(cont.)

152

90,
Zr

Symbol

Value (b)
0.92

38

RI

0.085

50

RX

0.20

0.10

Method
pile osc

Comments
Au (1540)

eval

0.03

act

Neutron energy range


1 - 5 0 000 eV

46
91

Zr

38

RI

51
50

RI:

0.15

eval

7.81

eval

5.0

1.5

react

7.3

0 .8

act

Neutron energy range


1 - 5 0 000 eV

46
92

Zr

93,
Zr

94

Zr

6.5

eval

38

RI

0.297

eval

46

0.5

eval

38

RI

26.0

eval

46

22

eval

38

RI

0.21

RI

0.57

0.03

act

Au (1551). RI/o

50

0.23

0.03

act

Neutron energy range

eval

1-50
52

RI

0.30

53

RI

0.398

44

0.37

46

0.26

0.03

0.04

measured

000 eV

act
act

eval
eval

Measured s - 6.62 0.06.


o
I - 0.369 0.037

34

ALBINSSON

Isotope
95
96

Ref.

Symbol

Value (b)

Method

Zr

38

RI

5.42

eval

Zr

38

RI

5.30

eval

52

RI

5.0

0.4

act

53

4.97

0.05

act

Comments

Measured S

- 945 40

RI - 4.97

97,
Zr

46

6.0

44

5.0

38

RI

1.55

eval

0.5

eval

eval

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI - 0 . 9 5 FOR Zr


RI - 0 . 3 8 FOR
RI - 5.0
93

Nb

RI

12

FOR

9A

Zr
96

Zr

8.5
13

pile osc

Au (1558)

pile osc

Au (1513). RI > 12.7


Au (1558)

54

8.15

108

RI

5.8

act

RI

act

Au (1558)

RI

8.4

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured


o

0.65

2.6

pile osc

Au (1500). RI - 8.73

a - 1.15
0

95

Nb

45

6.2

38

RI

25.1

act
eval

no
RECOMMENDED VALUE RI - 8 . 0 FOR

1.4

Au (1514). RI - 6.7

35

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

Ref.

Symbol

Value (b)
13.8

Mo

1.7

Method
react

Comments
Li ( 3 2 . 2 ) . Reactor measurement, not corrected
for d e v i a t i o n from 1/E

12

19.0

35

25

55

RI

32.1

25

22.5

56

RI

27

pile osc

Au (1513). RI = 19.5

calc

RI - 26.2

3 1

pile osc

Au (1558)

pile osc

Au ( 1 5 4 0 ) . RI - 2 3 . 1

t of f

Calculated from resonance


parameters

57

RI

38

RI

106.3

12

100

46

100

38

RI

26.11

eval

46

25

eval

38

RI

15.05

eval

46

15

eval

38

RI

6.698

eval

35

6.3

calc

RI - 6.37

58

RI

6.69

eff

29.23

react

RI calculated as a function of plate thickness

95,
Mo

96,
Mo

97,
Mo

98

Mo

eval

20

pile osc

Au (1513). RI - 101

eval

0.13

react

Au (1558)

10.7

2. 3

act

Au (1490). RI - 9.1

11, 3

9.9

1.1

act

Au (1490). RI - 8.9

ALBINSSON

36

Isotope
98
Mo
(cont.)

Ref.

Mo

100

Mo

RI

Value (b)

1.3

0.1

Comments

Method

act

Au (1551). RI/o

measured
o

RI

7.1

1.0

act

44

eval

46

8.0

42

RI

6.79

0.42

59

6.38

0.15

108

RI

21.0

act

38

RI

24.8

eval

38

RI

4.00

35

1.1

0.2

cal

RI - 1.19

60

RI

3.73

0.20

act

Au (1558)

11

4.06

0.23

act

Au (1490). RI - 4.15

108

RI

3.29

act

Au (1558)

3.8

act

Measured S Q - 21.7 0.8

99

Symbol

37

Au (1550)

eval
act

Co (37.5)
RI - 6.4
Au (1558)

eval

0.2

S Q (Au) - 17.7. RI = 3.9

4
46

RI

4.2

3.9

0.2

act

Au (1551). RI/o

measured

rec

RECOMMEN DED VALUES RI - 25 FOR Mo

99_
Tc

38

RI

12

RI - 7.5 FOR

98

RI - 3.9 FOR

100

Mo
Mo

eval

197.9
60

20

pile osc

Au (1513). RI = 92

37

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope
99

Tc
(cont.)

Ref.
46

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI 96

Value (b)

Symbol
200

Method

Comments

rec

200

61

RI

5.51

0.40

act

Mn (13.1)

RI

4.6

0.2

act

Au (1551) . RI/o measured


o

49

6.67

0.11

act

RI - 6.7

"Ru

61

RI

mass spec

Co (75)

100_
Ru

38

RI

11.57

61

RI

11.3

2.6

act

Co (75)

61

RI

79.2

8.0

act

Co (75)

38

RI

79.6

eval

46

76

eval

38

RI

4.266

37

4.19

0.04

act

Measured S - 3.76 0.03


Q
S Q (Au) -17.7. RI - 4.8

RI

4.3

0.4

act

Au (1551) . RI/o measured

Ru

101

Ru

102

Ru

195

20

eval

eval

46

4.2

61

RI

4.16

rec
+

0.41

act

Co (75)

1O3

RU

38

RI

10A

RU

38

RI

5.43

eval

49

4.36

act

RI - 4.6

RI

6.1

0.3

act

Au (1551) . RI/a measured

62

RI

4.6

0.4

act

Co (75)

66.0

eval

38

ALBINSSON

Isotope
104

Ru

Ref.

Symbol

Value (b)

46

Method

Comments

4.4

(com.)
105,,
Ru
106.

Ru

38

RI

5.10

eval

38

RI

1.28

eval

63

RI

0.6

act

Co (75)

64

RI

2.0

act

Co (72.7)

pile osc

Au (1558)

react

Au (1558)

act

Au (1558)

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI -

5.5

RI - 11

0.6
96,,Ru

FOR

10

FOR

102

RI - 5 . 2 FOR

103

Rh

RI

592

65

RI

1 200

RI

675

66

RI

Ru

Ru
106 D
Ru

RI - 1.0 FOR
103

Ru

RI - 4 . 2 FOR

100

1 080

40

act

In std

610

24

act

Au (1551). RI/o

4.4 min X

105

Rh

59

78

act

4.4 min

59

1 054

74

act

104

38

RI

1 013. 7

eval

46

1 100

rec

38

RI

1.7 x 10*

eval

62

RI

1.65 x 10*

act

RECOMMENDED VALUES R I -

1 1 0 0 FOR

RI - 17 000 FOR

103

Rh

105

Rh

104

measured

R h m . RI - 85

R h g . RI - 1 120

39

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

Ref.

Pd

Sjinbcil

Value (b)

Method

RI

22.3

pile osc

104.Pd

38

RI

22.9

eval

Pd

38

Rl

74.8

eval

85

rec

Comments
Au (1558)

105.
46
Pd

38

RI

5 .601

62

RI

5.96

eval

106

46

0.57

5 .6

act
rec

107

Pd

38

RI

80.4

eval

108

Pd

38

RI

215.2

eval

RI

186

240

46

109.Pd

38

RI

110,Pd

38

RI

7.10

RI

4.6

act

Au (1551). RI/a measured.


13.47 hrs 109 Pd8

rec

60.9

eval

eval
i

0.6

act

Au (1551). RI/o

measured.

22 ,nin Pd*
46
112

38

RECOMHENDED

Ag

RI

VALUE III

6.0

rec

1.99

eval

- 5 . 8 FOR

RI

>650

RI

466

Pd

70

pile osc

Au (1558)

react

Li (32.2). Reactor measurement, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

40

ALBINSSON

Isotope

Ref.

Symbol

Value (b)

Method

Comments

12

810

50

p i l e osc

Au ( 1 5 1 3 ) . RI - 835

67

670

20

pile osc

Au ( 1 5 4 0 ) . RI - 698

68

RI

780

20

pile osc

Au (1540)

115

715

30

pile osc

Au (1550). RI - 740

71

RI

755

116

RI

750

RI

RI

(com.)

107

109

Ag

Ag

rec
40

87.2

act

Au (1565)

act

Au (1558)

144

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured


o

77

act

Au (1514). RI = 90

pile osc

Au (1513). RI - 1 910

act

Au (1558)

act

Au (1549). 253 days

45

12

1 870

RI

1 240

69

RI

47.5

38

RI

1 444.2

RI

1 118

RI

57

200

6.6

110

Agm

eval
68

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured


o

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured.

253 daysU V
22, 7
44

RI
I

81.1
1 500

2.2

act

+ 200

eval
act

110

RI

38

70

RI

57.0

+ 16.4

Co (69.9). 253 days

249 days
SQ

110

46

Im

1 450
50

Agm

Agm

(Au) - 17.88 0.50.

I/o - 16.28 + 0.45


o
46

U0

41

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope
111

Ag

Ref.

38

Symbol

RI

Value (b)

105.8

46

Comments

Method

eval

100

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI -

755 FOR Ag

RI - 1 400 FOR 109 Ag


Cd

71

RI

U0

38

RI

51.11

RI/o
o

19.7

46

37

rec

38

RI

45.88

eval

46

47

rec

38

RI

14.18

eval

46

17

rec

38

RI

365.6

eval

38

RI

16.45

72

RI

23.3

2.0

act

RI/o

11.4

0.6

act

Cd

1U

U2

U3

Cd

Cd

Cd

114

cd

102.2

rec

Absorption

eval

0.9

act

cd*

eval

Au (1551). RI/o measured


53.5 hrs 115 Cd g . RI - 3.4

46

Im

rec

43 days

46

I8

20

rec

53.5 hrs U 5 C d 8

79.9

eval

U5

Cd

38

RI

U6

Cd

38

RI

1.29

eval

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI - 3 FOR 1 U C d ( U5 Cd m )


RI - 20 FOR 1 U C d (115Cd8)

Cd

42

Isotope

ALBINSSON

Ref.

Symbol
RI

In

Value (b)

2 220

300

Method
react

Comments
Li (32.2). Reactor measurement, not corrected
for deviation from 1/E

113
In

12

3 600

350

pile osc

Au (1513). RI - 3 740

67

3 140

70

pile osc

Au (1540). RI 3 290

158

act

Measured S

37

-24.7+0.5
o
(Au) - 17.7. RI - 160

50 days

RI

213

10

act

1U

measured

Inm

38

RI

3 221.1

eval

RI

2 640

act

Au (1558)

2 886

act

Au (1490). RI - 3 440

11

3 200

100

act

Au (1530). RI - 3 280

73

RI

2 500

85

act

Au. RI/a o - 15.37 0.47


c/ m
54
m H 6 TIn

3 530

100

act

Au (1525). RI - 3 620

74

I/a
RI

2 190

30

act

- 17.3

Au (1551). RI/o
54 min

10, 7
29

RI

U6

In

measured

2 710

200

act

Au (1514). RI - 2 800

3 350

+ 150

act

Au

pile osc

Au (1558)

react

Li

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI - 2 600 FOR

Sn

Inm

Au (1551). RI/o
50 days

115
In

1U

RI

4.56

RI

5.7

115
In

0.7

(32.2). Reactor meas-

urement, not corrected

for deviation for 1/E

43

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

Ref.

Sn
(com.)

12

Symbol

Value

(b)

Method

Comments

8.5

2.0

pile osc

Au (1513). RI - 8.7

2.1

act

Au (1551). R I / O Q - 13.6

U2

Sn

RI

27.4

U5

Sn

38

RI

27.16

eval

U6

Sn

38

RI

17.5

eval

RI

U7

U8

U9

Sn

Sn

Sn

120

Sn

0.49

0.02

act

46

15

rec

38

RI

16.57

eval

46

12

rec

38

RI

7.41

eval

46

rec

38

RI

5.32

eval

46

3.5

rec

38

RI

1.31

eval

46

1.5

rec

26.29

eval

121

Sn

38

RI

122

Sn

38

RI

0.893

RI

0.83

46

0.6

rec

Au (1551). RI/o measured


o

eval
1

0.02

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured


0

123

Sn

38

RI

2.39

eval

124

Sn

38

RI

11.34

eval

44

ALBINSSON

Isotope

Ref.

124
Sn
(cont.)

49

125

Symbol

Value (b)

7.5

RI

8.7

Sn

38

RI

126,
Sn

38

RI

RI - 7.6
+ 0.4

13.89

RI

0.232

106

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured


o

eval
eval

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI - 9 FOR

Sb

Comments

Method

(9.7 min

125

Snm)

13

react

Li (32.2). Reactor measurement, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

121

Sb

112

RI

115

38

RI

205.5

49

168

26

act

RI - 170

RI

129

act

Au (1551). RI/o

RI

169

108

RI

12

react

B std

eval

measured
0

act

Au (1550)

134

act

Au (1558)

RI

143

act

Au (1558)

10

206

15

act

Au (1514). RI - 210

29

RI

200

17

act

Au

46

200

rec

122

Sb

38

RI

159.0

eval

123

Sb

38

RI

125.6

eval

37

97

act

Measured S 28.3 2.1


o
S (Au) - 17.7. RI - 100
0

45

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

Ref.

123 sb
(cant.)

Value (b)

Symbol

Au

(1551). Rl/a o measured

Co

(69.9)

act

Au

(1558)

RI

219

11

act

44

120

10

eval

22

RI

140

46

130

act
rec

58.2

108

RI

29

RI

116

10

act

Au

10

120

12

act

Au (1514). RI - 122

124

Sb

38

RI

19.25

eval

125

Sb

38

RI

19.05

eval

126

Sb

38

RI

64.5

eval

127

Sb

38

RI

14.7

eval

128

Sb

38

RI

15.9

eval

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI - 180 FOR

121

RI - 120 FOR

123

Te

Comments

Method

RI

37

RI

50

12

Sb
Sb

pile osc

Au (1558)

react

Li (32.2). Reactor measurement, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

72

pile osc Au (1513). RI 74


eval

38

RI

46.87

46

66

38

RI

5 661

eval

46

ALBINSSON

Isotope

Ref.

Symbol

Value (b)

123 Te

46

38

RI

7.94

eval

38

RI

17.53

eval

46

18

rec

38

RI

8.18

RI

8.0

46

rec

48.7

eval

5 400

Method

Comments

rec

(com.)
12

*Te

125

126

Te

Te

127

Te

38

RI

128

Te

38

RI

1.558

RI

1.2

eval

0.7

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured


o

eval

0.1

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured


69min129Te*

75

RI

1.55

0.13

act

Au (1543). o

(Te) - 0.20

69 min 1 2 9 T e ^

75

RI

0.077

46

46
129 Te
130 Te

act

Au (1543). 34 days

1.5

rec

69 min

0.08

rec

,, ,
129^ m
34 days
Te

38

RI

7.41

eval

38

RI

0.184

eval

43

0.47

0.006

0.14

act

129

129

Tem

Te8

Measured S

- 2.10 0.17

So (Au) - 17.7. RI - 0.48

131

Te

RI

0.34

46

0.36

rec

38

RI

0.05

eval

0.04

act

Au (1551). RI/ao measured

47

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

Ref.

132,
Te

38

Sjrmbol

RI

V a l u e (b)

0.007

Method

eval
no

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI - 1 . 5

FOR

RI - 0 . 0 8 FOR
RI - 0.4
I

76

RI

127

38

RI

151 .8

112

RI

130

108

RI

132

RI

106

i oq

T e ( 3 4 days

Te8)

Te (69 min
128

FOR

125

Comments

129

Tem)

Te

13 730

act

Co (75)

eval
18

12

react

B std

act

Au (1558)

react

Li (32.2). Reactor measurement, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

12

180

30

43

145

pile osc

Au (1513). RI - 177

act

Measured S - 27.8 0.5


o
S (Au) - 17.7. RI - 150
0

RI

95

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured


o

10

145

act

Au (1514). RI - 150

13

RI

146

act

Cd-ratio and o used to


0

calculate RI

129,

79

227

46

150

111

RI

140

38

RI

25 .97

eval

77

RI

50

act

111

RI

22

23

46

45

act

Au (1510). RI - 230

rec

20

t of f

t of f
rec

Co std

48

ALBINSSON

Isotope
130,
131,

133,
135,

Ref.

Symbol

Value (b)

38

RI

173.3

eval

38

RI

10.0

eval

78

RI

act

rec

38

RI

0.005

eval

38

RI

0.03

eval

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI - 150 FOR

127

126

Xe

153

RI

38.0

128

Xe

38

RI

110.0

eval

46

100

rec

220

rec

3.8

act

129

Xe

46

130

Xe

38

RI

17.29

eval

46

12

rec

38

RI

789.9

eval

46

830

rec

38

RI

2.46

eval

46

2.4

rec

52.25

eval

131

132

Xe

Xe

Comments

Method

133

Xe

38

RI

134

Xe

38

RI

4.604

eval

46

rec

Co (75)

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

Ref.

Symbol

Value (b)

49

Method

Comments

135

Xe

38

RI

136

Xe

38

RI

133

Cs

12

490

80

pile osc

Au (1513). RI = 550

67

450

15

pile osc

Au (1540). RI - 465

80

RI

370

50

act

Co (74)

38

RI

460.3

22

RI

495

17

act

Co (69.9)

RI

437

26

act

Au (1550)

10

30

act

Au (1514). RI = 30
m
29 h 1 3 4 C s

RI

360

90

act

Au (1551). RI/a

7 262

eval

0.120

eval

eval

measured
0

81

RI

461

46

450

25

act

Co (75)

rec

134

Cs

38

RI

87.97

eval

135

Cs

38

RI

61.99

eval

82

RI

80

act

46

58

rec

15.55

eval

Co std

136

Cs

38

RI

137

Cs

38

RI

0.414

eval

RI

7.4

pile osc

Au (1558)

RI

12 .6

react

Li

Ba

1 .7

(32.2). Reactor meas-

urement, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

ALBINSSON

50

Isotope
130

134

Ref.

70

act

Au (1550)

RI

276

10

act

Au (1551). RI/o

RI

24

act

Au (1551). RI/a

RI

37.80

eval

46

10

rec

46

100

Ba

Ba

Comments

270

38

136

Method

RI

Ba

135 Ba

Value (b)

Symbol

38

RI

46

17.07

38

act

0.7

Au (1551). RI/o

Ba

38

137

measured

Ba m

4.916

eval

rec

RI

0.219

eval

RI

0.31

0.02

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured


o

0.20

0.09

act

Measured S Q - 0.649 0.04

RI

46
138

measured

eval

2.5 min
Ba

measured

17
RI

137

43

S Q (Au) - 17.7. RI - 0.35

46
140.
Ba

38

0.2
RI

46

13.59

La

eval

13

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI - 0.3 FOR


139

rec

38

RI

15 .63

RI

11.8

138,

Ba
eval

1 .2

act

Au (1550)

51

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope
139

La

Ref.
45

Value (b)

S;ymbol
I

7.5

0.8

Method

Comments

act

Au (1514). RI - 12

pile osc

Au (1558)

(COM.)

140 T
La

RI

10.7

83

RI

14.1

0.9

calc

RI

11.5

0.8

act

Au (1551). RI/a

29

RI

10.8

1.1

act

Au

154

RI

11.2

0.6

act

84

RI

12.1

1.0

abs

46

11

rec

38

RI

70.68

eval

154

RI

69

70

46

RECOMMENDED VALUE!! RI - 11 FOR

measured

act
rec

139

La

RI - 70 TOR
Ce

U0

Ce

react

Li (32.2). Reactor measurement , not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

RI

3.7

38

RI

0.507

85

RI

0.49

0.05

act

Au (1558)

RI

0.48

0.05

act

Au (1550)

86

Rl

0.49

0.05

act

Au (1558)

43

0.23

0.01

act

Measured S - 0.476 0.0


o
So (Au) - 17.7. RI - 0.48

RI

0.44

0.03

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured


o

0.24

46

1.7

eval

rec

52

ALBINSSON

Isotope
141

Ce

142

Ce

Ref.

Value (b)

Symbol

38

RI

38

RI

1.514

85

RI

1.6

43

0.81

Method

Comments

eval

28.73

eval

0.2

act

Au (1558)

0.10

act

Measured So = 0.865 0.005


S (Au) - 17.7. RI = 1.3
0

RI

1.20

act

46

1.0

rec

42.66

eval

U3

Ce

38

RI

U4

Ce

38

RI

2.602

87

RI

2.62

46

2.2

eval

RI =1.40 FOR
Pr

act

Co (75)

i An

Ce

U2

Ce

38

RI

17.52

RI

14.1

0.2

act

Au (1550)

RI

20.7

3.0

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured


o

RI

12.1

act

Au (1558)

83

RI

18

calc

46

RI

13

rec

Pr

38

RI

143.8

eval

Pr

38

RI

190.0

eval

88

RI

190

46

150

142

U3

0.26

rec

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI - 0.49 FOR

U1

Au (1551). RI/o measured


o

eval

25

Co std
rec

53

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

Ref.

145.
Pr

38

Value (b)

Symbol

RI

Nd

142

Nd

143

144

145

146

147

Nd

Nd

Nd

Nd

Nd

Comments

eval

445.1

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI = 14 FOR

Method

141,,
Pr

89

RI

43

react

Au (1558)

112

RI

40

react

B std

38

RI

8.84

eval

46

0.2

rec

38

RI

64.47

eval

10

<50

46

60

38

RI

7.64

eval

46

3.6

rec

38

RI

271.3

10

130

46

250

38

RI

2.36

RI

3.2

0 .5

act

Au (1550)

85

RI

3.0

0 .3

act

Au (1558)

17

RI

2.60

0 .18

calc

RI

2.85

0 .18

act

46

2.0

38

RI

649.8

pile osc

Au (1513)

rec

eval

15

pile osc

Au (1513). RI = 154

rec
eval

rec
eval

Au (1551). RI/a

measured

54

ALBINSSON

Isotope

148

150

Nd

Nd

Ref.

Symbol

Value (b)

38

RI

14.01

85

RI

14

act

17

RI

13.8

1.0

calc

RI

14.0

0.7

90

RI

18.7

0.5

46

20

38

RI

85

RI

14

act

17

RI

12.6

0.2

calc

RI

20.5

0.7

act

14

46

RI - 14
pm

Au

(1558)

act

Au

(1551). RI/o

act

Au

(1558)

Au

(1558)

Au

(1551). RI/o measured


o

measured

rec

eval

rec

2 . 8 FOR

RI - 17

Comments

eval

2.59

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI

147

Method

146.,
Nd

FOR

U8

Nd

FOR

150

Nd
eval

38

RI

2 178

44

2 400

300

eval

91

274

66

act

RI - 1 320

92

RI

700

250

act

5.39 day

92

RI

1 520

230

act

40.6 day

92

RI

3 220

act

Total activation

93

2 280

t of f

200

5.4 day

148

Pm

'V
Pm

RI

198 8. RI - 2

400

a - 200 7. RI - 2
o

300

94

192

+ 100

t of f

55

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope
147
Pm
(com.)

148

Pm

Ref.

V a l u e (b)

Sj-mbcl

Method

Comments

95

RI

720

200

mass spec

40.6 day

Pmm

95

RI

800

250

mass spec

5.39 day

148^_m
Pm

46

1 050

rec

40.6 day

46

1 150

rec

5.39 day h '

38

RI

eval

5.39 day

93

43 980

3 600

2 400-

t of

Pm

U8

Pm

- 10 600

a
0

Pm

151

Pm

RI

38

RI

38

RI

31 990
927.7

RI
Sm

RI

eval

1 300 FOR U 7 P m ( 5 . 3 9 day


1 200 FOR
1 790

Pmm

eval

1 210

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI

40.6 day

eval

i+ 1

U9

38

U8

Pm ( 4 0 . 6 day
270

Pmm)
Pm")

Li

react

(32.2). Reactor meas-

urement, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

148

U9

sm

Sm

Sm

38

RI

566.2

44

646

95

RI

107

eval

60

640

i+

147

200

mass spec

RI

646

60

mas 8 spec

103

RI

714

50

t of

46

600

38

RI

18.51

103
44

RI

27

38

RI

3 705

eval

rec
eval

14

mass spec

eval

Co std

56

ALBINSSON

Value (b)

Isotope

Ref.

149Sm
(cont.)

96

RI

150

38

RI

257. 1

97

RI

227

23

act

103

RI

310

15

t of f

46

240

rec

38

RI

178

eval

111

RI

3 300

46

3 100

rec

38

RI

3 240

eval

98

RI

2 644

604

t of f

99

3 050

200

act

Au std. RI - 3 150

100

RI

3 200

100

act

Au (1540)

12

2 850

300

pile osc

Au (1510), RI - 2 950

RI

2 530

150

act

Au (1550)

RI

3 270

+ 170

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured


o

46

3 000

rec

108

RI

2 920

act

38

RI

1 137

eval

38

RI

38. 21

98

RI

31

t of f

RI

23. 0

1.0

act

151

152

153

Sm

Sm

Sm

Sm

Symbol

Method
mass spec

4 400

Comments

Co

(72.3)

eval

700

Co (75)

t of f

Au

(1558)

Au

(1551). RI/o measured


o

eval

57

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope
156

Sm

Ref.
38

Symbol
RI

Value (b)
331.9

Method

Comments

eval
1 AT

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI
660 FOR
RI

150
Sm
152

27 FOR

Sm

RI 151

Eu

Sm

270 FOR
RI = 2 900 FOR

Sm

98

RI

3 265

108

RI

3 420

101
7

RI

1 400

RI

3 550

160

310

t of f

act

Au (1558)

40

9.3 hrs

act

RI

2 580

130

act

152

Eu

measured

Eu8

Au (1551). RI/a
152

9.3 hour

153

Eum

Au (1551). RI/o
12 year

152

measured

Eu

102

RI

11 410

450

act

12 year

102

RI

3 847

270

act

9.3 h

98

RI

1 632

195

t of f

12

1 280

100

pile osc

Au (1513). RI - 1 430

RI

1 520

act

Au (1551). RI/a

80

152

152

Eu8

Eum

measured
0

102

RI

3 887

62

act

154

Eu

38

RI

1 240

eval

155

Eu

38

RI

1 223

eval

156

uEu

38

RI

1 258

eval

157_
Eu

38

RI

826.4

eval

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI - 2 600 FOR

151

RI - 7 000 FOR

151

E u (12 year

RI - 1 500 FOR

153

Eu

E u (9.3 hour

152
152

Eum)

Eu8)

ALBINSSON

58

Isotope

Ref.
2

Gd

Value (b)

Symbol
RI

67

Method
react

Comments
Li (32.2). Reactor measurement, not corrected
for deviation from 1/E

104

RI

393

152

Gd

RI

3 000

154

Gd

98

RI

107

155

Gd

156

157

158

Gd

Gd

Gd

calc

300

act

177

17

t of f

RI

335

50

mass spec

105

RI

530

mass spec

46

250

rec

38

RI

1 563

eval

104

RI

1 720

calc

38

RI

107

RI

100

104

RI

95

calc

46

90

rec

105

RI

23

mass spec

38

RI

3 410

eval

104

RI

711

calc

38

RI

97.9

98

RI

60.5

104

RI

72

RI

84

90.0

Au (1550)

eval

30

mass spec

eval

6.0

t of f
calc

20

act

Au (1550)

59

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

Ref.

158 Gd

RI

116
186.7

Symbol

Value (b)

Method
act

Comments
Au (1551). RI/o

(com.)
159

Gd

38

RI

160

Gd

38

RI

1.445

98

RI

6.9

104

RI

4.8

calc

46

7.0

rec

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI = 300 FOR


RI

80

measured

eval

eval

1.0

t of f

1 Si
Gd

FOR 158Gd
i

159

Tb

38

RI

376. 4

49

343

eval

35

act

I/O o - 15.6 + 0.8


o

(Au) - 17.7. RI - 365

RI

365

40

act

Au (1550)

85

RI

450

50

act

Au (1558)

RI

403

20

act

Au (1551). RI/o

108

RI

780

act

Au (1558)

46

420

rec

160

Tb

38

RI

161

Tb

38

RI

eval

1 140

655. 9

eval

159_
RECOMMENDED VALUE III - 400 FOR " * T b

Dy

106

RI

1 840

180

react

160^
Dy

106

RI

1 160

130

react

38

RI

1 160

eval

46

1. 200

rec

measured

60

ALBINSSON

Isotope
160
Dy
(cont.)

16

Ref.

Symbol

Value (b)

107

RI

915

38

RI

1 670

107

RI

1 060

46

1 200

106

RI

1 670

38

RI

2 550

eval

46

2 800

rec

106

RI

3 324

400

react

107

RI

1 170

mass spec

38

RI

1 650

106

RI

1 962

176

react

107

RI

1 380

100

mass spec

46

1 900

38

RI

795

106

RI

377

34

react

RI

332

10

rec

RI

780

60

act

90

Method

Comments

mass spec

eval
+

80

mass spec

rec
167

80

react

eval

rec
eval

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI - 1 200 FOR

16

Dy

RI - 1 300 FOR

161

Dy

RI = 2 600 FOR

162

Dy

RI = 1 900 FOR

163

Dy

RI -

164

Dy

800 FOR

Au (1551). RI/a

measured

61

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

165

Ho

Ref.

Symbol

Value (b)

Method

Comments

38

Rl

678

eval

108

Rl

628

act

Au (1558)

Rl

620

act

Au (1551). RI/a measured

90

Rl

710

46

700

30

act

Au (1550)

rec

RECOMMENDED VALUE Rl = 660


166

Er

98

Rl

122

13

t of f

107

Rl

57

16

mass spec

3 177

325

167

Er

98

Rl

168

Er

98

Rl

35 .5

7.0

t of f

170

Er

98

Rl

44

t of f

108

Rl

32.2

Rl

25 .2

3.0

t of f

act

Au (1558)

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured


o

RECOMMENDED VALUE XI 35 FOR 170.Er


169

Tm

Rl

1 550

200

act

Au (1550)

Rl

"1 450

65

act

Au (1551). RI/o

19

Rl

2 240

130

act

Co (69.9)

24

RECOMMENDED VALUE HI - 1 700


Yb

168

Yb

109

Rl

177

109

Rl

30 950

19

Rl

21 000

4 200

act

98

Rl

31 900

4 500

t of f

calc

calc
Co (69.9)

measured

62

ALBINSSON

Isotope
168^

Ref.

Symbol

Value (b)

Method

Comments

RI

14 700

1 900

act

Au (1550)

RI

23 000

5 000

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured

35 706

17 139

act

(COM.)

49

i/o-

- 6.49 0.13

S (Au) - 17.7. RI - 37 000


o
170

171

Yb

Yb

172

173

17

Yb

Yb

*Yb

176

Yb

109

RI

326

98

RI

211

20

t of f

107

RI

270

30

mass spec

109

RI

313

98

RI

344

39

t of f

107

RI

332

30

mass spec

109

RI

23.5

98

RI

26.2

6.0 t of f

107

RI

25

109

RI

394

107

RI

410

109

RI

33.8

19

RI

68.6

7.2 act

98

RI

26

t of f

RI

30

act

RI

37.6

1.5 act

109

RI

7.6

calc

calc

calc

mass spec

calc

40

mass spec

calc

calc

Co (69.9)

Au (1550)
Au (1551). RI/o measured
o

63

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

Ref.

Symbol

176 Yb
(cont.)

98

RI

t of f

RI/a Q

2.4

0.2

act

Au (1551)

react

B std

Value (b)

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI = 25 000 FOR

Yb

330 FOR

171

Yb

RI

25 FOR

172

RI "

31 FOR

270 FOR

RI =

RI

7 FOR

Yb
17A
Yb
176

Lu

112

RI

720

70

175,
Lu

101
7

RI

405

15

98

RI

1 158

RI

4
7

176,
Lu

Yb

280

t of f

550

75

act

Au (1551). RI/aQ measured

RI

1 060

45

act

Au (1551). RI/o measured


o

RI

2 400

250

rec

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI

Hf

Comments

Yb
170

RI =

Method

__ 175.
600 FOR
Lu

RI

1 160

RI

1 470

1 200

pile osc

Au (1558)

react

Li (32.2). Reactor measurement, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

36

2 850

+ 350

pile osc

Au (1510). RI - 2 280

112

RI

2 800

600

react

B std

67

2 080

50

pile osc

Au (1540). RI - 2 130

65

RI

2 130

60

react

Au (1558)

RI

1 750

act

Au (1558)

113

RI

2 300

60

react

64

ALBINSSON

Isotope

Ref.

Symbol

114

RI

2 280

180

abs

Hf

RI

300

200

act

Hf

113

RI

880

40

react

65

RI

400

20

react

Hf
(com.)
174

176

Value (b)

Method

177

Hf

113

RI

7 000

240

react

178

Hf

113

RI

1 710

50

react

179

Hf

113

RI

595

55

react

RI

act

3.9

0.2

Comments

Au (1551)

RI/o

Hf

113

RI

52

RI

21.6

RI

32

RI

32.5

measured

Au (1558)

Au (1551). RI/o measured

5.5hr18OHfm
180

react

act

Au (1558)

act

Au (1550)

1.5

act

Au (1551)

RI/o

measured
0

37

24.3

1.6

act

Measured !; = 2.17 0.09


o
S Q (Au) = 17.7. RI = 30

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI - 2 100 FOR Hf

RI
181

Ta

RI

28 FOR
474

180

Hf

62

react

Li (32.2). Reactor measurement, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

12

RI

578

RI

750

690

115

1 100

pile osc

Au (1513). RI =1 220

pile osc

Au (1558)

50

act

Au (1550)

25

pile osc

Au (1550). RI - 700

400

65

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

Ref.

Symbol

Value (b)

181Ta

116

RI:

690

108

Rl

800

R::

715

71

Rl

660

155

Rl

943

50

t of f

Rl

290

35

react

40

Method

Comments

act

Au (1565)

act

Au (1558)

act

Au (1551). RI/a measured

(cont.)

182

Ta

70

rec

Li (32.2). Reactor measurement, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E

12

330

60

pile osc

Au (1513). RI = 340

112

RI

170

+ 20

react

B std

119

RI

372

35

325

20

calc

RI = 335

117

RI

367

33

react

Au (1558)

118

RI

360

70

react

Au (1558)

71

RI

373

rec

57

RI

338

react

eval

RI calculated as a function of plate thickness

182

183W

184W

98

RI

592

119

RI

591

98

RI

371

119

RI

387

98

RI

14.1

60

t of f
eval

42

t of f

eval

1.5

t of f

66

ALBINSSON

Isotope

Ref.

Symbol

184 W
(cont.)

119

RI

13.5

118

RI

8.4

2.0

react

120

RI

14.9

1.6

act

RI

22.0

1.0

act

98

RI

486

119

RI

551

eval

108

RI

345

act

120
7

RI

441

118

RI

490

100

react

Au (1558)

11

476

50

act

Au (1490). RI - 560

RI

390

act

Au (1558)

121

RI

450

122

RI

318

RI

420

45

act

Au (1551). RI/o

40

RI

380

84

act

Au (1551). E

122

RI

2 760

186 W

187 W

Value (b)

Method

Comments

eval

50

22

36

Au (1558)

Au (1551). RI/a

measured

t of f

Au (1558)

act

act
act
o

measured

- 0.2 eV

act

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI - 370 FOR W


RI =

15 FOR

18A

RI - 420 FOR 186W


185

Re

RI

1 100

123

RI

1 726

68

act

Au(1558)

calc

Calculated from resonance


parameters

124

RI

1 650

90

capt

124

RI

1 753

90

act

Moxon-Rae detector

67

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

Ref.

Value (b)

S^rmboJ

125

HI

1 828

RI

1 250

123

BlI

308

120

Method

Comments

act

(com.)

187

Re

20

act

Au(1551). RI/o

calc

Calculated from resonance

measured

parameters

125

RI

312

RI

288

RI

315

22

act
act

35

act

Au(1551). RI/o

measured

1 HS

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI = 1700 FOR

RI
Os

RI

310 FOR

187

180

Re
Re
20

react

Li(32.2). Reactor measure


ment, not corrected for

deviation from l/E.


184

Os

RI

600

120

act

Au(1551). RI/o

measured
0

189

Os

RI

190

Os

BI

0.013

39

18

act

Au(1551). RI/o Q measured

act

Au(1551). RI/a
15 day

RI

29

15

act

191

Au(1551). RI/o Q measured


13 hour

192

Os

Ir

R:t

Rl

3.6
2 000

1.0

490

act
react

measured

0S8

191

0Sm

Au(1551). Rl/o o measured


Li(32.2). Reactor measure
ment, not corrected for
deviation from l/E.

191

lr

RI

3 500

22

RI

4 800

240

59

4 0 7 4

59

940

28

160

act

Au(1558)

act

Co(69.9)
RI - 4500. 74 d a y 1 9 2 l r g
RI - 1200. 1.4 m i n 1 9 2 l r m

68

ALBINSSON

Isotope

Ref.

Value (b)

Symbol

191lr
(cont.)

193Ir

RI

1 370

RI

1 390

RI

3 400

400

Method
act

Comments

74 day

200

measured

Au(1551). Rl/er
192

Ir* "

act

Au(1558)

act

Au(1551). Rl/a

measured
0

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI = 4000 FOR

Pt

196 p t

198 p t

191

RI

12

185

45

RI

5.6

108

RI

55.3

45

54

RI

48

Ir
pile osc

Au(1558)

pile osc

Au(1513). RI = 200

act

Au(1514). RI - 12

0.6

act

Au(1551). RI/o

act

Au(1558)

act

Au(1514). RI =

act

Au(1551). RI/a

81.5

measured

55
measured
0

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI = 53 FOR


197

Au

198 p t

RI

1 558

act

71

RI

1 550

rec

40

RI

1 551

20

act

156

1 510

40

act

RI = 1 553

pile osc

Au(1558)

Absorption. Cd cutoff =

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI = 1 550

Hg

RI

31

RI

72.4

8.0

react

Li(32.2). Reactor measure


ment, not corrected for
deviation from 1/E.

196

Hg

112

RI

73

RI

1 230

130

react

B std

act

Au(1551). R I / O Q measured
65 hour

197

Hg8

69

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

Ref.

Symbol

196 H g

126

RI

Value (b)
413

15

Method
act

(cont.)

Comments
Au(1550). Co(75)
65 hour

RI

47

act

Au(1551). RI/c Q measured


,, .
197 U m
24 hour
Hg

126

R:L

58.9

2.4

act

Au(1550). Co(75)

198

Hg

202

Hg

Hg

Tl

205,

'Tl

Pb

Hgm

2.00

0.15

act

Au(1551).. RI/o o measured

30

2.1

0.5

act

Au(1490). RI = 4.1

126

Rl

4.99

0.19

act

Au(1550). Co(75)

22

Rl

3.94

0.08

act

Co(69.9)

Rl

3.98

0.25

act

Au(1551). RI/a Q measured

RI

0.85

0.06

act

Au(1551). RI/o o measured

FOR Hg

RI - 4.3 FOR

203.

197

RI:

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI 73

Tl

Hgg

24 hour

20A

197

202

Hg

157

RI

12

abs

Neutron slowing-down technique

19

RI

349

17

act

Co(69.9)

RI

129

act

Au(1558)

157

RI

40

abs

Neutron slowing-down technique

RI

0.5

act

Au(1558)

157

RI

0.7

abs

Neutron slowing-down technique

RI

0.094

pile osc

Au(1558)

0.05

pile osc

Au(1513). RI = 0.12

12

0.1

0.03

70

ALBINSSON

Isotope
209

Bi

210 B i
230

232

Th

Th

Ref.
1

Symbol

Value (b)

RI

0.53

36

0.05C *

127

RI

0.20

Method

Comments

pile osc

Au(1558)

0.012

pile osc

Au(1510). RI - 0.062

0.02

act

Mn(13.1)

128

RI

996

40

act

129

RI

1 020

30

act

158

RI

1 035

85

t of f

RI

88

act

Au(1550)

RI

72.6

5.0

act

Au(1551). RI/o

13

RI

89.8

4.0

act

13

RI

93

abs

RI

61.8

12.0

react

Co(74)

measured

Li(32.2). Reactor measurement, not corrected for


deviation from 1/E

67

84

pile osc

Au(1540). RI - 85

130

RI

81.2

3.4

react

Au(1579)

RI

71.4

pile osc

Au(1558)

131

RI

83.3

3.0

act

Au(1555)

132

RI

86

calc

44

82

133

RI

82.7

1.8

eval

RI - 85

act

Au(1561)

71

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

Ref.

Symbo L

232
Th
(cont.)

134

RI

233

Th

Value (b)
79

Method
calc

Comments
RI calculated from resonance parameters

135

RI

84

ace

Au (1565)

136

83

act

Au (1510). RI - 84.4

142

RI

82. 5

3.0

act

Au (1555)

71

RI

84

135

RI

386

rec
+ 100

act

Au (1565)

- 232_
RECOMMENDED VALUE RI - 82 FOR
Th
231

233

Pa

Pa

71

RI

480

rec

174

RI

11. 820

abs

137

RI

470

90

act

Co (75). 1. 2 min

137

RI

460

100

act

Co (75). 6. 7 hrs

137

RI

930

135

act

Co (75)

138

RI

920

act

Co (75)

71

RI

820

159

RI

842

44

860
901

160

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI - 880 FOR

RI

224

90

237

(945) for capture


P
234

Pam

2 3

rec
+

233

35

45

act

Co (72.0)

eval

RI - 875

t of f

RI - 920

react

Li (32.2). Reactor meas-

Pa
40

urement, not corrected


for deviation from 1/E
232 D

139

RI

280

mass spec

Capture. Co (75)

ALBINSSON

72

Isotope

Ref.

Symbol

Value (b)

Method

Comments

232u

71

RI

540

rec

Absorption

71

RI

320

rec

Fission

71

RI

220

rec

Capture

44

RI

750

20

eval

Fission

140

RI

837

40

act

Fission. Co (75)

141

RI

743

36

(cont.)

233

Fission. In std

Cd ratio,

fiss prod gammas -

141

RI

743

24

Fission. Au (1535). Cd rat


fiss counter detect

142

RI

792

27

Fission. Au (1555). Cd rat


fiss counter detect

161

RI

771

49

143

RI

821

59

144

RI

838

40

Fission

145

RI

830

60

Fission. Analysis of

162

RI

765

163

RI

780

40

164

RI

850

90

71

RI

780

140

RI

S81

45

Absorption

146

RI

899

50

Absorption

143

RI

965

65

Absorption

71

RI

917

Fission. Co std
act

Fission. Au (1555)

Fission. Pulsed n source

eval

Fission
Fission

rec

rec

Fission

Absorption

Cs

73

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

Ref.

Symbol

Value (b)

Method

233[j

161

R"

135

act

Capture. Co std

163

RI

137

eval

Capture

71

R::

137

rec

Capture

145

Rl

146

mass spec

Capture

140

RI

144

mass spec

Capture

71

RI

665

rec

Absorption

44

600

rec

Capture. RI 645

w:

700

rec

Capture

RI

271

act

Fission

161

Rl

275

16

167

RI:

278

164

Rl

274

11

Fission

145

Rl

292

14

Fission. Analysis of

163

Rl

280

11

168

RI

275

44

RI:

270

10

11

Rl

263

12

Comments

(cont.)

234 U

166
235

Fission. Co std
Fission. Cd and B filters

eval

Cs

Fission
Fission. Pulsed n source

rec

Fission
Fission. Cd ratio, tot
fiss prod gammas

141

RI:

265

Fission. Au (1535). Cd
ratio, fiss counter detect

141

RI

269

Fission. Au (1535). Cd
ratio, tot fiss prod
gammas

141

RI

291

14

Fission. In std Cd ratio,


tot fiss prod gammas

74

ALBINSSON

Isotope

Ref.

235u
(cont.)

71

RI

280

175

RI

300

175

RI

450

71

RI

420

161

RI

136

169

RI

143

163

RI

145

236

238

Symbol

Value (b)

Method

Comments

rec

Fission

50

rec

Fission

* 100

rec

Absorption

rec

Absorption

act

Capture. Co std

mass spec

Capture

140

eval

Capture

RI

150

mass spec

Capture

168

RI

140

71

RI

140

175

RI

150

170

RI

417

171

RI

172

Capture. Pulsed n source

rec

Capture

50

rec

Capture

25

act

Capture

350

25

calc

Capture

RI

397

34

act

Capture

71

RI

320

rec

44

RI

415

eval

173

RI

419

25

36

285

25

RI

267

44

269

11

280

10

Capture. Au (1550)

pile osc

Absorption. RI - 286

act

Absorption

rec

Absorption. RI - 270

act

Absorption. RI - 281

75

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope
238 a
(com.)

Ref.

Symbol

Value (b)

Method

RI

281

act

71

RI

278

rec

175

RI

280

15

rec

Capture

176

RI

279

20

t of f

Capture

232

U FISSION

RI 220 FOR

232

U CAPTURE

RI 540 FOR
233

U FISSION

RI 140 FOR

233

U CAPTURE

RI 930 FOR

233

U ABSORPTION

238

Np

235

RI 140 FOR

235

U CAPTURE

RI 415 FOR

235

U ABSORPTION

U FISSION

RI 410 FOR

CAPTURE

RI ' 280 FOR

U ABSORPTION

850

44

870

36

870

44

44

173

RI

44

TKL.
U ABSORPTION

RI 275 FOR

RI

173

U ABSORPTION

RI > 790 FOR

RI 675 FOR

Np

Absorption

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI 320 FOR

237

Comments

rec

Capture. RI - 950

pile osc

Capture. Au (1510).
RI = 950

rec

Fission. RI - 6

510

rec

Fission. RI 1 500

1 500

Capture

130

500

10

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI

920 FOR

RI - 1 500 FOR

Fission
rec

237

N p CAPTURE

238

FISSION

Capture. RI - 12

ALBINSSON

76

Isotope
238

239

Pu

Pu

Ref.

Symbol

Value (b)

Comments

Method

RI

25

rec

Fission. Measured

44

16. 7

eval

Fission. RI 23.9

189

RI

26

act

Fission

177

RI

164

15

t of f

Absorption

44

RI

164

eval

Absorption

173

RI

169

eval

Absorption

166

RL

150

rec

Capture

178

RI

3420

act

Absorption

167

RI

301

10

Fission. Cd and B filters

179

RI

327

22

fission, Cd ratio, tot fis

166

prod gammas
141

RI

289

Fission. Au (1535). Cd rat

fiss count detect


164

RI

330

30

146

RI

310

20

163

RI

301

44

RI

300

10

180

RI

366

26

Fission

181
7

RI

300

10

Fission

141

RI

360

18

Fission. In std Cd ratio,

Fission
rec

Fission

eval

Fission

eval

Fission

tot fiss prod gammas

71

RI

288

190

RI

230

rec

Fission

t of f

Fission. E 1 eV. Not


c
evaluated for lower cutoff

77

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

Ref.

239Pu

71

RI

472

rec

Absorption

71

RI

134

rec

Capture

190

RI

188

t of f

Capture. E

44

RI

8220

rec

Absorption

36

11 300

1 000

pile osc

Absorption. RI - 11 500

182

RI

10 000

2 800

pile osc

Absorption

74

13 780

550

act

Absorption. RI - 8850

183

RI

13 607

+|

Symbol

Value (b)

Method

700

react

Absorption

184

RI

11 000

4 000

react

Absorption

185

react

Absorption. Au (1513)

Comments

(com.)

240

Pu

8 270

17

500

1 eV

RI - 8420

241

Pu

186

RI

9 000

3 000

act

Absorption

187

RI

8 850

act

Activation

71

RI

8 280

rec

Absorption

175

RI

SI 0 0 0

rec

Capture

166

RI

8 000

rec

Capture

192

RI

8 650

abs

Absorption

179

RI

581

800

1 500

Fission. Au (1555).

33

Cd ratio, tot fiss prod


gammas

141

RI

532

Fission. Au (1535). Cd ra

16

tot fiss prod gammas

71

RI

573

164

RI

550

166

RI

545

rec
40

Fission
Fission

rec

Fission

78

ALBINSSON

Isotope
241
Pu
(cont.)

242

Pu

Ref.

Value (b)

Symbol

Method

Comments

145

RI

569

37

44

RI

580

40

163

RI

617

71

RI

712

rec

Absorption

71

RI

139

rec

Capture

145

RI

162

tec

Capture. E

166

RI

260

rec

Capture

178

RI

1 310

act

eval

Fission. 3.0 eV
c
Fission
Fission

0.2 eV

Absorption. Co (48.6)
U-238 (282)

188

RI

1 280

71

RI

166

60

act

Absorption. Co (75)

1 100

rec

Absorption

RI

1 150

rec

Capture

175

RI

1 300

200

rec

Capture

191

RI

1 055

170

t of f

Capture

193

RI

1 110

60

t of f

Absorption

RECOMMENDED VALUES RI - 25 FOR 2 3 8 P u FISSION


RI - 160 FOR 2 3 8 P u ABSORPTION
RI - 310 FOR 2 3 9 P u FISSION
RI - 140 FOR

Pu CAPTURE

RI - 450 FOR 2 3 9 P u ABSORPTION


RI 9 000 FOR 2 4 0 P u ABSORPTION
RI = 570 FOR 2 4 1 P u FISSION
RI - 140 FOR 2 4 1 P u CAPTURE
RI - 710 FOR 2 4 1 P u ABSORPTION
RI = 1 200 FOR 2 4 2 P u ABSORPTION

79

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope

Ref.

241.
Am

166

RI

194

RI

21

164

RI

21

65

RI

166

242.
Am

243.
Am

S;rmbol

Value (b)

Method

Comments

rec

Fission

act

Fission

act

Fission

900

act

Activation. (16 hour

RI

L 600

rec

Capture

194

RI

2 100

200

act

Capture. ( 242 Am 8 )

194

RI

300

act

Capture. ( 242 Am m )

194

RI

<300

act

Fission

195

RI

1 570

t of f

Fission

196

R:C

]. 570

10

t of f

Fission

178

R:.

2 340

50

act

Absorption. Co (48.6)

8.5

30

U-238 (282)
166

RI

1 400

191

Rl

1 480

194

RI

2 300

RECOMMENDED VALUE RI - 20 FOR


243

244

Cm

Cm

rcc

Capture

135

t of f

Capture

200

act

Absorption

241.
Am FISSION

199

RI

1 860

400

act

Fission

197

RI

2 345

470

t of f

Absorption

198

RI

19

act

Fission

199

RI

13.0

2.5

act

Fission

166

RI

650

rec

Capture

199

RI

650

50

act

Capture

197

RI

550

40

t of f

Absorption

242
Ai

ALBINSSON

80

Isotope
245

246

247

Cm

Cm

Cm

*8Cm

Ref.

Symbol

198

RI

900

50

act

Fission

199

RI

770

150

act

Fission

200

RI

1 140

100

201

RI

105

199

RI

100

20

197

RI

810

180

198

RI

11.0

199

RI

(low)

199

RI

120

201

RI

120

Capture

204

RI

260

Absorption

198

RI

800

50

act

Fission

199

RI

950

190

act

Fission

200

RI

1 060

110

199

RI

810

198

RI

199

RI

275

202

RI

350

Value (b)

13.5

Comments

Method

Fission
Capture

0.5

25

Capture
t of f

Absorption

act

Fission

act

Fission

act

Capture

Fission

400

act

Capture

act

Fission

75

act

Capture

40

act

Capture. Mn (13.1)

0.8

249

Bk

204

RI

1 240

249

Cf

198

RI

2 200

70

200

RI

2 940

280

204

RI

2 750

Absorption. Co (75)

act

Fission
Fission
Absorption

81

INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

Isotope
250

251

Cf

Cf

252

253

cf

Cf

Ref.

Symbol

Value (b)

204

RI

5 300

Capture

205

RI

4 975

Absorption

205

RI

1 370

Fission

204

RI

980

Capture

205

RI

2 100

205

RI

12

203

RI

43.5

204

RI

42

Capture

205

RI

58

Absorption

205

RI

2 235

Fission

205

R::

2 250

Absorption
Absorption

254

Cf

205

RI

100

254

Es

206

RI

2 300

Method

Comments

Absorption
Fission

2.0

90

Capture

Fission. Cf std

REFERENCES TO TABLE
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[19]
[20]
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[37]
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KOHLER, W., SCHMELZ, H., Nukleonik 9 (1967) 270.
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[113]
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[117]
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ALBINSSON
MUGHABGHAB. S.F., CHRIEN, R.E., Phys. Rev. 1/74(1968) 1400.
NILSSON, R., Nucl. Phys. 29 (1962) 66.
PATTENDEN, N.J., Nucl. Sci. Eng. 17 (1963) 371.
SPIVAK, P. E., e t a l . , "Measurements of the resonance absorption integrals for various materials and
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Peaceful Uses At. Energy (Proc. Conf. Geneva, 1955) 5, UN, New York (1956) 91.
ROGERS, J. W., SCOVILLE, J.J., Nucl. Sci. Eng. 33 (1968) 350.
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LATEK, S., TOPA, J., Nukleonika 13 (1968) 881.
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PIERCE, C.R., SHOOK, D . F . , Nucl. Sci. Eng. 3_1 (1968) 431.
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22 (1968) 191.
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KIM, J . I . , ADAMS, F . , Radiochim. Acta 8 (1967) 165.
HALPERIN, J., OLIVER, J. H., Chem. Div. Ann. Prog. Rep. for Period ending June 20, 1962, ORNL-3320
(1962) 2.
ATTREE, R. W., et a l . , Can. J. Phys. 40 (1962) 194.
COTE, R.E., DIAMOND, H., GINDLER, J.E., SCHWE, H., Phys. Rev. 176(1968) 1421.
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HARDY, J., Nucl. Sci. Eng. 22(1965) 121.
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EASTWOOD, T . A . , WERNER, R. D., Can. J. Phys. 38(1960)751.
HALPERIN, J., e t a l . , Chem. Div. Ann. Prog. Rep. for Period ending June 20, 1962, ORNL-3320 (1962) 1.
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HALPERIN, J., et a l . , Nucl. Sci. Eng. 16 (1963) 245.
BIGHAM, C.B., Fission Resonance Integrals of U-233, U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241, Chalk River
Rep. AECL-1910 (1964).
HARDY, J., Nucl. Sci. Eng. 22 (1965) 121.
ESCH, L.J., FEINER, F . , Trans. Am. Nucl. Soc. 7(1964)272.
YASUNO, T., J. Nucl. Sci. Technol. 2 (1965) 532.
EILAND, H.M., ESCH, L.J., FEINER, F., MEWHERTER, J. L., Nucl. Sci. Eng. 44(1971) 180.
FEINER, F . , ESCH, L.J., "Survey of capture and fission integrals of fissile materials", Reactor Physics
in the Resonance and Thermal Regions (Proc. ANS Natl. Top. Meet. San Diego, Calif., 1966) 2, MIT
Press, Cambridge, Mass., and London (1966) 299.
BAUMANN, N. P., Reports to the AEC Nuclear Cross-Section Advisory Group, WASH-1046 (1964) 49.
RYVES, T.B., HUNT, J. B., GOODIER, I. W., J. Nucl. Energy 22 (1968) 465.
KONDUROV, I. A., EGOROV, A.I., KAMINKER, M., KOROTKIKH, E.M., NIKITIN, A.M., At.
Ehnerg. 24 (1968) 533.
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INFINITE-DILUTION RESONANCE INTEGRALS

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32 (1972) 203.
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[179] HARDY, J., Jr., K1EIN, D., SMITH, G.G., Nucl. Sci. Eng. 9 (1961) 341,
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[181] HANNA, G . C . , WF.STCOTT, C. H., LEMMEL, H.D., LEONARD, B.R., Jr., STORY, J . S . , ATTREE, P.M.
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[ 182] KRUPCHINSKY, P. A., J. Nucl. Energy 6_ (1957) 155.
[183] NICHOLS, W.H., Nucl. Sci. Eng. 17 (1963) 144.
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Energy (Proc. Conf. Geneva, 1955) 5, UN, New York (1956) 172.
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[186] EROZOLYMSKY, B.G., e t a l . , J. Nucl. Energy 4 (1957) 86.
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2nd Int. Conf. Peaceful Uses At. Energy (Proc. Conf. Geneva, 1958) 15, UN, Geneva (1958) 127.

86

ALBINSSON

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Pu240, Pu242 and Am 243 ", 2nd Int. Conf. Peaceful Uses At. Energy (Proc. Conf. Geneva, 1958) 16,
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[193] YOUNG, T.E., REEDER, S.D., Nucl. Sci. Eng. 40(1970) 389.
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TABLES AND GRAPHS OF CROSS-SECTIONS


F O R ( n , p ) , (n,a) and(n,2n) REACTIONS
IN THE NEUTRON ENERGY REGION 1-37 MeV
M. BORMANN, H. NEUERT, W. SCOBEL
I. Institut fur Experimentalphysik,
Hamburg University,
Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany

Parti
TABLES OF CROSS-SECTIONS
(Range: 1 3 . 9 - 1 5 . 1 MeV)
ABSTRACT. The tables of recommended cross-sections are intended mainly to be of practical use in
activation analysis and also in nuclear chemical research or systematic nuclear physical analysis. Therefore the
compilation is not extended to the reaction types (n, d), (n, y). (n, r) and (n, t), which are usually of minor practical
interest. The literature before 1 March 1972 has been considered. The recommended values were deduced
from the data by preferentially using series of newer publications. The mean values are characterized by typical
errors; it was not possible a calculate weighted mean values because the information given in the literature is
sometimes too incomplete to be treated consistently. Occasionally the well-known semiempirical formulae
were applied. In some cases no recommendation could be given because of lack of a sufficient number
of reliable measurements. The interval of the excitation functions is divided into three groups:
13. 9 - 14.29 MeV, 14.3 - 14. 69 MeV and 14.7 -15. 09 MeV neutron energy. Usually one recommended value
for each interval is given. Special attention should be paid to the original literature because in several cases the
main sources of errors are the use of different standard values of cross-sections and the incomplete knowledge
of the decay scheme of the radioactive isotope considered.

INTRODUCTION
The following tables are the result of a compilation of all data on crosssections of neutron-induced reactions of the types (n, p), (n,a) and (n, 2n) in
the neutron energy range from 13. 9 to 15.1 MeV that were available to us in
the literature. The tables are restricted to reactions leading t o o - , /3- or
7-active residual nuclei with experimentally manageable half-lives so that
activation techniques can be used.
From this pool of data, mean values were deduced for each reaction as
far as possible, taking into account considerations as mentioned below. These
mean values are recommended for further applications, e. g. in nuclear
chemical research or in systematic nuclear physical analyses, as they were
calculated repeatedly for all three reaction types [1-6] . However, these
recommended data are intended mainly to be of practical use in activation
analysis. Therefore, this compilation was not extended to the reaction types
(n, d), (n,7), (n,T ) and (n, t J1 that are usually of minor practical interest. As
regards (n,t) reactions, the reader is referred to an article by Qaim et al. [7],
(n.T) = (n, 3 He) ; (n, t) - (n,

87

88

BORMANN et al.

Procedure of recommendation
This compilation includes experimental cross-section data available
in the literature up to 1 March 1972. Of great help for the preparation of
it was an older compilation [8] and the CINDA report of literature on
neutron data [ 9 ] .
The original papers often contain no complete information on the details
of the experiments and the evaluation of the measured quantities. Especially
the comments on the half-lives or the nuclear level schemes and branching
ratios or the isotopic abundances used, on the method of neutron flux measurement and the behaviour of the neutron flux as a function of time, and on the
determination of the counting efficiencies are sometimes incomplete.
Therefore the available data cannot be treated consistently and also cannot
be brought to a comparable state, so that a part of them may contain systematic
errors.
Furthermore the errors, if there are any given, often are not specified
as to their meaning (statistical or maximum error, standard deviation, etc.).
Thus it is not possible to perform the calculation of a weighted mean value
in a clear-cut way using, e. g., the reciprocal square of the errors, as has
been done for (n, 2n) reactions only [10,11].
Therefore we have tried to deduce recommended values from the available
data by preferentially using series of newer publications, especially those
which contain a greater number of cross-sections that were measured for
different target nuclei with similar methods, and other publications that
present extraordinarily thorough measurements. The accuracy of these
mean values is characterized by typical errors (standard deviations).
Measured cross-sections showing large deviations from the majority of the
other results on the same reaction were not taken into consideration.
Occasionally the well-known semiempirical formulae [1,2,12] were
applied so as to get information on the general trend of the cross-section
values.
In some cases no value could be recommended, either because of lack
of reliable measurements or because only a very small number of contradicting results was available. These cases are marked in the tables with
a dagger (T).
The recommendations are given for neutron energies from 13.9 to
15.1 MeV. In this interval the excitation functions of some of the reactions
change rapidly. The typical neutron energy spread is about 200 keV.
Therefore it seemed to be reasonable to divide the published data into three
groups according to the incident neutron energy. These groups correspond to
the energy intervals 13.9 - 14. 29 MeV, 14. 3- 14. 69 MeV and 14. 7 - 15. 09 MeV,
respectively. For many reactions recommended values are given only for
two or one of these intervals. If an excitation function of the reaction is
available (see Part 2), the missing value should be interpolated.
Structure and notation of the tables
For each type of reaction (n, p), (n, a) and (n, 2n) a table is
given (Tables I, II and III). The reactions are arranged according to increasing atomic number Z of the target and, within one element, according to
increasing mass number A. The following items are given:

89

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

Column 1: Nuclear reaction. If not otherwise specified, the total crosssection of the reaction (crtot) is presented. The additional symbol m
in the nuclear reaction scheme indicates that the cross-section
CT"1 for that part of the reaction leading to the residual nucleus in
a metastable state is given. The symbol g instead of m in the
reaction scheme characterizes the part of the reaction leading
to the formation of the residual nucleus in the ground-state prior
to further decay (crg). In this case the metastable state is not
involved.
If the metastable state of a residual nucleus decays totally, with
an isomeric transition to the ground-state and if, furthermore,
for the half-lives the relation Tf T? is valid, the total crosssection crtot can be measured by observing the cumulative decay
of the ground- state (cyS*) occurring with the half-life T? . This
case is characterized by the symbols gR* at the residual nucleus
named R. Figure 1 illustrates the symbolism.

exc

case(a)

case Ib)

Residual nucleus
IA + n-p)= B

Target nucleus A
(A + n)

FIG. 1.

Reaction A(n, p)B with metastable state in the residual nucleus. The event in case (a) contributes

to the cross-section o, in case (b) to oS. o t o t = o + 08. if T 8 T ^ and if the metastable state m decays
in an isomeric transition with 1CO% to the ground-state, then o8"~, the cross-section corresponding to the
cumulative decay with half-life T , is equal to o m + 08.

90

BORMANN et al.

In those cases where no value could be recommended the symbol t


is added . The symbol indicates that there are, according
to the tables of Lederer et al. [13] that have been used here,
uncertainties in the decay scheme of the reaction or that special
attention should be paid to the scheme.
Column 2; Isotopic abundance (in per cent) of the target nucleus in atomic
abundance. The values listed are taken from Ref. [14] .
Uncertainties are characterized by the symbol .
Column 3: Half-life (Tx) of the residual nucleus. These data are taken
from Ref. [14] if not otherwise indicated.
Columns
4-6:

Cross-sections (in mb) for the energy intervals 14.1 0. 2 MeV,


14.50.2MeV, 14.90.2MeV, respectively. Usually one
recommended value is given. Further values listed in square
brackets [ ] are experimental results that show unexplainable
deviations from the recommendation. If only values in square
brackets are given, a recommendation is not possible and no
experimental result can be preferred.

Column 7: List of reference numbers. References in square brackets [ ]


are those for the corresponding values given in columns 4 - 6 .
References in round brackets ( ) were excluded from consideration because they show strong deviations or are improbable for
physical reasons.
Table III is followed by a list of comments,
throughout the table refer to this list.

The handwritten numbers

REFERENCES TO INTRODUCTION
[1]
[2]
[3]
[4]
[5]
[6]
[7]
[8]
[9]
[10]
HID
[12]
[13]
[14]

PEARLSTEIN, S., Nucl. Data 3A (1967) 327.


PAI, H.L., CLARKE, R. L., CROSS, W.G., Nucl. Phys. A164 (1971) 526.
QAIM, S.M., Z. Naturforsch. 25a (1970) 1977.
BORMANN, M . , LAMMERS, B., Nucl. Phys. A130 (1969) 195.
QAIM, S.M., Nucl. Phys.. A185 (1972) 614.
GARDNER, D . G . , ROSENBAUM, S., Nucl. Phys. A96 (1967) 121.
QAIM, S.M., WO'LFLE, R., ST'OCKLIN, G., Chemical Nuclear Data, Measurements and Applications
(Proc. Conf. Canterbury, 1971), Inst. of Civil Engineers, London (1971) 121.
BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY, Neutron Cross Sections, Rep. BNL-325, 2nd Edn (1966).
CINDA 71, An Index to the Literature on Microscopic Neutron Data, published by the IAEA on behalf
of the four CINDA centres, IAEA, Vienna (1971).
BIDDY, Z . T . , Thesis, Kossuth University, Debrecen (1972).
BODY, Z . T . , CSIKAI, J., At. Energy Rev. 11 (1973) 153; see also BODY, Z . T . , INDC (HUN)-10 (1973),
report available from Nuclear Data Section, IAEA, Vienna.
GARDNER, D . G . , YU-WEN-YU, Nucl. Phys. 60(1964)49.
LEDERER, C M . , HOLLANDER, J . M . , PERLMAN, I . , Table of Isotopes (6th Edn), Wiley, New York (1967).
SEELMANN-EGGEBERT. W., PFENNIG, G., MUNZEL, H . , Nuklidkarte (3rd Edn), edited by Bundesministerium filr Wissenschaftliche Forschung, Bonn (1968).

91

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

TABLE I.

14-MeV (n, p) CROSS-SECTIONS

Reaction

Ll(n,p) 6 He
Be(n,p) 9 Ll

12

C(n,p) 1 2 B

Isotopic
abundance

7.42

0.8 B

100

0.17

80.39

13.65 B

3.0203

"(..,)c

99.6337

5730 :rr

IJ

0.3663

:2.25

99.759

7.1

16

O(n,p) l 6 N

8 + 2

8.5 + 2

98.893

H(.P) 1 S C

Cross"sections ( mb)
14.9 MeV
14. 5 MeV

<4

ft)

100

!!7

1.93 0.25
CIS + \ )

177
f4O5)
400; 406

77
16 + 4

41+4

20 + 2
19+6
18 + 5

23

Na(n,p) 23 Ne

100

38

402; (10); (403)


[404]
401; (159)

34 4

F(n,p)l90

390; 399
21; 4 01

25 + 4

39 4

19

References

14. 1 MeV

43

351;

401

41; 63; 158; 279; 409; (193)


41; 63: 279; 407; (221)
41; 63; 158; 159; 279; 351;
401; 408; 410; (193)
37; 236; 406
411; (221)
159; 225; 401; 408; (236)^351)
236; 406; 412

f j * 5)
43 5

225; 227; 2J6; 538; 351;


4 0 1 ; 408

*Mg(n,p)2**Na*

78.70

15.05 h

200 20

180 18

56; 74; 105; 114; 151; 223;


(293; 412)
56; 74; 114; 221; 223; (116)
56; 74; 114; i ; i ; 223; 225;

138 + 14

384

190 19

287; 307; 413; (401)


0.020

25

Mg(n,p) 25 Ha

10.13

59.6 11

49 + 5

[63 + 10]

41;C412]
44+5
40+4
C59 6]

26

Hg(n,p) 26 Na

11.17

1.0

27 + 7
(50 5)

* m decays vrith 100% tog (T^, 2 5-Tj

41; 221
41; [225; 247; 38$; 401)

412
C385)

92

BORMANN et al.

TABLE I (cont. )
Reaction
27

Al(n,p) 27 Mg

Cross-sections (mb)
14. 1 MeV
14.5 MeV
14. 9 MeV

Isotopic
abundance
100

9.46 min

78*7

75 + 8
75 7

28

Si(n,p)28Al

92.21

2.3 min

29

S l ( n ,P) 29 A1

4 .70

74; 412; (155); (i63l (405)


74; 221; 261; (163)
74; 155; 225; 287; 338; 401;
408; (82); fl63)

250*30
230

6.6 min

30

120 + 20
147 18

30

S l ( n ,P)3O"A1

3 .09

72 s

P(n,p)31Sl

100

2.62 h

88 +
83 5
f52 10J

32

S(n,p)32P

95.0

14.3 d

225 f 12

212 15
S(n,p) 3 *P

4.22

12.4 a

78 * 7.5
[85 395
,73 * 7
132 t 8 j

35

Cl(n,p)35S

75.529

88 d

107 + 38

37

Cl(n,p)37S

24.471

5.1 min

25+5

Ar(n , P ) ' 8 C I

*Ar(n .P)*M

39

K(n, p) 39 Ar

0 . 063

99 .600

93 . 1 0

37.3 min

269 yr

41+4

110 + 22

377
148

20 5

377
148; 379

15.7 2

354 45

41
[221J
41; [247; 401]

74, 201
74; 221
74; 338; 401; (225); C275); C408)

75 20

1.4 min

8; 26; 225; 271; 340; (338)

412
216; 423

33 6

38

110, 124; (412)


(221); (414)
128; 159; [225; 401J

8; 271; 348; 412; 421; (420)


8; [221; 422J

225 + 25

f380 T 30j

3<1

221; 261
401; (225)
419
261

0 . 18 * 0.06
<7

31

9; 93; HO; 147; 196; 228;


241; 270; 295; 323; 327;
367; 412; 416; 418; (105J;
ri64h (196)
67; 84; 93; 147; 159; 261;
388; (114k (221)
36; 147; 149; 159; 196; 214;
287; (238); (40lJ; (408); (417)

180; 387

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

93

TABLE I (cont. )
Reaction
<li

K(n,p) l ' 1 Ar

Isotopic
abundance

6.88

Tj

:..83 ll

Cross-sections (mb)
14. 1 MeV
14.5 MeV
14. 9 MeV

50 + 5
48 + 10

44; 295
[221]
44; 49; 401; (225); f338): (340)

180 10

216; 295; 348


216
207; 340; (145)

f501 + 24]

295; 406
216
f2O7]

f81 + 33]

<l2

Ca(n,p)'l2K

0.64

12.36 h

175 + 10
182 + 22

" l 'ca(n,p)'''K

0.145

22 h

97 + 10
110 * 13

**Ca(n,p)**It

2.06

SZ.Omin

35 7
36+7

* 5 Sc(n,p)' l5 Ca

100

165 d

55 + 5
53+6

18; 406
18
18; 340

270 + 25

38; 185; (348);f412)


81; 185
38; 185; 224; 345; 426; (238)

120 + 20

412; (348)
81; 139
224; (238); C345)

56+4

* 6 Tl(n,p)* 6 Sc

7.93

84 d

290 20
280 + 2 0

120 + 2 0

< 8

* Tl(n,p)* 8 So

73.94

44.1 h

61+6
61+6
61+6

' l 9 Tl(n,p)* 9 Sc

5.51

57.5 min

30 + 2

Tl(n,p) 5 o Sc

5.34

1..7 mill

39+6

24+5

[l64j
81
49; 224; 238; 345; 401; (426)

fl47 13)
17+3

51

V(n,p) 5 1 Tl

99.76

5.8 mto

38; 114; 348; (412)


81; 114; 139; (221)
38; 114; 224; 238; 345; 401;
426; (82)
348 (164)
81
224; 345; 401; (238)

35 4

5O

295; 348; 406


53 ;145; 207; 340;(338)

35+5
f27 * 4.5]
36 + 3

35; 348; 412


f221)
35; 82; 345; 401; (49); (S39);
C338); (408)

94

BORMANN et al.

TABLE I (cont. )
Reaction

52

Cr(n,p) 5 2 V

Isotopic
abundance

83.76

Cross "sections (mb)


14. 1 MeV
14. 5 MeV
14.9 MeV

T,

3.75min

References

163; 3*8; 412


163; 221

90 + 13
94 + 10
96 + 10

6 6 ; 163; 214; 338; 405;

408; (401)
53

55

Cr(n,p) 5 3 V

Mn(n,p) 55 Cr

*Pe(n,p) 5 *Mn

9.55

100

5.82

2.0min

45+6

3.6 min

303 d

36 + 6

348; 412
66; 401

37 + 7

348; 412;(179)
370; 401

45 +

350 30
310 + 25
315 i 25

56

Fe(n,p) 56 Mn

91.66

2.57h

112+6

80; 110; 184; 241; 272; 291;


323; 348; 429; 430; (9); f412)s

Cnh (w)

103+6
103 + 6

n,p)57Mn

2.19

1.7 min

59

Pe(n,p) 58 Mn

Co(n,p) 5 9 Fe

0.33

100

1.1 min

45 d

71+7

81
65

23 3.5

348
65

23 + 4

78 + 10

412; 417
311
367; (340); (434)

80 + 23

58

Ni(n,p) 5 8 g Co*

67.88

71 d

79; 184; 221; 272; 383


26; 36; 80; 184; 254; 272;
291; 340; 383; 432; (65*(95*
fl63>, (405)

t241;

f55 6}
75 + 8

58

80; 273; 348; 417; (9/; (24il


(412); (428)
79; (363)
26; 254

410 + 30

41; 68; 80; 119; 348; 417;


370 40
330 30

41; 79; 119; (414)


20; 26; 41; 49; 68; 80; 119
287; 345; 367; 433;

58..

9.15

ta

190 + 18

6O

Nl(n,p) 6 O g Co*

26.23

5.26yr

160 5

219; 345; (367)

109 + 8

227; 348; 412; 417; (9)


227; (79)
227; 345

25 *

401; (367)

138 10
118 8

60.,,

10.5 min

(97)

219
219

218 + 20

95

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

TABLE I (cont. )
Isotopic
abundance

Reaction

61

Nl(n,p)6lgCo*

1.19

Cross-sections (mb)
Tj

1.6 h

14. 1 MeV

14. 5 MeV

Nl(n,p)6z*Co

3.66

1 3 . 9 min

98 10

3*8; 435
79; (221)
3*5; ( 3 6 7 )

21 3

79
3*5; (2*0)

23

*35
[79J
3*5; (2*0)

88*3
lo;

62

14.9MeV

19

lo

101; *35

24 6
62a

1.5 min

3* 2

f!5 i 3]

6 1

' Nl(n,p) 6 '' g Co

1.06

7 . 8 min

5 * 1
*.l

0.05

"-co
fo.*3 0.02]

*35
2*0

*35
f2*0j

63

Cu(n,p) 63 Ni

69.09

9 Jjr

118 20

3*8; 412; *17

65

Cu(n,p) 65 Ni

30.91

2.56 h

2* *

35; H 0 ; 2*1; 27*; 3*8; 368;


21 5
23 * 3

*17; *37
3 5 ; 27*
36; * 9 ; 9 5 ; 2 1 * ; 238; 27*;

275; 365; 368


6I|

Zn(n,p) u4 Cu

48.89

19.8 h

200 15

170 15

66

Zn(n,p) 66 Cu

27.81

5.1min

75*20
65 6
70 7

67

Zn(n,p)67Cu

4.11

61.9 h

39*6

Zn(n,p) 68 Cu

18.57

30

25

19 4
69

G(n,p) 69g Zn

60.4

57min

17 *
10 + 1.5

69

"zn

13.9 h

348
[261]
240; 401
97
365
97

21
23.6 + 3.0

1) Association of decay to ground-state or metastable state not accurately known.

348; (412)
261; (221)
37; 365; 367; *01

3*8; *12
365

43 + 10

68

35; 4*; 114; 312; 3*8; 412;


436; *37
312; 438; (221)
**; 11*; 312; 362; 365; *01;
(49>, C245)

365;

(33)

96

BORMANN et al.

TABLE I (cont. )
Cross-sections (mb)

Isotopic
Reaction

71

abundance

Ga(n,p) 7 1 g Zn
71m

7O

39.6

Zn

Ge(n,p) 7 O Ga

T.

14. 1 MeV

2.4 min

21.1min

14. 9 MeV

<4

3.9 h

20.52

14. 5 MeV

5.4 + 1.2

440
365

11 + 1.5

365

12+4

440

110 + 20

348

fl29 + 65)
C
72

G(n,p) 7 2 Ga

27.43

14.10 h

70

10

32
31+4

348
f221; 321J
365

20 + 4

348
321; (221)
365

10 + 3

321
365

19 t 3

18; 41;101; 111; 183; 219;


445
18; 219; 512; (221)
18; 4 1 ; 219; 303; (401)

14.5 + 1.3

1; 101; 111; 445


1
1

134 + 20

4 1 ; 145
[ 4 1 ; 363J
4 1 ; 145; 154; (303)

56+5

363
153; 154; 303; 364

36 10

348
221; 363
303

22+3

363
154; 364; (303)

[47 + 5)

73

Ge(n,p) 7:5 Ga

7.76

4.8 h

21
26 ^ 3

13.2 + 1.3

75

As(n,p) 7 5 g Ge*

100

83 min

21+3
20+3

75

"Ge

48 8

18 ^ 2
16 + 1.5

7<l

Se(n,p) 7 \l

0.87

17.7 d

135 20
[108 + 20)

76

77

Se(n,p) 7 6 As

Se(n,p) 7 7 A

9.02

7.58

26.4 h

38.8 h

56 5.6

45
35 + 10

78

Se(n,p) 7 8 g A*
78

"A

23.52

1.5 h

6 min

C338; 365]

24 + 2.4

O.93 0.09

364

16+2

208

97

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

TABLE I (cont. )
Reaction

79 B r ( n , p ) 7 9 *Se
81

Br(n,p) 81g Se

Isotopic
abundance

50.537

3.9 mln

49.463

:.8min

14.

Cross-sections (mb)
14. 9
1 MeV
14. 5 MeV

10

References

MeV

+3

362

7 + 1.5

[286)
303; 362

20+5

286; 512
128; 209; 303; 362

+ 6]
22 + 7

80

Kr(n ,p)8"Br

2 . 27

4 .4 h

55 t 9

175

82

Kr(n ,p) 82 Br

11 .56

35.4 h

23 + 4

175

*Xr(n ,p) 8 " g Br

56 . 9 0

12 mir.

8 . 5 + 1 .5

175

72.15

4.4b

4.1 + 0.4
4.7 + 0.5

41
512
41; 149

tlO + 2)

[512]
fi49; 401J

45+4

18; 348
18; (286)
18; 340

9 +1

149

17 + 2

74; 348
74; 221; 512; (286)
74; 149; 340; (354); (401)

85

87

86

88

89

Rb(n,p) 8 5 "Kr

Hb(n,p) 8 7 Kr

Sr(n,p)86gRb*

Sr(n,p) 88 Rh

Y(n,p)89Sr

90,'zr(n,p) 9 O g Y*

27.b5

9.86

82.56

100

51.46

4.3+0.3

76 min

18.7 <>

17.8min

50.5 d

64.1 h

C4.9 + 0.5)

41+4

17 + 1.5

23 + 1.5
24 + 1.6

18; (293); (406)


18
18; 340

45+4

18; 262; 348


18; 221; 286; 333
18; 6 1 ; (345)

44+4
46 + 4

3.18 h

No value recommended.

12.9 1.0

189
149; 345; 352

98

BORMANN e t a l .

TABLE I (cont. )
Isotopic
abundance
(%)

Reaction

91

Zr(n,p) 9 1 *Y*

11.23

Cross-sections (mb)
Tj

58.8 d

14. 1 MeV

14. 5 MeV

14. 9 MeV

32+2

262
318; (286)

40 8
H i ?
91

"y

50min

17.5 i

0.8

Zr(n,p)92Y

17.11

3.5 h

21+1

262; 3*8
19+2
21+2

189; 333; (286)


49; 345; 354; 401

7+2

262; 346
221; 333; (286)
49; 345; 354; 401

8*3

96

92

Zr(n,p)96Y

2.80

2.3min

Mo(n,p) 92 "Nb

15.84

10.2 d

* Mo(n,pK

Nb

13+4

443

62.5 4.0
60 + 10

189; (221); (286)


49; 254

9.04

6.3 min

6 . 0 + 1 .5

49

37 + 6

254

95

Mo(n,p) 9 5 Nb

15.72

35 d

96

Mo(n,p) 96 Nb

16.53

23.4 h

16 3

92
21+7
19 + 4

97

Mo(n,p) 9 7 g Nb*

9.46

74 min

17.7 1.5
11.7 2.3

98

"Nb

l.Omin

Mo(n,p) 9 6 g Nb T
9B1

Nb

23.78

7.4^0.8

1.5min
51 min

[2 l ]
[ 6 . 7 + O.6J

96

Hu(n,p) 9 6 To

66.7 h

5.51

4.3d

f92]
t92j
fl893

f l 3 + 3)
C2.6 + 0 . 7 ]

Tc(n,p) 9 9 Mo

189; (221; 286)


254
189

f4.1 + 0.5J

99

286
254; (49)

92
15.9 + 1.3

97

345; (354)
262
189

18.6 + 1.9

92

References

7 1

f49; 92; 254; 40lJ

122

146+7

189
170 + 30

2) Decay scheme and association of measured T1/2 to ground-state and metastable state not known.

130

99

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

TABLE I (cont. )
Cros s-sections (mb)

Isotopic
abundance

Reaction

"u(>.,p) 9 9 "Tc

12.72

ii.O h

100

12.62

17

Ru(n,p) 1 0 0 Tc

14. 1 MeV

14.5 MeV

14. 9 M e V

< ,

130

'7 6

247; '101

[2 1.5)
[36 3)
102

R u ( n . P) 1 O 2 TO

31.61

; s

2 0.5

P )-V

18.58

ISmin

7.2

100

39.5 cl

10

*Ru(n,

10

>Rh(n, p)

<l

105

Ru

Pd(n,p) 1 0 ' l g Rh 10.97


1041-Rh

1O5

Pd(n,p) 1O5 *Rh t 22.23

105a

106

.0

42

2.7 + 8

346; (221)

4.4 min

31+6

346

[37.6 *_ 2.0]
[50 + 6]

35.5 I,

401

16

189
346

16

30 .

189
346i 401

9+2

1O9

Ag(n,p) 1 O 9 Pd

48.65

21

13.5 h

11O

Cd(n,p) 1 0 6 Ag

Cd(n,p) 1 1 O Ag

1.215

12.39

24.0mln

2*.4

189
401

15 + 2

11+2
15 i 2

18; 347; 348


18; 329
18: 345; (214; 401)

102 + 16

43; 348; 446


43

8 + 2

401

13+2

106

fl89; 221]
[346; 401)

23+8

8.3 1.5

Ag(n.p) 1O7 -pd 51.35

130

189

6.0 + 2

1O7

[221)
[130]

351; 401; (130)

16 9 1.5

45

Pd(n,p) 1 0 6 Hh 27.33

References

80 20

324

27

100

BORMANNetal.

TABLE I (cont. )
Isotopic
abundance

Reaction

Cross-sections (mb)
T,

14. 1 MeV

14. 5 MeV

14. 9 MeV

15+4
[2275 . 1 , 1 ]

3 2 4 ; 348; 446;[18)
[28.7 + 1 . 4 ]

[18]
[31 + 1 . 5 ]

tl2

Cd(n,p)112Ag

24,07

3.2 h

11 + 3

3 2 4 ; 3 4 8 ; 446
189

15 1 . 3

113

11

Cd(n,p)113Ag

12.26

5.3 h

'*C(i(n,p) 1 1 ''Ag

28.86

5.2 s

7.58

2.5min

U6

Cd(n,p)U6Ag

115

In(n,p)J15gCd

115

112

95.72

"cd

"ln

l15

S n ( n , p ) l l 5 " l n 0.35

li6

Sn(n,p) 1 1 6 g In 14.30
ll6

117

"ln

Sn(n,p)117gIn

8 * 2

14.4mln

[0.2 + 0.1]

[324]
67

15.5 i 4.0

348; (448)
329
12.5 + 1.5

345

7.7 1.2

187
345

3.5 0.2

[35]

[447]
13 0.7

187

21 min

9 + 2

6 7 : 187

4.50 h

3.5 0.2

187

14

38 min

11 + 4

51

11+2

187; 189; (67)


51

8 + 1

9.2+2.7
9 . 8 + 1.6
1 3 . 6 *_ 3

117

"ln

1.15 h

2.8 + 0.8

In

"ln

24.03

5 a

4.4 min

3) Association of measured T|/2 not known.


Checking of decay scheme is urgently recommended.

442
189; (187)
5 0 , 134
442

4 . 7 + 1.0

118

401

5 . 4 + 1.5

17+3

5 4 . 0 mln

7.61

3 2 4 ; 3 4 8 ; 446

3 + 1.6

43 d

S n ( n , p ) 1 1 2 g I n 0.96

112

53.5 h

Cl8]

5 . 1 + 1.6

187; 189
5 1 ; (134)

0.4 + 0.2

51

[5.8 + 0.2]

67; 187
67;
[51]

11+2

3)

101

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

TABLE I (cont. )
Isotopic
abundance

Reaction

Tj

Cross-sections {mb)
14. 1 MeV
14, 5 MeV
14. 9 MeV

(%>
119

Sn(n,p)

119g

119

12O

In

8.58

"ln

Sn<n,p)12Ii

2.3 rnin
18 min

32.85

2.6 + 0.3
4.3 1.5

187; (67)
51

4.3 1.*

187; (67)
51

2.8 + 1.0

67; 400
239

2.6 ^ 0.3

44 .

Sb(n,p) 1 2 1 g Sn

57.25

27 h

2.2 * 0.4

346

123,Sb(n,p) 1 2 3 g Sn

42.75

129 d

1.8 _ 0.4

346

40 min

2.8 0.9

346

123a

346

12 1

' Te(n,p) 1 2 ' l g Sb


12<l

126

4.61

"sb

T(n,p)l26Sb

Te(n,p)128gSb

18.71

31.79

128m

"Sb

13O

Te(n,p) l 3 o Sb

34.48

Sb
127

I(n,p)127gTe

9 + 2

1.6 min

"Sb

128

60.3 A

100

<0.6

130

Xe(n,P)130 I

1.6 0.3

346

19 min

4.5 0.6

346; (146)

9.32 Ji

1.3 0.3

148; 346; (51)

:IO min

1.0 0 . 2

148; 346; (51); (134)

(I min

0.55 0.18

346; (51); (134)

]>7 miri

0.61 0.09

346; (51)

S'.4 h

11.7 1.2

5.3 1

109 d
4.08

346

12.4 d

9.8 1.0
f3.8 0.4)
127"

51; 346

12.3 h

6.7

+ O.fi

329; (221)
252; f345j
345
175

131

Xe(n,p)131 I

21.18

8.05 a

5.3 0.6

175

132

X e ( n , p ) l 3 C 'i

26.89

:!.<4 h

2.5 + 0.3

175

"xe(n,p) W 'i

10.44

!i2 mill

2.2 + 0. 5

175

100

;.65 A

13

133

C8(n,p)133gXe*

5.70 2.35

253; (180)

4.80 + 0.75

253

102

BORMANNetaJ.

TABLE I (cont. )
Isotopic
Reaction
1 6

' Ba(n,p)1'6Cs

abundance
7.81

Cross-sections (mb)
T;
12.9 h

14. 1 MeV

14. 5 MeV'

14. 9 MeV

43 t 10
49 i 10

348
329
317 (340)

2.4 + 0.4

348
189; 329
317; 340

4.7 + 0.5

317; 406
221; 400; (329)
132; 317; 340

8+2

348
189; 329
132; 317

8^2

329
317; 401

4.5 1.0

400
317; (132)

3b.3 3.8

158

Ba(n,p) 1 3 8 Cs

71.66

32.3min

2.3 + 0.3
3 + 0.5

139

La(n,p) 1 : 5 9 Ba

99.9H

82.9min

5 + 1
5+1

U0

Ce(n,p) 1 ' l 0 La

88.48

40.2 h

11+2
9.5 2.5

1 l2

' Ce(n,p) 1 '' 2 La

11.07

92.5 min

7 +2

348
9.5 0.9

1 ll

' Pr(n,p)1''1Ce

lll2

Nd(n,p) 1 '' 2 Pr

" l3 Nd(n,p) 1 '''pr

l ie

' Nd(n,p) 1 '' 8 Pr

100

27.11

12.17

5.73

32.5 d

19.2 h

13.6 d

1.98 min

4.5 1.0

13 + 3,

3"i6
13.5 + 2.7

329

11.5 2.3

329

11+2

348

3.5 + 1
3.5 + 0.8

1 l8

' SiD(n,p) 1 '' 8g P

11.24

1 l8 1

' ' 'pm

l52

S(n,p)152P

26.72

348
317

5'.4 d

14.3 * 2.3

336

41.8 d

18.8 + 4.4

336

6 min

.P)15"P.

2 2 . 71

1 . 6 min

.(. ,P)153S-

5 2 . 18

46 .8 h

l56

Gd(n ,p) 1 5 6 Eu

2 0 . 47

15 .1 d

Gd(n , p ) 1 5 7 E u

1 5 . 68

15 .1 b

l57

References

3.7 + 0.2

400
3.7 + 0.2

316; 317

3.5 + 0.2

316; 317

7.4 + 0 . 7

329

<15

11.3 1.7

132

329

103

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

TABLE I (cont. )
Isotopic
abundance

React i o n

!1

156

Ocl(n,p)

24.87

46

159

Tb(n,p) 159 Gd

100

18.56 h

14. 1

Cross-sections (mb)
MeV
14.5 MeV
14.

niin

2.

References

MeV

6 i

o. 6

[15.8 + 2.5)

132

[336]
3.4 1.5

49; 132

16O

Dy(n,p) l 6 O Tb

2.294

72.1 <J

163

Dy(n,p) 1 6 '"Tb

24.97

7 mm

165

Bo(n,p) 1 6 5 Dy t

100

2.35 h

[40*10)

Cm]

1.3 min

<1

111

165>

Dy

132

3 1

317

167

Er(n,p) 1 6 7 Bo

22.94

J.I h

16B

Er(n,p) 1 6 8 Ho

27.07

3.3nln

2.5 1.0

317

170,.
Er(n,p) 1 7 0 Bo

14.88

45

1.8 t 0.5

317

,u(n,p) 175 Yb

97.41

4.2 cl

176

Hf(n,p) 1 7 8 g Lu 27.1
Lu

181

1M

317; 401

3.42 * 0.52

329

30m:ji

1.72 0.17

334

20min

1.02 0.10

334

Ta(n,p) 1 8 1 Hf

99.9877

42.5 d

W(n,p) 182 Ta

26.41

115

2.3 + 0.23

449

W(n,p) 1 8 3 Ta

14.40

5.0 i

2.8 0.3

449

3 0.5

333; 400

4.8 * 1.0
[14 4]
186

W(n,p) 186 Ta

28.41

2.3 0.5

187

He(n,p) 1 8 7 w

62.93

S3.8 h

188

0(n,p) 1 8 6 He

13.3

16.8 h

l9o

0s(n,p) 1 9 0 "He

26.4

2.8 h

17; 329; 333; (240)

3.9 0.4

329

8.7

406
216

7.1 1.9

2.0+0.5

329; 333) (400)


[240)

1.3

406

104

BORMANN et al.

TABLE I (cont. )
Reaction

Isotopic
abundance

Crosss-sections (mb)
14. 1 MeV
14. 5 MeV 14.!9 MeV

References

'"iKn.p)193^

62.7

31 h

2.7 0.6

329

19

32.9

17. 4 h

4.2 + 0.5

135; 329

4.2 h

(2.9 0.31

[329J

*Pt(n,p) l 9 *Ir

95 P t ( n > p ) 195 I r a * 33.8

196

197

Pt(n,p)196Ir

Au(n,p) 1 9 7 Pt

25.3

100

1.4 h

18 h

1.68 0.25

450
1.1 + 0.2

135

2.3 * 0.2

18; (293)
18; 329

2.0 *_ 1
2.4 + 0 . 1

" 8 Hg(n,p)' 9 8 Au

199

201

Hg(n,p) 1 9 9 Au

Hg(n,p) 2 0 1 Au

10.02

16.84

13.22

2.70 d

3.15a

26min

2O3

Tl(n,p) 2 O 3 Hg

29.50

46.9d

2O5

Tl(n,p) 2 0 5 Hg

70.50

5.5 min

294

4.7 0.3
4.5 + 0.5

135

2.3 0.3

294
135

3.63 + 0.36

294
329

2.1 0.3

294
329

4.6+0.6

1.5 + 0.7

[30 + 10)

3 + 1.6
3 0.3

0.46 * 0.06

Bl(n,p) 2 O 9 Pb

100

3.30 h

1.3 + 0.3
0.75 + 0.30

0.7205

99.2739

(240)

221; (135; 329)


240
135; f221; 400]

ft i O

2O9

18

329
214; 238; 329

24.4min

1.86 0.38

329

6.75 d

1.3 1 0.3

329

2.3 min

1.5 0.1

328

105

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

TABLE II. 14-MeV (n,a) CROSS-SECTIONS


Reaction

Be(n,/) 6 He

""

Cross-sections (mb)

Isotopic
abundance

14. 1 MeV

100

0.

8 8

10 + 1

80.39

0.

84

.30

14. 5 MeV

14. 9 MeV

390

31 + 6

19

23

26

F(n,0C) 16 N

Na(n,<t) 2 0 F

Mg(n,oO 23 Ne

100

100

11.17

7. 1 s

11 .2 a

38 a

Al(n,.) 2 ' l g Na*

100

15.05 h

389
13

236

5
26 + 6

159;

150 + 20

65;

72 10

39;
39;
39; 225; 351

150 + 20

236;

84 10
77 + 8

27

Ri Jferences

120.5 + 2
116 + 3

351
322; 344; 386
322; (214)

83;

124; 196; 309; 393; (93)

18;

56; 114; 116; 141; 196;

223;

286; 309; 321; (382);

18; 36; 56; 93; 114; 155;

'Sl(n,O 2 7 Mg

3.09

9.46 la

::.3m:ji

3<1

Si(n,(t) 3 1 Sl

4.22

51.62 li

Cl(n,<O 3 2 P

75.53

14.3 d

Cl(n,0(,) 1 *''

*Ar(n,lO 3 7 S

24.47

99.6

12.4 11

5.1 min

m decays with 100% to g (Tf /2 > T,j)

(383);

f~ 150]

261; 361; 3811 (221)


C25 i 338]

70 + 10

119 * 16

35
115 + 12

35; 114; (232)


35; 114; (128); (159);

163 15

8;
221;
225; 338

126 7

100 + 20

348
216;
275

380

120 13
90+10

I;

10 + 1.5

269;
376;
374;

13 + 1.5
10 + 1.5

(382);

384

117 15

37

205; 223; 238; 276;

65+6

138 35

35

196;
309;

(275);

(324)
377
(379)

(351)

(225)

106

BORMANN et al.

TABLE II (cont. )
Reaction

59

K(n,)' 6 Cl

**K(n,<<,)38Cl

Isotopic
abundance

Cross -sections (mb)


14. 5 MeV
14. 9 MeV

14. 1 MeV

Ti

93.10

3. I X 10 yr 84 + 12

6-88

37.3min

34

46 6
31 i 5

340
221; 232
49: 225; 338; 340

35 * 6

295
232
138; 335; (338); (341);

54 6

18
18
IB; 49; 214; 340

23 + 6

324;
345

10 * 2

324
139; 375
345

19+4

71; 307
139; 307
49; 82; 345

32+5

37
37; t l 4 ; 232; 311
37; 370; 397; (338); (372)

96 + 10

80; 241; 273


79; 363;
80

21.5 + 2

65

39 + 8

'l''Ca(n,i(,)''1Ar

2.06

1.83 h

35 + 5
35 + 8

*5So(nft)*2lC

'00

12.36 h

55 _ 2.8
56 3

"l8Ti(n,<O''5Ca

5o

Tl(n,*)* 7 Ca

73.94

5.34

165 d

4.54 d

39 + 6

9.4 + 1.5
9.5 2

51

v(n,<0* 8 Sc

99.76

44.1 h

15 2
17+3

55

Mn(n,t) 52 V

100

3.75 min

32 + 5
32+5

*Fe(n,ot,) 51 Cr

5.82

27.8 d

100 20
98 + 1 5

58

59

Pe(n,lt) 5 5 Cr

0.33

3.6 min

Co(n,y 56 MB

100

2.57 h

30+3
30+2
29 * 3

58

67.88

2.6 yr

125+16

Hl(n,<C)59Fa

3.66

45 d

22 3.5

6i

Ni(n,<<.) 55 Fe

References

32; 38; 114; 184; 273; 343


184; 273; 311
114; 184; 273; 328; J40;
367
392

17+4

324
340

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

107

TABLE II (cont. )
Isotopic
abundance

Reaction
6

*M(nA)61Fe

63

Cu(n,4) 6 0 Co

Cross-sections (mb)
Tj

1.08

6.1min

69.09

5.26 yr

14. 1 MeV

14.5 MeV

14. 9 MeV
5.2+1.2

340

32.7 2.5
23 + 3

227;
227; 369; (159);(398)
369

10+5
1.9 + 0.6

101;
f356]
49; 159; (368)
49

3 9 . 1 2.7

227; (378)
35.7+ 2.5

60m

65

Co

Cu(n,o0 6 2 g Co

10.5 min
30.91

13.9min

4.8+1.4
f20 10]

62>

Co

1.5

rain

10 1

357
261; 361
365; ( 4 9 ) ;

9+1

7O

69

Zn(n,6) 67 Nl

0.62

50

7.8 2.2

366

Ga(n,C)66Cu

60.4

5.1 min

18 + 2

365

39.6

30

C60 + 4)

T351)

27.43

55 min

7 + 1.5

321; 365

13.9 h

8 * 1.5

3 2 1 , 365

71

Ga(n, fl C) 68 Cu t

72

Ge(n,(t) 6 9 g Zn
69

"zn

'*G<!(n,t)71gZn

36.54

2 . 4 mta

ClO I.5J

71m

75

Zn

A(n,oi) 7 2 G

4 h

100

14.1 h

3.32 0.33

so

S e ( n , , ) 7 5 g G e t 23.52
75

3.3 0.5

365

11 2.5

18; 41; 101; 250


18; 358
18; 41; 49; 243; 303

12+2

S(n,o077gO
77m

79

49.82

Br(n,<C) 76 A

50.54

83 min

[7 1]
7.6 0. 9

11.3 h

6 + 2

54 a

26.4 h

14 + 5
16 6
15+6

No value recommended.

f365)
321

12+2

78

(367)

Cl5];
f2.8 0 . 6 )

References

T3O3 ;

3 6 3 ] ; (15">); (3*4)

364
364; (153); (154); (303)
3'*
35; 343
35; 358; 360
49; 128; 209; 303; 362

108

BORMANN et al.

TABLE II (cont. )
Isotopic
abundance
(%)

Reaction

81

Br(n,.) 7 8 A.

49.46

Tj

Cross-sections (mb)
14. 1 MeV
14.5 MeV
14. 9 MeV

1.5 h

0 9 + 2)
6*3

86

Kr(n,.) 8 3 g Sc 17.37

23 mln

85

Rb(n,.)82Br

35.4 h

71.15*

1.2 0.1

175; 361

41; (286)

7 * 2

(4.9 + 0.5]

87

Hb(n,i) 8 l | Br

31.8 min

84a"Br

6 min

Sr(n,(.) 65 "Kr t 82.56

4.4 h

Y(n,j0) 86g Rb*

18.7 d

89

27.85*

100

t358)
7 * 2

41; 340

2.1 + 0.4
1.9 * 0.4

360;
340
340

1.8 * 0.2

f75
5 0.5

86.,,

92

Zr(n,<0 8 7 "Sr

Zr(n,o(,) 89 Sr

9 1

' Zr(n 1 <O 91 Sr

51.46

17.11

17.40

2.8 h

50.5 d

9.7 h

93

Zr(n,oO 93 Sr

Nb(n,c0 9 0 g lf*

2.8

100

8 mln

64.1 h

5.5 + 1
0.91 + 0.45

2.8 + 0.3

262; 355; 357


356; (333)
49: 243: 355; (149)

10 * 1.2

18; 345: 348


18; 345

5.5 + 1.5

18: 262: 348; 355


18; 189; 333: 343
18; 49; 345; 355

3 1

262; 348; (333)


49; 345; 354

3.2 * 0.3

10 + 1

4.8 + 1

3*1

9*1

5.8 + 1

18;
18;
18;
189
49;

20 t 8
2.5 0.3

189
48; 92
134; (189)

9*1
90. y

92

Mo(n, 16)89*Zr 15.84


89

"Zr

9 1
3.19 h

5.5 i 0.5

78.4 h
4.2 min

Checking of decay scheme is urgently recommended.


# Isotopic abundance not accurately known.

286)

18; (293)
16
IB; 340; (286)
49

5 + 1

96

(358)

C221 ;

5 1

90

f358]
49; 128; 303; 362; (209);
(363)

293; 343
293; 353
391; (345)
149; 352; (345)

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

109

TABLE II (cont. )
Isotopic
abundance

98

Mo(n,o0 9 5 Zr

Mo(n,<(,)9'zr

Cross-sections (mb)
T,

14. 1 MeV

23.78

65.5 d

8.1+1

9.63

16.8 h

25 15

14, 5 MeV

14. 9 MeV

189

92
[286]

[14 6)

23 .4 h

- R U , n ^ , - H O 18.58
1 3

Rh(n, i O 1 0 0 Tc 100

27.33

2 . 0 2 + 0.22

122

14 .6 min

2.6 1

130

1"' 8

11

350;

3S' . 5 d

5 .6 + 0. 7

189

2 . 6 * 0.4

343
189; 333
346

2.6 0.5

57

109

\ll )6 Rh 48
.65*

4 . 2 min

13 .8 ^ 6 . 2

221

12 3

2.2 h

C d < n , O 1 ( >Wi. 22

17 d

Cioo 4 0 ]

Cd(n.A) 1 O 9 Pd 24.07

14 h

2.6

106

ll2

Ru 11 . 8 1

0.3
3.3 0.2

*Cd(n,et) l l l g Pd 28.86
U1

"pd

Sn(n,o0 1 1 5 g Cd

24.03

22 mln

0.5 + 0.1

324; 347; 348

0.15 0.05

324; 347

53.5 h

2.6 0.3

216; 329; (324)


345

0.95 0.06
1.15 0.1

18
18
18; 345

43 d

0.3 0.1

345

27 h

0.76 0.15

346; (198)

129 d

0.8 0.1

148

40 mta

0.8 0.4

198; 346

1.1 0.08
115

12ll

126

"cd

Te(n,^) 1 2 1 g Sn

4.61

Te(n,cC) 1 Z 5 g Sn

18.71

1Z

'*Sn

18; 324; (348)


18;
18

5.5 h

2.8 0.5

118

214; (164)
C324}

3.1 * 0.3

(351)

110

BORMANN e t a l .

TABLE II (cont. )
.
r ,
Isotopic
abundance

Reaction

128

Te(n,0 1 2 5 8'Sn31.79
125

13O

"sn

Te(n,tf(; 127!! Sn 34.48*

"'ifn.oO'^^Sb
m

133

100

"sh

C(n,O130I

100

Tt

Cross-sections (mb)
14. 1 MeV
14. 5 MeV
14. 9 MeV

9.4 d

0.53 0.11

324

9.7min

0.45 + 0.1

1*8; 198

2.1 h

0.39 + 0.08

329; 346; (198)

60.3 d

1-5 0.5

132; 344; 345

20 min

1.5 + 0.2

252;

2 + 0.5

342; 343
la9; 329
132; 34O; (49)

12.3 h

1.0 + 0.3
1.9 + 0.3

138

Ba(n,(,) 135g Xe* 71.66


135

139

"Xe

La(n,oO t36 C

11|O

Ce(n,<<) 137 'Ba

99.91

88.48

9.15 h

2.0 0.2J

91; ( H I )
[189)

15.6 min

0.55+0.05

189; ( H I )

12.9 d

2.0+1

2.55min

3.6 _ 10

t.45 + 1

329; 330
132; 317

10.5 1.1

39
39; 221
39; 317; (132)

( t!

189; 329
317; 340

12.1 + 1.15
11+1.1

lll2

U2

Ce(n,i<,) 139 Ba

Nd(n,<C) 139g Ce
l39

11.07

27.11

"Ce

**Nd(n,^) 1 * 1 C

23.85

82.9 min

6.5*1

140 d

10 + 2

317; (219)

56.5

2 1

317

32.5 d

336
132

9 +2
<15. 5

'"Ndtn.oO1*^'

17.22

[2.6 0.3)

33.4 h

re. 3
1 8

* d(n^t) 1 * 5 CB

5.73

3.0 min

" 1 ' 1 S(n,^) 1 ' ll Nd

3.09

2.5 h

26.72

1.73 n

22.71

12 min

Sm(nf(,)
15

Nd

*S(n,Q 151 Nd

5 l
11

2.0)

[329)
[317J
317
339

9 3

221; 317
9 3

317

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

111

TABLE II (cont. )
Isotopic
abundance

Reaction

Crosis-sections
T

14. 1 MeV

(mb)
14. 5 MeV 14. 9 MeV

References

B
47.82

41.8 d

52.18

2.7

19. 1

336

3.6
9 ;t

156

Od(n,0U 1 5 3 S.

20.47

46.8 h

8.5 -3

158

Gd(n,() 1 5 5 S

24.87

22.4 min

2.4*0.4

338

336; (329)
336
132

2.18 + 0.52
16O

Gd(n,,O157S.

21.90

0 . 5 min

100

15 .1 a

2 .2 0 . 5

-Dy(n.,,-od

25.53

18 .56 h

3 .56

16

28.18

:>.6mln

fO.9j

*Dy(n,c0 l6l G<l

317

. . .

330

. 0.36

329

f220j
6 1.5

" 5 Ho(n,<) l62 Tl>


16S

100

E r ( n , O l 6 5 8 D y e 27.O7

7.5 mln

132; 317; 338

i O."1

336

S.35H

0.5*0.2

317

1.26 mln

1.0 + 0.2

317

14. 88

4 .4 min

1. 0 i 0 .2

317

^ , .

1 2 . 73

12 mln

0. 2 0

337

-,

27. 14

4.2 d

2 . 1 0. 2

141; 329

Hf(n X) 177 n.

35. 24

1.9 h

2 . 2 0. 2

141;

Ta(n,<<,)i78gLu

99.99

30mIn

l65
17O

18O

181

"Dy

Er(n X) 1 6 7 Dy

.05

0.5 0.3

333

[0.14 0.045
178

"LU

20 mln

to.3 0.1)
tr

28.41

63 min

[334)
333
333

1.2*0.2

[0.85]

C333J
f2.5 1]

ra

62.93

8.7 h

0.94 0.15

26.4

S:i.8 h

0.5 0.1

t334)

[240]
329
216; 329

112

BORMANN et al.

TABLE II (cont. )
Reaction

19

*Pt(n,c(,) 1< > 1 0.

196

Pt(n,rf,) 1 9 3 O.

197

Isotopic
abundance
(%)

Crosts-sections (nib)
14. 1 MeV
14. 5 MeV
14.9 MeV

37.3

16 .6 h

32.9

15

2.43 0 . 3

329

1.26 * 0.25

329

25.3

31 h

0.55 0.11

329

100

17.4 h

0.35 ^ 0.02

18
18; 329
18

Au(n,(,) 19 *Ir

'

0.27 * 0.02
0.45 + 0.02

2OO

202

2O

18 h

0.2 + 0.1
1.77 0.4

294
329

29.8

31 min

1 0 1 0 . 1

329

'll(n,<)M0A

29.5

48.4 min

2 .2 + 0 . 4

135; 331; 332; (329)

70.50

30 s

Pb(nA) 2 3 Hg

23.6

46.9 d

Pb(n,c(.) 2o5 ng

52.3

5.5 min

1 .58 0 . 2

100

4.3 min

41 min

4 .6 + 1 . 2

99.27

6.9 min

Cl.50.3]

Tl(n,ot) 2 o 2 Au

2O6

238

23.13

Hg(n,() 1 9 9 Pt

205

206

Hg(n,C) l97 Pt

References

U(n,o(,) 235 Th r

0.75 0.35
2.7 0.04

240

324

329

o. 5

330; (329)

329

fo.6 0.15J

[329]
C328J

113

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

TABLE III. 14-MeV (n, 2n) CROSS-SECTIONS


Cross-sections (tnb)
14. 1 MeV 14. 5 MeV
14. 9 MeV

Isotopic
abundance

99.6357

9.96mln 6.1 * 0.1

37; 47; 64; 78; 122; (15); (103)


7.0 - 0.5

47; 78; 87; 88; 221; 257


8.2 * 0.6

19

F(n,2n) l8 F*

100

10<>.7 min 4714

87; 221; 257; 258; 282; 319-

13(1 * 10 ns
Na(n,2n)22Na

100

1.62 yi-

6015

70; 78; 82i 205; 282; (307)

2.7 - 0.3

28 * 2

185;

CV3.B3

C
54 - 5

27

31

Al(n,2n)2Su

tOO

d.4 s

2.5 min

P (n.Z

Cl(n,2n) 3 ''8 C l t

75.529

84

10.9 t 0.8

257

5.1

8ft (59)

1.57 s

10.0 i 1

104; 127; 128| 159; 225; 247*466)

[1.7 - 0.3)
p . 8 0.5J
K.o i 0.6J

[1613
[2753
CO

17.3 * 1]

T247J

5.6 1 2]

[221]
2575
275]
227:

3.47 i 1.56]
5.42 i ).4O
t7.6 4 0.75
C12 i n
93.10

7.7 mill

2.5 - 0.3

0.95

6.88

1(O

Ca(n,2n)39Ca

96.97

0.185

294 i 23 I BA)

2483

232; 257;i|64
5.1 i 0.5

37; 161; 165; 225

0.8 - 0.2

161

; : 16

*)

0.88 1

4.54 d

:6j

24; 37; 295; "64

3.5 - 0.3
38m

fa?

185; 205

<0.17

Cl2.UI

35

78; 104; 128; 225


15; 37; 64; 78; 88; 216; 236; 282t
327; (47)

55+4

23

References

900 - 108

C53J

295
920 - 180

139
1070 i 360

138; (207)

* m decays with 100% to g (T^ * T J J J ) .


t No value recommended.
Note: Handwritten numbers V to ^ y refer to the List of comments which follows this table (page 129).

114

BORMANNetal.

TABLE III (cont. )


, . .
Isotoplc
abundance

Reaction

<

*5Sc(n,2n)MgSc

100

Cross-sections (mb)
T,

14. 1 MeV

4.0 h

110 i 12

14.5 MeV

14. 9 MeV

I t ; 61; 161, 246


182 - 15

If, 216
199 20

Sc

2.M d

127*12

14; 246; (231)


149 - 12

14; 246; 257; (231)


155 - 15

"6Tl(n,2n)'l5Tl

7.93

3.08 h

13.5 - 1

216; 257; (87)


50 i 4

1.31

12 min

10 1 1.5

(257)
28 i 3

Cr(n,2n)51Cr

83.76

27.8 d

278 - 20

m(n,2n) 5 V.

100

303 a

855 - 60

223- 311
850 i 60

Ve(n,2n) 53 %t*

5.82

8.5 min

10.5 - 1

12; 81; 87; 144; 257;


22 - 2

56

Pe

fe[n,2n)55?e

2.5 min
91.66

100

26; 205; 223

9; 12; 59; i4i; 241; (273)


15.5 * 1

55

43; 255

27; 44; 223; 308; (126); (314)


890 - 60

165; 214; 255; 287; 4611 (66)

43; 314
358 i 25

55

38{ 82; 224; 238; 246

461
(26.4 i 2.2J

52

14; 214; (231)

38; 64; 216


30 - 2

SOcrOi.ai)119*

11; 49; 214; (165); (248)

144; (65); (95); (255)

[0.84 t 0.15] p55J *-)

2.6 yr

440 i 90

314

71 d

655 - 50

32; 40; 60; 69; 971 126; 223; 305; 312;


313} (27); (112); (219)
720 i

50

69; 97; 223; 312; (112): (219); (311)


735 - 55

9.15 h

428 - 43
KK t *1

69; 97; 223: 312; (112); (155); (219);


(287); (367)
40; 97, (219); (367)
97; 311i (81); (219)

"23 - 43

97; (219)

115

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

TABLE III (cont. )


Isotopic
abundance

67.88

ctions (mb)
Ti

36.0 h

14. 1 MeV

14. 5 MeV

14. 9 MeV

211.5 - 2

391 85; 1191 2221 2H6;465 ;


(251)
31.0 * 2.5

85! 87; 119; 222; 216; 257|


163;I65 ; (79); (221)
31.9 - 3

5cu(n,2n) 62 Cu

69.09

9.7IS min

180 i 20

33; 11; 71; 85; 88j93; 110;


119; 171J 183; 181; 228;
211; 259; 270; 323; 327;
(61; 78| 109)
71; 87i 93: 119; 181; 221;
226; 310; 4l0; (16; 78)

522 - 20

585 * 25

65

Cu(n,2n) M Cu

30.91

12.11 h

913

50

35; 85; 87; 93; 216; 222;


216; 257; 258; 271; 311;
(221)
975 - 50

Zn(n,2n) 6 3 Zn

18.89

38.'l min

119 9

87; 113; 222; 257; 259;


261; 282; 312
2<W i 16

Zn(n,2n) 65 Zn

Z7.81

215 &

620 i 60

88; 261
710 i 60

Zn(n.2ti) 6 98Zn*

0.62

57 min

60.1

68.3 min

88; 161

711 - 100

161; 255

261

850 * 80

37; 6 1 ; 173

957 i 80

71

Oa(n,2n) 7 0 aa

39.6

21.1 min

11; 255; 308

1307 - 130
600 i

13.9 h

H9; 88; 222: 255


255; 282;
Wit 19;
312; 367; (71;"66 )

11; 313
650 4 60

70

36: 83; 85; 95; 119; 222;


238;216; 255; 271; 287;
306; 307;

35; 11; 6 1 ; 113; 170; 222 (


282; 312; 323; (71)
165 * 13

66

71; 76i 83; 85; 93; 119;


128; 181; 228; 255; 287;
(78; 101; 225)

35; 11; 85; 93; 110; 216;


217; 222; 211; 216; 271;
327; (78; 323)
956 i 50

26: 39; 19; 85; 119; 222;


216;165 i (155); (287);(367)

37; 257; (221)


1070 - 90

37; 88; 165; 166

(?6l - 100]

C88J; (165)

[700 - 106]

C221J

116

BORMANN et al.

TABLE III (cont. )


Isotopic
abundance

Reaction

Oe(n,2n)69oe

20.52

Cross-sections (mb)
Ti

39 h

14. 1 MeV

14. 5 MeV

14.9 MeV

246

508 S 40

610 i 50

821 j 246; 255; 257; 321


700 i 50

72

Ge(n,2n) 71I1 be

27.43

76

Be(n,2n)75EGe*

7.76

487 i 50

20

83 min

1157 - 100

9lU i 80

1; 219
1042 i 80

As<n,2n) 7 l | W

100

17.7 d

165; 199; 219; 288


1; 219

967 - 80

75

458

219; 321; (221)


1232 i 100

"be

246; (165)

219; 288
1210 i 100

75

References

1020 i 75

l j 219; (199)

39; 43; 126; 145; 246;(250)

1060 - 75

246; 302; (221)


1085 i 75

7l4

Se(n,2n) 73g Se

'

0.87

7.1 h

140 i 20

2; 40; 144
185 - 30

257; 301
220 i 35

7>

Se)

42 min

165 1 40

257; 301
235 * 55

Se(n,2n) 75 Se

9.02

120 d

845 60

301
944 i 65

Se(n,2n) 77m Se ' )

23.52

17.5 s

760 - 70

63; 226; 268


885 * 70

3.9 min

f6B0 i lOOj

Se(n,2n) 8 l 8se

9.19

18 min

225 1 45

894 i 89

28; 134; 226; (200)


301; (221)

960 i 50
Checking of decay scheme is urgently recommended.

{2003
226]; (1)

301
345 - 25

57 min

63; 226; 268

CSOO; (1)
fl25 j 10]
(255 - 20J

82

145; (226)

63; 226, 268


804 i 70

49.82

2; 40; 144; (226)

145
808 i 81

78

2; 40; 144; (154); (226)


2; 40; 144

210 - 50

76

39; 13; 88; 1H5; 246; 255

134; 226; (154); (200)

117

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

TABLE III (cont. )


Isotopic
abundance

50.337

Cross-sections (mb)
14.5 MeV

Ti

6.H min

14. 9 MeV

862 1 50

l ; 61; 171; 219; (59)


932 - 60

l ; 219; 257| (221); (302)


1010 i 50

8l

Br(n.2n) 8 6Br

9.163

17.6 min

111; 219

390 - 39
410 i 41

219; 286
430 i 13

1.1 h

719 - 9*

33; 257; 286; 302


750 * 50

Kr(n,2n) 8 *'Kr

I,

1.2 h

C215 i 20)

2.27

34.9 h

810 t 60

175

55 8

415 i 50

175

11.56

13 s

160 i 15

175

17.37

I.K h

350 * 35

175

72.15

33 d

t i W t 725
C964 58]

C246)
C13); (88); (293)
C310)
C246J; (286); (293); (302)
1530

77)

71)

1174 9A)
1682 161)
_ _.
Ii335 * 90)
min

[31 i 21]

27.85

18.7 d

B74 1 28)
C926
C9 i 61)
1)
C711
C 1 * 50)
0)

(1170 * 59)
(1394 * 139)

C302]
Dio]
43)
tao)
[119)
[246]
[264]; (293)

[1202 t 60]
[1832 * 276)

1.0 min

]
264]
431
210)
119)

[13]
Pi78 t 48)
B05-34)

Rb(n,2n)868Rb*

128; 209; (219)

0.351

C1O93 * 793
T15O9 - 761

87

94; 128; 209*, 219


33; (111); (219)

730 - 80

86

l ; 128; 209

(246)
[310); (286); (293); (J02)

tll91 - 60)
[1560 * 156)
[1417 t 72)
; 932 J 150)
[ 584 t HO)

[246}
[264)
fi49);

118

BORMANN et al.

TABLE III (cont. )

*Sr(n,2n) 8 3sr

.
T .
Isotopic
abundance

T,

O.56

33 h

Cross-sections (mb)
14. 1 MeV
14. 5 MeV
14. 9 MeV

CH2

7)

C46), (39)
[482 t 80}
t380 t 505
tl66 1 8 ]

Clio J 805
C181 - 9]

86sr(n,2n) 8 *ssr

9.86

65 d q,

787 - 50

220 i 20

302; (286)
276 - }0

2.8 h

222 t 15

(286; 302)
351 - 30

Y(n,2n)88Y

100

108 d

149; 210; 264;

37; I456
(225 - 24)

89

210; 261
156; (213)

247 - 25

82.56

2431
[2463; (39)i (165)

213; 264; 456; (88); (286)


1060 i 105

70 min

[3027
[2863
(216)

850 - 15

119; 210; (35D

202; 261; 425; (126);


(213); (293)
930 i- 84

456; (286); (118)


1015 - 70

9zr(n,2n>896zr* M)

51.16

76.1 h

630 i 15

2; 216; 262; 264


714

50

2; 246; 257; 3151 (286)


790-50

1.2 mln

[221; 315J

T1383

C21
t8i 12}
[113 J 15)
168 i 203

Zr(n,2n)95zr

2.80

65.5 d

1I56 i 80

100

10.2 d

ri9J
h ; H9t 161; 261)
T1993; (210)

315
1529 - 141

95|fc(n,2n)92ta>

i; 161; 210: 216; 251; 261;


(119); (199); (210)

C!1 - 33
C123J
(79.5 i 5.61

96

88; 161; 254; 264; 159

110 t 30

251

229;
1180 i

30

2M

. 593.

y^

118; 229; 293; 315; (286)


450 - 30

30: 19; 119; m ; 229; 251;


264; 1,73

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

119

TABLE III (cont. )


Isotopic
abundance
(%)

1 5 .8

Cross-sections (mb)
T(

15.5 min

14. 1 MeV

14. 5 MeV

14. 9 MeV

135 * 10

2; 87; 92; I**; 323


170 1 13

2; 67; l i t ; 221; 315; (46);


(257)
195 - 15

65 s

7.8 i l

2; 19; 83: 2io; 218; 255;


(131)1 (161); (151)
2

13 i 1.2

2; 315
17 - 1.5

2; 161; 255; 295; (91); (131)

(210); (248)

ioo

99

fb(n,2n) lt>

9.01

6.9 n

3*1

9.63

66.7 h

1510 - 180

115
92
t2O39 ; 210)
1389 - 81

12861
315; (221)
C1910 t 1 9 1 3
C1762 t 200}
1390 - 60

96

Ru(n,2n)95Ru

5.51

1.65 h

774 1 66

30
f6lO t 50)

tl89; 257)
870 1 50

1(W

l03

nU(n.2n)103Ru

Bh(n,2n) 1 0 2 % 1

1.87

2.9 d

18.58

39.5 d

100

206 d

1169 i 96

2.9yr /

30
11W t 80

315; (130)

,530 J 40
C69O i 671

229j 315
CoS; (293

563 * 40

229; (293)

383 * 30

229

400 1 27
W2w(n.2n) 1 0 1 M

0.96

26.7

110

N(n.2n)H>W
109o

Bd

11.81

8.3 h

4.7 mln

229; 315

C637 * 451

21 a

13.5 h

30; 261; (130); (221)

315

1460 i 1I5

fi65)
(88)
255

D15]
1030 i 105

30

517 * 8 0

210

30; 221; ]
(208)

1975 * 110

498 i 45

30; 315
510 i 30

208: (199)

120

BORMANN etal.

TABLE III (cont. )


. . .
Isotopic
abundance
(%)

51.J5

C r o s s - s e c t i o n s fmb)
T,

21 min

14. 1 MeV

14.5 MeV

14.9 MeV

((1000*100)
100010
[852 | 80)
80)
[818 - 75)

f93j
U59J
UJ
[59). ( 6 t ) i (U0);(179>;(306);
(270); (221); (293); (323)
(93)
C2573

ClOOO t 100}
C889 i 66)

C520)

8.3 d

C67); (221)
(601 i 90) [166)
[870 i HO) [210)
C657
T100
100) [1651
C57 T
(662
(662 ii66)
66) t211)

580 - 30

307; (293)
605 i 30

3071 (293)
630 - 3i

109

g(n,2n) 1 0 8 g Ae

18.65

2.4 min

740 - 80

a o ; 306; 307;

93; 164; 306; 323;


(110); (179)
740 1 80

93; (67); (221)


740 - 80

106

Cd(n,2n) 105 Cd

1.215

55 min

610 - 60

(260); (13)
928 - 85

188; 257; 260;


(980 - 1O0J

108cd(n,2n) 107 Cd

0.875

12.39

112

Cd(n,2n) 1:11I t<i

21.07

6.5 h

[501 18)

153 d

19 min

D21)
315; H 9

1221 i 150

315; 319

621 t 75

H65
C315)
576 i 69

Od(n,2n) 1 1 5 g oa

7.58

53.5 h

850 - 70

216; 315
790 i 80

ba

13 d

165

2H6; 324
830 - 80

115

[260); (13)

915 - 85

C725 - 50)b)

ll6

93; 165; 210; 214

760 i 60

216; (165)
2H6; 324

790 i 80

216; 315
770 i 80

216; (165)

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

121

TABLE III (cont. )


,
Isotopic:
abundance

Reaction

4.28

Cross-sections (mb)
T\

14. 1 MeV

l M rain

14. 5 MeV

14. 9 MeV

316 i 40

462; (131)
320 i 25

21 mln

1317 i 200
1450 i 100

295

In

50.0 d

1557 i ioo

i 3 i ; 2*6; (116)
1515 i 100

ai(n,2n)mSn

tt

0.96

35 mln

(1200 i 150]

[187; 257;463 )
[1400 i 150]

0.66

24.03

115 d

[1239 * 130J
[1800 - 100)

14 d

966 i 100

1871 315
t51)

8.58

245 d

1114 i 210

187

4.72

27 h

875 - 135

187

5.94

129 d

900-180

10 mln
Sb(n,2n)l 2 Bst>'' 0 )

[43; 260)

D15)
C187)

C1230 i 340)

121

26; 211; 246; 248; 267;


(176); (205)
Pl3; 88; 260);
(167)5 <3>

[1300 i 150]

HSn(n,2n)"*Sn^

211; 247; 248; 267; (176)


21,6

1515 i 100

112

[267)
[211)
fl761

131
323 - 50

lllta

211; 267; (176)


[131)
R625

[1790 i 150)
[1753 i 110]
[1540 i 140)

72 s

211; 267; (176)


* 6 2 ; (13Ui(94)

[1527 56)
[1633 i 21)

95.72

References

57.25

15.9 mln

167

517 i 23

187

1 0 1 0-^ 8800
1010

43; 162; 171; 259;


(59)j (78); (164)
1080 i 9 0

171; 257; 259; 315;


(78); (221)
1110 i 90

5.8 d

43; 162; 165; 211| (78)


[162)
[43)

BEl-SB
[427 i 2 0 )

D15)
B97 J 35)
(564 i 132)
C695 - 64J

[211J
162)
43)

122

BORMANN et al.

TABLE III (cont.


Isotopic
abundance

12

%b<n,2n)1223Sb* '

42.75

Cross-sections (mb)
Tj

2.68 d

10,

14. I MeV

14. 5 MeV

14. 9 MeV

BS1

fl706 t 120]
:i263 i 135]

tl245 j 312]
C1542!--f801
"

(2211
[3151
C1270 i

4.2 min

70}

5*7 - 79
731 - 73

268
686 i 60
1013]

iao

lfe<n,2n) ll9 Sne

0.089

9Ofc

123

ns(n,2n) i a Ib

121

2.46

Ds

12*Tte(n,2n)123nift! <>;

128lte(n>2n)127glle

217
199]

16 h

685 - 100

148

4.7 d

535 i 85

148

750 i 100

148

530 t 80

148

17 d

154 d

725 1 0

315

890 - 100

4.61

117 d

980 - 100

31.79

9.4 h

780 i 60

315

315

30; 221; 315


660 i 50

j27m
109 d

34.48

43, 457, (165,211)


43

69 min

940 t 100

36; 134; 148; (198)


30; 315;(148)

S99 ; 120)
!812 T 50]
1570 - 301
C664 - 40}
C580 J 27]
C435 - 507

34 d

Ciooo i 61;

ill?
D28 - 100J

IZTlfrl.ai) 126 !

100

12.8 d

126

[198J; (148)
(33); (192)
315; (221); (310)

1649 - 80
1650 t 140

12<l

, (198)
C3O](51)
D15J

26; 132; (252)

Xe(n,2n)123Xe

0.096

2.1 h

1130 - 110

Xe(n,2n)125Exe*

0.090

16.8 h

1355 - 165

175

55

700-200

175

175

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

123

TABLE III (cont. )


Isotopic
abundance

Reaction

128

Xe(n,2n)127Ste*

1.91?

127^

13o

132

Cross-sections (mb)
T

ji6.il d

175
175

1435 t 130

175

775 65

175

5.65 d

2360 i 210

175

2.2 d

665 - 80

175

9.15 h

1700 i 100

175

15.6 mSn

750 50

175

Xe(n,2n)151"1Xe k)

26.89

11.8 d

135m

8.87

Xe

1520 - 110

216; 310; 315


1600 - 110

0.101*

J2.1 h ( l 2 9 C s ) 1 1 )

315

1571 - 100

315

315
9*0 i 80

7.81*'

8.7 h

tili9 - 80]

8a(n,2n)137Bfc B *)

71.66"

2.55 min

1020^70

268
1250 - 100

138

Ce<n,2n)7 C e

17.2 h

0.250

31.1 h

# Isotopic abundance not accurately known.

C5171

91
1018 - 100

0.193

317

CM5]
[700 i 80J

138

132; 253

1371*70

783 * 56

')

References

810 - 65

8.0 d

Xe(n,2n)135EXe*

14. 9 MeV

1530 i 170

1.08

136

14. 5 MeV

70 a

Xe(n,2n) 12 * 1 Xe ' )

10.11

14. 1 MeV

1318 - 90

958 - 100

317

315

315

124

BORMANN et a l .

TABLE III (cont. )


Reaction

^(n^W

Isotopic
abundance
(%)

88.48

Cross-sections (mb)
T

14. 1 MeV

140 d

14. 5 MeV

14. 9 MeV

1800 1 2 0

13; 153; (9D


C1593 * 130]

C315J
1760

13

*be

56.5 s

ino

1210 * 1 2 0

39; (206), (315)


1160 * 120

11.07

1695 1 0 2

32.5 d

315
1850 160

3.1 min

1800 110

171; 221; 257; 260; (206)


1860 iiso

27.11

2.5 h

1640 i 130
f2O753

43; 99; 317; 157

13; 9 i ; 171; 260; (61)


1810 - 110

l''2|U(n,2n)l' | la*

39; 247; 317

43
1730 170

100

43; 991457 ; (317)


39; 91", 241

1200 - 110

l" 2 Ce(n,2n)l"l0e

References

1640 - 1T0

43; 104; 260; 317,*611


(165)

30; 206
[257]

C41H

99; 129
(317}

lilm

61

670 t 60

91; 452
610 i 60

50; 206
674 70

5.73

11.1 d

452

1626 - 200
[2160 200]

5.62

1728 276

1.73 h

8.83 min

1380 - 138

206; 257; 260


1620 i 162

550 t 50

50; 206
[800 i 200)

46.8

10; 43; 161; 260; (316)


43; 452; (91)

510 i 70

22.71

D17J

13; 91; 260; 152


1478 148

64 s

f3171

206
[2200 300J

3.09

129

C2250)

ClO; 94; 161]

C2213
1500 - 300

316; 317

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

125

TABLE III (cont. )

153Eu(n,2n)152niEuT

Cross-sections (mb)

Isotopic
abundance

Tj

17.82

12.6

52.16

9.3

14. 1 MeV

14.5 MeV

14. 9 MeV

510 - 70

f652 - 90)

Eu

5"Gd(n,2n)153od

l6o

Gd(n,2n)159Gd

96 min

2.15

21.90

[91 - 123

1855 * 110

1675 * 160

1221)
1660 i 170

10.5 s

[521 1 70)

C50)
[1250 i 3003

Ry(n.2n) 1 59 By

l65

H>(n,2n) l M l I te

1,3 i 191

220

0.0902*

2047 i 205

220

2.291

100

8.06 h

111 d

2015 1120

39 mln

'

1050 * 100

4Sto

24mln(g)

l68

Er(n,2n) l 6 l Er

Er(n,2n)l67"tr')

0.136

3.1 h

33.41

10.3 h

27.07

2.3 s

99

280

1780 i 140

99; 205; 288


280

'"O

l62

[217J

0.0521 * 1C.2 h

1110 i 150
l6

132; 165; 317

[152)
[160 t 19)

l60

99

152
[1170)

100

Cl65)
[317]
[152]

2"2 d

Hi.56 h

165; 281; 317

[152]
Cl61 t 253
JV50 * 2001

References

1740 i 200
[2110 - 300)

1870 - 300

43; 288;
C99); (165); (36)

452
1750 1 120

132

1965 * 155
C1000 i 400]

99
C3171

C1080 t 1001

t63)
6 9 0 i 24)
C1125 ; 92)
P03 - 10)

C50I
C50J
C635
C268:
(268?

[690 J 110)

p1 7 )

{973 - 120)

163)

126

BORMANN et al.

TABLE III (cont. )


Isotopic
abundance

Reaction

17O

lfi

Er(n,2n)l69Er

9fti(n,2n) l6a fti

"<""

" " 175m<n,2n)17'lf!Lu


1T

14. 1 MeV

11.88

9.5 d

100

93.1 d

14. 5 MeV

1895 - 133
1200 i 5003

(1030 * 1003
2000 - 115

C2933
99

2080 * 110

99

12.73

101 h

1810 i 130

281; (165); (317)

97.11

3.6 yr

1285 110

110 d

655 - 55

0.18*

23.6 h

(860 160J

70 d

2000 - 100

l8l

Ta(n,2n) 18Om Ia

i8\
'

13.75

1.3 a

35.21

18.6 a

99.9877

8.1 h

Hi
i l l 5

99

(880 - 1003

f273

(570 - 503

C217J

C69O i 70J

[2683

ClliO ii 80J
S071 - 173
S071
[1825 i 901

[13; 2163

(1130 J 80]
fl8l0 - 100)

182W(n.2n) l 8 l W

99
991 (317)

CiH3

2220

Hf(n,2n)17*te'4)

281

32 d

5.20

l8o

Ri sferences

14.9 MeV

3.03

Hu

2n> 1 7 %

Cross-sections (mb)
T

[13: 2163
f5ij; (223)
[1820 1 1003

B * (239)

26.11

130 d

2230 ii5o

99; 102

30.61

5.3 a

(790 1 90J

2173. (325)

71 d

[2290 - 2303

28.11

1.6 min

510 i 8 0

C102]
210; 217

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

127

TABLE III (cont. )


, . .
Isotopic
abundance

37.07

Cross-sections (mb)
T,

38 d

14. 1 MeV

14. 5 MeV

14.9 MeV

[1910 6oo]M)

[160]
1130 - 220

165 d*S)

[ll2o!iod]*)
260 - 100

187

Re(n,2n) 186 Re

62.93

90 h

1440 i 410

Os(n,2n) 1 9 1 0s'

41.0

15 d

2233 i 199

135
2120 - 220

191

13 h

!*(n,2n) 1 9 a "2lr

37.3

5.2 h

831 - 116

164 i 14
204 1 2 0

11.0 d (g)

62.7

0.76

I960 i 230

7'l.2 d

3.0 d

1 8

9 Pt(n,2n) 1 9 7 Ett

7.21

99; 255

2062 1 121

255

135

460 -

18 h

Pt

1128 i 125

86 min

30; (135); (221)

1060 i 90

Au(n,2n) 1 9 6 Au*

100

6.2 d

2403 - 120

135; 21; (221; 293)


2250 - 120

Au

S.7 h

200; 255; 320

216; (15; 123; 293); (*69)


2270 i 120

196m

255; 320; (200)


30; 135

980 i 100

197

255

135

1030 - 160
197m

30; 255; (165,

1723 - 130

2035 i 150

4.1 d

320; (174)

30

2026 1 168

25.3

320

30

190^
IT

165; 468

30
1993 - 200

^ *

466

160
1580 - 160

192

1(68
[160]

13* - 7
[175]

99; 216; 255; 307; (200)


216;
(293)

113 - 10
C210J

135; 216
C293)
117 i 10
[230J

9?; 216
200}

128

BORMANN et al.

TABLE III (cont. )


Cross-sections (mb)

Isotopic
abundance

0.116

14. 1 MeV

9.5 h

40 h

19S

Hg(n.2n) 197 %g

10.02

61.14 h

14. 5 MeV

14. 9 MeV

C<1100J
363 - 54

135

1617 - 160

135

1125 i 100

135

[1060 i 70]

[294]

9*0 i 100

291

1010 i 140
23.8

900 i 70
885 i 80

135
910 1 85

200

%(n,2n)1S9flWE

23.13

43 min

880 60

46.9 d

135

294

2060 i 190
2050 - 160

135; I56
2190 1 150

29.50

12.1 d

Tl(n,2n) 20 ' l Tl

20l|

Pb(n,2n) 203 8Pb*

70.50

1.18

3.8 yr

52.1 h

135; (216; 293)


1850 - 180

99; 226;233 ; (210)

1990 1 140

284

1810 i 120

98; 202; 300


1740 - 140

135
1840 i 130

20 1

* Pb t

6 8

[1260 * 270]

IlJ
C1340 i 120J
(860 i 180)

23.6

1100 i 200

0.80 s

1444 * 100
1700 1 150

3.7 10 5 yr
2.6 KB

[1]
l6l3

117

63; 281
1631 i 150

100

88; 99; I6l;226 j 470


flj

C1330 i 220J

52.3

99; 233; 255

f216; 277; 2933

[1350 t 150]
1950 i 200

285

255

291
789 - 120

6.85

255; (99)
291

2220 i 150

63;ll6
63; 118; 161; (217)
4; 15; 106; 123; 182; 266
&OSJ

t290 i 30]
C630 - 120]

[471]
116; 118]

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

129

TABLE III (cont. )

Reaction

Isotop:.c
abundar.ce

26Ra(n>2n)225Ra

unstable

100

Cross-sections (mb)
T

14. 1 MeV

14. 5 MeV

'..It . 8 d

1600 1 200

;!5.6 h

1390 1 130

55; 2*6; 292


1210 t 120

5 U(n,2n) J 37u

99.2739

6.75 a

750 50

125; 230; 72
640 * 150

H>(n,2n)236"top

unstable

22 h

234; 246; (326)

125; 237; 11511;


680 t 40

237

218

230; 246; 292


1320 - 130

2 8

References

14. 9 MeV

390 i 70

125; (11)

230

LIST OF COMMENTS TO TABLE III


1) Taken from Ref. 5.
2) Threshold energy exceeds projectile energy by more than 1 MeV!
3) See also Refs 88, 257 and 290.
4) Ref. 458.
5) Cross-sections are renormalized, taking into account the 73^0 isomeric transition of 42 min
Ref. 460).

73 m

Se (see

6) Including that part of the (n, n' y) reaction with the neighbouring isotope that populates the same metastable
state.
7) See also Ref. 169.
8) Assuming lOCfr isomeric transition.
9) Half-life of the cumulative 08 + 0. 86 o m decay.
10) See also Ref. 246.
11) Cumulative ground-sUte cross-section: o8 + 0 . 9 4 o m .
12) See also Ref. 133 (o m '*8 = 1.35 b) and Ref. 246.
13) Half-life not accurately known.
14) See also Refs 87, 246.
15) The references cited mainly differ in the separation of o and 08 due to the similar half-lives.
16) See also Refs 246, 31E-.
17) Cumulative ground-state cross-section: 08 + 0.91 o m .
18) Contribution from

18

Ta(n, n* ) 180 m T a negligible. For dm*$

19) Cross-section for the production of 2.2-d


20) Cross-section for the production of 50-d
21) Without decay of the 161-keV

l92

1Mm

184

see also Refs 15, 266.

Re.

8Re.

Ir isomer (half-life 650 yr).

130

BORMANN et al.

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FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS


50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98

131

BROADHEAD, K. G., SHANKS, D. E., HEADY, H. H., Phys. Rev. 139(1965) B 1525.
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BRAUN, H., SCHULZE, W., Radiochem. Acta 9 (1968) 22.
BRZOSKO, J., GIERUX, E., SOLTAN, A., WILHELMI, Z . , Nucl. Phys. A123 (1969) 603.
BUTLER, J.P., SANTRY. D . C . , Can. J. Chem. 39(1961) 689.
BUTLER, J. P., SANTRY, D. C., Can. J. Phys. 41 (1963) 372.
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132
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
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151
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153
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PREISS, J. L., FINK, R. W.. GARDNER, D. G., Annu. Prog. Rep. Nucl. Chem. (1960).
PAULSEN, A., Z. Phys. 205 (1967) 226.
MINETTI, B., PASQUARELLI, A., Z. Phys. 199 (1967) 275.
FREVERT, E., Acta Phys. Austriaca 20 (1967) 304.
NIX, J., CHITTENDEN, D., GARDNER, D. G., Annu. Prog. Rep. Nucl. Chem. (1961).
VONACH, H., MUNZER, H., Osterr. Akad. Wiss. Nov. 13 (1958) 199.
HUSAIN, L., KURODA, P. K., J. Inorg. Nucl. Chem. 30_(1968) 355.
CROSS, W.G., PAI, H. L., private communication (1963), quoted in Rep. BNL-325 (1966).
KARDONSKY, S., FINSTON, H. L., WILLIAMS, E. T., Phys. Rev. 4C (1971) 840.
RANAKUMAR, N., KARTTUNEN, E., FINK, R. W., Nucl. Phys. A128(1969) 333.
CZAPP, B., VONACH, H., CSsterr. Akad. Wiss. 2 (I960) 13.
GRAY, P. R., ZANDER, A.R., EBREY, T . G . , Nucl. Phys. 62(1965) 172.
NAGEL, W., Rep. EANDC(E)76"U", NEA, Paris (1967) 59.
SINGH, J. J., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 15 (1970) 1328.
ARON, P.M., At. Ehnerg. 16(1964)370.
HEMINGWAY, J. D., JAMES, R. H., MARTIN, E.B.M., MARTIN, G.R., Proc. R. Soc. A 292 (1966) 180.
SALAITA, G. N., Nucl. Phys. A170(1971) 193.

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

137

385 NURMIA, M.J., FINK, R. W., Nucl. Phys. 8(1958) 139.


386 KAUL, O.N., Nucl. Phys. 33(1962) 177.
387 BORMANN, M., JEREMIE, H., ANDERSSON-LINDSTROM, G., NEUERT, H., POLLEHN, H.,
Z. Naturforsch. 15a (I960;. 200.
388 KANTELE, J., FINK, R.W., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 6(1961)252.
389 HE1BERG, S. A., Phys. Rev. 96 (1954) 856.
390 BATTAT, M.E.. RIEE, F.L., Phys. Rev. 89(1953)80.
391 KULISIC, P., AJDACIC, V., CINDRO, N., LALOVIC, B., STROHAL, P., Nucl. Phys. _54 (1964) 17.
392 SEEBECK, U., BORMANN, M., Rep. EANDC(E)57"U", NEA, Paris (1965) 18.
393 SEEBECK, U., BORMANN, M., Nucl. Phys. 68(1965)387.
394 KUMABE, I., TAKEKOSH:, E., OGATA, H., TSUNEOKA, Y., Phys. Rev. 106(1957) 155.
395 DAVIS, E.A., BASS, R., BONNER, T.W., WORLEY, D.M.,Jr., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 5(1960) 110.
396 KNELLWOLF, T., ROSSEL. J., Helv. Phys. Acta 39 (1966) 376.
397 KUMABE, I., TAKEKOSH::, E., OGATA, H., TSUNEOKA, Y., J. Phys. Soc. Jap. 13 (1958) 325.
398 IRFAN, M., JACK, V . , Proc. Phys. Soc. 81.(1963)808.
399 FRYE, G., Phys. Rev. 93(1953) 1086.
400 CHATTERJEE, A., Nucl. Phys. 60(1964)273.
401 PRASAD, R., SARKAR, D., Nuovo Cim. 3A 3 (1971) 467.
402 BORNEMISZA, G., Nucl. Sci. Abstr. 17(1963)932, No. 7198.
403 ALBURGER, D.E., ELWYN, A., GALLMANN, A., KANE, J. V., OFER, S., PIXLEY, R.E., Phys. Rev.
Lett. 2(1959) 110.
404 MILLER, D.G., private communication (1961), quoted in Rep. BNL-325, Suppl.2 (1964).
405 FERGUSON, J.M., THOMPSON, W.E., KERN, B. D., cited in Nucl. Phys. Z9 (1962) 373.
406 CSIKAI, J., NAGY, S., Nucl. Phys. A91 (1967) 222.
407 PAIC, G., SLANS, J., THOMAS, P., Phys. Lett. 9(1964) 147.
408 MITRA, B., GHOSE, A. M., Nucl. Phys. 83 (1966) 157.
409 LILLIE, A. B., Phys. Rev. 87(1952)716.
410 DeJUREN, J.A., STOOKSEERRY, R. W., Phys. Rev. 120 (1960) 901.
411 HILLE, P.. Osterr. Akad. Wiss. 177 (1969) 467.
412 ALLAN, D. L., Nucl. Phys. 24(1961)274.
413 DEPRAZ, M.J., LEGROS, G., SALIN, M. R.. J. Phys. Rad. 21(1960)377.
414 HASSLER, F.L., PECK, R. A., Phys. Rev. 125(1962) 1011.
415 BROWN, G., MORRISON, G.C., MUIRHEAD, H., MORTON, W. T., Phil. Mag. 2(1957)785.
416 HALING, R.. PECK, R. A., EUBANK, H. P., Phys. Rev. 106(1957) 971.
417 STOREY, R., JACK, W., WARD, A., Proc. Phys. Soc. A75(1960) 526.
418 TIWARI, P.N., KONDAIAH, E., Proc. Conf. Nuclear Data,Microscopic Cross-Sections and other Data
Basic for Reactors, Ps.ris (1966).
419 PEETERS. E., Phys. Lett. 7 (1963) 142.
420 EUBANK. H. P., PECK, R. A., HASSLER, F. L., Nucl. Phys. 9 (1958) 273.
421 COLLI, L., IORI. I., MARCAZZAN, G.. MERZARI, F., SONA, A.M., SONA, P.G.. Nuovo Cim. 17
(1960) 634.
422 ANTOLKOVIC, B., Nucl. Phys. 44 (1963) 123.
423 HEERTJE, I., DELVENNE, L., NAGEL, W., ATEN, A.H.W.,Jr., Physica 30 (1964) 2290.
424 ANDERSSON-LINDSTRO'M, G., NEUERT, H., Z. Naturforsch. 13a (1958) 826.
425 ABBOUD, A., DECOWSKI, P., GROCHULSKI, W., MARCINKOWSKI, A., SIWEK, K., TURKIEWICZ, I.,
WILHELMI, Z . , Rep. IBJ 1147/I/PL (1969).
426 KOEHLER, D. R., ALFORD, W.L., J. Nucl. Energy 18 (1964) 81.
427 CHITTENDEN, D.M., private communication (1961).
428 ALLAN, D. L., Nucl. Phys. 10 (1959) 348.
429 MARCH, P.V., MORTON, W. T., Phil. Mag. 3(1958) 143.
430 STROHAL, P., KULISIC, P., KOLAR, Z . , CINDRO, N., Phys. Lett. 10 (1964) 104.
431 McCLURE, G., KENT, D., J. Franklin Inst. 260 (1955) 238.
432 BORMANN, M., FRETWURST, E., WREGE, G., private communication (1963), quoted in Rep. BNL-325(1965).
433 KUMABE, I., FINK, R.W.. Nucl. Phys. 15(1960)316.
434 VONACH, H., MUNRO. J., Nucl. Phys. 68 (1965) 445.
435 VAL'TER, A. K., GONCHAR, V.Y., ZALYUBOVSKIJ, I . I . , LATYSHEV, G.D., CHRUSIN, G.P., Izv.
Akad. Nauk. SSSR, Ser. Fiz. 26 (1962) 1079.
436 ARMSTRONG, A.H., ROSEN, L., Nucl. Phys. 19(1960)40.
437 BLOSSER, H.G., HAMDLEY, T. H. . Rep. WASH-191 (1956) 48.

138

BORMANNetal.

438 RAYBURN, L. A., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 6_ (1961) 462 Fl.
439 ZHEREBTSOVA, K. I., MAKAROVA, T . P . , NEMILOV, Y.A., FUNSHTEIN, B. L.. Sov. Phys. - JETP 35
(1959) 947.
440 DEMICHELIS, F., GUIDETTI, M., MIRALDI, E., OLDANO, C . , Nuovo Cim. 58 XB (1968) 176.
441 COX, A.J., FRANCOIS, P.E., J. Inorg. Nucl. Chem. 31.(1969)2957.
442 BRZOSKO. J., DECOWSKI. P., WILHELMI, Z . , Nucl. Phys. 45(1963) 579.
443 VALLIS, D. G., PERKIN, J. L., J. Inorg. Nucl. Chem. 22(1961) 1.
444 GUJRATHI, S., MUKHERJEE, S., Nucl. Phys. 85 (1966) 288.
445 RAMA PRASAD, P., RAMA RAO, J., KONDAIAH, E., Nucl. Phys. A138(1969) 85.
446 LEVKOVSKI], V.N., Sov. Phys. - Dokl. 2 (1957) 182.
447 KLYUCHAREV, A. P., USHAKOV, U.V., CHURSIN, G.P., Sov. Phys. - JETP 19 (1964) 1002.
448 EUBANK, H., PECK. R., ZATZICK, M., Nucl. Phys. 10(1959) 418.
449 SAKISAKA, M., J. Phys. Soc. Jap. 14 (1959) 554.
450 VONACH, H., MUNZER, H., HILLE, P., Acta Phys. Austriaca 23 (1966) 183.
451 BACS6, J., CSIKAI, J.. PAZSIT, A., Acta Phys. Hung. 1 (1965) 295.
452 RAMA PRASAD, P., RAMA RAO, J., KONDAIAH, E., Nucl. Phys. A125(1969) 57.
453 US ARMY ROCKET AND GUIDE MISSILE AGENCY, Rep. ARGMA-TN-2, HIN 30 (1962).
454 PHILLIPS, J.A., Rep. AERE NP/R 2033 (1965).
455 KUMABE, I., TAKEKOSHI, E., OGATA, H., TSUNEOKA, Y. , OKI, S., J. Phys. Soc. Jap. 13(1958)129.
456 FEDDERSEN, K.-H.. Diplomarbeit, Hamburg (1972).
457 CSIKAI, J., Magy. Fiz. Foly. If (1968) 123.
458 RURARZ, E., HARATYM, Z . , KOZLOWSKI, T., WOJKOWSKA, J., Inst. Badan Jadrowych, Rep. IBJ
1091/IA/PL (1970).
459 HUDSON, O. M., MORGAN, I.L.. Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 6 (1961) 506.
460 MARLOW, K. W., FAAS, A., Nucl. Phys. A132 (1969) 339.
461 JESSEN, P., BORMANN, M., DREYER, F . , NEUERT, H., Nucl. Data 1A(1965) 103.
462 KAROLYI, J., private communication, cited by BODY, Z. T., Thesis, Debrecen (1972).
463 LU, W., FINK, R.W., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 15_ (1970) 1372.
464 PETO, G.. BORNEMISZA-PAUSPERTL. P., KAROLYI. J., Acta Phys. Hung. 24(1968) 93.
465 TEMPERLEY, J. K.. Nucl. Sci. Eng. 32 (1968) 195.
466 MITRA, B., Ind. J. Phys. 41 (1967) 752.
467 CHURSIN, G. P., GONCHAR, V.Yu., ZALYUBOVSKIJ, 1.1., KLYUCHAREV. A. P., Zh. Ehksp. Teor.
Fiz. 44 (1963) 472.
468 DRUZHININ, A. A., LBOV, A. A., BILIBIN, L. P., Yad. Fiz. 5 (1967) 18.
469 BAK, M.A., PETRZHAK, K. A., CHENG, T-IA-Mei, Izv. Akad. Nauk SSSR, Ser. Fiz. 24(1960)818.
470 KAROLYI, J., private communication, cited by BODY, Z. T., Thesis, Debrecen (1972).
471 MONNAND, E., PISTON, J., C.R. 263 (1966) 712.
472 DAROCZY, A., RAICS, P., CSIKAI, J., Conf. Neutron Physics, Kiev, 1971.
473 CINDA 71, An Index to the Literature on Microscopic Neutron Data, IAEA, Vienna (1971).

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

139

Part 2

GRAPHS OF EXCITATION FUNCTIONS


(Range: 1 - 37 MeV)

ABSTRACT. The compilation is restricted toexcitation functions that can be measured by activation techniques.
For practical purposes, m.unly absolute cross-sections are needed; therefore, excitation functions given
only in relative units were excluded. As the excitation functions given in the literature frequently differ
for several reasons, less in shape but more in the absolute cross-section values, we desisted from deducing
mean excitation functions by averaging over the published data. Where there are significant differences in
the absolute values, the excita:ion functions should be renormalized by using the 14-MeV cross-section
values given in Part 1.

INTRODUCTION
The last survey on excitation functions of neutron-induced reactions
was published in 1.965 [1]. In the meantime, a considerable number
of precise measurements on these topics has been performed, mainly with
neutrons of the 12- to 20-MeV region.
The following compilation is restricted to excitation functions that can
be measured with activation techniques. In particular, the excitation
functions of reaction transitions leading to single-energy states of the
residual nucleus - e.g. (n, OQ), (n, o^) transitions - are excluded from
this compilation.
As to the intention of this compilation, the user is referred to the
introductory comments of Part 1. The same applies to the nomenclature
of the reaction types and abbreviation symbols. In contrast to the procedure
used in the tables to derive the set of recommended cross-section values
for neutron energies of about 14 MeV, we did not want to deduce mean
excitation functions by averaging over or calculating from the published data.
The totality of the excitation functions presented here is to be understood as a critical compilation that has been worked out in the following way.
Starting from some older compilations (Refs [1-3]) and using the CINDA
Report [4], all available published excitation functions were gathered
together. Often the excitation functions are published in graphic form only;
therefore, the graphs given here may contain small errors which arise
when estimating the values from the original graphs.
From this stock, first all those excitation functions were excluded
that were given in relative units only. This concerns mainly the papers
of Prestwood and Bayhurst [5] and Ferguson and Albergotti [6]. Second,
those excitation functions were omitted that showed strong and unexplainable
deviations from the majority of the other measurements for the same
reaction or that were in contrast to reliable theoretical calculations or
predictions (this applies mainly to some (n, 2n) excitation functions compared
with statistical model calculations). Third, excitation functions for the
small neutron energy interval 13. 5 - 15 MeV were excluded because this
information is alreadv contained in the tables of Part 1.

140

BORMANN et al.

The remaining excitation functions are included in the following


compilation. If more than one excitation function is given for a reaction,
these mostly concentrate around a mean value. In rare cases great
differences between two excitation functions can be found, usually, however,
not in the form but in the absolute magnitude. These excitation functions
should be renormalized by using the recommended 14-MeV cross-section
values given in the tables.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The authors would like to thank Miss M. Brauer for her help in preparing the graphs and tables.

REFERENCES TO INTRODUCTION
[1]
[2]
[3]
[4]

JESSEN, P . , BORMANN, M . . DREYER. F . , NEUERT, H . , Nucl. Data 1A (1965) 103.


LISKIEN, H . , PAULSEN, A . , EURATOM Rep. EUR 119e (1968).
BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY, Neutron Cross Sections, Rep. BNL-325, 2nd Edn (1966).
CINDA 71, An Index to the Literature on Microscopic Neutron Data, published by the IAEA on behalf
of the four CINDA centres, IAEA, Vienna (1971).
[5] PRESTWOOD, R.J., BAYHURST, B. P., Phys. Rev. 121 (1961) 1438.
[6] FERGUSON, J. M., ALBERGOTTI, J . C . , Nucl. Phys. A98 (1967) 65.

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

141

GRAPHS OF
(n, p) CROSS-SECTIONS
Excitation functions of (n, p) reactions for the target nuclei:
3

He,
32

S,

Li,
34

12

S,

C,

37

16

C1,

O,

39

19

K,

F,

41

Ni,
8

65

Cu,

64

9Y, M z r ,

Zn,

109

66

Ag,

Zn,
106

25

Na, ^Mg,

40

K,

47Tij 48Ti> 49Ti) 50Ti>


60

23

Ca,

42

Mg,

Ca, Ca,

27

A1,

45

Sc,

51V> 52Cr> 5 4 F e j 5 6 F 6 )
69

Ga,

Cd,

75

As,

Cd,

74

127

Se,

I,

133

85

Rb,

Cs,

28

186

31

Si,

46

59CO)
86

Sr,

W,

P,

Ti,
SS^
88

197

(The abbreviations of references (e.g. CO 50) are constructed


fiom the name of the first author and the year of publication.
A list cf references is given on pages 270-272.)

Sr,

Au

142

BORMANN et al.

er
(b)
1.0-

i
Tr

He(n,p)T(3H)

CO 50
x BA55
A SA61

0.5-

I
I
0.

c)

6
Imb)
A0-

10-

9 E n (MeV)

Li(n.p) 6 He

x BA 63
PR 69

30-

20-

n
u

00-

10

11

12 En(MeV)

143

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

12

6
Imb)

C(n,p)12B

x KR 59
RI 68
30

HH

20

10

15

16

17

18

19

20

IIII
21

22

&
16

(mb).

20-

23 En(MeV)

O(n.p) 16 N

x SE 61
. BO 66 (BO 67)

n.

12

tt

16

50-

T%
"3

n.

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 En(MeV)

144

BORMANN et al.

6
(mb).

l6

O(n,p)16N

JU62
CA67

50-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

6
(mb)

19

19

20 En(MeV)

F(n,p)19O

40. BO 65
x PI 65
30-

20-

10-

11

I
* I

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

i I
20 E n (MeV)

145

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

6
(mb)

23

40-

10

En

(MeV)

,23

K
Ng(n,prNe

x WI 61
PI 65
30

20

11

10-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E^MeV)

146

BORMANN et al.

6
frnb)
100-1

PI 63

x BA65

50-

[mb)

10 En(MeV)

24

200-

Mg(n,p) 24 W
IM 60

100-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E^MeV)

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

147

10 En(MeV)

19

20 EJMeV)

148

BORMANN et al.

6 ,
(mb)
200H

2A

Mg(n,p) 2A No

CO 56
x GA 62

n. .

100-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20

En(MeV)

*Mg(n,p)2ANQ

(mb).

JE 63 a
PA 65 b

200'

100-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20

E^MeV)

149

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

25
(rrthd

Mg(n,ppNa

. BO 66(BO 67)

T H pr HL

50-

0 11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

27

20 ^ I M e V )

Al(n,p) 27 Mg

6
(mb)
HE5A

20-

15-

10-

';

'

*
D1

10 EnlMeV)

150

BORMANN et a l .

6
(mbl
20027

Al(n.p) 27 Mg

HU58
* CA62
x BA65
100

10 En(MeV)

6
b
100
27

A!(n,p) 27 Mg
HU59

'III,

50-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

151

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

11

27

(mtr

1}

AI(n,p) 27 Mg

x MA 60

50-

I
11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

I1
20 En(MeV)

6
Imb)
400.

28

300-

. CO 56
A KE59
JE 63

Si(n,p) 28 Al

200

100

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 En(MeV)

152

BORMANN et a l .

28

Si(n.p)28AI

b
(mb)"
. MA 56
x B I 63

500-

01

28

6
(mb)-

10 E n (MeV)

Si(n.p)28AI

x ME 63
. BA 65

500-

xx

x * *

mft
f

f1

01

10 E n (MeV)

153

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

5
imbl
3l

P(n.p) 31 Si

x ME 48
. LU 50
50-

5
(mb!

31

200-

10 E n (MeV)

P(n,p) 31 Si
RI 51
CU60

100

10 E n (MeV)

154

BORMANN et al.

31
6"
(mb)"

P(n,p) 31 Si

. MO 58

j
j

1001

6
(mbl

10 E n (MeV)

31

P(n.pPSi

GR58

III" Him
100-

I
I

10

11

12

13

14

15 En(MeV)

155

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

32
6
(mb)

S(n,

. Al 57

400<
**)

I.

300-

* *

* *

200'
*

100-

10 E ^IMeV)

mb
32

400.

S(n

Al 57
300

it

fa,

13

14

200-

100'

n.
1

12

15

16

17

18

19

20 E,, (MeV)

156

BORMANN et al.

(mb)
32

400-

300-

S(n.p) 32 P

* KL48
LU50
x HU55

a
x*x

200*

.'%

100-

n.

6(mb)

32_,

10 E n (MeV)

v32_.

S(n,pr P

400-

SA63

' 1I

300-

2005

100-

n .
10

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19 En (MeV)

157

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

6 I
(mb).
3

BO66 u BO 67

fi

50-

U
11

'S(n.,

12

13

15

16

17

18

mb).

19

37

20 E n (MeV)

CI(n P Ps

MA 66
50-

I
011

12

13

I
15

I I

in

16

17

I
18

I
19

\
20 En(MeV)

158

BORMANN et al.

6
(mb)

39

400-

LA 63
x 8A 64

K(n,p)39Ar

300

200

100.

10 E n (MeV)

61

(mb)

41

K(n,p)41Ar
80 69

50-

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20E n (MeV)

159

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

Imb)

40-

. BA 65a

30-

20-

10-

n1

10 E n (MeV)

160

BORMANN et a l .

6"
(mb)1
UR 61

500-

II

10 En(MeV)

6
Imb)
100-

BA

65Q

50-

i
1

i
4

10 E n ( M e V )

161

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

6
(mb>

Co(n,p) K
. BA 6 5 a

5-

10 E n (MeV)

6
(mb)

Sc(n,pf5Co

BA61

50-

11

12

13

M,

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

162

BORMANN et a l .

6"

(mb)
400

,46,

Ti(n,pPSc

L I 65a
x BO 65a
Ftt 66

300

200

100

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

6
mb)-

19

20 E n (MeV)

47X.,

.47-

Ti(n,p) Sc

x} G061
TR 62

50-

10 En(MeV)

163

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

(mb)

A7

200-

Ti(n,p) 47 Sc
PA 66

150T

100-

i1

'

50-

011

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 Ep (MeV)

6
mb).

^Tiln.p^c

50-

U *

11

12

GA62
BO 65a

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 En(MeV)

164

BORMANN et al.

6
(mbl

48

Ti (n, pftc

50-

T ,
1
i

011

12

13

14

15

PA 66

16

17

18

19

49
5
(mb)-

20 E n (MeV)

Ti(n p) A9 Sc'

PA 66

50-r

011

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

165

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECT IONS

6
(mb)

;0

20-

T,(n,p)5QSc

. PA 66

15

10

5-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 En(MeV)

51...

.51-,-.

V(n,p) Ti

(mb)

BO 63

50-

4-

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

166

BORMANN et al.

(mb)

2r

,52W

Cr(n.p) V

200

KE59

150

100

50

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 En(MeV)

6
[mb).

x VA61
. CA6/.
A JO 65
500-

1.

56

10 E n (MeV)

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

6
(mb)

167

54

Fe(n.p) Mn

SA 65
LA 65
CA 65
500-

oJ

m
X

6
.mb).

54

10 E n (MeV)

Fe(n,p) Mn

SA 65
CA 65
500-

i
*

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

168

BORMANN et al.

6
(mb)

56,

Fe(n,pf6Mn

TE58
x LI 66

50-

10 E n (MeV)

Imb)
100^

Fe(n,p)

Mn

50-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

(mb).

169

-i

R.(n P M n
*

SA64

50-

*
Ml 1 "
HH
KM

56

10 E n (MeV)

Fe(n.p)56Mn

6
(mb)

BO 62

200-

SA 64

150h

100-

-i50

11

12

13

1A

15

16

17

t-s-a

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

170

BORMANN et al.

6
(mbH

59

Co(n,p) 59 Fe

JE63

500-

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 ^

(MeV)

6'
<mb>

NA62
x BA 62
* DE 65
s.a. GO 60

500-

10 E n (MeV)

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

6"

171

58

Ni(n. D ) 589 Co"

CH 65
x BO 66

500-

)
~5

0-

11

12

13

hfbil

15

16

17

'l-ft

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

^itn.p)589^

x OK 67
DE68

5CXP
*..

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 En (MeV)

172

BORMANN et al.

58

Ni(n.pP9Co

K0 63
x ME 63
DE 68

10 E n IMeV)

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

173

6
Imb)

60

N.(n.p)69Co^

200-

PA 67
150-

-i

100-

50-

"11

12

13

15

16

17

1"8

19

2'0 En(MeV)

10 E n (MeV)

6
[mb)

Cu(n .P) 6 5 Ni
. SA66
15-

10'

5-

-i

01

174

BORMANN et a l .

11

12

-13

15

16

17

18

19

20 ^

(MeV)

(mb)
200-

RA58
VA61
NA62

150

100

50

"r

" ' I

' "i

10 E n (MeV)

175

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

6"
(mb

64

200

Zn(n,pPCu

. GA 62
* WE 62
A
BO 69

150

100

50

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

66

20E n (MeV)

Zn(n,p)66Cu

BO 65

50-

11

12

13

15

16

17

16

19

20 E n (MeV)

176

BORMANN etal.

69

Ga(n,p) 59m Zn

BO 62

(mb)

40T

30-

20-

10-

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n

(MeV)

^AslappSGe*
b
(mb)

x BA 61
BO 67

40-

30-

20-

10-

o.
11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

177

75
fr

As(n.p)759Ge

D
mb)

40.

OK

67

30.lifcdL T T T
T

20-

10-

0-

75

1^r

As(n,p)75mGe

(mb)

x AB 67

40-

OK 67

30-

20.

10

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 Ep (MeV)

178

BORMANN et al.

6
[mbf
BO 67

100-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

85

6\
mb

20 E n

(MeV)

Rb(n,p) 87m Kt

BO 67

11

12

13

15

16

17

15

19

20 E n

(MeV)

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

179

86

(mb)

Sr(n.p) 86 9Rb >l

40
i -

BA61
30-

20

10

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

88

(mb)

20 ^ (MeV)

Sr(n,p)68Rb

CO 56

30

20-

10

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

180

BORMANN et al.

89

(mh)

Y(n, p) 89 Sr

BA61

8-

6^

2-

n-

20-

10 E n (MeV)

On

(mb)

1589

Y(n.p) 8 9 Sr

10 BA61
5-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 En(MeV)

181

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

90

Zr(n,p)9cV

Imb)-

BA 61

50*

10

11

12

13

V.

15

16 17

18

19 En(MeV)

6"
(mb)

BA 61

20

15

~j~*

ID

10

11 12

13

15

16

17

18 19 En(MeV)

182

BORMANN et al.

106

6T
(mb)

Cd(n ( p) 106 Ag

BO 68

20O

100

i
11

12

13

14

15

16

111

(mb)

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

Cd(n(p)111Ag

BA 61

80

60-

20-

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20EnfMeY)

183

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

6 i

(mb)

40

30

i27I(njp)127Te

20

+1

LA 63

10-

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 En(MeV)

H H

40

30

I-IH

"^CsvnjP/^C

Hh

LA 63

10

r>

u. 1

12

13

1'4

15

16

17

18

i'9

20 E n (MeV)

BORMANN et al.

184

186

,6J

(mbj

W(n, P r b Ta
Ba 59

20

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

5,
(mbj

18

19

20

197A . ,_

.197

21 En(MeV)

Au(n,pr'pt
Ba 61

2-

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

185

GRAPHS OF
In, a) CROSS-SECTIONS
Excitation functions of (n, a) reactions for the t a r g e t nuclei:
9

Be, B .
41

85

K,

Rb,

40

19

F,

23

Ca, ^ C a ,

89

Y,

32

Zr,

Na,
45
W

26

Sc,

Zr,

Mg,
51
93

27

V,

Nb,

A1,

55

31

Mn,

112

P,

54

Cd,

34

Fe,

118

35

S,
59

Sn,

C1,

Co,

127

I,

63

37

C1, 4 0 Ar,

Cu,

133

Cs,

75

As,

140

(The abbreviations of references (e.g. ST 57) are constructed


from the name of the first author and the year of publication.
A list of references is given on pages 270-272.)

Ce,

39

K,

i^Br,
197

Au

186

BORMANN et al.

(mbH
KScT

ST 57
BA 61a

x
xX
xx

T
>

50-

8 9

6
(mb)

40-

En (MeV)

AR56

x SC70

30-

20-

10-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

187

19

fmh\

400

F(n,oc) 16 N
MA 55

x BO 55
X

300'

200-

x.

100

01

19

10 ^

(MeV)

F(n.oc) 16 N

(mb)

200-

SM 60

150-

100-

50^

01

10 E n (MeV)

188

BORMANN et a l .

19

F(n.oc) l6 N

(mb)
200-

BA 65

150-

%*

100-

50-

n1

l9

6
(mb)

10 E n (MeV)

F(n,oc) 16 N

PI 65

40

30

20

n i

10-

11

12

13

15

16

17

15

19

20 E n (MeV)

189

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

6'
Imbl
-

23

Na(n, 0C) F
20

WI 61
X BA6A

50-

.
n

23

6
(mh)

Li
1

.1

10 E n !MeV)

Na(n,

20

. PI 65
x WO 66

I.I

100-

ff
1

I
011

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 En (MeV)

190

BORMANN et

al.

26

6
(mb)

Mg(n,oc) 23 Ne
BO 66 (BO 67)

50-

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 E^

(MeV)

5'
(mb)
. SC 61
x BA 61

100-

10

11

12

13

1A

15

16

17

18

19

En

(MeV)

191

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

6
Imb) BU 63

* ME 67

* * * ,

100-

hi"

10 11 12 13 U

15 16 17 18 E n (MeV)

6
(mbl

GR 58
TE 60
ME 67

100-

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 E n (MeV)

192

BORMANN et al.

6
(mb)
50-

25
LI

66

10 E^MeV)

6
(mb)x KE 59
MA 60

100-

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

193

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

IM 61
* BO 61
. GA 62

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20E n (MeV)

194

BORMANN et al.

31

1mb)
20

P(n.Pc)28Al

. AG 6 2
x CU 6 3

1.5 *

LO-

j
1
i m

OS-

10 E n (MeV)

31

6'

P(n.c6) 2 8 AI

ITlDJ-

.
x

GA 62
BO 63

100-

-Ft
0
11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 En(MeV)

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

195

34

Sln. oc) 31 S,

AL57

100-

Jj

I
I

I I
0-

10

11

12

13 En (MeV)

196

BORMANN et al.

35

(mty

CI(n.o^) 32 P

AD 53

50-

'1

37

6
(mb)'

10En

(MeV)

Cl(n,oc) 3/l P

. AB

67

100-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 ER

(MeV)

197

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

6"

fob).
SU 66

'I! I , '

10-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20^(MeV)

39

K(n,od)36CI

BA 64

(mb)

100-

(MeV)

198

BORMANN et a l .

39

6
(mb)

K(n, oc) 36 CI

BO 62a

50-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

6
(mb)

20 E^ (MeV)

K(n,oc) 38 CI

BA 65a

20

15

10

10 E n (MeV)

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

199

4O

200

Ca(n,oc) 37 A

. BA 65a

150.

100-

50

0
7

10 EJMeV)

12

13

15 En(MeV)

er
Imb)
.

40-

BA 65a

30'

20

10

10

11

200

BORMANN et al.

6J

^Sdn.oc^K

(mb)
. BA 61

50-

10

11

12

13

15

16

51

(mbf
100

17

18

19 20 E n (MeV)

V ( n.oc ) 48 Sc

. BO 61
62

X CI

50

I I

if

j j J 1 *
I
11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20

E n (MeV)

201

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

Mn(n,oQ
6T
(mb)

GA 62
x BO 65

50

l
11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

6"
(mb)

20 En(MeV)

'Fe(n.oc) 51 Cr

. SA 65

100-

10

11

12 13

15

16 E n (MeV)

202

BORMANN et al.

56
Co ( n # o i . ) Mn

59

(mb)

40.

SA 64
x LI 66

30

20
if.

10'

o
5

10

11

59

6
(mb

12

13

En(MeV)

Co(n,oc) 56 Mn

BO 61
SA 64

40-

30

* 1
20- *

fry
j

10-

Q
11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

En(MeV)

203

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

59

6"
(mb)

Co(n.c*J 56 Mn

x GA 62
JE 63

40-

30

20

10

11

12

13

1A

15

16

17

59

18

19

20

21En(MeV)

Co(n,oc) 56 Mn

6
(mb)
. L I 65
0-

30

20

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 En(MeV)

204

BORMANN et al.

6^
(mb).
63

Cu(n. ccf5 Co

PA 67

50-

n2

I.

63

fmhl

10 E n (MeV)

Cu(n ,oc) 60 Co

PA 67

50*

,
-\
EH
if-

"""lS
"V T i

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 En(MeV)

205

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

75

As(n.og) Go

6
1mb)
20 -

BA 61
x BO 67

15

10
**
5-

10

11

12

13

15 16

17

18

79

19

20 En(MeV)

Br(n.oc)75As

6
Imbf

BO 63

10-

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 En(MeV)

206

BORMANN et al.

85

Rb(n,cO 82 Br

6"
(mb>
BO 67

10

11

\2

13

15

16

6
Imb).

17

18

19

20 En(MeV)

19

20 En(MeV)

* TE 60
.

BA 61

17

18

5-

X
X

X
X

011

12

13

1A

15

16

207

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

92-, ,

89 C

Zr(n,oc) Sr

(mb)
.

BA 61

10-

0.

11

12

15

13

16

18

17

9<

+
4

5-

11

19

12

13

15

1'6

17

Zr(hJoj)91Sr
BA 61

14

20 E n (MeV)

18

19

20 En(Me^)

208

BORMANN et al.

93
(mb)

Nb( n i a) 9 C V

x TE 60
. BA61

10-

X
X
X

n -I

93
6"
(mb)

10 En(MeV)

Nb(n,oc) 9 V

x TE 60
.

BA 61

X
X

10-

x. T i!r'-im '

^~i h

X
X

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

6.
mb)

112

209

Cd(n,* ) 1 0 9 Pd

^H

BA 61

5-

06

I-H

10

118

6
mb)

11

12 13

14

15

16

17

18 19

20Er|MeV)

Sn(n. * ) 1 1 5 C d

. BA 61
3-

2-

1a
1*4

n-

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

210

BORMANN et al.

6
(mb)

133

Cs(n.oc) l3O I/

n.oc)

Sb

BO 62a
5-

011

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20En(MeV)

uo

Ce(n,o.) 137m BQ

(mill
ITTIDI

20

BO 66

15 J

ft

10

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

211

(mb)
2.0.

197

Au(n,a 194

. BA 61

1.5-

1.0.

0.5-

0-

T
'^i

10

11

12 13

V,

15

16

17

18 19

20En(MeV)

212

BORMANN et al.

GRAPHS OF
(n,2n) CROSS-SECTIONS
Excitation functions of (n, 2n) r e a c t i o n s for the t a r g e t nuclei:
12
50

Cr,

70

Ge,
86

14

C,

52

55

Cr,

76

Sr,

N, 16 O,1 9 F , 2 3 Na,
Mn,

75

Ge,
88

Sr,

Sb,

123

198

Y,

90

59

27

A1,

Co,

58

Se,

80

Se,

78

Zr,

93

Nb,

31

Ni,

Se,

92

P , 3 2 S , 3 5 C1, 3 9 K, 45 Sc,
63
79

Cu,

Br,

65
81

Cu,

64

Zn,

86

B r , Rb,
96

Mo, ^ M o , Ru,

104

66
87

128

197

Te,

Au,

130

203

Te,

Tl,

127

204

I , 1 3 3 Cs,

Hg,

204

Pb<

140

Ce,

208

Pb,

46

Ti,

Zn,

e9

Rb,

84

Ru,

107 Agj 109 A g j 106 C d j 116 C d ) 113 Iri) 115 Irl(

Sb,

Pt,

Fe,

74

As,

89

102p d ) 110pd>
121

54

103

Sr,

Rh,

112gnj

142

Ce,

141

232

Th,

238

(The abbreviations of references (e.g. BR 52) are constructed


from the name of the first author and the year of publication.
A list of references is given on pages 270-272.)

Ga,

Pr,

213

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

6
tmb)

12

M
C(n,2n)11/
C

20BR 52
BR 61
15-

10

5-

22

23

2U 25 26

27 28

29

30

31 32 33

34 35

36 En(MeV)

6
u

(mb)

N(n,2n) 13 N
CR60

10-

II

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 ^ (MeV)

214

BORMANN et al.

6"
(mb)
20-

N(n,2n) 13 N

A FE 60
x BR 61
BO 65

15 -

10

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

6
mb)
20-

20

N(n,2n) 13 N

x BR 61
15

10
i

5-

n21 22 23 2A 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32

33 34 35 ^ (MeV)

215

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

(mb)

16

20-

O(n.2n) 15 O

BR61

15-

10-

51
0

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

7U

25

16

26 En(MeV)

O(n.2n) 15 O

(mb)

20-

BR 61

15

I
10 H

5-

n18

29

30

31

32

33

34

35

36

37 En(MeV)

216

BORMANN et al.

19

6
(mb>-

F(n,2n) 18g F*

. WI61a
x RA62

100-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 ER (MeV)

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 En(MeV)

217

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

19

F(n,2n)189F*

I ?

x CR 60
. BR 61

100-

012

13

15

16

17

18

19

20

21 E (MeV)
n

19

F(n.2n) l8 9F*

BR 61

100-

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

32 E n (MeV)

218

BORMANN et a l .

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

23

(mbfl

20 En(MeV)

Na(ni2n)22NQ

LI 65a
x PI 65
A ME 67

100-

i! !

1 i

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

219

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

6
mb)
27

AI(n.2n)2 6 m A |

MA 60

100-

I
I
0

11

12

6mb)-

13

31

15

16

17

18

19

20 En(MeV)

19

20 En(MeV)

P(n,2n)30P

x FE 60
. BO 63

50-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

220

BORMANN et al.

6
(mb)

32

S(n.2n)31S

. BO 66

0.5-

011

12

35

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

CI(n,2n) 3Am - g Cl

0
-t

frnb)

-i

. MA 60c (m)
(g)
x AB67

&

30-

20-

10-

011

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 Ep, (MeV)

221

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

6'
mb)

39

K(n,2n) 38g K

40 BO 65
x BA 65a
30-

20-

10*

13

14

-i
15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22 E n lMeV)

39
6"

\38nriL
m
K(n.2nr
K

(mb)
BA65a

20-

15

10

13

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22 ER (MeV)

222

BORMANN et al.

0
(mb)
400-

x PR61(g)

300-

T tf }

200-

i_a_iT

-*

100-

n.
11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 En(MeV)

* 5 Sc(n.2n) U m Sc
6
(mb)

PE 61 (m)
x PR 61 (m)
AR 64 (m)

400'

300'

200

HE

\ I
100-

n .
11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

223

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

(mb)
400-

PR 61
x BO 65a
A PA 66

300-

200-

100h-

11

12

13

'i

14

15

16

17

18

19

20E n (MeV)

224

BORMANN et al.

Imbl
50

Cr(n,2n)'<9Cr

r *T

t-j-t

-1-

18

19

. JE65

50-

0-

11

1-5-1

12

13

15

16

17

20 E n (MeV)

LiT^TI

6
imb)

52

300

Cr(n,2n)51Cr

BO 68

200-

100

011

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

225

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

55

Mn(n,2n)54Mn

er
PA 65b
* ME 67
A BO 69

(mb>

1000

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 EJMeV)

6J
(mb)SA 65
* AN 68
HO 72

100-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

2 0 ^ IMeV)

226

BORMANN et al.

(ml*

59

500-

Coln,2n)5<V

BO 61
x BO 66a
DE 68

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

6
(mtt

l9

Co(n,2nP9Co

WE 62
x CH 65a
PA 65b
A

500-

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

227

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

frnbH

59

Co(n # 2n) 58fT1 Co

x BO 66a
DE68
500-

11

12

6'
(mbj

13

5fl

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

19

20 ER(MeV)

Ni(q2n) 57 Ni

PR 61 (mb)

T^

50-

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

228

BORMANN et al.

58

Ni(n.2n) 57 Ni

CS 65 (CS 66)
BO 66

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E p (MeV)

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20E n (MeV)

229

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

63

Cu(n,2n) 62 Cu

(mb)

. CO 56
x FE 60
a GL 62

500-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

63

6
1mb)-

20 E n (MeV)

Cu(n.2n) 62 Cu

BR52
x CR 60
a BO 62

I.T
500-

13 U

15

16

17

18

19

20 21

22 23 24

25 26 2 7 ^ (MeV)

230

BORMANN et a l .

6.
(mb)

63

50O

Cu(n,2n) 62 Cu

. CS65ICS66J
x LI 65

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 En(MeV)

C
(mfc*

63 Cu(n.2n) 62 Cu

900-

11

12

13

CU68
x 80 69

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

231

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

IT J

6
Imb)

65

500-

11

Cu(n,2n/*Cu

x RA62
. BO 63

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 En(MeV)

6
(mb)"

T
NA65
SA66

500-

10

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19 En(MeV)

232

BORMANN et al.

65

6
(mbf

Cu(n,2n)^Cu

. PA 65
x CS65(CS66)

000-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 En(MeV)

6
65

ImbT

Cu(n,2n) 64 Cu
PR 61

BO 69
KDO-

11

HE-

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

233

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

fob)"
. CO 56
x PA 65
A BO 69

50O

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

6
frnb)

20 E_ (MeV)

GA 61
WE 62
RA63

400-

300-

200-

100-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E p (MeV)

234

BORMANN et al.

66
6
mb)

Zn(n.2nPzn
BO 69

HOOD-

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

69
5
mb)

Ga(n,2nfka

. BO 65

Km

11

20 E n (MeV)

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n

(MeV)

235

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

mbV

500-

11

i*
12

13

PR 61
x WA 72

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n IMeV)

tmb)
OK 67
ST 70

KXD-

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 EnIMeV)

236

BORMANN et al.

76

6
(mbl

Ge(n,2n) 75m Ge

. AB 67
* OK 67

100D-

11

12

13

V.

15

16

17

18

19

20 EJMeV)

6
mb)PR 61
BO 68

1000-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20Ep(MeV)

237

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

7/;

Se(n.2n) 73m -9Se

6
H072(m)
H 0 7 2 (g)

(mb)
400-

300

200

100-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

6
(mb)

20 En(MeV)

*Se(n,2n) 73m <9- tot Se

For comparison of HO 72
and BO 66a see ret. 460

BO 66a (g)
B0 66 a (m)
AB 69 (m+g)

of U MeV tables

I-AH

500-

KH

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n WeV)

238

BORMANN et

al.

6
CA 67

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

80

6
(mb)

20 E^MeV)

Se(n.2hi Wln Se

. AB

67

l-ii

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n

(MeV)

239

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

TIt 11

a.

79

Br(n,2n) 78 Br
K0 62
AB 67
OK 67

500-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

81
6
tmtiJ

20 ^ (MeV)

Br(n.2n) fl0m Br
BO 62

4500-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20

E^MeV)

240

BORMANN et al.

10

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

85

6
(mb)-

19 ER (MeV)

Rb(n,2n)^mRb

BO 68
x WA72

10C0-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

241

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

87

6 '
(mb).

Rb(n,2n) 86g Rb*


PR61
RI

66

1000-

10

11

12

13

15

16

17

6
tnnb)-

18

19 ^

PR

61

BO

66

(MeV)

I00O-

-*-

12

13

iZ

15

16

17

18

19

20" ^(MeV)"

242

BORMANN et al.

6
(mb)-

86

Sr(n.2n)85Sr

. FE 72 (m)
x FE 72 (m+g)

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

88

Sr(n,2n)87mSr

50>

** * *
0

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

(mb)
400-

. BO 65
* FE 72

300-

f
i JT JT
XT

200-

100-

0 H1

T.

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20E n (MeV)

243

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

6"
Imbf

89

YJn.2nP 6 Y

TE60

* RI66
o AB69a
A FE72
500-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 En (MeV)

90

Zr(n,2n)89gZr

PR 61
A R I 66
x AB 69

(mbj

IO0O-

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

244

BORMANN et al.

93

Nb(n,2nPmNb

(mb)

PA70a
BI70

500-

10

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19 ER (MeV)

6
(mb)-

500-

92

Mo(n,2n) 91 Mo

. BR 52 (6'g+0.576m)
x AB 69

13

15

16 17 18

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26

245

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

92

6
(mb).

Mo(n.2n) 91 Mo

x CS 65 (CS 66)
HO 72

500*
*

J
0 11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

6'
(mb)

20 E n (MeV)

*Mo(n.2n) 93m Mo

GA70

10-

I
i

0 11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

246

BORMANN et al.

6
(mb).

96

Ru(n.2npRu

500-

11

. BI 70

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

1w

6"
(mb)

20 ^

(MeV)

Ru(n,2n) l03 Ru
BI 70

Ht
1000-

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

247

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

l03

6
(mb)-

Rh(n.2n) 102m Rh
PA 70a

500-

10

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19 E n IMeV)

103

Rh{n,2n) 102 9Rh

Imb)

. PA 70a
* BI 70

500"

X)

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19 E n (MeV)

248

BORMANN et al.

102

Pd(n.2n) 101 Pd

BI 70

O00-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

110

20 ER

(MeV)

Pd(n,2n) 109m 'gpd

mb)

i iHf

. BI 70 (m)
x BI 70 (g)

000-

* * *{
11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 ^

(MeV)

249

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

5 '

107

Aq(n,2nf 06m - g Ag

60 (m)
x R A 6 3 (g)
. CU 68 (g)
1000-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

6
(rel.units)
107

Aq(n,2n) 106m Aq

20

PR 61

15

10

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

250

BORMANN et al.

109

6
(mb).

Aq(n,2n)1089Ag

. CU 68

500-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

106

6
fob)

20 E n (MeV)

Cd(q2n) 105 Cd

x RA 63a
BO 68

H ::

KXD-

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 E^ (MeV)

251

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

116

Cd(n,2n) 115m -9Cd

(mb}

PR
PR

61 (m)
61 ( g )

500-

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

113
6'
lmb>

20 E n (MeV)

In(n,2n) 112m ' 9 In


GR70(m)
GR70(g)

hH

BOO-

11

12

13

14

15

16

-17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

252

BORMANN et al.

115
6
(mb)

. PR 61 (m)
x ME 6 7 (m)

if

l\

000-

11

In(n.2n) mm In

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

115

In(r\2nJlKnIn

(mb)

GR70(m)
GR70(g)

KXX>

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E^ (MeV)

253

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

121

(mb).

20 E n (MeV)

Sb(n,2n) 12 9Sb

* KO 62 (g)
A RA 63 (g)

I000-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E p (MeV)

254

BORMANN et al.

121

Sb(n.2n) 120m Sb

(mbfl
x BO 68 (m)
KA 68 (m)

WOO-

A
11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

121

20 E n

Sb(n,2n) 12 9Sb

x BO 68
KA 68

1000-

(MeV)

(g)
(g)

*
*

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n

(MeV)

255

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

123

6
mb)-

Sb(n.2n)122Sb'
PR 61
BO 68

KTO-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

12&
(mb)-

20 E^ (MeV)

re(n.2n) 127m '9Te


B I 70 (m)
BI 70 (g )

ooo-

11

,\k I
12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

256

BORMANN et a l .

5
(mb)-

13O

Te(n,2n) 129m '9Te

. BI 70 (m)
x B I 7 0 (g)

1000-

11

12

127

(mb).

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E p (MeV)

I(n,2n) 126 I
MA 53
BO 62
WA 72

t-

1000II

10

11

12

13

15

16

17 E p [MeV)

257

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

133
6
(mb)

Cs(n.2n) 132 Cs

x BO 62
WA 72

000-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

lAC

20 ER (MeV)

te(A2n) 1 3 9 Ce

BO 66 Im)
* BO 68 (m+

6
hb)

000-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 En(MeV)

258

BORMANN et al.

K2

6
Imb)-

Ce(n,2n)u1Ce

BO 68

1000-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E

(MeV)

6
Imb)

u1

Pr(n.2nPPr

. FE 60
x KO 62

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

259

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

6
(mb)'

\l
U1

D0O-

Pr(n.2n)U0Pr
RA 63a
BO 68

11

12

1.3

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

6 '
Imb*

u2

ii

I00O

11

12

13

Nd(n.2n) u1g Nd*


BI 70

15

16

17

18

19

20 ^

(MeV)

260

BORMANN et

al.

(mb)
2000^

1500

COORA
BO

63a
68

500-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

165
1

er '

20 E n

(MeV)

Ho(n,2n) 164 Ho

(mb)x

II

1000-

11

12

13

ME 67
BO 68

Im)
(m+g)

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

261

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

l55

6
(mb)

Ho(n.2n) 16 ' m -9Ho


ST70lm)
ST70(g)

000-

I
I

I
11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

l68

Imb)

20 E n (MeV)

Er(a2n) 157m Er

CA67

coo-

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E p (MeV)

262

BORMANN et al.

6
bb)

169

Trn(n,2n) 168 Tm

TE60

1000-

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

16l

6
(mb}

Totn,2n) 180rr 'Ta

X PR 61
BO 68
' BR 69

u
i

I0OO-

11

18 E^MeV)

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 ^ (MeV)

263

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

6
irel.Einh.)
18A

W(n,2n) 1 8 3 m W

2.0
. ZI 65
1.5

1.0

0.5

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

192

6 '
Imb)

20 En (MeV)

Osln,2n) 19 ^O
BI 70

2000

BOO-

I0OO-

500-

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

264

BORMANN et a l .

191

6
frib)

Ir(n,2n) 190 Ir

HH

asoo

. B I 70 (m 2 )
x B I 70 (g+m.,)

1500-

1000

500-

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

198

6 '
(mb)

\\W\\

2000

20 ^

(MeV)

R(q2n) 197m -gpt

. BI 70 (m)
x BI 70 (m+g)

i
i

1500-

1000-

500

11

12

13

V.

15

16

17

18

19

20En(MeV)

265

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

197

Au(n,2n) 196m Au

(mb)
x TE 60
PR 61

2001

T '

H-41

150-

100

50-

10

11

12

13

15

TXl

(mb)

16

17

18 E n (MeV)

HTJ

2000

H-

x TE 60
PR 61

I50Q

D0O-

500'

n .
u 3

10

11

12

13

15

16

17 ER (MeV)

266

BORMANN et al.

203

6
mbf

TI(n.2n) 202 TI

x TE 60
PR 61

ii; 4-

1000-

'if

}
I*

i
n

<3

10

61

11

12

13

ft i

Imkl
imDj

20Q0

U,

15

16

17

18

19 20 21 E n (MeV)

20A

Hdn.2n) 2 0 3 Ha

FE 72

BOO-

*
500-

011

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

20 E n (MeV)

267

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

6'
Imb)
20CO

600-

20

1030

500

*Pb(n,2n) 203m Pb
x AB67

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

2C

20 E n (MeV)

*Pb(n.2n) 203 9Pb*


xTE 60
*VA 63
DE 70

Imb)
2003
A1

1500-

* 4s1- L
A

000

500.

0
10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19 EJMeV)

268

BORMANN et al.

208

Pb(n.2n) 2 0 7 m Pb

(mb)

x SH 62
. CA 67

200O

i-

500-

1000-

500X

0\
r

10

11

13

12

1A

15

232

16 E n (MeV)

Th(n.2n) 2 3 1 Th

frnb)

x TE 59
BU 61

200O
X

1500-

000-

500-

0
(3

10 11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19 E n (MeV)

269

FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS

232

(mb)
EOOO

Th(n.2n)231Th

. PR 61

1500-

\
1000-

500-

0 i

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

19

238

20 E n (MeV)

U(n.2n) 237 U

. KN 58
x

X-J

GR

61

coo-

*
X

X
XX
X
X

m
u -5

10 11 12 13 U

15 16 17

18 En (MeV)

270

BORMANN et al.

REFERENCES TO GRAPHS
AB 67
AB 69
AB 69a
AD 53
AG 62
AL 57
AN 68
AR56
AR64
BA 55
BA 59
BA 61
BA 61a
BA 62
BA 63
BA 64
BA 65
BA 65a
BI 63
BI 70
BO 55
BO 61
BO 62
BO 62a
BO 63
BO 64
BO 65
BO 65a
BO 66
BO 66a
BO 67
BO 68
BO 69
BR52
BR61
BR69
BU 61
BU 63
CA 62
CA 64
CA 65
CA 67
CH 65
CH 65a

CI 62
CO 50
CO 56

ABELS, C . , BORMANN, M., CARSTENS, W., Rep. EANDC(E)76"U", NEA, Paris (1967) 51.
ABBOUD, A . , DECOWSKI, P . , GROCHULSKI, W., MARCINKOWSKI, A . , P1OTROWSKI, J . ,
SIWEK, K . , WILHELMI, Z . , Nucl. Phys. A139 (1969) 42.
ABBOUD, A . , DECOWSKI, P . , GROCHULSKI, W., MARCINKOWSKI, A . , SIWEK, K . ,
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ADLER, H . , HUBER, P . , HXLG, W., Helv. Phys. Acta 26 (1953) 349.
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FAST NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS


CR 60
CR62
CR69
CS 65
CS 66
CU 60
CU 63
CU 68
DE65
DE 68
DE 70
FE60
FE72
GA 61
GA 61a
GA 62
GA 70
GL 62
GO 60
GO 61
GR58
GR 61
GR70
HE 54
HI 66
HO 72
HU 58
HU 59
HU 55
IM 60
IM 61

IE 63
JE63a
JE65
JO 65
JU 62
KA 68
KES9
KL48
KN 58
KO 60
KO62
KO 63
KR59
LA 63
LA 65
LI 65
LI 65a
LI 66
LU50
MA 53

271

McCRARY, J. H. , MORGAN, I, L., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 5 (1960) 246.


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CSIKAI, J., Int. Conf. Study of Nuclear Structure with Neutrons, Antwerp (1965) 102.
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CUZZOCREA, P., NuovoCim. 1 6 ( 1 9 6 0 ) 4 5 0 . "
CUZZOCREA, P., PAPPALARDO, G., Nucl. Phys. 48(1963) 686.
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DEBERTIN, K., ROSSLE, E., Nucl. Phys. 70 (1965) 89.
DECOWSKI, F., GROCHULSKI, W. , MARCINKOWSKI, A . , SIWEK, K., SLEDZINSKA, I.,
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GANGRSKU, Y. P., KHARISOV, I. F . , Sov. J. Nucl. Phys. J12 (1971) 611.
GLOVER, R. N , , WEIGOLD, E., Nucl. Phys. 29(1962) 309.
GONZALEZ, I . , RAPAPORT, J., LOEF, J. J. van, Phys. Rev. 120(1960) 1319.
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Rep. EUR 119e (1968).
HUDSON, O . M . , MORGAN, I. L . , Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. n 4(1959) 97.
HURLIMANN, T . , HUBER, P., Helv. Phys. Acta 28 (1955) 33.
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IMHOF. W. L. , private communication (1961), cited in Rep. BNL-325 (1965).
JERONYMO, J . M . F . , MANI, G. S . , OLKOWSKY, I . , SADEGHI, A . , WILLIAMSON. C . F . ,
Nucl. Phys. 47 (1963) 157.
JERONYMO, J . M . F . , MANI, G . S . , OLKOWSKY, J., SADEGHI, A . , WILLIAMSON. C . F . ,
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LISKIEN, H., PAULSEN, A . , Nucl. Phys. 63(1965) 393.
LISKIEN, H., PAULSEN, A . . Nukleonik 8 (1966) 315.
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272
MA 55
MA 56
MA 60
MA 60a
MA 66
ME 48
ME 63
ME 67
MO 58
NA 62
NA 65
OK 67
PA 65
PA 65b
PA 66
PA 67
PA 70a
PE 61
PI 63
PI 65
PR 61
PR 69
RA 58
RA 62
RA 63
RA 63a
RI 51
RI 66
RI 68
SA 61
SA 63
SA 64
SA 65
SA 66
SC 61
SC 70
SE 61
SH62
SH 68
SM 60
ST 57
ST 70
SU 66
TE 58
TE59
TE 60
TR 62
UR61
VA 61
VA 63
WA 72
WE 62
WI 61
WI 61a
W5 66
ZI 65

BORMANN et al.
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MATHUR, S.C., MORGAN, I. L., Nucl. Phys. 75(1966) 561.
METZGER, J., ALDER, F . , HUBER, P., Helv. Phys. Acta 21 (1948) 278.
MEADOWS, J. W., WHALEN, J. F., Phys. Rev. _13_0(1963) 2022.
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CROSS-SECTIONS FOR FISSION


NEUTRON SPECTRUM INDUCED REACTIONS
A. CALAMAND
Nuclear Data Section,
International Atomic Energy Agency,
Vienna, Austria
ABSTRACT. A review is given of cross-sections averaged in a uranium-235 fission neutron spectrum.
The review extends to all integral measurements available in the literature up to April 1973 for ( n , p ) , ( n , a ) ,
(n, 2n) and (n, n') reactions. Whenever possible, the cross-sections have been renormalized to a standard value
of 1250 70 mb for the ur.inium-235 fission cross-section averaged in the thermal fission neutron spectrum of
uranium-235. Recommended values have been attributed. Furthermore, averaged (n, p), (n, a) and (n, 2n)
cross-sections have been estimated for all stable and a few long-lived isotopes and are compiled in a separate
table.

INTRODUCTION
The fast component of a reactor neutron flux induces activity which
can be used for neutron activation analysis, but which can also interfere
with activity induced by thermal neutrons.
In both cases, a knowledge of the cross-sections averaged in the fast
neutron spectrum :'s required. Since the shape of this fast neutron spectrum
changes from one reactor to another, and even from one position in the
reactor to another., one must refer to a precisely defined averaged crosssection. For this the cross-section averaged in the uranium-235 thermal
fission neutron spectrum is used:
r

a = / a(K)
J
0

X(JE)

dE

where a (E) is the activation cross-section and x(-E) tlje normalized flux
density distribution of the fission neutron spectrum ( f x(-E) dE = 1).
Estimates of c? are made either by integral or differential measurements.
In integral measurements, the samples are exposed to fission neutrons, and
a is deduced from the measured induced activity and the determined fission
neutron flux. In differential measurements, a(E) is measured and a is
computed using various representations of x(JE).
In the following, a review of integral measurements for (n, p), (n, a),
(n, 2n) and (n, n1) reactions, and an estimation of (n, p), (n, a) and (n, 2n)
averaged cross-sections for the stable and long-lived isotopes of the elements
from lithium to bismuth are given.
REVIEW OF INTEGRAL MEASUREMENTS FOR (n, p), (n, a), (n, 2n) AND
(n, n') REACTIONS
In this review, we are interested in the compilation of all available data
rather than in a very precise assessment of a few reactions important for
273

274

CALAMAND

neutron dosimetry and/or fast reactor technology. This means that we shall
not discuss or analyse the discrepancies between differential and integral
measurements. For most reactions, the agreement between the results of
each method is adequate for our purpose.
We have chosen to review only the integral measurements, simply
because they are more numerous than the differential ones while at the same
time including practically all of them. Therefore, if not otherwise indicated,
the original values quoted in the tables are derived from integral measurements. In some rare cases, where integral measurements are not available
or are too discrepant, we have used differential or calculated data.
In some integral measurements, great care was exercised in exposing
the samples to a neutron flux that was as close as possible to a thermal
neutron induced uranium-235 fission neutron spectrum. This was achieved
using fission plate or converter techniques. In most other cases, it was
simply checked that the reactor spectrum did not deviate "significantly"
from a pure fission spectrum. This spectrum equivalence is true in general
for the energy range above about 1. 5 MeV. Therefore, for threshold
reactions, the fission neutron spectrum is used as zero-order approximation
to the true spectrum, independent of reactor type and irradiation position.
Most of the integral measurements were made relative to a standard
reaction and have therefore to be renormalized for intercomparison. Table I
gives the most commonly used standard reactions and the values adopted in
this review. These values are taken from a report by A. Fabry (Ref. FA72),
which is an evaluation of experimental microscopic integral cross-sections
measured in the thermal fission neutron spectrum of uranium-235 for
29 nuclear reactions relevant to neutron dosimetry and fast reactor technology.
Renor maliz ation
Whenever possible and if not already renormalized by Fabry, the original
data have been renormalized according to the standard values given in Table I.
For some less common standards, recommended values from Tables II, III
and IV have been used.
The renormalization is done by multiplying, for each reaction, the
original data by the ratio of the new standard value to the old one. Branching
ratios have not been taken into account in this renormalization. Errors have
been considered as standard deviations. Renormalized errors always include
the uncertainty in the standard cross-section used for renormalization.
In Fabry's evaluation a least-squares method is used to produce a
recommended set of fission spectrum integral data scaled to a unique
standard, which has been chosen to be the uranium-235 fission cross-section
averaged in the uranium-235 thermal fission neutron spectrum and for which
a value of 12 50 mb has been accepted.
Fabry first renormalized experimental data sets of various authors to
his own experimental data set, for which a uranium-235 standard value of
1335 mb had been accepted. All the renormalized data sets, together with
Fabry's data set, were then scaled to a value of 1250 mb for the fission
spectrum averaged uranium-235 fission crosg-section.
Consequently, all renormalized values appearing in the tables are linked
to the uranium-235 standard value. Except for the values renormalized by
Fabry, the absolute errors on renormalized values include an absolute error
of 70 mb on the uranium-235 standard value.

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

275

Determination of recommended values


Keeping in mind the practical use of these tables, we have decided to give
a "recommended" value for each single reaction appearing in the tables, even
if some values are of doubtful quality.
For the reactions which he has evaluated, Fabry recommends values
that are a weighted average of his renormalized and then scaled values. In
most cases, Fabry1 s recommended values are also ours, except for the
errors which, in aur case, always include the error in the uranium-235
standard. These values are strongly recommended.
For the cross-sections not evaluated by Fabry a selection has been made
among the available renormalized values. A weighted average of the selected
values was then performed using the inverse of the squared errors as weight.
Averaged values of at least three renormalized values agreeing within 15% are
also strongly recommended. Both these values and Fabry's recommended
values appear underlined in the tables.
Other "recommended" values are: either the average of discrepant values,
or the average of onl}' two agreeing values, or no average at all for single
measurements.
Structure of Tables II, III, IV and V
Tables II, III., IV and V summarize the status of integral measurements.
For each reaction all data available in the common literature up to April 1973
are given, together with the standard used, if this is known or relevant. The
first column gives; the reactions. In the second column appear the references
to the original values, which are given in the third column. The fourth
column gives the standard used by the author. The numbers in parentheses
refer to notes, a list of which is given following Table V, Renormalized
values are given in the fifth column and recommended values in the sixth.
The boxes drawn within the tables for some reactions contain the original
data and their renormalized values used by Fabry in his evaluation. The
result of the evaluation, Fabry's recommended value, given in the third
column, appears :.n the last line of the box, attached to the underlined
reference FA72. Our recommended value, which is identical to Fabry's
value except for the error as explained previously, is given in the last
column. The dotted line within the box separates the measurements
performed with fission plates or converter (upper part) from the ones done
by exposure to pile neutrons (lower part).
The renormaiized values selected for averaging are marked with a short
line on the right-hand side. The brace } collects the renormalized values
in an average recommended value. Absolute errors given in parentheses are
those that have been arbitrarily chosen when no error had been given by the
author.

ESTIMATED AVERAGE FISSION NEUTRON CROSS-SECTIONS FOR


(n, p), (n,a) AND (n, 2n) REACTIONS
Tables II to V are far from being complete and numerous cross-sections
required by the experimentalist are unknown, hence the need for a complete
estimation. Some publications give cross-sections which have been theoretically calculated (see, for example, Pearlstein's calculations (Ref. PL73)

276

CALAMAND

using an empirical model based on statistical theory for nuclides having 21


to 41 protons) or evaluated (see, for example, the evaluation by Pope and
Story (Ref. PO73) using the United Kingdom Nuclear Data Library for 64 data
files). But, so far, only Roy and Hawton (Ref. RO60) have attempted an
estimation covering all stable isotopes and a few long-lived radionuclides
from lithium to bismuth. Since the number of available measurements on
which the estimation is based has nearly doubled since 1960, we thought it
to be useful to review the values estimated by Roy and Hawton.
Basis of the estimation
Hughes (Ref. HU53) has defined a useful quantity Eeff, called the effective
energy, assuming that the cross-section cr(JE) is proportional to the penetrability P(.E) of the Coulomb barrier which confronts the charged particle
leaving the compound nucleus. In this case, the reaction rate, as a function
of the energy E of the incoming neutrons, is proportional to the product of
P(.E) and x(-E)- Thus the spectrum-averaged cross-section is proportional
to the area under the curve x(E) P(E) in Fig. 1.

PIE)

PENETRABILITY CURVE P(E)

WEIGHTED PENETRABILITY
CURVE %(E) PIE)

Eeff
NEUTRON

ENERGY

FIG. 1. Eeff is defined in such a way that area A is equal to area B.

277

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

As shown in Fig. 1, -Eeff is defined as the energy for which the area
marked A is equal to the area marked B, so that the area under the curve
x(E) P(E) is the same as the one delimited by x(-E) and a vertical dotted line
drawn at Eeff- At unit penetrability, the cross-section cr(E) becomes constant
and equals a0, which Hughes' measurements have shown to be roughly
proportional to the surface of the nucleus. The cross-section a(E) can then
be written <j() = a P(E) A 2 / 3 , where A is the mass number and a is a constant.
The spectrum-averaged cross-section can then be written:
OO

a =f

(j(B) )((E) dE

= aA

2/3

= a

P(E)

dE
Eeff

The quantity a/A^ 3 is proportional to the integral of the fission neutron


spectrum from Eeff to infinity, and it is then possible to predict an average
cross-section if the effective energy of a given reaction is known. The

n.p ) C R O S S - SEC TION S

ROY
-'

i T l .

HAWION

CONFIDENCE

INTERVAL

EVEN - A TARGET
OOO - A TARGET

E.ir

[MeVI

FIG.2. (n,p) cross-sections averaged in a fission neutron spectrum.

278

CALAMAND

I n.a )

CROSS-SECTION S

67%

CONFIDENCE

INTERVAL

FIG.3. ( n , a ) cross-sections averaged in a fission neutron spectrum.

validity of this very simple model was tested by Hughes' old measurements.
Later on, large discrepancies with more recent measurements have shown
the inadequacy of Hughes' model to predict average cross-sections.
Rather than trying to refine the previous theory, Roy and Hawton
(Ref.RO60) have looked for an empirical correlation between a and E e f f . For
each measurement, they have plotted the quantity a 2 5/A 2 / 3 versus Eeff (-Eeff
being obtained from Hughes' plots (Ref. HU53, Fig. 4-3)). The number 25
means that the cross-sections have been renormalized arbitrarily to a nucleus
of mass A = 125, for which A 2 ' 3 = 25. The (n, 2n) cross-sections have been
plotted versus the threshold energy _ET. From the line giving the best fit of
the experimental points, Roy and Hawton have then tabulated the estimated
cross-sections. The lines fitted by Roy and Hawton have a steeper slope
than the ones given by the integral of the fission neutron spectrum from

279

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

fa>[ET..= iB5MEV)
(n,2n )

10.

""Tl {

CROSS-SECTIONS

1 .

< *

.8<9v

01

5"F

0.01

:0.28MEV)

0.001 .

i IMeVI

FIG.4. (n,2n) cross-sections averaged in a fission neutron spectrum.

Hughes' model. Moreover, for (n, p) cross-sections, the data split along
two parallel lines, the odd-A nuclei having much lower cross-sections than
the even-A nuclides.
This compilation assumes the approach by Roy and Hawton to the measurements presently available. All recommended values of Tables II, III and IV
have been used for the fit, except for the data marked with +. Relative errors
on data from a single measurement or on data averaged over two measurements have been increased arbitrarily up to 20% whenever they were lower
than this value. This was done in order to give lower weight to the
unsupported measurements. The 20% arbitrary errors appear in Figs 2, 3
and 4 as dotted error bars.
Threshold energies BT have also been recalculated using the latest
Q-value evaluation (Ref. GV72); for exoergic reactions ET = -Q, for endoergic
reactions E? = -Q(A+1)/A, where A is the mass number of the target nuclide.
Several threshold values, for which Q was not evaluated, have been taken
from Ref. HW70. These changes in the threshold values resulted in corrected
effective energies.
Figures 2, 3 and 4 show the results. The shaded areas define a 67%
confidence interval. It can be seen that our best fits have consistently greater
slopes than the ones of Roy and Hawton. Except for (n, p) cross-sections of
odd-A nuclei, the dispersion of which is large anyway, our fit is not very
much different from that of Roy and Hawton.

280

CALAMAND

Table of estimated values (Tab.VI)


The fission neutron spectrum averaged cross-sections are estimated
from the solid lines in Figs 2, 3 and 4, giving the best fits to the experimental
data, and are compiled in Table VI, together with their estimated relative
errors (one standard deviation). For those reactions where a is less than
0.1 nb, a is simply given as < 0. 0001 mb. No value is given for the few
reactions for which Eeff is less than 2 MeV, the validity of the estimation
being doubtful in this case. The recommended values of a given in Tables II,
III and IV should of course be preferred to the estimated ones.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
The author wishes to thank C. L. Dunford and J. J. Schmidt for their
critical review of the manuscript.

TABLE I. ADOPTED STANDARDS


Reactions
24

Mg(a,p)24Na

27

Al(n,ct)24Na

32
46

o Ao (mb)
1.53 0.09
0.725 0.045

Stn,p) 32 P

69 4

Ti(n,p) 46 Sc

12.5 0 . 9

"FeCn.p^Mn

82.5 5

'"NUn.p^Co

113 7

^Uln.OF P

1250 70

23!

328 10

U(n,f)F P

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

281

Explanation of symbols used in


Tables II, III, IV and V
(

)*

The reaction has been used as standard with the numerical value
given in parentheses.

(0. 05)

The error given in parentheses has been arbitrarily chosen.


Marks the data selected for use in the averaging process.

Collects renormalized values in an averaged recommended value.

Marks the data not accepted for the fit of the estimated values.

1. 530. 09 Underlined data are strongly recommended.


FA72

Refers to Fabry's recommended values (reported in the "original


values" column of the tables).
The boxes drawn within the tables for some reactions include the original data
and their renormalized values used by Fabry (FA72) in his evaluation.
Separates within the box the measurements performed with fission
plates; or converter (upper part) from the ones done by exposure
to pile neutrons (lower part).
(1), (2)... (29)

Refer to Notes to Tables II-V, a list of which follows Table V.

282

CALAMAND

TABLE II. INTEGRAL (n, p) CROSS-SECTIONS AVERAGED IN THE


URANIUM-235 THERMAL FISSION NEUTRON SPECTRUM
Original values

Reactions

&
6

Ityn.p)* *

17 0 (n,p)17 N

I9p(n,p)19o

23Ha(n,p)23He

24

"g(n,p)24Ha

HU53

Standards a
(mb)

< r & ? (mb)


0.014

RT58

0.019+25*

HE58

(1.85+O.11)1O- 2

RI58

O.OO52+3O5f

HB58
AN64

(9.3+0.9) 10-3
(7.4+O.6)lcr3

HB53

0.5

SA59

0.99

HB53

0.7

S459

1.0

HD53

1.0

(1)
27

Al(n,o0-O.6+2O?C
(2)

7Al(n^0-O.6+aO5S

7Al(n,O<)-0.6

(2)

(1)

31p(n,p)-19

(1)
31p(n,p)-19

(1)

HA62

1.05+0.25

unlaiown

BO64

1.31+0.06

32 S (n,p)-6O

BR67.7O

1.44+0.05

HJ70

1.31+0.05

KI71

(1.4)

PA72

(3)
2

7Al(n,<x) 0.61

(4)

1.62+0.07

35o(n,f)-1335 (7)

Renormalized
values

Recommended
values

5 + Aff("b)

S + fk'? (">*)

0.022
O.O23+O.0O3

- |o.019+0.001

0.018+O.0011

0.0063+0.0013 )
0.0093+0.0009 - (O.OO86+O.OOO8 +
O.O089+O.OOO9 -

0.8

1.35+0.8

1.9

1.1

1.9

]jl.5+0.6

1.6

1.53+0.07
1.53+0.053
I.58+O.O6
1.56
I.52+O.O45

RI57

1.29

23^j"(n,f3.3O4

1-53

PA61

1.2

2TAl(n,oO-0.60

1.51

27Al(n,ot)^).57

1.41

H062

1.1

HS68

1.30+0.17

(5)

1.53+0.20

KI71

(1.4)

(4)

1.56

72

(6)

FA72

1.53+0.03

1.51+0.12
235tl(n,f)-125O

I.53+O.09

Numbers in parentheses refer to notes, a list of which follows Table V.

1.53+0.09

283

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

Reactions

References

TABLE II (cont.)
Original
values
CT i A5( m ^)

^5j|g(n,p)25ua

HU53

2.0

27Al(n,p)27lig

HU53

2.8

BO64

2.9+0.5

GR68

(8)

Standards
(ml.)

(1)

3.2

(1)

4.5

32s(n,p)-6O

3.4+0.6

3.5+0.35

31p(n,p)31Si

Reoommended
value 8

3.2(i1.6)

4-7+0.3

KJ7O

2.9+0.3

27Al(n,=<)-0.61

KL72

4.35+0.20

235o(n,f)-1335 (7)

4.07+0.15

RI57

3.43

23So(n,f)-3O4

4.01

2350(n,f)-125O

4.0+0.45

(6)

28si(n,p)28Al

Renormalized
values
CT +. ^CT (nrt>)

4.17+0.33

FA72

4.0 +0.4

FH64

3.40+O.38

HB53

BO7O

6.68+0.08

32s(n,p)-65

7.1+0.4

KI71

4.90+O.32

(4)

5.4+0.5

4.0+0.45

unknown

(1)

6.4

HD53

2.7

(1)

4.3

NS68

2.40+O.18

(5)

2.8+0.3

BU7O

3.41+0.04

32S(n,p)-65

3.6+0.2

KI71

2.98+O.I7

(4)

3.3+0.3

HO53

19

RR6O

(23)

32s(n,p)-69+4

35+3

BO64

3O.51.2

32s(n,p)-6O

35-5+1.4

GR68

(8)

RI57

31.2

PAH

36+2

(1)

30

38.6+2.5
36.5
2

35o(n,f)-125O

36+3

1 6.4+O.8

> 3.3+0.2

284

CALAMAND

Reactions

32 S (n,p)32p

References

TABLE II (cont.)

HU53

Original values

Standards

C- Aff (mb)
30

(1)

Renormalized
valueB
CT i E&' (mb)
48

21

31p(n,p)-19

40

58+15*

238 o ( n i f ). 3 1 0

61+9

SA59
W62
EE62
PH64

653
61+5

LW66.68

41

BO64

(9)
unknown

54p e (n,p).60

56

3 2 s(n,p)-6O

70+1.4

PA72

J3i3_

RI57

60.3

PA61

58 (16)

MA64/1

65 (17)

MC72

(6)

PA72

69+2

KO66/2

376+20

32s(n,p)-66

383+31

LH66.68

55

54pe(n,p)-6O

76

34 S (n,p)34p

RA67/I

0.36+0.032

58ni(n,pV95

O.43+O.O5

35oi( n ,p)35 S

HU53

16

GI66

~8l0+40

RA67/1

78.3(calo.)

(24)

HH53

0.24

a)

33s(n,p)33p

37oi(n,p)37s

4lK(n,p)4lA r

IA65

2.73+0.41

RA67/1

I.78+O.I4

Recommended
values

235u(n,f)-1335 (7)

68.5+2
71.2
73+7

32 S ( n ,p).6 5

68.5
7O.55.6

35u(n,f)-125O

(1)

69+4

69+d.

76(+15)

O.43+O.O5

26

unknown
78 (+23)

0.38

0.38(+O.19) +

unknown
2.1+0.2

- 2.1+0.2

285

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

Reactions

nces

TABLE II (cont. )
Original valuee

<Ti ACT (mb)

Standards
(mb)

Renormalized
valuee
a + ACT (mb)

Recommended
values
<y + Acr(mb)

43ca(n,p)43 K

0166

0.3

unknown

45so(n,p)45oa

ND61

9+1

32s(n,p)-66

9.4+1.2

RO68/2

34.6+0.5

3 2 S(n,p)-60

39.8+2.4

NK58

4.1

3 2 s(n,p)-3O

9.4

BO62

10+1 %

HL63

15+2

58Hi(n,p)-101

17+2

4671^^)4630

HI63

38u(n,f)-31O

0.3(+O.15) +

10.6+1.6

58Hi(n,p)-92

21+4

ZJ

12.8

27Al(nf>0-O.6O8

15+3

KD66/1

12.6+0.4

3 2 S(n,p)66

13.2+0.9

BS67

8.6+1.4

unknown

BO64

12.840.6

3 2 S(n,p).6O

BR67.7O

H.6+O.5

(3)

15
12.3+O.5

KE71

10.8+0.61

PA72

13.0+0.6

HO62

9.0

BO64

3.0+O.6

5%i(n,p)9O

9-3

M464/2

8.+O.8

^^n.p).^

8.45+O.85

RA67/1

(12.6)

4 6 Ti(n,p)-12.6

N368

9.30+0.73

3C69

10.9+0.7

KI71

11.2+0.63

K72

()

2422.

12.5+0.5

^Al(n/5i)^).57

12.0+0.7
12.2+0.4
11.4

12.3

(5)

10.9+0.9

7Al(n^()j).767

10.6+0.7

(4)

12.5+0*7
13.0+1

35(j(n,f)-125O

12.5+O.9

(4)
35o( n ,f).i33 5 (7)

j15+12

12.5+0.9

286

CALAMAND

Reactlone

nces

TABLE II (cont.)
Original v a l u e s

Standards

&
o

S1

(mb)

ACT (mb)

Renorraalised
values
ff+ ivff (mb)

Reconmended
values
O^i Aff(mb)

OS

47Ti( n ,p)47 Sc

KE58

32s(n,p)-3O

O.48

W62

18+15^

238u(n,f)-31O

19iJ

N163

18+3

22+4

KO66/1

13.2+1
18.2+2.6

58m(n,p)-92
32S(n,p)-66
unknown

BO64

22+1.5

32 S (n,p)-60

KI71

17.3+0.90

HO62

15

NS68

26+3.I

DS67

48 T i( n ,p)48 S c

0.21

(4)
27Al(np<)-0.57

13.8+1.3
25.6+I.7
19-3+1
19.2

(5)

30.5+3.6

SC69

19.8+1.2

27Al(n,oO-0.767

19.2+1.1

KI71

19.0+1.2

(4)

21.2+1.3

PA72

20+2

ME58

0.077

32s(n,p)-3O

BD62

O.53+15S&

238u(n,f)-31O

O.56+O.O9

NI63

0.44+0.08

58Hi( n ,p).92

O.54+O.IO
3.45+0.3

35o(n,f)-125O

K066/1

3.3+0.2

32 S ( n ,p).66

IS67

0.11+0.01

unknown

BO64

0.21+0.016

3 2 s(n,p).6O

KI71

O.272+O.O52

HO62

0.25

NS68

0.240+0.054

SC69

0.334+0.02

KI71

O.294+O.O25

FA72

0.315+0.02

51v(n,p)5lTi

HS68

0.74+0.08

52cr(n,p)52v

RA67/1

O.92+O.O37

(4)
27

Al(n,oQ=0.57

(5)
27

Al(n,ot) .0.767
(4)

| 235u(n f f).125O

(5)
58jri(n,p).95

20+2.3

20+2.3

0.18

0.245+0.002
O.303+O.O58
0.32
O.282+O.O63
0.324+0.02
O.328+O.O28
0.315+0.027

0.315*0.027

0.87+p.ll

O.87+O.II

1.09+0.08

1.09+0.08

287

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

TABLE II (cont. ;
a

Reactions

Original values

Standards

Refe

Renormalized
value 8

Reooranended
value 8

vttsW

+ ACT (*)

53cr(n,p)53v

RAIJ7A

0.37+0.026

5%i(n,p).95

0.44+0.04

0.44+0.04

54cr(n,p)54v

RA67A

(4.9+0.8)10-3

58Hi(n,p)-95

(5.8+1.0)10-3

0.0058+0.001

SC57

15

54pe(n,p)54ib

(10)

46

3 2 s(n,p)-3O

53

7Al(n^)^).6

68

38u(n,f)-31O

62+10

HE;*

23

ROfi9

56

BU62

59+15*

BA(i8

59.8+1436

STiO

63+1

58Hi(n,p)-105

68+4

BOM

663.5

3 2 S(n,p)-60

77+4

unknown

BR7i7O

76.5+3.O

FA12
PA61

-895_._.
54

K*2

65

11*64/3

763

NS68

67+9

1C72

(6)

mi

82.5+2

5F<ntp)5S*i

NB58

0.44

(see also next


Page)

HJ62

1.2+15*

BO64

O.9O+O.05

OR68

(a)

(8)

1.07+0.07

BR67.7C

1.06+0.04

(3)

1.13+0.043

5J70

O.85+O.O5

^AUn^oQ-O.ol

1.025+0.06

PA72

1.15+0.04

1.08+0.035

(3)
.

83.5+2.5

TAl(n^().0.60

73

?Al(n,o()-0.57

58Ni(n(p)107

8I.5+3.2

35o(n,f)-1335 (7)

83
83.3+ 3-3

(5)

84.7+10.5

35o(n,f)-125O

81.5+4.5
82.5+5

32

S(n,p).3O

23&

0(n,f).310

3 2 s(n,p)-60

35o(n,f)-1335 (7)

1.0

1.3+0.2
1.05+0.06

82.5+5

288

CALAMAND

Reactions

References

TABLE II (cont.)
Original values

Standards
<mb)

<X i ACT (">b)

Renormalized
values
O~ ACT (mb)

56pe(n,p)56lb

PA61

0.82

27

Al(n^^.6O

1.03

(cont f d)

H062

0.71

27Al(n^)-0.57

0.91

NS68

0.96+0.09

MC72

(6)

PA72

1.07+0.06

59oo(n,p)59pe

58,ri(ntp)58co
(see a l s o next
page)

(5)
5o(n,f).1250
(10)

SC57

O.25

5.7

32s(n,p)-3O

RC59

-0.3

27Al(n l O i).0.6

HI62

1.4+15*

WA63

0.5

unknown

BA68

1.46+23*

unknown

RS68

1.15+0.15

HB58

45
225

RC59

140

DU62

97+15*

ZJ63

120

1.13+p.ll
1.29+0.10

ME58

RB59

Recommended
values

3U(n t f)310

(5)
32

S(n,p)-3O

32

S(n,p)-3O

238
27

O(n,f)-31O

A1 (n to<)0 608

1.07+0.08

0.77
13

1.5+0.2
'1,42+0.14
1.35+P.2

103.5
517.5
103+16
143

unknown

BA68

75.7+12*

BO64

105+5

BR67.7O

IO4.5+4.O

(3)

KI71

(104)*

(4)

PA72

120+6

PA51

92

R062

90

27

MA64A

107 (17)

32S(n,p)-65

113

RA67/1

(95)

5%i(n,p)-95

111

32

S(n,p)-6O

35u(n,f)1335 (7)
7Al(n^<).0.60
Al(n^<).0.57

1.07+0.08

122.5+6
113.3+4.3
116

112.5+3.5
115.5
115

289

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

Reactions

(cont'd)

SSlfi^.pjSSmoo

^(n.p)60^

References

TABLE II (cont. )
Original values Standards

NS68

96+13

SC69

114+7

KI71

(104)*

MC72

(6)

PA72

113+2.5

(5)
2

?Al(n,0=O.767

U)

IIO.5+7
116

IIO+5.7
]

235u(n,f).125O

113+7

ME58

13

32s(n,p)-3O

30

30+7

3 2 S(n,p).6O

35+8

BR67.7O

33.7+1.1

PA72

37.5+5

PA61

28

27

Al(n,ot)-0.60

35

HO62

30.5

2 7 Al(n,().0.57

39

PA72

35.4+1.0

235u(n,f)-125O

35.4+2.2

RB59

<4.5

SC57

O.56

ME58

3-7

DU62
HO62

<2

3.2+15$
<0.5

NS68

1.69+0.18

HA72

^ifn^J^OnOo

61

Recommended
value s
O^ A^Cmb)

113+15

BO64

RC59

Ri(n,p)61Co

(mb)

jj- &cf (mb)

Renormalized
value 8
CT+ Aff (mb)

(3)

35u(n,f)-1335 (7)

H3+7

35.8+1.2
35.1+1.1

35.4+2.2

3 2 S(n,p)-3O
(10)

1.72

32s(n,p)=3O
2 7 Al(n,o().0.60
2 8

3 U(n,f)-31O

27

3.4+0.5

Al(n^<).0.57

.2.3+0.4
2.0+0.2

4.4+1.0

(5)
S^ifn.pVlOS

HA72

I.98+0.20

5%i(n,p).lO5

2.1+0.3

SC69

1.3+0.1

27

1.23+0.12

HA72

1.63+0.12

5%i(n,p)-105

Al(n,o0-0.767

4.7+1.1
2.1+0.3

l i . 4+0.2
1.75+0.17

290

CALAMAND

Reactions

References

TABLE II (cont.)
Original values Standards
S + i i 5 (mb)

2Ni(n,p) 6 2co

HA72

(9+3)10-3

5ou(n,p) 6 55i

PA61

0.36

HS68

O.52+O.O5

ME58

22

RC59

35

4Zn(n,p) 6/ !cu

SSNifn.pJ-lOS

Al(n,*)-0.6
(5)
3 2 s( n ,pMO
2T

Al(ny=0^>.6O

Renomalized
values
CT+ Aw ( i t )

(9.7+3.4)10-3

O.435(+1O;{)
0.61+0.07

31+1556

238u(n,f)-310

33+5

27+1.6

32 S (n,p)-60

31.5+1.9

HJ7O

25.2+1.3

27

KI71

37.4+3.0

PA72

32+1.7

235u(n,f)-1335 (7)

30+1.2

PA61

28

27Al(n,o<)-0.60

35

H062

25

RA67/I

26.9+1.2

58Ki(n,p)-95

31.4+1.3

NS68

27.0+4.1

31.7+4.8

SC69

32+2

(5)
2
7Al(n,o<)-0.767

KI71

35-5+2.8

TO72

31+1.5

RA67/1

O.56+O.O34

58Ni(ntp)-95

0.67+0.06

HS68

0.32+0.11

(5)

O.38+O.I3

7zn(n,p) 6 ?Cu

MS58

0.27

32s(n,p)-3O

0.62

(see also next


page)

PA61

0.57

27Al(n^0-O.6O

O.69

IU62

O.88+155C

238tj( n ,f).3io

0.93+0.14

BO 64

0.9+p.l

32s(n,p).6O

1.04+0.13

66

Zn(n,p) 66 Cu

27

Al(n,o<)-0.57

(4)
2

35n(n,f)-125O

Vo.48+0.08

51

KJ62

(4)

O.0097+0.0034

42

BO64

Al(n(O<)^).6l

Recommended
values
a +>a:(">l>)

30.4+1.6
41.7+3.3

32

31+2
39.6+3.1
31+2.3

31+2.3

I0.62+O.II

291

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

References

TABLE II (cont.)
Reactions

Original values

Standards

a i A S (mb)

(mb)

Renormalized
value s
<y + A 5 1 (mb)

Recommended
values
<T+>CT(mb)
1

7zn( n ,p)67o u

Nl6;,/2

0.88+0.11

5 8 Ni(n,p).92

1.08+0.15
1.14+0.11

RA6T/1

O.96+O.O67

5%(n,pte5

OB6S'

0.82+0.04

54pe(n,p).6l

HP6*'

0.8

unknown

SC6S'

1.11+0.08

27

RA6T/1

(13.1+1.9)10-3

5%i(n,p)-95

69Oa(n,p)69"Zn

HP65'

0.496+0.073

unknown

72Oe(n,p)72 O a

RC5S'

<0.01

(oont'd)

^(n.p)

6 8

Al(nyc<)-0.767

1.07+0.04

1.05+0.10

0.0156+0.0025

O.OI56+O.OO25

0.496+0.073 +

0.022(+0.006)+

fAl(n,o<)-0.6

RA67/1

0.0218

(21)

"A.( n t p)75o.

HS6E

0.45 (oal.val.)

(19)

74s,(n,p)T4As

0166

6.6

8lBr(n,p)8lg Se

ST67

0.020+0.004

8l

Br(n,p) 8 l Se

ST67

0.012+0.003

88

Sr(n,p)Rb

NS6S

0.01 (cal. Tal.)

BA6E

0.31+19*

90zr(n,p)90,

NS68

0.18 (oal.iralj

92M0(n,p)9ann.

MK56

1.3

32

(see also next


page)

0062

7.4310%

5%li(n,p J-105

0.45(+0.15) +

unknown
27

6.6(+3.3)

Al(n,c<)=0.6

O.O24+O.OO5

0.024+0.005

TAl(n,<^^).6

0.0145+0.004

O.OI45+O.OO4

0.01(+0.003) +

(19)
unknown

0.31+0.06

0.l8(+p.06) +

(19)
S(n,p)-3O

3
8.00.9

292

CALAMAND

Reactions

(cont'd)

95110^^)95^

Referenced

TABLE II (cont.)
Original values

Standards

Renormalized
value s

(mb)
32s(n,P)-60

7.23+0.5

B064

6.2+0.4

BR67.7O

6.57+0.28

KI71

6.04+0.45

PA72

7.7+O.5

H062

6.0

7.65

RA67/1

6.74+0.27

6.58+0.26

NS68

6.70+0.63

(5)

KI71

6.00+0.43

(4)

PA72

7.0+0.4

(3)

7.OO+O.3O

(4)

6.73+0.05

235u(n,f).1335 (7)

235u(n,f)=1250

7.2+0.3

7.87+O.74
6.70+0.47
7.0+0.6

7.0+0.6

3 2 s(n,p)-3O

ME58
0062

Recommended
values
CT +^lO*(nft)

0.7810%

92Mo(n,p)=7.43

0.730.08

27Al(n^<).0.57

HO62

32S(n,p)=6O

0.150+0.02

0.14+0.01

BO64

0.13+0.02

R167/1

0.138+0.006

GO62

0.2410%

92no(n,p)-7.43

0.23i0.03

0.23*0.03

PR67

0.093+0.001

32S(n,p)-60

0.107+0.006

O.1O7+O.OO6

9Ag(n,p) 10 9p d

NS68

0.06 (cal.val.)

lCd(n,p) lo6 Ag

ST67

2.7+0.2

"Cd(n,p)UAg

RC59

9 6 Ko(n,p) 9 V
1

3Rh(nIp)13Su

1O

HG68/1

rt/0.1
(11.1+0.2)10-3

0.137+0.012

O.O6(+O.O2) +

(19)
2

7Al(n^,..6

VAl(n^.6

32

s(n,p)-6O

3.3+0.3

3.3+0.3
o.i(+p.O5) +

(12.8+0.8)10^

0.0128+0.0008

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

293

Reactions

12

Tl(n,p)7j.

Standards
(ml.)

Renormalized
value s
CTijtjr
(mb)

Recommended
value s
CT + ACTKmb)

(7.62+0.11)10-3

32 S (n t P ).6O

(8.8+0.5)10-3

O.OO88+O.OOO5

KB59

5.3

3 2 s(n,p)-3O

12

12(+6)

RB59

0.0015

3 2 s(n,p)=30

0.0035

+
O.O035(+O.O017)

DS68

3.5+0.9

5*51(n,2n)0.004

4.3+1.6

4.3+1.6

0B67

0.12

unknown

0.12(+0.06)

Vf(n,p)l82Ta

RV67

(3.8+0.6)10-3

(11)

(4.0+0.7)10-3

0.004+0.0007

3w(n,p)l83 Ta

RV67

(2.8+0.5)10-3

(11)

(3.O+p.6)lO"3

0.003+0.0006

Tl(n,p)2<Hg

ME58

0.004

0.009

0.009 (+0.004)+

36Ba(n,p)136Cs

l82

l8

Original value 1

RO66/1

^(n,p)132c.

References

TABLE II (cont.)

32s(n,p)-3O

294

CALAMAND

Reactions

^(n^e

11

B(n,)8U

References

TABLE III. INTEGRAL (n, a) CROSS-SECTIONS AVERAGED IN THE


URANIUM-235 THERMAL FISSION NEUTRON SPECTRUM
Original v a l u e s

Standards
(mb)

Renormalized
values
^ +, A ^ (mb)

10

(1)

ON68

38.2+3.8

(15)

HB53

0.085

(1)

0.14

HD53

4.5

(1)

7.2

SA59

4.5

HU53

0.4

S59

0.47

?Al(n)24Ka

HU53

0.6

SA59

0.44

ME6O

O.48

DE62

0.63+O.03

(1)
P(n,p)-19

(1)

0.85+15*

^^(n.fMlO

0.62+0.03

unknown

BO64

0.60+0.03

3 2 S(n,p)-6O

GR68

HJ7O

(0.61)

K171

(0.63)*

FA72

0.89
O.96
O.55

(9)

DU62

0.695+0.02

0.64

O.83
32S(n,p).6O

IB64

BR67.7O

32.8+3.8

8.5

31

0.90+0.14

0.70+0.035

(8)

0.75+0.0045

(3)

0.74+0.02

7Al(n,o;)^).6l

O.78+O.O3

35o(n,f)-1335 (7)

RI57

0.60

2j8

PA61

(0.60)*

(-)

0.735
0.70
0.73+0.02

U(n,f)-3O4

0.71

7Al(n^)-O.6O

0.755

HO62

(0.57)

27

Al(n^<)-57

0.73

RA67/1

0.61+0.028

58

Ki(n,p)-95

0.71+0.03

HS68

O.58+O.O7

(5)

Recommended
values

16

HJ53

(see a l s o next
page)

0.68+0.06

Numbers in parentheses refer to notes, a list of which follows Table V.

O.14(+O.O7)

. 7.85+0.9

. 0.765+0.17

295

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS- SECTIONS

Reactions

^AKn.oO^Na
(cont'd)

JCsKn^Mg

P(nA) 28 Al

34S(n,o031Si

35ci(n,o<)32p

References

TABLE III (cont. )

SC6$<
KI73

Original values Standards


ffAo"

(mb)

(mt>)

27Al(n^)-767

(0.767)*
' (O.63)

MC7!:

(6)

FA7<

O.725+O.O2

ni6i

0.15+0.02

KI71

0.130+0:020

HU53

1.43

SA59

0.75

HB53

3.0

SA59

1.2

BL65

2.23 (oalo.)

(4)

Renormalized
values
O-iAf(nb)

Recommended
values
^ +/^(mb)

0.744+0.045
0.70
0.73+0.015

35u(n,f)-125O

O.725+O.O45

7Al(n,p)-3.43

0.175+0.03

(4)

0.144+0.023

(1)

2.29

3 P(n,p)-19

(1)
31p(n,p)-19

5.0

SA59

4.1

31p(n,p)19

ED59

15

unknown

(1)

0.155+0.02

1.9+0.6

1.44
4.8
2.3

(18)

HU53

- O.725O.O45

2.2(+0.2)

4.8
7.8
8.8+4.6

BI65/1

12.4

3 S(n,p)-62

13.8

1*66,68

32

54Fe( n ,p)-60

44

36ci(n,cO33P

LH66.68 52

54pe(n,p)-6O

72

39K(n,o03fiCl

HS68

8.0 (calc.)

41 K ( n ^)38ci

RA67/I

0.61+0.032

58

JO68

O.68+O.O5

(19)

i(n,p)-95

0.73+0.06

7Al(n,o0-0.6

0.82+0.08

72(36)

8.0(+0.3)

| O.76+O.O5

296

CALAMAND

Reactions

References

TABLE III (cont.)


O r i g i n a l value s

Standards
(mb)

5=+ A 5 0>rt>)

Renormalized
values
3-t ACT- (mb)

Recommended
valueB
5 1 + iCT(mb)

4Ca(n lO ()42 K

GI66

13.2

unknown

13(+6)

44 O a(n,o0 4 1 Ar

U65

(61.1+9.2)10-3

unknown

0.0611+0.0092+

45sc(n,o042K

RO59

<5

27Ai( n;l ^-o.6

RG68/2

0.158+0.004

32S(n,p)=6O

0.182+0.012

Ti(n^5Ca

MB58

0.0055

32s(n,p)-3O

0.013

0.013(+O.0O6)*

5Ti(n,o0 47 Ca

ME58

0.0002

32s(n,p)=3O

0.00046

(4.6(+2.3))l5i

51v(n^)^ 8 So

HU53

0.08

SA59

0.0099

48

55 Mn ( n , 0< )52 v

54p e (n,)51cr

(1)
31p(n,p)-19

0.13

(15.3+2.7)10-3

(5)

O.O18+O.OO3

KI71

0.0217+0.0015

(4)

0.024+0.002

NS68

0.11 (calc.)

(19).

ME58

0.37

32 S (n,p)-3O

0.79+155?

unknown

KS68

O.50+O.I5

OT65

0.397+0.12

59co(n,c<)56Mn

SA59

0.14

31

(see also neirt


page)

BA68

0.32+18^

unknown

HS68

0.131+0.011

(5)

(5)

r 0.022+0.003

0.11(+0.03) +
O.85

0.6+0.2

unknown

P(n,p)

- 0.182+0.012

0.0187

NS68

BA68

0.6+0.2

0.397+0.12 +

0.265

O.I54+O.OI6

- 1

297

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

Reactions

59co(n,c<)56*i
(cont'd)

References

TABLE III (cont. )

BR7O

Original values Standards


(mb)

0.147+0.005
O.I56+O.OO6

^(n.oO^e

(3)
2J

5u(n,f).125O

0.17

(10)

Renormalized
values
O i A S (mb)

Recommended
values

O.I56+O.OO6

lo.156+0.009

O.I56+O.OII

0.52

unknown

BA(i8

SC57

0.013

ME'-8

0.025

R0|i9

0.14

RC59

0.72

(10)
32 S (n,p)-3O

3+0.9

0.09+0.07

0.04
0.0575
0.17

27Al(n,oQ*0.6

O.87

0.54+0.07

5"Ni(n,p)"101

0.60+0.09

0.44

unknown

PA72

0.66+0.06

35u(n,f)-1335 (7)

0.62+0.04

H0()2

0.42

'Al(n,e<)-0.57

0.535

MA(i4/4

0.45+0.05

51p8(n,p)-76

0.475+0.05

NS68

O.382+O.036

HC72

(6)

PA72

O.5O+O.O5

SAS9

0.020

RA67/I

(6.3+O.4)10- 2

SC(i9

0.077+0.01

(5)

O.449+O.O42
0.495+0.05

23

O.5O+O.O6

58Hi(n,p)-95

O.O75+O.O07

0.073+p.Oll

5u(n,f).125O

0.038
O.O74+O.OO6

298

CALAMAND

Reactions

References

TABLB III (cont.)


Original values Standards

a AS (mlj)

Renormalized
values
g" A5 1 (mb)

Recommended
values
0".O r (mD)

RC59

-a

3 1 P(n,p)-19

NI63

O.O2O+O.O05

58Ni(n,p).92

O.O25+O.OO6

0.025+0.006 +

T4oe(n,o<)Tlnzn

NI63

0.002+0.001

SSHitn.p )-92

0.0025+0.0013

0.0025+0.0013+

TV(n,)76AS

NS68

0.02 (cal.)

BA68

O.OO2+27?

9 2 Zr(n,o<) 8 9sk

NS68

0.014 (oalc.)

93Nb(n,cx)9y

HO72

O.O585+O.OO22

27

93m>(n,ix)9OlI>y

RO72

0.0221+0.0003

92Mo(n^)89 Zr

ME58

0.017

98no(n,)95Zr

RA67/I

72Ge(n,)69n>Zn

O.O2(+p.OO6) +

(19)
unknown

0.O02+O.O0O6 +

(19)

0.014(+p.O04)+

Al(n^<)^).6

O.O7O7+O.OO5I

O.O7O7+O.OO5I

7Al(n,o^-0.6

0.0267+0.0017

0.0267+0.0017

32s(n,p)3O

0.04

O.O4(+O.O2) +

(14.0+1.3)1O- 3

/]6

0.0139+0.0016

0.0139+0.0016

SA59

2.4rlO" 4

31p(n,p)-19

0.00045

IE58

0.0005

3 2 S(n,p)-3O

0.0012

ST67

0.0027+0.0006

O.OO33+O.OOO8 -

U65

(1.9+0.3)10-3

unknown

l 8 l fc(nKX) 1 7 8 Ltt

SA59

8.5x10-5

3 1 P(n,p)-l 9

18

RT67

(O.19+p.O4)lO-3

33cs(n,e013I

4w(n,o0 l8l Hf

Ti(n,p)-12.6

7Al(n^)-0.6

(11)

O.OO33+O.OOO8

0.00190.0003 +
1.6x10-4
(0.200.05)10" 3

1.6(0.8))10" 4 +

(2+0.5)10-4

299

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

TABLE IV. INTEGRAL (n, 2n) CROSS-SECTIONS AVERAGED IN THE


URANIUM-235 THERMAL FISSION NEUTRON SPECTRUM
{Q

Reactions

4)

Original values

Standards

S
fft

0(n,2n) U C

(ab)

73+20

(12)

70-140

(13)

PE66

116.2+135?

(14)

ON68

144+6

(15)

RO6O

3ilO"6

32S(n,p).6O

BS68

-O(n.2n,15O

3Ha(n,2n)22Na

46

Ti(n,2n) 4 5 Ti

^(n^Or
a

Recommended
values
6=+ C>iT (nrt.)

(")

ZH63

*(..*>*

12

^?

Renormalized
values

V144+6

3.51IO- 6

(5)

(4.2+1.4)10-''

(5)

(5.3+2.4)lO~ 6

S(n,p).69

(8.6+1.4)10-3

HS68

(4.5+2.0)10" 6

LE63

(8.6+1.3)10-3

RE67

7.1OilO"3+2O?5

NS68

(7.2+1.0)10-3

KJ7O

(5.3+0.5)10-3

27

BE57

6.10-3

unknown

HA62

0.0012

unknown

HS68

(2.7+0.7)10-3

ST7O

(2.0+0.1)10-3

KU65

0.3+0.03

8060

0.0063

SC69

0.0087+p.OOl

QA71

O.OO54+O.OOO8

32

148+19

(5)
Al(n,0-O.6l

(5)
^Ni(n(p)105

(5.3+2.4)10

(9.4+2.0)10-3

(8.5+1.3)10-3

- c(7.3+0.7)10-3

(6.3+0.7)10-3

(3.2+0.8)10-3

(2.15+0.2)10-3 -

0.36+0.04

3 2 s(n,p)-6O

(20)

(4.2+1.4)10-7

0.36+0.04

0.0072{+205J)

0.0082+p.OOll

0.006+p.OOl

Numbers in parentheses refer to notes, a list of which follows Table V.

y(2.2+0.2)10-3

L0.0078+0.0009

0.006+0.001

300

CALAMAND

TABLE IV (cont.)
Reactions

55ifc(a,2n)54|fc

54

Pe(n,2n) 53 Fe

i
&

SC57

Original values

Standards

& i u & (mb)

(mb)

O.O5

0.15

R060

0.19

32

S(n,p).6O

0.22

H062

0.18

27

Al(n^)-0.57

0.23

NS68

0.202+0.018

ST70

0.26+0.02

58

Ni(n,p)-105

Wl

O.258+O.O3

FA72

0.27+0.015

23

5ff(n,f).1335(7) 0.253+0.01

FA72

0.253+0.01

23

5(j(n,f)-125O

(5)
(20)

HB53

0.0032
0.1+0.02

59co(n,2n)580o

NS68

0.340+0.0030

5 8 Hi(n,2n)57 N i

SC57

0.0012

R060

0.006

32

M68

0.004+0.000?

unknown

FA72

O.I24+O.OO9

235

Zn(n,2n)65zn

HO62

<4

27

^(n.^Ce

RO59

1.5

RO6O

0.29

NS68

0.304+0.036

ST7O

0.30+0.01

KR65

<1

Ou(n,2n)62Cu

5 A s(n,2n)T4A s

^(n.2,)^

(1)

Recommended
values

^ 5 * ("b)

(10)

BE57

63

Renormalized
values

<f 63= (mb)

0.24+0.025
0.28+0.03
O.285+O.O4

K 0.258+0.013
|

0.253+0.02
0.005

0.005(0.0025) +

unknown

(5)

0.40+0.04

do)

0.0037

S(n,p).6O

(8)

(StbO

32

0.40+0.04

O.OO7(+2O?S)

0.124+0.009

V 0.0049+0.0014

U(n,f)-125O

0.124+0.011

0.124+0.011

AKn.).. 5 7

< 5

< 5

1.8

1.800-9)

S(n,p).6O

(5)
58Hi( l P ) . 1 O 5
(21)

O.33(+2O?C)
0.36+0.05
0.32+0.02

< 1

y 0.33+0.02

<1

301

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

Reactions

80

Se( n ,2n)T9 S e

5Rli(n,2n)84m>

References

TABLE IV (cont. )
Original valueB Standards
(mb)

CT+ ACT" (mb)

KR6f

<10

RN66

0.2

<10

(21)

Renormalized
values
0^+ A5f(mb)

<10

unknown

88

Sr(n,2n) 8 7-Sr

KR6;

89

T(n,2n) 8 8 T

RO6C

0.12

32 S (n,p).6O

BA66

0.22+23^

unknown

RA67/2

0.2+0.01

4 6 Ti(n,p)-12.6

0.20+0.02

0.137+0.005

SSlJitn.p^lOS

0.147+0.010

ST7C

(20)

0.076+0.01

93m,(n,2n)92%b

HG66

~0.4

KI71

0.402+0.034

PA72

O.52+O.O3

KS68

0.370+0.030

U2

Cd(n,2n)lllmCd

<10

0.2(+0.1)

<10

O.14+(2O56)

0.15+0.024

0.0687+0.01

7Ag(n,2n)lo6mAg

=10

(20)

Wl

10

(21)

0.144+O.02

9Zr ( n ^ n ^ Z r

Recommended
values
CT+A^(mb)

.0.156*0.011

0.076+p.Ol

unknown
O.448+O.O38

235o(n,f)1335 (7 0.487+0.02
0.435+0.035
(5)

(4)

-0.il 8+0.04

H71

0.432+0.033

FA72

0.47+0.03

HG72

O.42O+O.OO7

NS68

0.39+0.07

(5)

0.46+0.09

O.46+O.O9

KH65

0.35+0.4

(21)

0.42+0.06

0.42+0.06

(4)

23

5u(n,f).125O

27Al(n,oO-0.6

O.482+O.O37

0.47+0.04
0.51+0.03

CALAMAND

302

Reactions

127

Kn,2n)126I

"8Ba(nf2n)137Ba

References

TABLE IV (cont.)
Original value

Standards
(!>)

<f ^ I T ( * )

32 S (n,p).6O

Renoroalized
values
CT+A^(mb)

Recomended
values
S- + kg=(mb)

2.0(+2056)

R060

1.7

MC72

(6)

FA72

1.09+0.05

235u(n,f).125O

HS68

1.62+0.24

(5)

RO68/1

0.647+0.010

32 S (n,p)-60

0.744+0.044

ST7O

1.02+0.01

SSHiCn.pJ-lOS

I.IO+O.07

KR65

2.0+1O5S

1.09+0.05

(21)

1.09+0.08

0.9+p.l

1.9+0.3

2.4+0.3

2.4+0.3

l8

<*(n,2n) l 8 5w

IR66

10.0+0.7

197Au(n,TO-133+10
(22)

l8

5Re(n,2n)l81Re

ST7O

4.3+0.3

S^itn.pVlOS

4.6+0.4

4.6+0.4

5Re(n,2n)l84>Re

ST7O

O.58+O.O3

SSjfifn.pJ-lOS

0.62+0.05

0.62+0.05

l 8 7Re(n,2n) 186 Re

IS67

10+6

^^(n.rj-^o+ig

l8

10.0+0.7

10*6

(22)

^Aufo.aO^Au

SC69

3.14+0.2

R060

4.0

HS68

2.75+0.55

0*71

2.41+0.35

3Tl(n,2 n ) 2 0 2 Tl

27

2.97+0.26

32s(n,p)-6O

4.6+(2O5f)

3.23+0.67

- 3.O+O.5

Al(n^j()M3.767

(5)
(20)

2.64+O.42

3.0i3

303

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

TABLE IV (cont. )
Reactions

10

Original values

Standards

<Pb(n,2n)a>3Pb

32Tt(n,2n)231Th

Renormalized
value s
o i A*3" Cmb)

Kerert

CTi &G~ v10^)

1)060

3.3

32s(n,p).6O

3.8t(a

IW62

5.0+15^

238u(n,f)-31O

5.3+0.8

ICI71

1.90+0.18

(4)

2.11+0.23

71

2.19+0.30

(20)

2.41+0.36

TH58

12.4+0.6

32

S(n,p).60.3

14.2+1.1

-10

27

Al(n,o<)-0.767

(ml)

Recommended
values

^+AcFM
2.45+0.4

14.2+1.1

304

CALAMAND

Reactions

f7se(n,n-) 7 7 m Se

7Sr(I.,n')87mSr

References

TABLE V. INTEGRAL (n, n') CROSS-SECTIONS AVERAGED IN THE


URANIUM-235 THERMAL FISSION NEUTRON SPECTRUM

SiAc ( )

KH65

600+60

KO67

652+30

Original values

Standards

1 mt

Renormalized
value s

& A5(mt)

(mb)
(21)
Ni(n,p)=100

725+86
737+57

KH65

120+12

KO67

91+5

9T(n,n') 8 9 B T

DI68

128.4+2^.

Hb(n,n') 9 3 m Nb

HG71

97+35 (calc.)

10

RO64

535.8 (calc.)

KO67

403+40

BT68

716+40 ( c a l c . )

(28)

KI69

558+32 (calc.)

(29)

H071

595+150(calc.)

(26)

KR65

140+14

K067

289+15

S^TiCn.pVlOO

327+26

SSHI^.PJ-IOO

205+15

3Rh(n,n0 1 0 3 n Rh

0d(n,n')lllmCd

5ln(n,n')U5lnIn

137Ba(n, n -) 137m Ba

(21)
58

Ni(n,p)=100

3Bh(n,n')=595+l50(26

^733+46

145+17
103+?

r112+17

128+32

(25)
10

Recommended
values
S'+.&SGA)

87+14

87+14

(27)
58111. (n,p)100

(21)

455+53
533+33

169+20

KO67

181+10

BH67.7O

177+6.0

NJ7O

156+5

27

Al(n,ot)-61

188+6

PA72

200+8

23

5u(n,f)-1335 (7)

I87.J+6

FA72

I88+4

23

5u(n,f)=125O

188+11

KR65

220+22

KO67

I89+IO

58

Hi(n,p).10O

(3)

(21)

[228+76

I88.5+6.4

266+J2
214+17

Numbers in parentheses refer to notes, a list of which follows this table.

188+11

[225+22

305

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

Reactions

197Au(n,n') 1 9' 7m Au

References

TABLE V (cont. )

DII58

Original values Standards


(mb)

379.8+25ff

KO()7

(25)
238

DUI>2

U(n,f)-31O

15-3+0.7
18.9+2.0

Renormalized Recommended
values
values
& i hsr (ifo)

(4)

38q+?5

23.3+3.5

17.3+1.3

- ^18.6+1.5

21.0+2.5

NOTES TO TABLES II-V


(1) The fission flux was determined by comparison with another fission flux produced in a simpler geometry
such as a converter. Hughes' old data set could not be ignored since some of his measurements are still unique
or among the few. It was then necessary to perform an empirical renormalization. This was done by comparing
Hughes' values with well istablished ones whenever possible. Hughes' data were found to be consistently too
low by an average factor of 1.6.
(2) The fission flux was ceduced from the power generated in the uranium rod. This power was calculated
from the flow and temperature rise of the cooling water. No renormalization was performed.
(3) Bresesti'sdata were first reported relative to a value of 0.61 mb for "Al(n,a) Z 4 Na (Ref. BR67). After
comparison with data obtained by integration of excitation functions over various spectral representations for the
fission spectrum, these data were rescaled by a factor of 1.14. The values for 4 6 Ti(n,p) 4 6 Sc, 5 8 Ni(n,p) 5 8 m Co
and 9z Mo(n, p) 92 Nb which do not appear in Ref. BR70 were multiplied by 1.14 by Fabry (Ref. FA72) and included
in his evaluation.
( 4 ) The fast neutron flux was monitored using the following standards: 104 mb, 1.4 mb and 0.63 mb for
58
Ni(n,p) 5 8 Co. " M g l n . p i ^ N a and 2 7 Al(n,a) 2 4 Na, respectively. New values for these standards (see Table I)
lead to an average renormalization factor of 1.11.
(5) The fission spectrum averaged cross-sections o were found by correcting the average cross-sections o 0
measured in a critical assembly of enriched uranium. In this case, our renormalized values were obtained by
multiplying Nasyrov's data by Fabry's rescaling factor, which is 1.175 for these data.
(6) The core centre reaction rate measurements of McElroy have been transformed by Fabry (see Ref.FA72)
into fission spectrum avers.ged cross-sections. Fabry's scaling is relative to a value of 0.73 1 0.015 for the
27
Al(n, a) cross-section.
(7) Fabty's data were directly quoted from Ref.FA72, although practically all of them were reported in
Ref. FA70/1. Although they result from absolute measurements, using the technique described in Ref. FA67
(see Note (9) for description of a similar technique), they are all consistently scaled to the uranium-235 average
fission cross-section value of 1335 mb, which can therefore rightly be considered as the standard.
(8) The double ratio measurements of Grundl (Refs GR67, GR68) have been converted to fission spectrum
averaged cross-sections by Fabry. All details can be found in Ref. FA72.

306

CALAMAND

(9) Depuydt et al. (Ref.DE62) have used the converter technique for their measurements. The absolute value
of the fast flux *f was determined from the absolute value of the thermal flux * t ij by means of the relation :
* f = v Zf * t h G fcor
where v = 2.43 0.02 is the mean number of neutrons emitted per thermal fission of uranium-235
If = 23.8 0 . 2 cm" 1 is the macroscopic fission cross-section of the converter, computed for a
microscopic thermal fission cross-section of (587 6) b for uranium-235
G

is a geometrical factor

fcor takes into account the secondary processes in the facility


*th is determined using (98.8 0.3) b for the thermal capture cross-section of gold-197
We have not renormalized in this case.
(10) The data are based on the assumption that the fission-neutron flux inside the uranium receptacle slug
equals the thermal neutron flux outside the slug; they were renormalized by multiplying by 69/22.5 as shown
by Mellish (see Ref. ME60).
(11) Two standards were used for the neutron flux determination: 0.54 mb and 10.6 mb for
46
Ti(n, p) cross-sections, respectively.

63

(12) Neutron multiplication was measured in beryllium spheres. The quantity 5 n 2n " n a
and o n 2 n was deduced taking 10 mb for the 9 Be(n,a) cross-section. No renormalization.

Cu(n,<x) and

was

determined

(13) The same method as in Note (12) was used with the same value of 10 mb for the 9Be(n, a ) cross-section.
No renormalization.
(14) Three standards were used for the neutron flux determination: 95 i 6 mb, 61 8 mb and 9.8 1,1 mb
for the "NiCn.p), ^Fefn.p) and 4 6 Ti(n,p) cross-sections, respectively.
(15) Green has used a manganese sulphate bath technique to make an accurate measurement of the 9Be(n, 2n)
cross-section averaged over a pure 2S2Cf fission neutron spectrum. The technique measures neutron multiplication
and therefore eliminates completely the need for a flux measurement. The 9Be(n, a) reaction was corrected
using a calculated average cross-section of 38.2 3. 8 mb. Fission neutron spectra of 2szCf and 235U are similar
enough to justify averaging (n, 2n) cross-section values of Green and of Felber.
(16)

The original value of 65 mb has been corrected by Fabry (see Ref. FA72).

(17)

Data communicated by S. B. Wright to W.H. Martin and D.M. Clare.

(18) The original value was computed by integration of an evaluated excitation function o(E) over a Watt
spectrum. It is clearly our recommended value in this case. Whenever a check is possible, the agreement
between our recommended values and Barrall's computed values is generally good, therefore we can arbitrarily
use a 10% relative error.
(19)

Nasyrov's computed values are based on the relation


5

=eff /
X(E) dE
Eeff

( / X(E) dE = 1)

where x(E) ~

e" 0 - 2

The calculation was performed whenever it was possible to choose o e ff among experimental or evaluated data.
When no other data are available, Nasyrov's calculated data become our recommended values with an arbitrary
relative error of 30%.
(20) Two standards were used for the neutron flux determination: 72.6 mb and 0.307 mb for "Fetn.p) and
75
As(n,2n) cross-sections, respectively.
(21) Four standards were used for the neutron flux determination: 92 mb, 3.4 mb, 1.2 mb and 0.63 mb for
58
Ni(n,p), 27 Al(n,p), 24 Mg(n,p) and 27 Al(n,a) cross-sections, respectively.
(22)

The standard chosen depends too much upon the shape of the fission spectrum to allow a renormalization.

(23) Ricabarra et al. have measured the following ratio:


5[ 31 P(n,p) 31 Si:]/5[ 32 Sln,p) 32 P] =0.51 0.03.

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

307

(24) Value calculated from an empirical formula valid for 8 ^ Z s 42. This value becomes our recommended
value for which we estima:e a 30% relative error.
(25) Cross-section averaged over a reactor spectrum from 0.1 MeV to infinity. The standard reaction used was
28
Si(n, p), for which an average cross-section of (10.4 2.4) mb, computed over the same energy range, has
been accepted. No renomalization.
(26) Hegediis has measured the excitation function of 93 Nb(n, n') 9 3 m Nb which he integrated over a Watt
spectrum (Ref. WT52) to obtain 97 35 mb. He used a standard value of 595 150 mb for103 Rh(n, n") 103m Rh.
This value was computed from Butler's excitation curve (Ref. BT68) using a larger conversion coefficient ratio
a k / a for103m Rh (0.131 instead of 0.099). This explains the lower value of 595 mb instead of 716 mb obtained
by Butler and Santry. The error on the 9 3 Nb(n,n') 9 3 m Nb cross-section includes the uncertainty of the standard.
(27) Obtained by integraiion of a Vogt and Cross (Ref. VC64) excitation function over a Cranberg spectrum
(Ref. CR56). No renormal.zation.
(28) The measured excitation function was integrated over a Qanberg spectrum (Ref. CR56).
retained for the average (s:e Note (26)). No renormalization.

Value not

(29) Kimura et al. measured the excitation curve up to 4.6 MeV. Above this value, they used the curve
calculated by Vogt and Cross (Ref. VC64) to compute o using a Cranberg spectrum (Ref.CR56).

REFERENCES TO TABLES 11 - V
AM64
BA68
BE57
BL65
BO64
BR67
BR70
BT68
BU70
BY65
CR56
DB57
DE62
DI68
DR66
DR67
DS67
DS68
DU62
FA67
FA70/1
FA70/2
FA72
FE66
FH64
FM69
FR67

AMIEL, S . , GILAT, J . , Nucl. Sci. Eng. 18(1964) 105.


BRAUN, H . , NAGY, L . , Radiochim. Acta jLO (1968) 15.
BETTS, R. H., DAHLINGER, O . F . , Rep. AECL PR-CM-11 (1957) 12 (quoted in Ref. ST70).
BARRALL, R. C . , McELROY, W . N . , Personnel Dosimetry for Radiation Accidents (Proc. Symp. Vienna,
1965), IAEA, Vienna (1965) 251.
BOLDEMAN, J. kv"., ] . Nucl. Energy A/B18(1964) 417.
BRESESTI, A . M . , BRESESTI, M., RYDIN, R. A., Nucl. Sci. Eng. 29(1967) 7.
BRESESTI, A . M . , BRESESTI, M., ROTA, A., RYDIN, R. A., LESCA, L . , Nucl. Sci. Eng. 4
(1970) 3 3 1 .
~
BUTLER, J . P . , SANTRY, D . C . , Neutron Cross-sections and Technology (Proc. Conf. Washington,
1968) 2, NBS, Washington (1968) 803.
BRUGGEMAN, A., DE SOETE, D . , HOSTE, J . , Radiochim. Acta ^4 (1970) 147.
BYRNE, A.R., private communication to FREEMAN, N . J . , J. Nucl. Energy 23 (1969) 713.
CRANBERG, L . , FRYE, G . , NERESON, N . , Phys. Rev. 103(1956) 662.
~
DUBOVSKY, B.G., KAMAEV, A. V., MAKAROV, E . F . , At. Ehnerg. 2(1957) 279 (Engl. transl. :
J. Nucl. Energy (1957) 172).
DEPUYDT, H . , NEVE DE MEVERGNIES, M., Reactor Science and Technology (J. Nucl. Energy)
A/B16(1962) 447.
DURRANI, S.A., KOEHLER, W., J. Nucl. Energy 22 (1968) 632.
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Sov. J. Nucl. Fhys. 4(1967) 366).
DRUZHININ, A, A . , LBOV, A. A., BILIBIN, L. P . , J. Nucl. Phys. (USSR) 5 (1967) 18 (Engl. transl.:
Sov. J. Nucl. Phys. 5(1967) 13).
DESCHUYTER, M . , HOSTE. J . . Radiochim. Acta 7 (1967) 198.
DESCHUYTER, M., MASART, D . L . , SPEECKE, A . , HOSTE, J . , Radiochim. Acta 3^0 (1968) 11.
DURHAM, R.W., NAVALKAR, M . P . , RICCI, E . , Rep. AECL-1434 (1962).
FABRY, A . , Nukleonik 10 (1967) 280.
FABRY, A . , Proc. Russian-Dutch-Belgian Meeting on Fast Reactor Physics, Melekess(1970) paper 35.
FABRY, A . , DE COSTER, M., MINSART, G . , SCHEPERS, J. C . , VANDEPLAS, P . , Nuclear Data for
Reactors (Proc. Conf. Helsinki, 1970) 2 , IAEA, Vienna (1970) 535.
FABRY, A., Rep. BLG-465 (1972).
FELBER, F . F . , .t., FARMELO, D.R., VAN SICKLE, V . C . , Nucl. Sci. Eng. 25(1966) 1.
FAEHRMANN, K . , Unpublished work quoted in Rep. ZFK-RN 23 (1964) 6.
FREEMAN, N . J . , BARRY, J . F . , CAMPBELL, N . L . , J. Nucl. Energy 23 (1969) 713.
FRANCOIS, J . P . , DE SOETE, D . , HOSTE, J . , Radiochim. Acta 8(1967) 192.

308
GN68
GI66
GO62
GR67
GR68
GV72
HA72
HE58
HG66
HG71
HO62
HP69
HU53
HW70
JO68
JA64
KI69
KI71
KO65
KO66/1
KO66/2
KO67
KR65
KU65
LA65
LE63
LL65
LW66
LW68
MA64/1
MA64/2
MA64/3
MA64/4
MC72
ME58
ME60
MU61
NI63
NI64
NI65/1
NI65/2
NJ70
NL63
NS68
OB67
OB69
PA61
PH58
PL73
PO73
QA71
RA67/1
RA67/2
RB59

CALAMAND
GREEN, L., Nucl. Sci. Eng. 32(1968) 30.
GILLETTE, J. H., Rep. ORNL-4013 (1966) 7.
GOPINATHAN, K . P . , Proc. Indian Acad. Sci. Sect. A 56 3(1962) 141.
GRUNDL, J.A., Nucl. Sci. Eng. 30(1967) 39.
GRUNDL, J.A., Nucl. Sci. Eng. 31(1968) 191.
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HANSEN, J.R., STEINNES, E., Radiochlm. Acta 17(1972) 46.
HENDERSON, W.J., TUNNICLIFFE, P.R., Nucl. Sci. Eng. 3 (1958) 145.
HEGEDUS, F . , Helv. Phys. Acta 9 (1966) 179.
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Los Angeles, 1962), American Society for Testing and Materials (1963) 133.
HUPF, H.B., Rep. TID-24823 (1969) 46, 52.
HUGHES, D.J., Pile Neutron Research, Chapter 4, Addison-Wesley, Cambridge, Mass. (1953).
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JANTSCH, K., unpublished, quoted in Rep. ZFK-RN 23 (1964) 6.
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KOEHLER, W., Nukleonik (1966) 9.
KOEHLER, W., Nukleonik 8 (1966) 59.
KOEHLER, W., Nukleonik ^0 (1967) 181.
KRAMER, H.H., WAHL, W.H., Nucl. Sci. Eng. 22(1965) 373.
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LEONHARDT, W., Kernenergie 6 (1963) 45.
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LEWIS, R.E., BUTLER, T.A., Nucl. Applies 2 (1966) 102.
LEWIS, R.E., Rep. TID-24823 (1968) 49.
MARTIN, W.H., CLARE, D. M., Nucl. Sci. Eng. ^8(1964) 468.
CLARE, D . M . , MARTIN, W. H., KELLY, B. T . , Nucl. Sci. Eng. U*(1964) 448.
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MELLISH, C.E., Rep. AERE-R3251 (I960); see also Nucleonics 19 3, (1961) 114.
MUENZE, R., JANTSCH, K., HLADIK, O., Kernenergie 4 (1961) 293.
NIESE, S., MORZEK, P., HEROLD, C . , Kernenergie 6 (1963) 37.
NIESE, S., Kernenergie 7 (1964) 105.
NIESE, S., Kernenergie 8 (1965) 499.
NIESE, S., Rep. ZFK-Rch 3 (1965) 23.
NAJZER, M., RANT. J., SOLING, H., Nuclear Data for Reactors (Proc. Conf. Helsinki, 1970)2,
IAEA, Vienna (1970) 571.
NILSSON, R., Neutron Dosimetry (Proc. Symp. Harwell, 1962)2, IAEA, Vienna (1963) 275.
NASYROV, F . , At. Ehnerg. 25 (1968) 437 (Engl. transl.: Sov. J. At. Energy 25 (1968) 1251).
O'BRIEN, H.A., Jr., ELDRIDGE, J . S . . Nucleonics 25 2 (1967) 4 1 .
O'BRIEN, H.A., Jr., Int. J. Appl. Radiat. Isot. 20(1969) 121.
PASSEL, T . O . , HEATH, R.L., Nucl. Sci. Eng. HK1961) 308.
PHILLIPS, J.A., J. Nucl. Energy 7 (1958) 215.
PEARLSTEIN, S., J. Nucl. Energy 27 (1973) 81.
POPE, A.L., STORY, J . S . , Rep. AEEW-M 1191 (1973).
QAIM, S.M., WOLFLE, R., STOCKLIN, G., Chemical Nuclear Data, Measurements and Applications
(Proc. Conf. Canterbury, 1971), Inst. of Civil Engineers, London (1971) 121.
RAU, G., Nukleonik 9 (1967) 228.
RAU, G., Rep. EANDC (E) 89 (1967) 4 1 .
ROBINSON, B. L., FINK, R. W., private communication, quoted by ROCHLIN, R. S., in Nucleonics 17
1(1959) 54, Ref. 14.
~~

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS


RC59
RE67
RG68/1
RG68/2
RG72
RI57
RN66
RO60
RO64
RR60
RV57
RY58
SA59
SC57
SC69
ST67
ST70
VC64
WA62
WA63
WE70
WT52
ZH63
ZJ63

309

ROCHLIN, R. S., Nucleonics 17 1 (1959) 54.


REDDY, G. R., SANKAR DAs7~M., Rep. BARC-280 (1967).
REGGE, P. de, DAMS, R., HOSTE, J., Radiochim. Acta9(1968) 57.
REGGE, P. de, DAMS, R., HOSTE, J., Radiochim. Acta H> (1968) 156.
REGGE, P. de, DAMS, R., HOSTE, J., Radiochim. Acta 7(1972) 69.
RICHMOND, R., quoted by ROCHLIN, R. S., in Nucleonics 17 1(1959) 54, Ref. 12.
REYNOLDS, S. A., Rep.ORNL-3889 (1966) 5 3 .
ROY, J . C . , HAWTON, J. J., Rep. CRC-1003 (1960).
ROY, J . C . , DURHAM, R. W., FOWLER, A.G., HAWTON, J.J., Rep. CRC-1101 (1964).
RICABARRA, D . , TURJANSKI, R., ATEN, A.H.W., Jr., J. Nucl. Energy, Part A: Reactor Science 12
(1960) 177.
RIVIER, J., BLACHOT, J., HOCQUENGHEM, J . C . , Radiochim. Acta 8 (1967) 196.
ROYS, P.A., KALMAN SHURE, Nucl. Sci. Eng. 4(1958) 536.
SAELAND, E., SAMSAHL, K., quoted by ROCHLIN, R. S., in Nucleonics 17 1 (1959) 54, Ref. 7.
SCHUMAN, R. I'., MEWHERTER, A. C., Rep. KAPL-1779 (1957).
~~
SCHUMAN, R. P., OESTREICH, D.K., unpublished (1969).
STEINNES, E., Rep. KR-123 (1967).
STEINNES, E., Radiochim. Acta 13 (1970) 169.
VOGT, E.W., CROSS, W.G., quoted by ROY, J . C . , in Rep. CRC-1101 (1964).
WAGNER, K., Kernenergie 10/11 (1962) 790.
WAGNER, K., I'OSER, H., Kernenergie 6 (1963) 177.
WEITMAN, J., DAVERHOG, N., FARVOLDEN, S., Trans. Am. Nucl. Soc. 13(1970) 558.
WATT, B.E., Fhys. Rev. 87(1952) 1037.
ZHEZHERUN, I. F . , SADIKOV, I. P., TARABAN'KO, V.A., CHERNYSHOV, A. A., At. Ehnerg. 15 6
(1963) 485(Engl. tiansl.: Sov. J. At. Energy 15 (1963) 1271).
ZIJP, W.L., Neutron Dosimetry (Proc. Symp. Harwell, 1962) 1, IAEA, Vienna (1963) 589.

TABLE VI. ESTIMATED AVERAGE CROSS-SECTIONS FOR (n, p), (n, a) AND (n, 2n) REACTIONS IN A FISSION
NEUTRON SPECTRUM

z
3

Element
Li

Be

(a, a) reactions

( n , p) r e a c t i o n s

Samples
Mass

ET
(MeV)

Eeff
(MeV)

3.18

3.8

11.91

12.5

o
(mb)
39.

Ao/o
(%)
+ 35, -25

< 0.0001

ET
(MeV)

o
(mb)

-4.78

6.41

2.1

6.13

8.29

0.37

14.26

15.1

< 0.0001

0.67

2.1

10

24.15

24.9

< 0.0001

8.64

10.3

10

-0.23

0.7

-2.79

-0.8

11

11.70

12.6

< 0.0001

7.24

12

13.64

14.7

< 0.0001

13

13.63

14.8

< 0.0001

14

-0.63

0.7

15

9.59

11.0

0.001

16

10.24

11.8

Ao/o

(mb)

(ft)

33.

+80, -45

1.85
7.49

1.0

9.28

0.18

9.2

0.15

12.50

0.008

6.18

8.6

0.37

20.28

< 0.0001

4.13

6.5

3.3

5.33

0.17

3.1

25.0

11.31

0.030

+150, -60

8.13

11.1

0.012

11.56

0.024

0.0005

+150, -60

2.35

5.7

6.0

16.65

0.0002

+150, -60

-1.82

1.6

5.29

8.7

0.42
8.0

8.36

9.9

0.0006

18

14.01

lls

< 0.0001

4.39

19

4.25

5.9

0.23

+150, -60

1.60

5.4

10

Ne

20

6.56

8.5

0.078

+100, -50

0.62

4.8

12,
26.

21

5.14

7.0

0.049

+150, -60

-0.70

3.5

22

10.53

12.4

0.0003

+150, -60

5.97

10.2

0.056

10.

31.

8.49

0.56

10.98

0.050

17.71

0.0001

7.08
10.84

Ao/o*
Cjfc)
+70, -40

250.

0.029

17

I1

( n , 2n) r e a c t i o n s
ET
(MeV)

Eeff
(MeV)

00

2.5
0.064

+70, -40

z
a

311

CO

CM
CM

CO
CO
t-

CM

po

o
o

p-

co

17

LO

Oi

o
o

00

CD

CO
CO

CD

CO

Oi

m
c-

p-

t-

<N

OO

rH

LO

CM

o
o

LO
CN

Oi

r-i
o

Co"

ai

CO
CD

rH

LO

CM

CO

00

CM

CO

CO

O3

CO

rH
CO

,
'

P-

Oi

'

C-

CO

'

rH

+80 -45

13.

Oi

o
o

00

CO
CO

15

O
O
O

11.

00

15

o
o

17

+70, -40

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

r-

CO

o
o

rH
i~t

CO
i-H

SI

CO

19

14

Oi

OS

rt

^D

10

Oi

Oi
CO

CD

CM

Oi
CM

oo

rt

CN

LO

CO

p-

CO

CM

o
1

CD

CO

o
CO

o
o

CO
1

CO

Oi
CO

o
CO

CM

CO

CM

CO

S3

rH

CN

CM

CO

LO

CD
CO

c-

CM

CM

rH

CO

O
CO

lO

o
o

Oi
O

CN

o
o

O
CD

LO
CN

In

in
CO

f-i

CO

o
o

CO

in

in

Oi

in

CO

CO

<N

S3

o
o

CO

CO

CO

rH

rH
O
o

CO

m
CD

S3
CO

iH

CO

CO

s
o

CO
i-H

(?)

S3

CD
CO

in

,_,

rH

CD

CO

in
r-t

CO

CO
CM

CO
OO

oo

CO

o
CN

rH

o
oo

10

CO
CO

CO

f1

CO

CM

100

Oi

11

CO
1

C00

CO
CM

oo
00

320

CO

CO

10

58

c-

10

CO

oo

10

CO

CO

CM

lO

CN

tN

CM

c-

CO

p-

CO

i-H

oo

OS
CO

g3

cn

CO

CN

o
1

CO

CO
CO

CO
CO

DO

ffl
<

a.

(/I

CD
H

00

en

CM

TABLE VI (cont.)
Samples
Z

Element

( n . P ) reactions
Mass

ET
(MeV)

Eeff
(MeV)

o~
(mb)

(n, a) r e a c t i o n s
Ao/o
(1)

1.75

5.2

40

0.54

4.2

42

2.80

6.5

43

1.06

4.7

44

4.99

8.6

46

7.08

48

13.22
-0.53

3.2

22.

+150, -60

12.
11.

19

41

20

Ca

1.1
77.
2.6

ET
(MeV)

+150, -60

0.11

reactions

~o
(mb)

Eeff
(MeV)

o
(mb)

Ao/o
(7o)

ET
(MeV)

7.8

2.6

+80, -45

10.34

0.16

+ 35, -25

-1.75

6.3

7.8

16.02

0.0006

+ 60, -40

-0.35

7.8

2.7

11.75

0.040

+150, -60

-2.29

5.9

0.11

+100, -50

2.81

10.9

10.7

0.005

+150, -60

6.05

16.8

< 0.0001

8.81

2.3

( n . 2n)

8.12

10.

11.39

0.059

14.2

0.0003

10.63

0.13

16.9

< 0.0001

10.16

0.21

0.40

8.8

0.67

11.57

0.050

+ 60, -40

0.08

8.9

0.59

13.48

0.008

+150, -60

-2.18

6.6

7.3

9.06

0.61
0.039

21

Sc

45

22

Ti

46

1.62

5.5

47

-0.18

3.7

48

3.27

7.2

0.98

+100, -50

2.07

10.9

0.035

11.87

49

1.25

5.1

1.4

+150, -60

-0.23

9.0

0.53

8.31

50

6.23

10.1

0.013

+150, -60

3.51

12.3

0.005

11.17

0.079

50

-3.00

1.0

-0.76

8.3

23

24

Cr

0.60

1.71

5.7

50

0.26

4.5

52

3.26

7.5

0.66

53

2.69

6.8

0.12

51

57.

1.3

9.52

0.40

11.2

0.024

11.27

0.073

1.5

+150, -60

2.10

+ 35, -25

-0.32

9.1

0.47

13.20

0.011

+100, -50

1.23

10.6

0.057

12.27

0.028

+150, -60

-1.80

7.6

4.1

8.09

+70, -40

1.5

0.033

+80, -45

A3/o
(<7o)

1.7

>
z
a

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

313

rH
O

to

'V c~
c-

CN

CO

to

10

rH

as
c-

CO
rH

CN

OS
rH

as
m

CO
CO

i-H

CO
<N

in

rH

CO

CD

as

rH

tr-

CD

CO

o
o

o
m

CN
CN

CO

tN

CO
O

|
|

m '
as

CN

i-H

i-4

CO

as

CO

CO
CO

CN

CO

CO

'

CO

CO

*"

rH

t-

CO

GO

CN

Ii

0, -45

OS

13.

CO
OS

CN
CN

10

091

CN

040

>

10

CO
to
O

060

CO
rH

026

OS
CN

007

+70,

11.

co

CO
CO

CN

CO

CO

rH

as

C-

<N

CN

CO

as

CO

CO

as
as

CN

as
o
m

IN

a,

as

to

in

e-

r-i

CO

o
rH

o
o>

I-l

CD

as

tCN

rH

CO

.10

CD
rH

.55

10.

rH

.00

11

OS

.63

as
CO

(N

.01

CO

o
CO

CO

CN

O
to

CO

CO
1

CO

CO

to

o
1

m
CO

o
o

CO

rH

rH

1
'

CO

CO

o
o

1|
O

rH

CO

o
CO

m
o

<N

i-l

70.

o
o

CD

C>

s
o

CO

CO

t"

CO

a>

rH

s
CO
in

s s

S;

CO

CO

CO

CD

r-l

rH

CM

CO

CO

CO

s
o

to

CN

CN
to

41

CO

CN

rH

as
<N

CO

CN

CN

to

r-i

CO

as

c-

rH

CO
CO

CO

CO
in

rH
in

CN

to

<N
t-

to

CN

c-

CO

<N

CN

CO

CO
CO

CO

as

CO

rH

'

CO

rH
C4

CO
CO

rH
CN

rH

rH

CO

CO

CO

s s

to

CO
CO

o
t-

1
1

CO

s
|

s s; 5 s

o
U

CN

CO
CN

Cu

as

CO
CO

cn

PQ

"*
CN

CN

CN

TABLE VI (cont.)
Samples

z
31

32

Element
Ga

Ge

( n . a ) reactions

( n , p) reactions
Mass

ET
(MeV)

Eeff
(MeV)

"a
(mb)

Ao/o

ET
(MeV)

+150, -60

-2.58

9.0
10.4

Eeff
(MeV)

o
(mb)

o
(mb)

Ao/a
(%)

ET
(MeV)

+80, -45

10.46

0.20

9.43

0.56

69

0.13

5.2

71

2.05

7.2

0.083

+150, -60

-0.93

70

0.88

6.1

6.5

+ 60, -40

-2.96

8.7

1.0

11.70

0.059

72

3.26

8.5

0.18

+100, -50

-1.48

10.2

0.12

10.90

0.13

+150, -60

1.5

0.67

( n . 2n) r e a c t i o n s

0.092

73

0.78

6.0

0.49

-3.91

7.7

74

4.78

10.0

0.020

0.45

12.1

0.008

10.34

0.23

76

6.72

11.9

0.001

2.4

14.0

0.0006

9.57

0.51

-1.20

10.7

0.0063

10.38

0.23

0.46

12.23

0.036

0.084

11.31

0.091

4.4

6.88

As

75

0.41

5.8

0.67

34

Se

74

0.58

6.0

7.9

+ 60, -40

-3.34

9.3

76

2.21

7.7

0.63

+100, -50

-1.69

10.5

77

-0.10

5.3

1.4

+150, -60

-4.47

7.7

78

3.53

9.0

0.092

+150, -60

-0.46

11.8

0.013

10.63

0.18

80

5.29

10.7

0.007

+150, -60

0.96

13.0

0.002

10.02

0.34

82

7.17

12.6

+150, -60

2.58

14.7

0.0002

9.39

0.64

79

-0.64

5.0

2.3

+150, -60

-1.86

10.6

0.075

10.83

0.15

81

0.81

6.4

0.29

+150, -60

-0.43

12.0

0.010

10.29

0.26

78

-0.09

5.6

+ 60, -40

-3.67

9.0

0.72

12.13

0.041

80

1.24

6.9

+ 60 -40

-2.35

10.4

0.10

11.67

0.066

35

36

Br

Kr

0.0004

15.
2.2

7.51

+70, -40

7.0

33

4.6

Aa/o
(%)

3.9

I
a

315

076

048

rH

CO

CO

l-l

i-H

ca

CO

rH

CO

e'en

CD

CO

CO

CO

rH
rH

OO
CM

c-

CO

CO

CO

r-\

ca

a>

CO

t-

CO

*1

00

CM
CO

CO
00

CO

CO

c-

5 1

CO

c-

CM

cn

c-

*
CO

1
|

CO

'

CO

CO

CO

T1

0. -45

*"

C*

10.

in

12

10.

tree

10

i-j

CO

11.

en
CO

023

1-1

CO

042

073

+70, -40

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

CO

a>

CO

CTJ

CO

CO

CM

CM

CD

<-

CM

ca

CO

CM

<N

CM

<?

CD

CO

rH
O

CO

ca

o
o
o

l-l

CO

+ 60,

CO

+150,

in

+100,

+150,

CO

s
o

rH

OO

CO
CO

CO

CM

CO
CO

2
CO
CO

CO

CO

CO

t-

Oi

CD

e-

CO

CO

CO

CO
00

8 S

CO

rH

US

CO

rH

ss s s s

CO

CO

CTi

00

rH

CO

CO

CO

DO

rH

CO

in

CD
CD

=0

CM
iC

CO

in
i

CO

CO
I

CO

rH

rH
C-

g 8
O

in

CO

tr-

CO

co

OO
OO

S3

CO

>*

CO

in
OJ
rH

t-

&

c-

CO

rH

rH
OJ

CO

to

in

o
CO

00

rH

rH

c-

CD

CO

00
OJ

CO

CO

Oi

i-l

rH

rH

CM

r-1

iO

CO

CD

CM

ca

o
o
o
o

o
o

e-

CO

+150

rH

rH

CO

.24

CO

o
o

+ 60

CD
O

00

+100

CO

+150

+100,

+150,

CD
CO

+150

CM

a
o

2
CM

35

TABLE VI (cont. )
Samples

z
42

43

44

Element
Mo

Tc

Ru

45

Rh

46

Pd

Mass

ET
(MeV)

96

2.43

Eeff
(MeV)

a
(mb)

( n , 2n) r e a c t i o n s

(n, a) reactions

( n , p) r e a c t i o n s
Ad/a
(%)

ET
(MeV)

E
eff
(MeV)

o
(mb)

0.84

6.89

8.4

0.037

8.73

1.4

-5.37

9.0
11.2

+100, -50

-3.99

0.057

+150, -60

a
(mb)
0.81

0.11

0.12

ET
(MeV)
9.25

10.4

8.9

Aa/o
(<?)
+80, -45

97

1.16

7.6

98

3.86

10.3

0.015

-3.20

100

5.27

11.7

0.002

-2.39

12.0

0.012

8.38

2.0

97

-1.13

5.4

1.4

-4.81

9.9

0.23

9.51

0.63

98

-2.37

4.1

+ 35, -25

-5.91

8.8

1.1

7.47

4.8

99

0.60

7.2

0.10

+150, -60

-3.92

10.8

0.065

8.97

1.1

96

-0.57

6.1

8.1

+ 60, -40

-6.38

8.5

1.7

10.81

0.17

98

0.93

7.6

0.87

+100, -50

-5.14

9.8

0.27

10.35

99

-0.49

6.2

0.45

+150, -60

-6.82

8.1

3.1

7.54

4.5

100

2.62

9.3

0.069

-3.97

10.9

0.057

9.77

0.50

101

0.86

7.5

0. 067

-5.80

9.1

0.75

6.87

8.8

102

3.76

10.5

0.012

-2.50

12.4

0.007

9.31

0.80

104

4.56

11.2

0.004

-1.06

13.8

0.0009

9.00

1.1

103

-0.02

6.7

0.22

-3.48

11.8

0.016

9.40

0.74

160.

0.28

102

0.37

7.2

1.6

+100, -50

-5.34

10.1

0.18

10.69

0.20

104

1.70

8.6

0.20

+100, -50

-4.19

11.3

0.033

10.12

0.36

105

-0.22

6.7

0.22

+15C -60

-6.33

9.1

0.77

7.14

6.9

Aa/a
(%)
+70, -40

>
z
o

317

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

+70,

Oi

iD

00

r-

CN

a,

CO

o
o
o

CO

as
00

o>

CO

as

o
o

S3 g

o
o

o
o

CO

CO

CM

r-4

CN

CO

i-l
CO

CD

s
iD

CD

CO

GO

CO

OJ

t>

1-t

CD

o
o
o

uO

CO

I-l

CD

Oi

00

CD

iD
O

CO

CO

CO

Oi

O
CO

1
'

CO

c-

.41

12.

ID

CO

12.

CO

xD
O

OS

oo

CO

CO

tf

ID

CD

o
CD

00
CD

CO
CO

CD

CN

CO

ID

CM

CO

CN

Oi

CD
t-

00
CO

CO
CO

CO

CM

c-

CO

CD

CD

tN

CO

Oi

t-

10.

r-l
t-l

CO

e-

CO
CO

iD
C-

CO

oo

a.

ID

<N

CO

CO

Oi

g g

CO

ID

CO

111

ci

CN

CO

free

OS

CD

(N

fr-

00

en

CO

oa
T

iD

CD

c:

E-

00

CM

CD
O

CtM

'

CN
1

CO

CO

00

CO

CO

Oi

CO

OS

CO

tM

&

CD

fr-

o
CO

.-(

m
CD

c1-1

r-l

CO

s s

CO

t-l

110

108

IO
o

106

109

107

106

El

O
1

CO

110

108

CO
t-

CN

107

r-

CO

113

o
o

114

00

CO

112

s
s
o
o

00

rj-

iH

ID

o
CO

'

'

CM
CO

05T+

+150

o>

o
ID

10

CM

ID

CO

118

CO

s
o

117

116

CM

s !

CN
ID

115

"?

CN

+100

1-t

+100

CO

CO

o
o

112

c~

CO

rf

i-i

115

o
o

<*

o
o
o

+150

CO

+100

CO

-1

o
tN

CTi
i-l

TABLE VI (cont. )
Samples
Z
50

51

52

Element
Sn

Sb

Te

( n , p)

o
(mb)

Ao/o

8.9

0.009

+150, -60

4.86

12.2

0.001

5.97

13.3

0. 0002

0.08

124

6.67

14.0

0.0001

1.98

Mass

ET
(MeV)

Eeff
(MeV)

119

1.58

120
122

121

-0.40

7.0

0.16

123

0.63

8.1

0.032

120

0.21

7.7

122

1.21

8.8

54

Xe

ET
(MeV)

E
eff
(MeV)

( n , 2n)

reactions
a

(mb)

Ao/6"

C5t>)

ET
(MeV)

reactions
a
(mb)
14.

0.015

+80, -45

6.54

15.6

0.0001

+80, -45

9.18

16.5

< 0. 0001

8.88

1.4

18.5

< 0.0001

8.56

1.9

9.32

0.89

9.04

1.2

-4.30

11.9

-0.96

-3.51

14.5

0.0004

-1.92

14.8

0. 0003

0.86

+100, -50

-6.64

10.4

0.13

0.17

+100, -50

-5.40

11.6

0.024

+80, -45

10.37

0.52
8.9

6.7

0.25

-7.58

9.4

0.56

6.99

9.7

0.044

-4.34

12.6

0.006

9.50

125

-0.02

7.5

0.078

-6.56

10.4

0.13

6.64

126

2.97

10.5

0.013

-3.39

13.6

0.001

9.18

128

3.53

11.0

0.006

-2.55

14.5

0.0004

8.84

1.5

130

4.25

11.8

0.002

-1.81

15.1

0. 0002

8.48

2.1

127

-0.09

7.6

0.068

-4.28

13.0

0.003

9.21

1.0

129

0.72

8.4

0.021

-3.47

13.8

0.001

8.91

1.4

124

-0.69

7.0

2.5

+ 60, -40

-6.79

10.8

0.076

10.31

0.34

126

0.47

8.2

0.42

+100, -50

-5.64

11.8

0.018

10.17

0.39

128

1.35

9.1

0.11

+150, -60

-4.81

12.6

0. 006

9.69

0.64

+150, -60

+70, -40

0.31

9.87

2.13

-0.84

Ao/a
(%)

1.0

124

123

53

(n,a)

reactions

0.76
13.
1.0

319

in

CO
00
OS

CO
o

r-l

OS

t-

OS

CO

CD

CO

tCO

GO

CO

CO

t-

CO

.45

in

c-

OS

13

10

CM

95

CO

.76

CO
CO

66

96

.35

+70, -40

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

o
o

CO

OS

CO

as

o
o
o
o

CM

r-,

s
CO

as

CO

CO

OS

30

CO

C-

CO

o
o

o
o
o

CO

CO

CO

f-t

f-

t
CO

c-

O)
I-l

CO

<N

CM

CO

CO

co

CM
tr~

-45

CO

CO

CM

OS

CO

o
o

o
o

co

CO

o
o

o
o
o

OS

CO

CM

CO

in

CO
CO

CO
CO

CD
C-

s s

CO

CO

CO
1

CO

in

CM
O
O

o
o

CD
O

OS

CO

t-

CO
CO

cO
CO

co

CO

89

CO

10

l-t

CD

CD

OS

'

CO

00
CO

as

CM

CO

CO

CO

SST

137

130

132

m
m

CO

CO

in

CM

OJ

s a

iH

CO

cco

00
OS

CO

OS

OS

CO

OS
CO

CO

CO

136

138

137

B
O
1

138

CO
OS

fr-

CO

CO

OS
l-t

CO

OS

a
s

<N

135

00

00

134

130

129

005

002

as

C4

CD

142

CO

Irt
o

m
r-t
iH

140

14

OS

CO
00

138

w
c-

136

004

CM

(N
o

139

CO

I-l

r-l

0005

o
GO

c-

00

022

o
o

g
o

040

095

025

084

081

133

0001

134

136

012

132

900

131

038

o
o

15

>

CO
CO

00

82

o
o

CO

TABLE VI (cont.)
(n p) r e a c t i o n s

Sa mpl es
Z

Element

Mass

ET
(MeV)

E
eff
(MeV)

o
(mb)

(n 2n) r e a c t i o n s

( n , a) r e a c t i o n s
Aa/o
(%)

a
(mb)

Ao/o
(%)

-6.15

12.5

0.007

+80, -45

ET
(MeV)

AO/CT"

(mb)

(7.)

9.46

0.86

59

Pr

141

-0.20

8.1

0. 035

60

Nd

142

1.39

9.8

0.042

-6.64

12.3

0.010

9.88

143

0.15

8.6

0.017

-9.72

9.3

0.71

6.17

144

2.23

10.6

0.013

-7.33

11.6

0.027

7.87

145

1.03

9.4

0.005

-8.73

10.2

0.20

5.80

146

3.32

11.7

0.002

-6.34

12.7

0.006

7.62

5.4

148

4.15

12.5

0.0008

-5.37

13.5

0.002

7.37

6.9

150

4.25

12.7

0.0006

-4.21

14.7

0.0003

7.41

6.7

62

63

64

Sm

En

Gd

+150, -60

Eeff
(MeV)

ET
(MeV)

144

-0.22

8.3

0.39

+100, -50

-7.92

11.5

0.031

147

-0.56

7.9

0.048

+150, -60

-10.11

9.4

0.63

10.63
6.42

148

1.69

10.2

0.023

-7.73

11.7

0.024

8.20

+70, -40

0.57
22.
4.2
32.

0.27
18.
3.1

149

0.29

8.8

0.013

-9.43

10.2

0.20

5.91

150

2.74

11.3

0.005

-6.74

12.8

0.005

8.04

3.6

152

2.64

11.2

0.005

-5.28

14.1

0. 0008

8.32

2.8

154

3.24

11.7

0.003

-4.10

15.4

0.0001

8.03

3.7

151

-0.71

7.9

0.049

-7.87

11.8

0.021

8.03

3.7

153

0.02

8.7

0.015

-5.83

13.8

0.001

8.61

2.1

152

1.05

9.7

0.050

-8.07

11.9

0.018

8.65

2.0

154

1.20

9.9

0.038

-6.51

13.4

0. 002

8.71

1.9

29.

321

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

+70,

CO
CO

CO

OS

r-i

rH

t- 1

CO

CD

CN

CO

rH

CO
OS

CD

c--

o
1/3
OS

OS

OS

1/3

CO

CO

CO

CO

CD

CN

OS

CO

OS

00

CO

tr-

<N
CO

CO

- ]

CO

co

c~

tr-

CO

-45

CO

-45

CD

-45

OS

o"

o"
CO

CO

o
o

O
O

o
o
o

rH

CO

o
o

o
O

o
o

O
O
O

o
o

o
o

CD
O
O
O

CO

CD

o
o

CO

CN

CO

CD

o
o

o
o

GO

CO

CO

os

CO

OS

CO

rH

OS

OS

CO

OS

OS

00

CO
rH

CO

1-t

""^

OS

OS

CO

5?

CO

CO

CO

os

CO

CN

rH

CN

CN

166

167

168

170

CO

OS

014

022

CO

CO

rH
rH

002

083

OS

CO

OS

CN

rH

CO

oo

156

CO

5"

I-

i/D
CD

CD
CD

to

CO
CD

156

"T

155

oo

CD

159

CO

CO

CO

CO

CO
CN

t-

CO

164

+10

164

.CD

162

urj

t-

t-

cCO

CO

o>

CO

CD

163

CO

CO

"?

161

CO

CN

lO

+15

CD

"?

CO

CN

039

QO
1/3
O

s s

CN

c-

160

St.

r-i
rH

CO

CO

i/3

158

CO
OS

w3

CO

010

004

CO

160

006

CM
CO

o1

ffl
<!
H

158

021

157

032

6000

CO

CO

CO

r-i

CN

CO

+10

CD
CO

006

CO

CN

12

CN

CO

CN

CO

006

i/3

1/3

c-

CO

+15

i-H

CO

162

c-

CO
CM

004

CO
CN

U3

**

165

CD

CD

003

CO
CO

OS

003

CO

014

eCN

10

CO

016

crH

169

CO

so

to
to

TABLE VI (cont.
Samples

(n, a) r e a c t i o n s

(n, p) r e a c t i o n s
o
(mb)

Ao/o

ET
(MeV)

E
eff
(MeV)

a
(mb)

(n, 2n) r e a c t i o n s
Ao/o

ET
(MeV)

o
(mb)

Element

Mass

ET
(MeV)

70

Yb

168

-0.50

8.9

0.18

+100, -50

-8.60

12.9

0.005

9.11

1.4

170

0.19

9.6

0.063

+150, -60

-8.17

13.3

0.003

8.52

2.4

171

-0.69

8.7

0.016

-9.33

12.2

0.013

6.66

172

1.09

10.5

0.017

-7.31

14.2

0.0007

8.07

173

0.54

10.0

0.002

-8.20

13.3

0.003

6.40

174

2.29

11.7

0.003

-6.41

15.1

0.0002

7.51

176

3.38

12.8

0.0005

-5.58

15.9

0.0001

6.92

175

-0.31

9.2

0.008

-7.87

13.8

0.001

7.70

176

-0.90

8.5

0.33

+100, -50

-8.49

13.2

0.003

6.33

174

-0.58

9.0

0.16

+100, -50

-9.17

12.8

0.005

8.64

176

0.41

10.0

0.036

+150, -60

-8.62

13.4

0.002

8.13

177

-0.29

9.3

0.007

-9.71

12.3

0.011

6.42

178

1.48

11.1

0.007

-7.91

14.1

0.0009

7.67

179

0.57

10.1

0.002

-8.68

13.3

0.003

6.13

180

2.53

12.2

0.001

-6.86

15.2

0.0002

7.43

180

-1.71

8.0

0.72

+100, -50

-9.18

13.0

0.004

6.62

181

0.24

10.0

0.003

+150, -60

-7.41

14.8

0.0003

7.69

5.8

180

0.03

9.8

0.049

13.6

0.002

8.54

2.5

1.03

10.9

0.009

-8.86

182

-7.89

14.9

0.0003

8.10

3.9

71

72

73

74

Lu

Hf

Ta

Eeff
(MeV)

+80, -45

15.
3.8
20.
6.7
12.
5.6
22.
2.2
3.7
20.
5.8
27.
7.4
17.

Aa/o
(%)
+70, -40

323

FISSION NEUTRON AVERAGED CROSS-SECTIONS

+70,

in

CM

CO

CO

ca

Oi

c-

rH

CO

oa

CO
CO

CO

oa

el

CO

ca
m

CO

CO

CO

CO

Ol

CO

CO

Oi

CO

CD

t-

CO

CO

CO

CO

c-

C-

CO

Oi

CO

CO

1-1

CO

o
V

CO

'

r-l

ca

CO

CO

CO

r-

CO

cco

CO

CO

in

CO

rH

Oi

o"

<N

r-i

CO

o
o
o

o
o
o

OJ

CD

o
o
o

o
o

c
o

CO

CO

-I

< *

CO

in

CO

CO

CO

CM

Ol

CO

CO

CO

CO

oa

Oi

in

CO

CO

o
c-

ca
eos

o
o

rH
O

CO
O4

in

CO

Oi

Oi

CO

CD

t-

CO

ca

CD

CO

CO

O5

CO

CD
CO

"?

r>

c-

CD

CO

r>

CO
CO
CO

CD
1

CO

CO

c-

S3

a>

CO

CO

t-t

ca

00

&

in

CO

Oi

CD

CO

oa

rH

CO

CO

ca

CO

t-t

CO
CO

CD

s s

rH

O3

CO

CO

(H

198

196

195

194

192

190

193

189

188

187

186

184

187

185

186

197

CO
CO

ri

CO

ca
(N

002

CO

CO

ca

CO

0001

N
CO

OS

Oi

002

ca

CO

003

<N

010

Oi

CO
rH

CD

rH

032

005

192

190

184

183

191

0003

ca

005

024

006

020

0004

002

002

8000

TOO

TOO

SOO

800

002

+15

CO
1

IH

CO

CD

00

TABLE VI (cont.)

to

Samples

(n

o
(mb)

Element

Mass

ET
(MeV)

Eeff
(MeV)

80

Hg

196

-0.10

10.3

0.024

198

0.59

11.0

199

-0.33

10.0

200

1.43

201

0.72

202

81

82

83

Tl

Pb

Bi

(n, cc) r e a c t i o n s

p) r e a c t i o n s
Ao/c j
i.%
+150, -60

(MeV)

E
eff
(MeV)

o
(mb)

( n . 2n)
Ao/5

reactions

ET
(MeV)

a
(mb)

+80, -45

8.79

2.1

+80, -45

6.68

-8.25

15.0

0.0003

0.009

-7.46

16.3

< 0.0001

0.003

-8.73

15.0

0.0003

11.8

0.003

-6.55

17.3

< 0.0001

8.07

11.1

0.0005

-7.89

15.9

< 0.0001

6.26

2.73

13.1

0.0004

-5.71

18.0

< 0. 0001

7.79

5.6

204

3.74

14.1

0.0001

-4.46

19.2

< 0.0001

7.53

7.3

203

-0.29

10.2

0.002

-7.20

16.8

< 0.0001

7.76

5.8

204

-1.13

9.4

0.096

-7.46

16.2

0.0001

205

0.75

11.2

0.0005

-5.68

18.0

< 0.0001

204

-0.02

10.5

0.019

-8.20

16.1

0.0001

206

0.75

11.3

0.006

-7.14

17.1

< 0.0001

8.12

207

0.65

11.2

0.0005

-7.89

16.4

< 0.0001

6.77

208

4.23

14.8

< 0.0001

-6.19

18.2

< 0.0001

7.40

208

-3.65

7.3

209

-0.14

210

-0.72

8.34

+80, -45

+80, -45

6.69

3.2

4.3
25.

17.
7.0

8.44

3.0

+100, -50

-10.58

14.1

0.001

+80, -45

6.94

10.5

0.001

+150, -60

-9.63

14.9

0. 0003

+80, -45

7.49

9.9

0.046

+150, -60

-11.88

12.6

0.008

+80, -45

4.62

+70, -40

17.

7.58

2.2

Ao/a
(<7o)

4.1
16.
8.5
13.
7.8
130.

o
>

EXCITATION FUNCTIONS FOR


CHARGED-PARTICLE-INDUCED
NUCLEAR REACTIONS IN LIGHT ELEMENTS
AT LOW PROJECTILE ENERGIES
J. LORENZEN, D. BRUNE
Aktiebolaget Atomenergi,
Studsvik, Sweden
ABSTRACT. This ccmpilation of data should be useful in various fields of nuclear applications,
with the emphasis on charged particle activation analysis. Activation analysis of light elements using
charged particles has proved to be an important tool in solving various problems in analytical chemistry,
e.g. those associated with metal surfaces. Scientists desiring to evaluate the distribution of light elements
on the surface of various matrices using charged-particle reactions require accurate data on cross-sections
in the MeV-region. Also, a knowledge of cross-section data and yield functions is of great interest in many
applied investigations involving work with charged particles, such as radiological protection and health
physics, material research, semiconductor material investigations and corrosion chemistry. The authors
therefore decided to collect a limited number of data which find use in these fields. Although the compilation
is far from being complete, it is expected to be of assistance in devising measurements of charged-particle
reactions in Van de Graaff or other low-energy accelerators.

INTRODUCTION
It is well known that nuclear reactions with charged particles are
hindered by the repulsive Coulomb interaction with the nucleus. Thus,
charged-particle reactions with acceptable yields occur only where lowor medium-weight nuclei are involved. Elements heavier than Z > 12
have therefore been omitted from this compilation. The central problem
in activation analysis is the identification of a given nuclide and a quantitative
determination of its concentration in a more or less complex matrix. In
this connection it is necessary to search for special reactions which exclude
competitive processes. This can be done, for example, by using selected
bombarding energies which lead to as few competitive reactions as possible.
Thus, resonances in the excitation function have been used in order to obtain
a dominant yield from the selected nuclide, or coincidence measurements
with reaction products have been made. Consequently, differential crosssections have been included, wherever they were available, as well as
integral curves. Furthermore, the compilation contains various yield
curves.
In some cases the emerging particle is specified with an index i.
This denotes whether the light product is produced in the ground-state (0)
or in the i-th excited state of the product nucleus. The excited states
and the corresponding gamma-ray energies can be obtained for instance in:
Nuclear Data Sheets, National Academy of Sciences, National Research
Council, Washington, D.C. (1962).
Where the values for angular distribution are related to the centre-ofmass system this is denoted by the index c m . for the units of the crosssection in the graphs. Otherwise the graphs show values in the laboratory
system.

325

326

LORENZEN and BRUNE

The authors are of the opinion that a diagram showing the shape of
cross-sections or excitation functions provides a more rapid and useful
source of information than do data from tables. For this reason, only
diagrams of absolute, normalized experimental values have been presented,
even in those instances where tables were provided by the experimentalists.
Unified symbols and units (see below) have been used, and abbreviated
references and comments have been included. The absolute errors as
determined by the experimentalists are shown in the diagrams.
Following the compilation of graphs, a list of references is given
which is arranged in P (number) for proton, D (number) for deuteron,
A (number) for alpha and H (number) for 3He-particle-induced reactions.
In some cases there are several publications concerned with the
same reaction. Where the cross-section was measured in different energy
regions an attempt was made to fit and normalize the different results to
a mean value at the point of intersection. Where identical information was
presented by several authors the choice was restricted to that of the most
recent origin.
In most cases the cross-sections collected for this compilation are
up to 20 MeV. To optimize irradiation conditions, it may be necessary
to know whether the cross-section increases at higher energies or whether
the resonance for the reaction concerned is already exceeded at low bombarding energies. Unfortunately, there are only very few measurements
for reactions induced by charged particles at higher energies. Therefore,
a request was made to H. M'unzel at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe
for permission to publish parts of the systematic study made by him and
his co-worker on experimental cross-sections for charged-particle-induced
reactions at higher energies.1 We received the kind permission to select
from this report the parts of interest. This reduced version is given in
Appendix I.2
(p,-y) reactions exhibit several resonances in the MeV region. These
resonances are of special interest in charged-particle activation analysis.
For calibration purposes and depth distribution studies of light elements
in heavy matrices, these sharp resonances can be used favourably. In most
of the cases the shape of the resonances is not so important as the characteristic data, such as position (resonance energy in keV), resonance width
(FWHM in keV) and height (cross-section in mb). Therefore, a request
was made to J.W. Butler, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington,
D.C., for permission to publish the systematic collection made by him on
(p, 7)-resonances 3 (see Appendix 2).
In Table A2-I. the cross-section given is the total cross-section in
millibarns at the resonance peak. Where more than one primary gamma
ray is emitted, the tabulated cross-section value is the sum of all such
individual primary gamma-ray cross-sections. For those resonances
which are too narrow for such cross-section measurements, the integrated

LANGE, J . , MUNZEL, H . , Estimation of Unknown Excitation Functions for ( a , x n ) - , ( a . p x n ) - ,


(d.pxn)-, and (p.xn)-Reactions, Rep. KFK-767 (1968).
2
A more comprehensive compilation is published in Landolt-Bornstein, New Series 1/5, Vol. a,
Q-Values; Vol.b, Excitation Functions for Charged Particle Induced Nuclear Reactions, Springer Verlag (1913).
5

BUTLER, J . W . , Table of (p. y) Resonances, Rep. NRL-5282 (Apr. 1959).

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

327

cross-section, JadE, has been tabulated where this measurement has been
made. In these instances, the abbreviation "evb" for "electron-volt barn"
has been inserted in the cross-section column.
As far as the gamma energies are concerned, only the most predominant ones have be:n compiled in Table A2-I. A question mark means doubt
about the number.
Finally, Appendix 3 is a Bibliography listing publications containing
various data for charged-particle-induced reactions.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
The authors wish to express their gratitude to the various contributors
to this compilation, especially to Dr. McGowan of the Data Centre at
Oak Ridge, Tennessee.

GRAPHS OF EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

Conventions and symbols


a

total cross-section

a exc

excitation function

-r-r

angular distribution

r (0)

diffusion cross-section for 0

cm.

centre-of-mass system

laboratory angle of measurement in angular distributions

energy in laboratory system

subscripts refer to proton

subscripts refer to deuteron

subscripts refer to helium-3

ail

ait

He

subscripts refer to alpha particle

gr. st.

ground-state

exc.st.

excited state

residual nucleus left in excited state

(p,p')

inelastic proton scattering

dpm

disintegrations per minute

LORENZENand BRUNE

328

PROTON

Reaction
1.
2.
3.

4.

Li(p,n) 7 Be

7
7

Li(p,) 4 He
8

Be(p, 7 ) B

Be(p,a) 6 Li

Cross-section
and angular distribution

Energy range
(MeV)

Page

a (0)

3-13

329

a (90, 120)

0.5 - 2.3

330

1 - 3.5

330

da

6 - 11.5

332

10

Be(p, 7 ) n B

a (0, 90)

0-6

334

6.

10

B(p, 7 ) u C

a (90)

3-17

334

7.

CT

1-14

335

C(p, 7 ) 13 N

0 - 2.2

337

13

C(p,n)13N

a; a (5, 40)

3-14

337

14

N(p,7)15O

a (90)

2-19

339

15

N(p,n)15O

a; a (5, 40)

4-14

340

12.

18

O(p,p')18O*

a (0)

3.2 - 5.4

341

13.

18

O(p,a)15N

a (0)

3.2-5.4

342

19

F(p,a) 16 O

a; -TTT

4-12

342

a (70, 165); - ^

9-12

343

relative yield

0 - 5.6

347

5.

8.
9.
10.
11.

14.

15.

B(p, 7 ) 1 2 C

12

-F(p.a7,^>

' S (9 O)

da

329

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

70

Li I p;n) 7 Be
i

i
-

60

50

40

30

T3lT3

20

10

gr.st.

0.43 MeV exc. s t - ^ " * " " * " ^ .

6
7
E p (MeV)

10

Reaction 1 , Ref. P1

\i(p,n)7Be

15

gr.st.*0.43 MeV exc.st.

A.53 MeV exc. st.

12

E p <MeV)
Reaction 1 , Ref. P1

13

330

LORENZEN and BRUNE

Ep

Lilp,oc)4He

(MeV)

Reaction 2, Ref. P2

2.0

Be(p, Y

' u l n

B
-

1.6 -

1.2

3.

b
0.8

0.4
1
0.5

10

1
1.5

2.0

Ep (MeV)
Reaction 3, Ref. P3

25

3.0

3.5

331

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

Be* p

Be*p

20 40 60 (0 100 120 UO 160 180

20 40 60 go 100 120 UO 160 WO

cm
Ref. P4

Be(p.d 0 ) 8 Be

Be* p

io 3

DlC

I I I i I I I I I I I I I
20 U> 60 90 100 120 UO 160 MO

20

Ref. P4

40

60

80 WO 120 140

LORENZEN and BRUNE

332

5.00

6.00

7.00

8.00

E p (MeV)
Ref. P4

3.0

4.0

5.0

6.0

7.0

8.0

Ep(MeV)
Reaction 4, Ref. P4

9.0

Be(p,a) 6 Li

10.0

11.0

12.0

333

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

9
9

Be(p.a 0 ) 6 Li

4-0

E p

Belp,a 0 ) 6 Li
i

.10 MeV

2.0
1.0 0.5 4.0

= 10.5 MeV

.-:

in

-Lu

2.0
1.0 -

"I

0.5 4.0
OICS

E P .11 MeV

2.0
1.0

05

4.0
2.0

Ep 11.5MeV

-;

1.0 0.5 i
30

Reaction 4, Ref. P4

Be(p.a,)6Li*(2.18)
I

30

60

90

120

cm.

Reaction 4, Ref. P4

i
150 180

l
60

l
90

t
120

150 180

334

LORENZEN and BRUNE

b|CS

5 -

Ep (MeV)

Reaction 5, Ref. P5

10

Reaction 6, Ref. P6

11

12

13

15

16 17

335

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

>

100

50

/Nw'T

1
10

i
12

(MeV)

Reaction 7, Ref. P7

a.
b

10

Ep(MeV)
Reaction 7, Ref. P7

12

336

LORENZEN and BRUNE

6.0

8.0

10.0

12.0

U.O

E p (MeV)

Reaction 7, Ref. P7

B(P,V,:
15

'

e = 90
10

Sig

1^

<*

Jk

V*\

40

6.0

i
&D

1
W.O

E D (MeV)
Reaction 7, Ref. P7

120

V..0

337

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

12

I ' I I \ 1 '

200-

C(p,Y) 13 N

I I ' ' I ' I I I

E R =0.456 MeV
= 35keV

1008060-

E R =1.698 MeV
r

= 70 keV

40_

20-

J3

a.

10 r
6-

0.2

0.4

0.6

0.8

1.0

1.2

1.4

1.6

1.8

2.0

Ep(MeV)

Reaction 8, Ref. P8

13
i

240

220

200

180

120

80

'

C(p,n)13Ngrst.

>

>

UO

100

TI

160

?\ TA

' 71

V\

60

THRESHOLD /

40 20

1
i

10

Ep(MeV)
Reaction 9, Ref. P9

12

14

2.2

LORENZEN and BRUNE

338

13
1

C(p,n)l3N
i

60 50 -

e5

40 --

30

b|CS
|CS
oro
20 -

10 ~-

ENERGY , , _ .
SPREAD *
THRESHOLD
i
i
i

A
%

10

11

12

13

Ep (MeV)
Reaction 9, Ref. P9

13

C(p,n)13N

30 -

6.40
-

20

10

THRESHOLD

10

Ep(MeV)
Reaction 9, Ref. P9

11

12

13

339

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

(JS/qH)

UP
5

HE
OP

LORENZEN a n d BRUNE

340

15

N(p,n) 15 O

30

-~

20

S
b|C
cm

10
ENERGY
. SPREAD *~~l
THRESHOLD

10 11

12

13

14

E D IMeV)
Reaction 1 1 , Ref. P9

15

240

nI

220

J1AL
l!
f yi

200
180
160

2 UO
. 120
b
100
80
60
40
20

N(p,n) 15 Ogrst.

THRESHOLD

1
8

Ep (MeV)
Reaction 1 1 , Ref. P9

10

12

14

15

341

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

15

30

N(p,n) 15 O

20

ol-o
10

V
THRESHOLD
3

1, ,
i

10

11

12

13

14

E p (MeV)

Reaction 1 1 , Ref. P9

l8

3i

),4

3.6

3.8

1.0

4.2

4.4

Reaction 12, Ref. P11

1.6

4.8

S.0

5.2

O(p, p' )O*

5.4

5.6

342

LORENZEN and BRUNE


19

3.2

3.4

3.6

38

4.0

4.2

4.4

4.6

4.8

5.0

O(p.al2)15N*

5.2

5.4

5.6

E p (MeV)
Reaction 13, Ref.P12
t8

O(p.<t 3 )' 5 N*
1
1

16.0 ID

I
o

12 0 -

4.0 0

\\

/ ^ 1/-

80 -

o
T3I-D

,
1
3.2

1
3.4

nfl

A / T ^ V*^
3.6

3.8

4.0

V |
4.2

V|^|
4.4

4.6

4.8

Ep(MeV)
Reaction 13, Ref. P12

10

Ep (MeV)
Reaction 14, Ref. P12

11

12

5.0

5.2

5.4

5.6

343

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

2.0

1.8
1.6
1.4

1.0

EXCITED . - , ,
STATE GROUPS__; 1 I

165 lab. -

ji

12

0.4

hi

>

i'.i

'n / v i \

0.2

9.0

10.0
11.0
E p (MeV)

ij

e m

n
v ^ fI
s^ 7 i

J
70 lob.'

\ - M

1.5

.o
E

0.8
0.6

2.0 . 1 4 2

3 r d ! 4th EXCITED
STATE GROUPS
\*

Nt

>

A-

12.0

1Q0

GROUND-STATE GR6TJP~>^

105

11.0

11.5

12.0

Ep (MeV)
Reaction 14, Ref. P12

19

V v '^

0.5 .

Reaction 14, Ref. P 12

F(p,o o ) 1< b

E p 5.000 MeV

0.7 -

A,
0.6 -

as -

0.4

\ II *

E
a

03

0.2 --

ai -

i
20

i
i
i
i
i
I
I
40 60 8(1 100 120 140 160 180

e,'cm.
Reaction 14, Ref. PI 2

20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180

8 cm.
Reaction 14, Ref. P12

344

LORENZEN and BRUNE

19

F(P,. O ' 6 O

1.2 -

20

Reaction 14, Ref. P12

19

40 60

80

100 120 U 0 160 180

Reaction 14, Ref. P12

F(p, o ) 16 0
1

3.0 -

,5

f:

.a

20 -

b i.o

o.s -

20

(0

60

80 100 120 U0 160 B0

Ep.6.S00MeV

\^
1
20

40

60

l"*l

80 100 120 140 160 180

c.m.

Reaction 14, Ref. P12

Reaction 14, Ref. P12

345

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS


19_,

.16-

F(p,l0) 0

Ep

> 7.400 MeV

1.4

1.2

_.

10

l"

1.

A.

:vl\

0.4

\ /

02

20

40

60

80

100 120 140 160 180

20

40

60

80

120 140 160 180

cm.
Reaction 14, Ref. PI 2

Reaction 14, Ref. P12

0.9 -

= 8.500 MeV
0.8

0.7

0.6 -

I "-

I
- ^\

0.4

Cj
D

"5 0.3

D
\

0.2
0. 1
0

20

40

60

80

WO 120 140 160 180

i
20

i
40

i
60

i
80
9

Reaction 14, Ref. P12

/
i

V
X

J
V
l

WO 120 MO 160 180

c.m.

Reaction 14, Ref. P12

LORENZEN and BRUNE

346
t9

F( P ) a o ) 1 6 O
0.8 -

-10.000 MeV

0.6

05

(mb/s

0.7

0.4

CJ

03

0.4

0.2
0.1

20

(0

60

80

100 120 140 160 180

#A \s
V

20

40

60

80

K)0 120 140 160 180

e,'cm.
Reaction 14, Ref. PI 2

Reaction 14, Ref. PI 2

19

F(p,ttoi16O

0.5 -

20

40

60

80
e

ft
100 120 140

c.m.

Reaction 14, Ref. P12

160 180

20

40

60

80 100 120 140 160 B0

cm.
Reaction 14, Ref. PI 2

347

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

18
16
14
V)

a:

12

<o
E
E
O
*o

10
8

lative

6
4

a.

JJLAL
0

0.4

0.8

1.2

16

2.0

2.4

I I I I I I I I I
2.8

3.2

3.6

4.0

I I I I

4.4

4.8

S.2

i
5.6

Ep IMeV)
Reaction 15, Ref. P13

19

p2

F|p,oiY)160

100
90
80
. GAMMA-RAY YIELD

70

+ ALPHA-PARTICLE YIELD
60
E

0 . 138

SO
40

"6
3 30

20
10
01
860

I
870

I
380

890

900

Ep

910

920

(keV)

Reaction 15, Ref. P14

930

940

9S0

960

970

348

LORENZEN and BRU NE


DEUTERON

,.
Reaction

1.

Be(d,-y) n B

2.

10

B(d,n)nC

Cross-section
,
,
_, x , ,.
and angular distribution
a

Energy range
,ti ^rs
(MeV)

_
Page

0.5-3.5

349

3 - 9

350

5-12

352

a;

a( 9 );

3.

B(d,n) 1 2 C

a (0)

0.6-3

352

4.

B(d, 2 n ) n C

8-18

353

5.

12

0(6)

5-10

354

a (30)

1-9

358

1 - 4 . 5 ; 1 - 12;

358

6.

12

C(d,p) 13 C

13

C(d,n) N

4-19
do
HO

7.

12

8.

7-12

360

C(d,a) 1 0 B

a(6)

5-10

361

14

N(d,p) 15 N

1. 0 - 3.5

363

9.

14

N(d,n) 16 O

0; a( 6 );

1-5.5

363

10.

16

O(d, n) 1 7 F

0; 0(6)

2.5-4.5

366

11.

16

^ ;

4 - 5.3; 3 - 15

368

3 - 5; 9 - 15

371

O(d,) 14 N

a{B)

4^

5.7 - 11

373

a (30, 150)

0.8-2.6

375

^ ail

1.4 - 2.4

376

dii
12.

20

Ne(d, p) 21 Ne

349

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS


9

0.5

1.0

IS

2.0

2.5

Be(d,Vo)"B

3.0

3.5

E d ( MeV)

Reaction 1, Ref. D1

Be(d,Y,) V

7
6
5
__
.Q

5- 3
b
2
1
0
OS

10

1.5

2.0

Ed (MeV)

Reaction 1, Ref. D1

2.5

J
3.0

L
3.5

350

LORENZEN and BRUNE

0.5

1.0

1.5

2.0

Ed (MeV)

Reaction 1, Ref. D1

E d (MeV)
Reaction 2, Ref. D2

2.5

Be(d,v 2+3 )V

3.0

351

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

10

B(d.n)"c

E d 6.30MeV

E d =9.00 MeV

2.0

2.0
1.5

1.0

0.5
0
1.5

1.0
0.5

0
1.5
1.0

0.5
0
1.5
1.0
0.5

0.5

I i I i I i
40
1)0 120

40

I i I
80 120

Reaction 2, Ref. D2

40

80

120

160

352

LORENZEN and BRUNE

250

200

150 B
E
b

100 -

50 -

10

15

Ed ( M e V )
Reaction 2, Ref. D3

11

0.6

10

14

18

2.2

E d (MeV)
Reaction 3, Ref. D2

Bld,n) 12 C

2.6

3.0

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

E d (MeV)

Reaction 4, Ref. D3

3 53

354

LORENZEN and BRUNE

12

T3l"O

Ed (MeV)

Reaction 5, Ref. D4

Cld,Po)13C

355

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

12

c(d, Pi ) l3 c*

0,
8'
4

140 lob.

0,
8

120 lab.

4
0
12
8

-5
E

90 lab.

70 lab.

4
0
12
8
4

DIT3

0
16

50 lab.

12
8
A
12
8

"I

I
10

Ed

(MeV!

Reaction 5, Ref. D4

356

LORENZEN and BRUNE

12

c(d,p 2 )V

160 lab.

10
Ed

(MeV)

Reaction 5, Ref. D4

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

Reaction 5, Ref. D4

357

358

LORENZEN and BRUNE

' 2 C(d,p 0 ) 13 C

9 = 30

2.0

4.0

60

8.0

10.0

12.0

4.0

4.5

Reaction 5, Ref. D5

1.5

2.0

2.5

Ed

3.0

(MeV)

Reaction 6, Ref. D6

3.5

5.0

359

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

10.0

12.0

(MeV)
Reaction 6, Ref. D5

140

1
1

100

120

40

20

60

BO

1
10
E d (MeV)

Reaction 6, Ref. D3

20

360

LORENZEN and BBUNE

12

Vv

C(d,n 0 ) l 3 N

' ' I ' ' I ' ' I ' I -

25 20 E d = 9 MeV

M2MeV . 35
30

10

25

bV

- 25
\

20

\ Ed = 8 MeV
\

20

15

in

35

30
25
20

\ Ed r 7 MeV

15
10.5 MeV- 10
5

. i . . i
0

30

60

90

120

150 0 20 tO

9 cm.

Reaction 6, Ref. D5

361

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

12

C(d,a o ) 1 0 B

12
140

120

Ed

(MeV)

Reaction 7, Ref. D4

lob.

l a b .

LORENZEN and BRUNE

362

12

C(d,a/B*

12 8

140

lab.

120

lob.

90

lab.

A
8

Ed

{MeV)

Reaction 7, Ref. D4

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS


"N(d.p)'5N

Reaction 8, Ref. D7
u

N(d,n) 15 0

3
Ed

(MeV)

Reaction 9, Ref. D8
u

Reaction 9, Ref. D8

N(d,n) 1 ! b

363

LORENZEN and BRUNE

364

N(d,n) 15 O
-

N(d,n) 1 5 0

9=90

9=105

e =120

1
6=45

9 = 135

e -60

6=150

6 = 75

6 =164

3
(MeV)

4
E d (MeV)

Reaction 9 , Ref. D8

365

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

N(d,n) 1 5 0

E d 3.131 MeV " f t \ E d = 4 . 8 0 0 MeV

130

120

60

120

'lab

Reaction 9, Ref. D8

60

120

180

366

LORENZEN and BRUNE

16

300

1'

1 '

O(d,n) 17 F*
1

^TOTAL

200 -

</ y

\J

/
/

100

11
2.S

3.0

1 1

1 '1

1 11 . , 1 1 ,

3.5

4.0

E d (MeV)
Reaction 10, Ref. D9

^Old.nl'V
40-

16

40

30

1 1I 1 1

15 -

20-

10

10

O(d,n)' 7 F

11111111111

>

I I >

100

3.0

3.5

V. .1

20
in 3 0 -

0
25

20-

15
10 Z0
2.0

2.5

2.5

4.0

Ed (MeV)

I*. . , i I. i

3.0

3.5

4.0

4.5

Ed(MeV)

Reaction 10, Ref. D9

Reaction 10, Ref. D9

45

367

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

16
. . | . i . i|

25
20 . 160
15
10
5

in

^Av

V
:- \l ' \A
-

1 111 1

30 - 40
20

140

/vA>,,

15

| 10

75

200

15

5
0

A
^

0
10

10

2 0

O(d,n) 17 F

ii | . 1111111.11... 11.
-

0
_

i i

150 -

120

20

ZS 3.0 3.5 4.0

50

.5

E d (MeV)

r ""v

100 -

1 1 1 1 1 1

15

1 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11 111 1 1
3.0 3.5 4.0

4.5

Ed(MeV)

Reaction 10, Ref. D9

Reaction 10, Ref. D9

16

O(d,n,)17F*
15

100 >

10
\

160" \

V i

2.S

3.0 3.S 4.0

4.5

2.5

3.0 3.5 4.0

Ed(MeV)

E d (MeV)

Reaction '10, Ref. D9

Reaction 10, Ref. D9

4.5

368

LORENZEN and BRUNE

16

'

O( d,) N

70 _

sr)

E d = 4405 MeV

50

^^

y1 -

.a

DITJ

30

/ -

10
1
30

i
60

i
90

i
120

150 180

e
Reaction 11, Ref. D10

16

70

0<d, ) t t N
1

e =160

50

j (mb/sr

30

ire
10
3.9

4.0

4.1

4.2

4.3

4.4

4.5

4.6

~Tr
4.7

4.8

4.9

5.0

1
5.1

5.2

5.3

5.4

E,, (MeV)
Reaction 11, Ref. D10

16

' 6 0(d,) U N

30

60

90

120

150

180

30

60

90

e
Reaction 11, Ref. D10

120

0(d,> U N

150

180

369

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

16

O(d,<x,)V

in

1
o!

10

Ed

(MeV)

II

12

13

14 15

Reaction 11, Ref. D11

I6

1.5

O(d,a,) U N*

l\

I.O

in

\ /
/
0.0
3.0

3.5

4.0
Ed ( MeV)
Reaction 11, Ref. D11

4.5

5.0

370

LORENZEN and BRUNE

16

0(d,a,)V

3.0

"i

2.0

f\

in

,4

Vi I .

1.0

/*
I

0.0

3.0

I
3.5

40

> I

U.S

5.0

E d (MeV)
Reaction 11, Ref. D11

16

O(d,cc

6 c m = 168.51-168.56

90

95

I0O

I0.9

11.0

IL5

120

125

E d (MeV)
Reaction 11, Ref. D11

13.0

135

14.0

14.5

ISO

371

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

16 * ,

*14.. *

Old,*,)

1000

500

."

1000

f
1
!

500

'V

'W

in

I.

it

:"

^J

?
f
;

.*.
500
e e .m. -1350

.V

'
1

500
r

A >.

.4^-4- -^

4;r'Vv

1000

50

A!

55

>

\h.\

500

500

e :.m.- 4
.^

60

70

6.5

Ed

(MeV)

Reaction 11, Ref. D11

7.5

8.0

85

9.0

372

LORENZEN and BRUNE

16

'cm.
Reaction 11, Ref. D11

O(d.<x,) tt N*

373

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

16

30

60

90

120

150

180

9cm.

Reaction 11, Ref. D11

30

60

90

O(d,,)UN*

120

150

180

374

LORENZEN and BRUNE

16
30

60

/
i

^\
1 \

*0(d,o,) t t N*

O(d,<x,) w N*
120

90

ISO

ISO

20

ISO

IBO

120

ISO

ISO

3.26 MeV

0.0
0.5

3.50 MeV /

3.36 MV

V.
3.64

A
MV.

3^85

.3.92 M.V
/
\
J

/
_

0.9

I \

^.oc

E
b|G

4.06

MeV,

MeV

j
. /

h
MeV

4.16

1if

S~

0.0
1.2

4.24

A
<0

\
\
\

30

90

/
I20

ISO

60

90

"cm.

MeV

/
30

l0

'cm.
Reaction 11, Ref. D11

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

375

20

Ne(d,p) 21 Ne

V)

B.U

ao _

e
4.0

2.0

n
0.8

i
1.0

50

A
/
J w

M
i

1.2

t f X\r
i.

1.4

1.6

1.8

1
2.0

2.2

2.4

2.6

Ed (MeV)
Reaction 12, Ref. D12

20

8.0

Ne(d,p) 2 1 Ne
i
i

6.06 150
E

4.0

iv

b1
2.0 -

0.8

nr
T * *1.2
T r T T14

10

Ed

>
-

1.6

1.8

2.0

2.2

2.4

(MeV)

Reaction 12, Ref. D12

2.6

LORENZEN and BRUNE

376

20.. . .

,21..

90

ISO

Ne(d,p0) Ne

2.0
1.5
1.0

as

1.60 MeV
i

50

in
JQ

4.I
3.0
2.0

1.71 MeV -

1.0
0
8 JO

6.0|4.0
2.0

1.81 MeV

8.0
6.0
4.0
2.00

1
30

1.92 MeV

1
60

90

120

1S0

180

cm.

30

60

cm.

Reaction 12, Ref. 012

120

180

377

CHARCED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

20,

'Ne(d,p,)2W

u.u

I
1

1
11

8.0
p

e .30

to

i l t. JP

4.0

tt

2.0

tt8

f^rf

1.0

1.2

1.4

1.6

1.8

2.0

2.2

2.4

Reaction 12, Ref. D12

2.6

378

LORENZEN and BRUNE

10.0

1
-i~

75

5.0

2.22 MeV _

25

cm.

Reaction 12, Ref. D12

30

60

90

120

150

180

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

379

ALPHA

..
Reaction
1.

2.

3.

4.

Cross-section
,
,
,. . ., ..
and angular distribution

Energy range
, , , TT. &
(MeV)

Page
&

^a

10

a; a (0)

4 - 1

381

da
df2

4 . 8 -- 7 . 8

382

a; a (0)

1.

6 .4

383

(0)

0. 34 _ 0.7

384

3.2 - 6 . 4

385

Be(a, 2 n ) u C

24-38

389

L i + o

Li(a,n) 1 0 B

Be(a,n) 1 2 C

12. . 5

6 -

380

5.

13

C(a, n) 16 O

2-5.3

389

6.

16

O(a, n ) % e

6 - 17.5

390

7.

20

Ne(a ,n)23Mg

11-28

390

380

LORENZEN and BRUNE

I ' I ' I ' I ' M T ' I ' I ':


EaxiO.OOMeV

10,"'

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I
20 (0 60 80 100 120 140 160 180

6 cm.
Reaction 1 , Ref. A1

6
'

I I I

Li*a
I I

I i

Ea=12.54MeV
102

in
->.

.a
1

to1

10

I i i i I i I i I i I i I i I i
20 to 60 80 100 120 KO 160 180

0c.m.
Reaction 1, Ref. A1

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

200

150
E
b

100 -

Reaction 2, Ref. A2

Reaction 2, Ref. A2

Li(a,n)10B

381

382

LORENZEN and BRUNE

7
1

30

'

'

60

'

Li
Li(a,no)1Cb

90

120

150

'

'

180

Reaction 2, Ref. A2

Li(a,n 0 ) 10 B

.a

30
'cm.
(For clarity some curves have been raised
by the number in mb/sr in brackets.)

Reaction 2, Ref. A2

383

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

10 *

) B

20

'

1 1 1

18
ii
i

16

~.

7.85MeV(-l4L

~l 7.53 MeV(-9)

J2

e
7.2IMeV(-6)

60

90

>

1 6.71 MeV

30

'

120

150

180

ec m .
(For clarity some curves have been raised
by the number in mb/sr in brackets.)

Reaction 2, Ref. A2
9

3.0

4.0

E a (MeV)
Reaction 3, Ref. A3

5.0

Be(oc,n) 1 2 C

6.0

384

LORENZ.EN and BRUNE


9

Reaction 3, Ref. A3
9

Be(o,n)' 2 C

Ground state
First excited
state

3(0

400
Ea(KeV)
Reaction 3, Ref. A4

Be(a,n) 12 C

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

120

B e (a,n 0 )

60
e

lab

Reaction 3, Ref. A3

120

385

I2

180

386

LORENZEN and BRUNE

Be ( a , n .

C.
4.4 4

40

40

60
lab

Reaction 3, Ref. A3

120

180

387

CHARGED-PART1CLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

V)

120

Reaction 3, Ref. A3

180

388

LORENZEN and BRUNE

lab

Reaction 3, Ref. A3

389

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

25

BeU,2n)"c

30
Ea

35
(MeV)

Reaction 4, Ref. A5

40-

2.8

3.6

Ea(MeV)
Reaction 5, Ref. A6

4.4

5.2

390

LORENZEN and BRUNE

0 U , n)'9Ne

17

18

Reaction 6, Ref. A7

20

Reaction 7, Ref. A7

NeU,n| 23 Mg

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

391

HELIUM-3

Cross-section
and angular distribution

Reaction
1.
2.

H( 3 He, n) 5 Li

%:

Li( 3 He,t) 7 Be

a (30)

o (o, 40)

4.
5.

Li( 3 He,a) ( i Li
3

L1

7.
8.
9.
10.

393

a (40)

2 - 4

394

Be( He,n) C

3-10

394

Be( 3 He,t) B

a (40)

2.5-4

394

3-3.8

395

a (90, 150)

11 - 18

396

B( He,d) C
B( 3 He,a) 9 B

a (150)

11 - 19

396

ff(fl)
a(6)

2-19
9-19

397
398

B( 3 He,n) 12 N

1-7

399

CT(6)

2-10

399

3.4 - 9 . 8

400

3-11

402

CT

6-10

422

CT

6-30

422

10

B( 3 He,p) 12 C

10
10

10

1C

B( He,a) B

da

11.
12.

12

C( 3 He,p) u N
3

15.

13

da
dfi;

C( He,d) N

12

12

C( 3 He,*) 1] C

CT

1-6

423

12

C( 3 He,n) 1 "O

CT

1.6 - 6
1.6 - 11
2-32

423
424
424

C( 3 He,pn) 13 N

exc

16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.

CT

12

13.
14.

392
393

da
6.

1-4
2 - 4

dQ.
7

Page

3; 3 . 5 ; 4

dCT

3.

Energy range
(MeV)

14
w

exc

N( He,p) O

CT

3-12

425

N( 3 He,ff) 1 3 N

CT

4-10

425

16

O( He,p) F

CT

2-9

429

16

0( 3 He,o) lfl O

CT

2-9

429

19

F( 3 He,a) 1 E F

CT

3-9

430

CT

3-9

430

19

18

::7

F( He,<*n) F

LORENZEN and BRUNE.

392

H(3He,n)5Li

2.80

1.0

1.6

2.2

2.8

3.4

4.0

Reaction 1, Ref. H1

2.40

2.00

40

80
0

c.m.

Reaction 1, Ref. H1

120

160

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS


7

393

Li( 3 He,t 0 ) 7 Be

Reaction 2, Ref. H2

Li( 3 He,t 0 ) 7 Be

Li( 3 He,t 0 )'Be

'

'He*

Li( 3 He,t 0 ) 7 Be

3.5 MeV

30

20

\
b ,0

40

V.( 3 He / t 1 ) 7 Be*

40

80

120

80

>

120

Li( 3 He,t,) 7 Be*

40

80

120

6c. m .
Reaction 2, Ref. H2

40

80

120

160

7
Li{3He,t,)7Be*
~ir

40

80

120

394

LORENZEN and BRUNE

20 -

E3He(
Reaction 3, Ref. H2
9Be(3He.n)"C

Reaction 4, Ref. H2
9

e = 40

1.0

4 ^

(mb/sr)

SIS

Be( 3 He,t 0 ) 9 B

0.5

2.5

3.0

Reaction5, Ref. H2

1
4.0

395

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

Be( 3 He,t 0 )9B


I

*3.2 MeV

0.5

30

60

90

120

150

30

60

90

I
120

I
150

6cm.

8cm.
Reaction 5, Ref. H2

Be( 3 H e / to) 9 B

Be( 3 He,t 0 ) 9 B

OfO

30

60

90

120

150

30

60

9,

6cm.

'cm.

Reaction 5, Ref. H2

90

120

150

396

LORENZEN and BRUNE

ol-S

11

12

13

15

16

17

18

mb/sr

Reaction 6, Ref. H4

11

12

13

15

16

E3He(MeV)
Reaction 7, Ref. H4

17

18

19

19

397

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

O)

o
m
i

I
1
1

>

i.

i
o
gj o
o o
<*> en

1
i

,1

.'

V\\

J'7'

i\
i

/'
\
'

.--'

^>

'l

1
!

'

V
$
y\ ~
\\ \\\
/

X\
\
/ \\
DC

ij

ii

<*" "

CD

;'

/
_

c
0

Ref.

oT

*^
X

to

Hi

CO

cti

*?
ffi

CQ

CD
o>

398

LORENZEN and BRUNE

10

B( 3 He, o ) 9 B

VI

15

E 3 u (MeV)
He
Reaction 8, Ref. H4

XI

10

11

12

13

14

Reaction 8, Ref. H4

15

16

17

18

19

399

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

I0

B( 3 He,n> 1 2 N

Reaction 9, Ref. H5

t0
1

2.2

'

'

'

1 '

B( 3 He f o) 9 B
1

a 30"oc0
0 150" en,

! mb/sr]

1.8

1.4

SIS

1.0

*%!& ^

- ^^Z/

0.6
0.2

t
.

10

Reaction 10, Ref. H6

400

LORENZEN and BRUNE-

10

20

60 100 140

BI3He,<*0)9B

20

60 100 140

6 C.m.
Reaction 10, Ref. H6

1OC

2.6

'

>,<*,)* B *
1 i

I
<J 0 O

I I I

Z2

30'
90"

Of,

a,

J50"

1.8

in

E
1.0

J
i

1.4
1

$&

/\

N\

TJ|-O

0.6

0.2 i

i
7

I 1 1

Reaction 10, Ref. H6

10

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

20 60 100 U0

20

B(3He,a,J9B*

60

6c. m.

Reaction 10, Ref. H6

100 UO

401

402

LORENZEN and BRUNE

12

C( 3 He.p 0 ) K N

-Q

E
-oho

11
'He
Reaction 11, Ref. H7

403

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

12

C( 3 He, P l ) u N*

- ( 2.31 MeV STATE )

10
'He

Reaction 11, Ref. H7

11

LORENZEN and BRUNE

404

(A

biG
TJIT3

11

'He

Reaction 11,

Ref.

H7

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

12/-M3
C( 3 He,p

405

3)

N*

11

'He

Reaction 11, Ref. H7

406

LORENZEN and BRUNE

U,

12 ~ ,3J

C( He.pA)'*N

E
-50

10
J

He

Reaction 11, Ref. H7

11

t>

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

407

12

8 -

C( 3 He,p 5 ) u N*
1
1^
r
100

(5.69MeV STATE)

8 = 172

75

6 -

V)

bid
OITJ

25

L
8
'He

Reaction 11, Ref. H7

10

11

408

LORENZEN and BRUNE

11

'He

Reaction 11, Ref. H7

409

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

12

C( 3 He,p 7 ) u N'

10

Reaction 11, Ref. H7

11

410

LORENZEN and BRUNE

12

C ( 3 He,p 8 ) u N*

tn

X)

E
OIC5
TJITJ

Reaction 11, Ref. H7

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

12

411

C( 3 He.p 9 )

11

Reaction 11, Ref. H7

412

LORENZEN and BRUNE

ru

413

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

12
9.20

8.92

8.60

8.23

8.10

7.90

a.
.a

C( 3 He,p,)V
8.35

7.50

6XB

Reaction 11, Ref. H7

LORENZEN and BRUNE

414

12

11.00

12

C ( : 'He, p2)

9.90

10.50

9.70

\
4

9.20

8.92

8.60

8.35

8.23

8.10

7.90

7.50

7.00

9.50

12
8

2.
a

12

6.70

6.50

5 46

605

510

12

300

8
\
4

/'
V

|
90

/
f
-

k
\

. ,I
180

,
90

I
180

Reaction 11, Ref. H7

90

90

180

415

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

12

C( 3 He,p 3 ) W N*

12

11.00

9S0

10.50

\
V

*~ J ^* J "' 1 1 ' c -riri

9.70

~x

^ s -^r?*,' < iV"

12

9.50

9.20

8.60

8.92

%.
12

5.

8.23

8.3S

7.90

8.10

12

7.50

7.00

6.70

6.50

\
\
k
\
y \

"*"

12

5.46

6.05
t.

5.10

tI

3.00

/
/

J*'

Jo6

>

x
X

1
180

90

180

Reaction 11, Ref. H7

90

180

90

18

416

LORENZEN and BRUNE

12

11.00

1050

9.90

C( 3 He / P 4 ) U N'
9.70

12

12

8.35

8.23

7.50

7.00

7.90

6.70

6.50

\*

8 \

3.00

5.10

5.16

6.05

A.

V A
\ /

\i
t

12

8.10

A..
*

90

180

90

180

Reaction 11, Ref. H7

90

180

90

180

417

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

12

noo

1050

C( 3 He.p 5 )V
9.70

9.90

12

8
4

X9.50

16

9.20

'
8.60

8.92

12

8
4
X

7.90

6.05

5.46

5.10

\
*

90

J
180"

sT

90
9c,
Reaction 1 1 , Ref. H7

90P

18

418

LORENZEN and BRUNE

12

n.oo

10.50

CIVP6)V
9.70

9.90

\
\

&60

7.50

7.00

6.70

650

16

\
\

,
x *

^ ^

N
I I I I I LI

0"

9CT

5.10

5.16

6.05

T8dF

9CT

180o
9 cm.

Reaction 11,

Ref.

H7

90*"

I
180

419

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

12

C(3He, p ? ) V

11.00

12

10.50

9.90

9.70

8.92

8.60

8.23

8.10

7.90

7.00

6.70

6.50

8
i

*
*-

~~

9L50

12

9.20

8
\

\
\

\
\

\
\

it

8.3S

12

\
TJPS

12

7.5CI

8
\

T
5.10

Reaction 11, Ref. H7

1
90

1
led"

420

LORENZEN and BRUNE

12

C(3He,p8)'V

11.00

1050

9.90

9.70

9.50

9.20

8.92

8.60

..--*.

A
8.35

7.90

8.10

1
TJFS

7.50

7.00

6.70

6.50

/
/

\
|
0
6.05

5.10

16

\
8
'*

d8

90*

1
180

90

Hf

etl,
Reaction 11, Ref. H7

90

grf"

no"

421

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

9.90

1050

1100

1_5<"*

_J

9.70

9.20

aso

,1

8.60

,1
7.90

8.10

823

8.35

ofi?

,,

90

.I

5.A6

180

Reaction 1 1 , Ref. H7

6.70

,!

6.05

Cf

7.00

750

650

5.10

,1

90

180

... . I

422

LORENZEN and BRUNE

12

C( 3 He,p) U N

2.8
.3.945 MeV (p 2 )
14

\
\

2.0

\
\

1-6

\.
2.31MeV(p,)

1.2

\
\

0.8
0.4

10

12

14

16

18

20

22

24

26

26

30 32

E3He.MeV,
Reaction 1 1 , Ref. H 8
l2

C( 3 He,d) 1 3 N

10

12

14

Reaction 12, Ref. H 3

12

12
3
C( 3 He,d) 1 3 N AND C( He,pn) " N

140
==*c-~t

120

^ \

-fc3t-

1i

100
30

60
b"
40
20

10

12

14

16

18

20

22

Reaction 13, Ref. H 8

24

26

28

30

423

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

12

c ( 3 He,) 1 1 C

1 ' ' ' ' 1'


200
E
b

' '..I

100 1 . . L.

M i l l

1 . 1 .

Reaction 14, Ref. H9

20

15

10

THRCSHOLD

Ea H e (MeV,

Reaction 15, Ref. H9

, . . 1

424

LORENZEN and BRUNE

12

'

C( 3 He,n Q ) u O

10

'He

11

(MeV)

Reaction 15, Ref. H10

12

12

16

20

E3He(MeV.
Reaction 15, Ref. H8

C( 3 He,n 0 ) u O

24

28

32

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

N( 3 H,,p) 1 6 O

102_'Tr-

10

I
6

I
8

I T I .
10
12

Ej H e (MeV)

Reaction 16, Ref. H11

U
1

'

'

N|3Ht.)13N
I

>

- nf

JV
\

20

.a
E
b

10

8
10
E, H ,(M.V)

Reaction 17, Ref. H11

425

426

LORENZEN and BRUNE

U
1

2.5

\
\

'

\
\

j
/
/

A\
\

\
V
\
\

1.5
-

f\

J
1

'fo i,o

!>*

/
\/

90 / X
\ \-'' /

y
',

\
/

*-^

0.5 --

165
2.0

'

3.0 - -

N( 3 He. 0 ) 1 3 N

y
i

so*

^*\ ^*" ^

Reaction 17, Ref. H12

U
1

N( 3 He,,) 1 3 N*
1

'

r\
0.6-

50/ \

/V
A \/
rA
1650

0.4 _

\t

/
-

/ r
i

\
1

90

\
\

f \

<

/
/
0.2 ~ /

Reaction 17, Ref. HI2

427

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

2.5IT1

'

'

'

N(5
1

>

2.0 -

1.5 -

VI
XI

1.0

0.5

/PA
'//

r^+
^165-

-A

?'. 1

E,

(MeV)
He

Reaction 17, Ref. H12

428

LORENZEN a n d BRUNE

N( 3 He y tt) 1 3 N
T

10
, 10 (0.591

/ ^ V ^ v J V ^ 25(2-11
<

-X

^^**\.^^_

35 (2.3)
35 (23)"
40 (2.6)50 (2.7)

10

10
77.5 (68).
85(0.22
90 (0.36)

10

10
x Indicates data from: KNUDSON, YOUNG,
Nucl. Phys. A 149 (1970) 323.
The plotted cross-section must be multiplied
by the number in brackets to obtain the true
cross-section.

10
11

E 3 H e (MeV)
Reaction 17, Ref. H11

429

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

12

(MeV)

E3u
H6

Reaction 18, Ref. H3

16
1

200
100
50
D

20

O( 3 He, c>C) 15 O

i-

:4
.

10
0

1 i
2

1 . 1

8
10
(MeV)

Reaction 19, Ref. H3

1
12

430

LORENZEN and BRUNE

20
.a

Z 10

i
8

i
10

12

Reaction 20, Ref. H3

12

Reaction 21, Ref. H3

C HARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

431

YIELD CURVES

Reacts
1.

Be(3He,nlnC

Enej^range

Page

6-18

432

2.

10

B( 3 He, T ) 13 N + n B( 3 He, n)13N

6-18

432

3.

10

B( 3 He,d) n C + u B( 3 He, t ) n C

6-18

432

4.

14

N( 3 He, d)15O

6-18

433

5.

14

N( 3 He,o) 13 N

6-18

433

6.

23

Na( 3 He,2p) 24 Na

9-18

433

7.

Be(3He,n;uC
B( 3 He,d) n C + n B ( 3 H e , t ) u C
12
C( 3 He,o) n C

0-18
0-18
0-18

434

B( 3 He,n) 1 3 N
C( 3 He,d) 13 N
14
N( 3 He,a) 13 N

0-18
0-18
0-18

12

C( 3 He,n) 14 O

0-18

14
16

N( 3 He,d) 15 O
O( 3 He,cr) l5 O

0-18
0-18

19

F( 3 He,an) 1 7 F

0-18

10

12

8.

16
O(33 He,p)Li 88 F
19

F( He,a) F

0-18
0-18

435

432

LORENZEN and BRUNE

a.

d
"
_i
UJ

>-

10

12

16

18

16

18

Reaction 1, Ref. Y1

10

12

Reaction 2, Ref. Y1

10

12

Reaction 3, Ref. Y1

16

18

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS


K

N(3H.,d)'5O

1 ' 1 ' I

10*

'

5
I

-5

,o6

10

12

14

> i

16

18

Reaction 4, Ref. Y1
U

1 i

N(3He,)13N

i >

2-

1"'

i65 i
o.

5|-

o.

3
UJ

-r

A'

10

12

16

18

16

18

Reaction5, Ref. Y1

10

12
U
(MeV)

Reaction 6, Ref. Y1

433

434

LORENZEN and BRUNE

i i i r i i r i i i i i I i i i I

C( H e , a ) C

12

10'

C( 3 He,d) 1 3 N

14

N( 3 He,af 3 N-

b
10

11

-b.

i i

i i i

i i

i i

B( 3 He,n) 13 N

i i

12
E3He (MeV)

Reactions 7, Ref. Y2

i i

16

i i

i i i

20

435

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

14

16

10

O( 3 He,a) 15 O

19

19

N( 3 He,d) 15 O.

F( 3 He,n) 1 7 F

F( 3 He,a)' 8 F

10

-b.

i i

i i

8
12
E3U_ (MeV)
Reactions 8, Ref. Y2

i i

i i

16

i i

20

436

LORENZEN and BRUNE

REFERENCES TO GRAPHS
Proton
PI
P2
P3
P4
P5
P6
P7
P8
P9
P10
Pll
P12
P13
P14

BORCHERS. R . R . , POPPE, C . H . , Phys. Rev. J 9 ( 1 9 6 3 ) 2679.


SWEENY, W . E . , MARION, J . B . , Phys. Rev. 182(1969) 1007.
VAUGHN. F . J . . et a l . , Phys. Rev. (1970) 1657.
BLIEDEN. H . R . , TEMMER, G . M . , WARSH, K . L . , Nucl. Phys. 49 (1963) 2 0 9 .
GOOSMAN, D . R . , ADELBERGER, E . G . , SNOVER, K . A . , Phys. Rev. 2 ( 1 9 7 0 ) 123.
KUAN, H . M . , et a l . , Nucl. Phys. A1S1 (1970) 129.
ALLAS, R . G . , e t a l . , Nucl. Phys. 58(1964) 122.
JARMIE, N . , SEAGRAVE, J . D . , Rep. LA-2014 (1957).
WONG, C , e t a l . , Phys. Rev. 123(1961) 598.
DAGLEY, P . , HAEBERLI, W . , SALADIN, J . X . , Nucl. Phys. 24(1961) 3 5 3 .
BERGDOLT, G . , GUILLAUME, G . , J. Phys. J3(1969) 1 4 5 .
WARSH, K . L . , TEMMER, G . M . , BLIEDEN, H . R . , Phys. Rev. 131(1963) 1690.
WILLARD, H . B . , e t a l . , Phys. Rev. j!5(1952) 849.
CHAO, C . Y . , e t a l . , Phys. Rev. _79_( 1950) 108.

Deuteron
Dl
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
D8
D9
D10
Dll
D12

BATTLESON, K . , McDANIELS, D . K . . Phys. Rev. 4(1971) 1601.


DIN, G . U . , NAGARAJAN, M . A . , POLLARD, R . , Nucl. Phys. A93(1967) 190.
BRILL, O . D . , SUMIN, L . V . , At. Ehnerg. 2(1959) 377.
CORDS, H . , DIN, G . U . , ROBSON, B . A . , Nucl. Phys. A127 (1969) 9 5 .
DAVIS, J . R . , DIN, G . U . , Nucl. Phys. A179 (1972) 1 0 1 .
JASZCZAK, R . J . , MACKLIN, R . L . , GIBBONS. J . H . , Phys. Rev. 281(1969) 1428.
PORTO, V . G . . et a l . , Nucl. Phys. A136 (1969) 3 8 5 .
RETZ-SCHMIDT, T . , WEIL, J . L . , Phys. Rev. 119(1960) 1079.
BAHNSEN, R . M . . WYLIE, W . R . , LEFEVRE, H . W . , Phys. Rev. ( 1 9 7 0 ) 859.
THORNTON, S . T . , e t a l . , Phys. Rev. 3_(1971) 1065.
JOBST, J . , MESSELT, S . , RICHARDS, H . T . , Phys. Rev. 178(1969) 1663.
COMSAN, M . N . H . , Atomkernenergie_18(1971) 3 1 7 .

Al
A2
A3
A4
A5
A6
A7

BLIEDEN, H . R . , TEMMER, G . M . , WARSH, K . L . , Nucl. Phys. 49 (1963) 2 0 9 .


VANDERZWAN, L . , GEIGER, K. W . , Nucl. Phys. A180 (1972) 615.
OBST, A. W . , GRANDY, T . B . , WEIL, J . L . , Phys. Rev. C ( 1 9 7 2 ) 7 3 8 .
DAVIDS, C . N . , Nucl. Phys. A110 (1968) 619.
BRILL, O . D . , SUMIN, L . V . , At. Ehnerg. 2(1959) 377.
SEKHARAN, K . K . , et a l . , Phys. Rev. 15(1967) 1187.
GRUHLE, W . , SCHMIDT, W . , BURGMER, W . , Nucl. Phys. A186 (1972) 2 5 7 .

Helium
HI
H2
H3
H4
H5
H6
H7
H8
H9
H10
Hll
H12

KLOPCIC. J . T . , DARDEN, S . E . , Phys. Rev. C ( 1 9 7 1 ) 2 1 7 1 .


ORIHARA, H . , e t a l . , Nucl. Phys. A139 (1969)~226.
HAHN, R . L . , RICCI, E . , Phys. Rev. 146(1966) 650.
BELL, R . A . I . , e t a l . . Rep. ANU-P/550 (1972).
PETERSON, R. W . , GLASS. N . W . , Phys. Rev. 130(1963) 2 9 2 .
PATTERSON, J . R . , POATE, J . M . , TITTERTON. E . W . . Proc. Phys. Soc. 85_(1965) 1085.
HAAS, F . , e t a l . , Phys. Rev. ^88_(1969) 1625.
SINGH, J . . Nucl. Phys. A155(1970) 443.
CIRILOV. S . D . , NEWTON, J . O . , SCHAPIRA, J . P . , Nucl. Phys. 21(1966) 472.
OSGOOD, D.R., PATTERSON, J . R . , TITTERTON, E . W . . Nucl. Phys. 60(1964) 503.
GUAZZONI, P . , MICHELETTI, S . , PIGNANELLI. M . , Phys. Rev. C 4(1971) 1086.
KNUDSON, A . R . , YOUNG, R . C . , Nucl. Phys. A149 (1970) 3 2 3 .

Yield curves
Yl
Y2

HAHN, R.L., RICCI, E., Nucl. Phys. A101 (1967) 353.


RICCI, E., HAHN, R.L., Anal. Chem. 40(1968) 54.

CrIARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

437

APPENDIX 1

EXCITATION FUNCTIONS OF
CHARGED-PARiriCLE-INDUCED REACTIONS AT HIGHER ENERGIES*
Systematics
Table Al-I. Characteristic data for the excitation functions.
Figure A l - 1 . Positions of the maxima for the excitation functions dependent
on the atomic number Z of the target nucleus.
Figure A l - 2 . Fall width at half maximum for the excitation functions
dependent on the atomic number Z of the target nucleus.
Figure A l - 3 . Heights of maxima for the excitation functions dependent
on the atomic number Z of the target nucleus.
Figure A l - 4 . Characteristic data of the excitation functions dependent
on the atomic number Z of the target nucleus.
Figures Al-5 to AL-12. Estimated and experimental excitation functions.
Figure Al-13. Yield from irradiation of thick targets.

"' From: LANGE, J., MUNZEL, H., Estimation of Unknown Excitation Functions for (a, xn)-, (a.pxn)-,
(d,xn)-, (d, pxn)-, and (p,;;n)-Reactions, Rep. KFK-767 (1968), with kind permission from the authors.

438

LORENZEN and BRUNE

TABLE Al-I. CHARACTERISTIC DATA FOR THE EXCITATION


FUNCTIONS

No. a

Target
nucleus

Reactioa
Q-value
(MeV)

Position of
maximum' 3
(MeV)

Height of
maximum
(mb)

(of.n)

1
2a
2b
3
4

5
6
7

8a
8b
9a
9b
10
11
12
13a
13b
14
15
i6a
16b
17
18

21
25
25
26
27
28

Sc-45
Mn-55
Mn-55
Fe-54
Co-59
Ni-60
Ni-62
29 Cu-63
Cu-65
Cu-65
30 Zn-64
30 Zn-64
Zn-68
37 Rb-85
Rb-87
41 Nb-93
41 Nb-93
42 Mo-92
Mo-100
47 Ag-107
47 Ag-107
Ag-109
48 Cd-106

-2. 2
-3. 5
-3. 5
-5.8
-5. 1
-7.9
-6.5
-7. 5
-5.8
-5.8
-9.2
-9.2
-5.7
-3. 5
-3.8
-7.0
-7.0
-8.4
-4.6
-7.6
-7.6
-6.4
-10. 1

12.7

630

8.7

680

10.9

520

10.5

190

550

11.1

9.7

950
700

8,9
-

11.8

820

10.9

770

10.2

320

12.0

250

10.0

240

9.4
11.6
9.6
9.2
10. 8

10.0
10.9

470
370
760
420
340

360
670

The numbers refer to the numbered excitation function curves


in Figs Al-5 to Al-12.
With respect to the energy scale E + Q.

439

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

TABLE Al-I (cont. )

No.

19
20
21
22
23a
23b
24a
24b
24c
25a
25b

26
27
28

29
30
31

Target
nucleus

49 In-115
50 Sn-112
Sn-114
Sn-124
!>6 Ba-138
56 Ba-138
57 La-139
57 La-139
57 La-139
67 Ho-165
67 Ho-165
68 Er-164
'9 Au-197
82 Pb-207
Pb-208
92 U-235
94 Pu-238

Reaction
Q-value
(MeV)

-7.2

Position of
maximum
(MeV)

Height of
maximum
(mb)

12. 1

300

-13.0

6.4

550

-11. 1
-5. 6
-8.6
-8.6

7.0

290

13.4

160

7.4

130

17. 2

900

-9.2

9.1

115

-9.2
-9.2

8.4

110

8.3

110

-9.2
-9.2
-11. 1
-9.8
-12. 1
-15.0
-10.9
-13.1

11.8

79

8.8

30

-12.8

13.3

200

-12. 1

-12.1
-16.0
-14. 0

640
670
10
390
180

260

6.9
-

110

10.3
6.4

90

(a, 2n)
1
2a
2b
3
4

6
7a
7b

9
10
11
12

?,i Sc-45
25 Mn-55
25 Mn-55
?-6 Fe-54
27 Co-59
?.% Ni-60
2.9 Cu-63
Cu-65
Cu-65
30 Zn-64
32 Ge-70
35 Br-79
37 Rb-85
47 Ag-107

-17. 1

-16.6
-14. 1
-14, 1
-19.0
-16. 1
-14.4
-12.7
-15.6

16.3
14.4
14.9
14.4
13.4
-

13.5
16.9

260
650

1000
86
320

2300

12.3
11.4

1000

810

LORENZEN and BRUNE

440

TABLE Al-I (cont.)

No.

Target
nucleus

Reaction
Q-value
(MeV)

Position of
maximum
(MeV)

Height of
maximum
(mb)

(a, 2n)
13
14
15

16
17
18a

18b
18c
19
20
21a
21b
22
23
24
25
26

27
28

Ag-109
Cd-106
Te-130
Ho-165
Er-164
Au-197
Au-197
Au-197
Pb-206
Pb-208
83 Bi-209
83 Bi-209
92 U-233
U-235
93 Np-237
94 Pu-238
Pu-239
Pu-242
98 Cf-252

-14.3
-19.2
-11.8
-16.2
-18.0
-16.4
-16.4
-16.4
-20.0
-19.5
-20. 3
-20. 3

25
26
30
37
47

-23.5
-26. 3
-31.5
-24.7
-26. 1
-24. 1
-24. 1
-24.4
-21.0
-24. 5
-24. 7
-27. 5

48
52
67
68
79
79
79
82

10.2

1050

12. 3

430

66

13.7
7.3

750

11.0

820

12.6

640

13.6
12.4
11.0
10. 5

800

1050
1000

9.9

900

10.5

910

650

-19. 1

8.9

-17.9
-18. 3
-17.8
-18. 2
-17.2
-18. 2

8.3

6.5
16

9.7

16

8.2

15.5

10. 8

13

7.8

10.5

10.4

9.5

{a, 3n)

Mn-55
Fe-56
Zn-64
Rb-85
Ag-107
Ag-109
Ag-109
49 In-115
50 Sn-124

57 I A - 1 3 9

10

67 Ho-165
68 Er-164

1
2
3
4
5

6a
6b
7

11

17. 3
-

15. 1
13.1
11.9
13.9

16
600
550

1000
950

15.0
11.7
10. 1
12.9

1400
1400
840

1180

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

441

TABLE Al-I (cont.)

No.

Target
nucleus

Reaction
Q-value
(MeV)

Position of
maximum
(MeV)

Height of

maximum
(mb)

(a, 3n)
12a

79 Au-197

12b

7 9 Au-197
S2 Pb-206

13

-25.4
-25.4

13.6

1100

12. 8

1400

-28. 5

1400

14

Pb-207

-26.8

12 8

15

83 Bi-209

16

83 Bi-209
S'2 U-233

-28.0
-28.0

11.5

17
18

19
20
21

U-235
93 Np-237
94 Pu-239
98 Cf-252

9.1

1200
1

9.8

-25.4

13.4

14

-23.8

13. 2
12.4

-25.3
-23.8

-25.0

4.5

3. 3

2;6 Fe-54
2;8 Ni-58
20 Zn-64
42 Mo-92

-1.8
-3. 1
-4.0
-5.6

16.2
15.0
14. 4

520

48 Cd-106
50 Sn-124

-5.6

17.3
23.0

245

la

26 Fe-54
26 Fe-54
Fe-56

-13.2
-13. 2
-13.7
-13.7
-13.7
-14.6
-14.3
-12.6
-16.0
-16. 0
-15. 5
-13.9
-15.3

14.8
14.6
13.7
14.7
16.3
16.4
17. 2
17.4

750

lb

1
2
3
4
5
6

-6.4

600
185
18

(a, pn)

2a

Fe-56
Fe-56
28 Ni-60

Ni-62

2b
2c

5
6a
6b
7
8

29 Cu-63
30 Zn-64
30 Zn-64
Zn-66
Zn-70
22 Ge-70

16. 6
17. 1
15.7

470
840
790
630
890
495
870
790
88

575

442

LORENZEN and BRUNE

TABLE Al-I (cont. '


No.

Target
nu.ci.tJus

Reaction
Q-value
(MeV)

Position of
maximum
(MeV)

Height of
maximum
(mb)

(a,pn)
10

11
12
13
14

47
48
50
57
94

Ag-107
Cd-106
Sn-124
La-139
Pu-238

-13.6
-16.7

17.4
18.6

-14.8

24.2

91
225
46

-15.6

-18.3

20.7

15

22 Ti-47
?4Cr-50
26Fe-54
30 Zn-66
32Ge-70
40 Zr-94
40 Zr-94
Zr-96
Zr-96
42 Mo-92
52 Te-130
58 Ce-142
58 Ce-142
83 Bi-209
83 Bi-209
92 U-235
94 Pu-239

4.6

12.4

200

2.9

8.3

265

2.8

10.5

155

3. 1

11.4

450

2.4

10. 4
13.8

270

12.3
12.7

130

85

5.2

13.0
10.9
16.2

3.5

3. 5

15.9
20.8

60

32

22.2
24.2

14

22 Ti-47
Ti-48
24Cr-52
24 Cr-52
26 Fe-56
29 Cu-63
Cu-65
Cu-65
30 Zn-66

-5.9
-7.0
-7.7

9.5

400

(d,n)
1
2
3
4

5
6a
6b
7a
7b
8

9
10a
10b
lla
lib
12
13

4.6

4.6
5.2
5.2

1.9

2.8
2.8
2.6
2. 2

120
85

190
75
-

34
10

(d, 2n)
1
2

3a
3b
4
5

6a
6b
7a

-7.7

-7.6
-6.4
-4.4
-4.4
-8.2

10.0
-

38
-

14.3
10.0
-

11.3
9.6
-

200
310
-

920
820
-

443

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

TABLE Al-I (cont. )


No.

(d, 2n)
7b

Target
nucleus

Reaction
Q-value
(MeV)

Position of
maximum
(MeV)

Height of
maximum
(mb)

30 Zn-66

-8. 2

Zn-68

-5.9

32 Ge-70

-9.2

34 Se-82

-3. 1

lla

40 Zr-96

lib

40 Zr-96

12

52 Te-126

-2.8
-2. 8
-5.2

10

13

Te-128

14a

Te-130

14b

Te-130

-4.3
-3. 4
-3.4
-3. 7

8.2

1050

7. 3
9.0

750

8.8

700

800

8. 5

750

10.9
10.3

700

15

53 J-127

16

55Cs-133

17a

58 Ce-142

17b

58 Ce-142

18

73 Ta-181

19

74 W-184

-4.7

20

-3.6

9.2

380

21

W-186
79 Au-197

-3. 8

10. 8

600

22

3 3 Bi-209

-4. 9

540

23

92 U-234

U-236

-4.8
-3. 1
-3. 1
-3.9

9. 9
9.2

-3. 5
-3.8
-3.8
-3.2

600

7.8

7 50

8.4

660
-

32

8 6
10.8

25

8.4

43

-3. 1

8.9
10. 5

70

94 Pu-239

-3.8

10.6

28

-10. 0

-10.9
-12.7

4a

40 Zr-96
53 J-127
59 Pr-141
33 Bi-209

4b
5

24a
24b
25
26a

U-235

U-238

-3. 1

26b

U-238

27
(d, 3n)
1
2
3

U-235

19

48

1200

-11.9

12.9
-

33 Bi-209

-11.9

92 U-234

-10.9

7.9

19

444

LORENZEN and BRUNE.

TABLE Al-I (cont.)

No.

(d, 3n)
6a
6b
7
8

Target

Reaction
Q-value

nucleus

(MeV)

Position of
maximum
(MeV)

Height of
maximum
(mb)

92 U-235
92 U-235

-10. 1
-10. 1

10. 1

26

8.9

24

U-236

-9.6
-10.9

9.4

57

94 Pu-239

(d,p)
1
2
3
4
5

6
7

27 Co-59
29 Cu-63
30 Zn-68
32 Ge-70
33 As-75
35 Br-81
39 Y-89

5.3

5. 7
4. 3
5. 2
5.1
5.4
4.6
4.2

9a

40 Zr-94
Zr-96

9b

Zr-96

3.4

3.4

13. 1
14. 7
12. 5
13.4
13.6
13.9
13.6
13.4
12.8
12.6

300
275
450
450
250
370
205
280
220
300

14.5
12. 8

10

45 Rh-103

4.8

11

46 Pd-110
48 Cd-114

3. 5

12
13

52 Te-130

3.7

13.3
13.5

14

55CS-133
58 Ce-142
58 Ce-142

3.9

13.5

2.9

2.9

59 Pr-141
73 Ta-181

3.6

12.9
15.8

260

3.8

15.8

230

3.5

15.8

280

19

74 W-184
W-186

3.3

310

20

75 Re-187

3.0

15.7
17.0

21

78 Pt-196

3. 1

22a

79 Au-197

4.3

18.8

22b

4.3

23

79 Au-197
82 Pb-208

24

83 Bi-209

25

Bi-209
92 U-238

2. 4
2. 4

19.3
15. 1
15.4
15.6

2.6

18.6

15a
15b
16
17
18

26

3.9

1.7

200
285
265
200

175
230

210
280
160
205
115
110
220

445

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

TABLE Al-I (con:.)


No.

Target
nucleus

Reaction
Q-value
(MeV)

Position of
maximum
(MeV)

Height of
maximum
(mb)

(p.n)
1
2
3a
3b
4a
4b
5

6
7
8

9
10
11
12
13
14

15
16
17
18
19a
19b
20
21
22
23
24
25

26a
26b
26c
26d
27

22 Ti-47
Ti-48
23 V-51
23 V-51
24Cr-52
24 Cr-52
25 Mn-55
26 Fe-56
Fe-57
IJ7 Co-59
28 Ni-61
Ni-62
Ni-64
;>9 Cu-63
Cu-65
31 Ga-69
39 Y-89
47 Ag-107
Ag-109
48 Cd-110
Cd-111
Cd-111
Cd-112
Cd-114
50 Sn-124
57 La-139
58 Ce-142
59 Pr-141
7 3 Ta-181
73 Ta-181
73 Ta-181
73 Ta-181
79 Au-197

-3.7
-4.8
-1.5
-1. 5
-5. 5
-5. 5
-1.0
-5.4

6.5
7.2
-

-1.9
-3.4
-2. 2
-1.4
-1. 1
-1.6
-2.6
-1.0
-1.0
-1.0
-1.0
-1.6

700
600
-

- .

-1.9

-1.9

510
-

11.5
7. 1

-1.6

-3.0
-4.7
-2. 5
-4.2
-2. 1
-2. 2
-3.6
-2.2
-1. 0
-4.7

300

6.6

450

7. 4
8. 1

400

6. 6

700

500
-

7.9

850

8.2

500

9.4
-

730
-

8.2

360

8. 3
11. 1

870
530

7.4

120
-

8.5

100

9.0

100

9.0

105

12
9.2

100

95

LORENZEN and BRUNE

446

TABLE Al-I (cont.)

No.

1 arget

nucleus

Reaction
Q-value
(MeV)

Position of
maximum
(MeV>

Height of
maxim um
(mb)

(p, 2n)
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8

23
27
28
29
31
39
41
47
48

10
11
12a
12b
13a
13b

14

73
73
79
79
82

V-51
Co-59
Ni-62
Cu-63
Ga-69
Y-89
Nb-93
Ag-107
Cd-110
Cd-111
Cd-112
Ta-181
Ta-181
Au-197
Au-197
Pb-206

-10.8
-10.9
-13.6
-13.3
-11.6
-12.8
-9.3
-10.1
-12.7
-11.7
-11. 3
-7.9
-7.9
-8.2
-8.2
-11.6

V-51
Co-59
Cu-65
Ga-69
Ga-71
Y-89
Cd-112
Ta-181
Pb-206
Bi-209

-23.7
-23. 1
-22. 0
-23.8
-20. 0
-20. 8
-21. 1
-15. 5
-20.0
-18.0

4.2
-

240
-

9.9

210

11.7

180

7.4

500

13. 2

1300

9.7
-

1050
-

6.8
-

900
-

9.4

1050

16.3
17.9
16.0
13.2
10.0
20.2

100

(p, 3n)
1
2

3
4

23
27
29
31

6
7

8
9
10

39
48
73
82
83

11
160

65
550

390

9.9

780

9.5

1200

9.0

900

12.0

850

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

I
{mil
K-

20

i
l*.n

^ tMV)

*
*>

20
Ed.Q
CMeV]

(d.2n)

16-

20
20

60
Z

10

IktoV]
16

20

40

60

__

80

100

FIG. Al-1. Positions of the maxima for the excitation functions dependent on the atomic number Z
of the target nucleus.

447

448

LORENZEN and BRUNE

FIG. Al-2. Full width at half maximum for the excitation functions dependent on the atomic number Z
of the target nucleus.

449

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

20

40

60

eo

wo

20

40

60

80

100

20

40

60

20

40

CO

80

100

20

40

80

100

20

40

60

so

100

20

40

20

40

60

80

MO

20

40

20

40

60

80

100

FIG. Al-3. Heights of maxima for the excitation functions dependent on the atomic number Z of the
target nucleus.

LORENZEN and BRUNE

450

Position of maxima

20

40

60

80

100

20

40

60

80

100

Full width at half maximum


20

CMeVl

16

\(d.3n]

(d 2n)

12

(4P),

8
4

3-10=

10

20

40

60

80

100

20

40

60

80

100

FIG. Al-4. Characteristic data of the excitation functions dependent on the atomic number Z of the target nucleus.
structure corresponding to Figs.Al-1 to Al-3;
structure estimated.

451

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS


3-B3

3IO J

3-10=

10

15

20

25

30

35

10

15

20

25

30

3-10'

U.n)

10!

2>90

etna

/
/

30

^"

10 _

'

i
i
;

10

IS

20

25

>W'

10

F1G.A1-5. Estimated and expetimental excitation functions.


experimental excitation functions;
excitation functions estimated for the middle of the Z-region given in the figures.

30

452

LORENZEN and BRUNE

10

10

15

15

20

20

25

25

30

30

35

35

FIG. Al-6. Estimated and experimental excitation functions.


experimental excitation functions;
excitation functions estimated for the middle of the Z-region given in the figures.

453

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

10

15

20

25

20
25
E - . O CMeV]

30

30

35

20
25
E,.0CMeVJ

FIG. A l - 7 . Estimated and experimental excitation functions.


experimental excitation functions;
excitation functions estimated for the middle of the Z-region given in the figures.

454

LORENZEN and BRUNE


31O 3

Icupn)

103 -

Z .61 - 83

CCrnU

10

15

20

25

30

35

10

IS

20

25

FIG. Al-8. Estimated and experimental excitation functions.


experimental excitation functions;
excitation functions estimated for the middle of the Z-region given in the figures.

30

35

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

455

3-10"

10 3

102

ld,2n)
101 _

2>90

6lmb]

26a

Illl

10'

1
I

310 1

3-10>

(d.3n|
2.20-40

[/

(d,3n)

II
' //
- /1/
'

II

1
'-

[:

Ill
'III '

10' -

i
i

I
i
1,
0

i
-

FIG A1-9.

20

25

30

1
5

10

15

20

25

30

Estimated and experimental excitation functions,


experimental excitation functions;
excitation functions estimated for the middle of the Z-region given in the figures.

35

LORENZEN and BRUNE

10

15

20

25

30

35

10

15

20

25

(d. p)
Z = 20-40

103

se

mbl :

;
j
_ 2

10 ! _

la 1 '"

^5

mTT7

**

!
0'

ib.

10"

>0

15

20

25

30

35

i,P)
z = 61-83
(

1O3
61mb]

Zt

/.

20 It
1 / -

/Ht.

10!

~^22b

._

'

"

'22b

^-17

/iM-

* - "

10

20

25
E a .QCMV]

10

FIG. Al-10. Estimated and experimental excitation functions.


experimental excitation functions;
excitation functions estimated for the middle of the Z-region given in the figures.

30

35

457

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS


310!

10

1!

15

10

15

20

20

20

25

30

35

10

15

20

25

30

35

20

25

30

35

25

30

35

25

30

10

15

25

30

35

10

15

20

FIG. Al-11. Estimated and experimental excitation functions.


experimental excitation functions;
excitation functions estimated for the middle of the Z-region given in the figures.

LORENZEN and BRUNE


310"

20

25

30

35

10

15

20

25

30

(p,3n)

Illl 1 1

Z 41 - 60
*

: .
://

" ' ^

1
I
rt
1

1
1
1
0

,
5

10

15

20

25

E, .QtlWV)

20
25
Ep .0 [M.V]

30

FIG. Al-12. Estimated and experimental excitation functions.


experimental excitation functions;
excitation functions estimated for the middle of the Z-region given in the figures.

30

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

459

FIG. Al-13. Yield from irradiation of thick targets. AK = yield after short inadiation times (t = 0.1 T);
AL = yield after long irradiation times (t T).

460

LORENZEN and BKUNE

APPENDIX 2

TABLE A2-I. (p, 7) RESONANCES AS A FUNCTION OF PROTON ENERGIES


RANGING FROM 163 keV TO 3. 0 MeV*
Proton
energy
(keV)

Reaction

163

B'Vylc 12

224

F19(P>aY)O16
Mg 2 4 (p, Y )Al 2 5
Al Z 7 (p, Y )Si 2 8
Na 2 3 (p, Y )Mg 2 4
C 14 (p,Y)N 15
N14(p,Y)o15
Al 2 7 (p, Y )Si 2 8
Mg 2 6 (p, Y )Al 2 7
Na 2 3 (p, Y )Mg 2 4

226
226
251

261
278
294
295
308
326

Mg25(P,Y)Al26
Al 2 7 (p, Y )Si 2 8

326

Si Z 9 (p, Y )P 3 0

330

317

339

Be 9 (p, Y )B 1 0
Mg 2 6 (p, Y )Al 2 7

340

F 1 9 (p. Y )o 1 6

355

P 3 1 (P.Y)S 3 2
C 1 4 (p, Y )N 1 5
N 1 5 (p, Y )O 1 6
N 1 5 (p,a Y )C 1 2
Na 2 3 (p, Y )Mg 2 4
Mg 2 5 (p. Y )Al 2 6
.,27,(p.v)Si
, c .28
Al

356
360
360
374
392
405

T'

1'

414

429

Mg 2 4 ( P . Y )Al 2 5
N 1 5 (p,a Y )C 1 2
N 1 5 (p, Y )O 1 6

437

Mg

418
429

(P.Y)-* 1

439

.,27,
>c.28
Al (p, Y )Si

440

P 3 1 (P.Y)S 3 2

441

Li 7 (p, Y )Be 8

Gamma-ray energy
(MeV)

16. 11, 11. 68, 4.43


7.12, 6.92, 6. 13
2.06, 1.56, 0.95

Crosssection
(mb)
0. 157
>0. 2

Resonance
Half-life and
width
0 + energy a
(FWHM)
(MeV)
(keV)
7
1
1?

7. 2 ; 3. 3

0. 3

6.82, 6. 14, 1.47

1.6

2.03 min; 1.7

<1

10.6, 7.8, 6.7


6 . 1 9 , 4.86,

7.6, 7 . 2 ,

0.8

0.82

12

6.2

5.88, 5. 17
6.9, 6 . 2 , 5. 2
7.74, 5.85, 5.61
7.12, 6.92, 6. 13
10.5, 7. 1, 5.4
12.43, 6.37
4.43
6. 26
6.26, 4 . 6 ? , 3.5?
7 ^ S. 1. 2.8
5.25, 0.70
2.70, 2. 25, 0. 89
4.43
6.46
6.72, 6. 30, 4. 66?

6. 4 s; 3. 2

<1

2. 50 min ; 3.2
160
160

0.007
0.03

94
94

2
4

300

0.001

6. 4 s; 3. 2

2. 5 min; 3 . 2
7. 2 s; 3. 3

0.9
0.9

6. 4 s; 3. 2
34

17.64, 14.74, 12.24

12

From: BUTLER, J.W., Table of (p, 7) Resonances, Rep. NRL-5282 (1959), with kind
permission from the author.
From: Chart of the Nuclides, 3rd Edn, Federal Ministry for Education and Science,
Bonn (196 8).

461

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

TABLE A2-I (cont.)


Proton
energy
(keV)
444
448
454

Reaction

Na 23 (p,Y)M (! 24
C13(p,Y)NH
26,
^27
M

Gamma-ray energy
(MeV)

2. J6

484

F 1 9 (P,(*Y)O

496

Mg 2 5 (p, Y )Al 2 6
-.30,
>_31

7. 12, 6. 92, 6. 13
6.36, 4.24, 4. 21?
7.75, 6.48, 4. 62
12.07

Si

(P,Y)P

513
530

Mg 2 5 (p. Y )Al 2 6

532

580

C14(P,Y)N15
n31,
Ne 32
P (P.Y) S
C13(p.Y)NU
Mg 2 5 (p, Y )Al 2 6

594

Na23(p,Y)Mg24

594

S32(P,Y)C133

10. 9, 8.0, 7.0


2.86, 2.05, 0.806

597
607

F19(p,aY)O16
Mg 2 5 (p, Y )Al 2 6

7. 12, 6. 92, 6. 13
6.88?, 6.46. 4. 34

612
625

Al 27 (p, Y )Si 213

506
511

540
550

636

Si30(p,Y)P31
O18(p,Y)F19
Al 2 7 (p, Y )Si 2 3
Ne 22,(p, Y/Na
. . . 23

640

c 1 4 (p, Y )N 1 5

648

661

P31(P.Y)S32
Ca 4 0 (p, Y )Sc 4 ; 1
.,27,
>c.2
Al (p, Y )Si
22
Ne (p.Y)Na^ 3
Mg 26 (p, Y )Al' :7

667

Mg 2 5 (p, Y )Ai ; J 6

630

632

650

654
660?

0. 127

39.5

9.96 min;

1.2

6. 4 a; 3. 2

Al 2 7 (p, Y )Si 2 8
Al"(p,Y)Si 2 8
Na 23 (p,Y)Mg; 24
Mg 2 5 (p, Y )Al 2 6

504

Half-life and
)3+ energy
(MeV)

7.85, 7.68, 5.71

473

500

Resonance
width
(FWHM)
(keV)
0.8

C 1 2 (P,Y)N 1 3
Mg25(p,Y)Al26

457

Crosssection
(mb)

>32

0.9
5

6. 4 s; 3.2

<0. 20
<0.17

10.29
10.8, 8. 0, 6. 9

0.8
3

6. 4 s; 3.2

6.4 s; 3.2

10.7, 5. 3
8.06, 4. 11

1. 44

32.5
6. 4 s; 3. 2

6.85?, 6.43, 4.28


2

2. 53 s; 4. 5
7. 1

30

6. 4 s; 3. 2

<1
7.87
8.5

10.41, 7.59, 1.77


9.40
10.8, 5. 3

2.6

<0. 06

17

0. 596 s; 5. 6
10.43, 7.61

<0. 06

7.88, 6. 68, 5.9


6. 4 s; 3. 2

462

LORENZEN and BRUNE

TABLE A2-I (cont.)


Proton
energy
(keV)
672
672
675
675

675
675

Reaction

F19(p.Y)Ne20
F19(p.Y)O16
Bn(p.Y)C12
Na23(p,Y)Mg24
25

Mg (p. Y )AI

26

Gamma-ray energy
(MeV)

Crosssection
(mb)

11.88, 1.63
7. 12, 6.92, 6. 13
12. 15, 4.43

57

Si (p,Y)P
,.27,
._.28
Al (p.Y> Sl
29
Si (p.Y)P30
N14(p,Y)O15
Si(p, Y )P

6.72

720

N15(p,Y)O16
Si(p, Y )P
Mg25(p,Y)Al26
Mg26(p,Y)Al27

725

Ni60(p,Y)Cu61

730

si 2 9 (p. Y )P 3 0

731

678

693
700

703?
710

717?
720

31

736

Al27(p,Y)Si28
Al27(p>Y)Si28

740

Na23(p,Y)Mg24

741

813

Al27(p,Y)Si28
Na23(p,Y)Mg24
Al27(PlY)Si28
w,31
C.3O,
Si (P. Y )P
21
Ne (P(Y)Na22
Al27(p,Y)Si28
Al27(p.Y)Si28
-.30/
i_31
Si (p, Y )P
25
Mg (p,Y)A126
F19(p.aY)O16
Si(p, Y )P
Mg 2 6 (p, Y )Al 2 7

816

P31(P.Y)S32

820

Mg25(p,Y)Al26
Mg24(p,Y)Al25

744
759
760

765
766
773
775
777
780

800?

825
825
828

P31(P.Y)S32
Ne22(p.Y)Na23

0. 5
0. 050

11.0, 8. 1, 7.1
6. 55, 5. 21, 3.30
7. 92, 6. 65, 1. 27
10.45, 7 63

30

Resonance
width
(FWHM)
(keV)

Half-life and
0 + energy
(MeV)

6.0
6.0
322
1

6. 4 s; 3. 2
<1

6.26, 4.29, 3.51

2.5 min; 3 . 2
100

8.0

2.03 min; 1.7

6. 59, 4.93, 2.46


6. 74, 5. 96, 5. 28
<5. 52
3.33

40

6. 4 s; 3. 2

0. 01 evb

<1

3. 3 h ; 1.2
2. 5 min; 3. 2

<0. 16
<0.09
11

<3
<1

<3

<0. 06
6.71, 4. 57, 1.27
2.62yr; 0.5, 1.8

12.33
8.00, 6.73, 1.27
6.65?, 4.99. 3.90

<0.08
0.009

7.6

7.39
7.69, 5.04, 4. 56
3.09, 2.64, 2. 14
9.64

6. 4 s; 3 . 2

6.4 ; 3.2
1.5

7. 2 a; 3. 3

463

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

TABLE A2-I (cont.)


Proton
energy
(keV)

Reaction

Gamma-ray energy
(MeV)

Crosssection
(mb)

7. 12, 6.92, 6. 13

19

835

F 1 9 (n.arv)O 1 6

840

Mg 2 6 (p, Y )Al 2 7

840

Si 3 (p, Y )P 3 1

6.82, 4.80, 1. 27

849

8.8

9. 61, 9. 17, 5.70


7.2, 5. 1, 4. 3
4.26
7. 12, 6.'92, 6. 13

877

O(p.Y)F19
.Ne
. 22,(p, )Na
,XT 23
Y
, .36
c- . 3 5 ,
l (P. Y)A
Ni58(p,Y)Cu59
F 19 (p,cr Y )O :l6
NaZ3(P.Y)Mg24

883?

K39(p,y)Ca"

9?

884
888

Al27(p.Y)Si':8
- .13 5 ,
. A. 3 6
C

890

Mg 25 (p. Y )Al 26

892

P31(P.Y)S32

895?

960

Si(p.Y)P
Ni 60 ( P , Y )Cu 61
N 1 5 (p. a Y )C 1 2
A 40 (p, Y )K 4 '
Ne 22 (p, y )Na 23
F 19 (p,a Y )O 16
Si 29 (p, Y )P 3()
Al 27 (p, Y )Si 28
K 39 (p, Y )Ca 40
Ne Z2 (p, Y )Na 23
F 19 (p.a Y )O 16
Al 27 (p, Y )Si 28
Mg Z5 (p. Y )Al 26
Ne 22 (p. Y )Na 23
Si(p,Y)P
Ni 58 (p. Y )Cu !i9
Mg 26 (p, Y )Al 27
Si 3 0 ( P ( Y )P 3 1
Si 29 (p. Y )P 30
, . 25,(p.y)Al
s.,2(>
Mg

980?

F 19 (p, Y )Ne 2

854
855
855
872

895
898
900
901
902
916

922
925?
933

935
936
940

943?
944?
947
954

955
956

Resonance Half-life and


width
g + energy
(FWHM)
(MeV)
(keV)
6.5

40
5

0.007 evb
540

11

<1

8 1 ; 3 . 7

4.5
8
<1

(P.Y)

5. 69
4.43
9. 66?, 9. 22?
7. 12, 6. 92, 6. 13
5. 74, 4. 48

0. 01 evb

<1

800

2.2

23

5. 1

3 . 3 h;

1.2

2. 5 m i n ;

3. 2

<0. 19
9?

9.69?, 9.25?
7. 12, 6.92, 6. 13

180

8.6
0. 34

6.99, 5. 15

4.35
8. 19, 6.92, 1.27
6. 49, 5. 04, 4. 52
5. 17, 4.70, 3.57?

6. 4 a; 3. 2

0. 14 evb

<1

81 a; 3 . 7

2. 5 m i n ;
6. 4 ; 3. 2

3.2

464

LORENZEN and BRUNE

TABLE A2-I (cont.)


Proton
energy
(keV)

Reaction

Gamma-ray energy
(ivie v j

980

Si 3 (p, Y )P 31

4.96, 4.84, 1. 27

980

9?

992

K39(p,Y)Ca40
Ne22(p,v)Na23
Na23(p,Y)Mg24
Mg25(p,Y)Al26
Be9(p,Y)B10
Mg 2 6 (p, Y )Al 2 7
.,27,(p, )Si
\ O .28
Al
Y

995

si 3 0 ( P , Y )P 3 1

1000
1001
1002
1006
1010
1011
1015
1022
1024
1029
1030
1040
1040
1046
1050
1050
1056

si30(P,Y)P31
Al27(p,Y)Si28
Ne22(p,Y)Na23
Ge74(p,Y)As75
Ni58(p,Y)Cu59
Na23(p,Y)Mg24
Mg Z 6 (p, Y )Al 2 7
.Na
. 23,(p, )Mg
>x, 24
Y
.,27,
>
O.28
Al (p, Y )Si
60
Ni (p,Y)Cu61
Li 7 (p, Y )Be 8
..15,(p )O
\^16
N

982
989

990
991
992

1059
1066
1068
1070
1070
1078
1080
1084
1086

(Y

N15(p,aY)C12
Mg 2 5 (p, Y )Al 2 6
P31(P,Y)S32
>K41
A.40-(p, Y )K
26
Mg (p, Y )Al 2 7
NU(P,Y)O15
...60,
I* 61
3 2
Nl 3 (p, y)Cu

Cross-

section
(mb)

<1

7.5, 6.8, 5.8

89

6. 4 s; 3. 2

0.05

10.78, 7.93, 1.77


6.98, 6.02, 1.27
8. 25, 6. 98, 5. 12

<1

<2. 5
4. 41

0. 007 evb

<1

81

B;

3.7

&0. 5
6.6
<0. 24

9
<5. 82
18. 15, 15. 25, 0.478
13.09
4.43

0.02 evb

<1

3. 3 h; 1. 2

168
1

130

15

130

6.4 s; 3.2
<5

8. 34, 5. 27, 3. 04
S5. 86

0. 05 evb

P W

Ne22(p,Y)Na23
Cl37(p,Y)Ar38
Ni60(p,Y)Cu61
>.,41
A.40,(p, Y )K
9
Be (p.Y)B10
Mg 2 5 (p. Y )Al 2 6

Resonance Half-life and


Zl?> P+ energy
r vv r u v i ;
(MeV)
(keV)

<1

6
9 . 1 , 7.5, 6.3
5. 87
6.9, 5.4, 0.7

2. 03 min; 1. 7
3. 3 h; 3. 2

<-S

0.03 evb

<1
3.8

6. 4 s; 3. 2

465

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

TABLE A2-I (cont.)


Proton
energy
(keV)
1087
1088
1089
1090
1090
1090
1096
1094
1100
1100
1101
1102
1105
1106
1117
1117
1120
1123?
1132
1135
1140
1146
1146
1160
1163
1165
1166
1167
1167
1169
1171
1172
1176
1180
1182

Reaction

Na 23 (p, Y )Mg 24
Ne 22 (p, Y )Na 23
Al Z7 (p, Y )Si 28
F 1 9 ( P . Y )N 2 0
F 1 9 (p.a Y )C 1 6
-.37,(p, )Ar
. . 38
Cl
Y
27
Al (p, Y )Si 38
Ge 7 4 (p, Y )A. 7 5
.40,
.,,41
A 58
K
Ni (P.Y)
(p, Y )Cu 59
31
P (p, Y )S 3 ' !
Cl 35 (p. Y )Ar 36
Mg 25 (p, Y )Al 26
Ne^p.^Na23
Al 27 (p, Y )Si 28
P 3 1 (P.Y)S 3 : !
K 3 9 (p. Y )Ca 4 0

Gamma-ray energy
(MeV)

Cross-

Resona nce
h

(mb)

(keV)

1. 1
<0. 11
12. 28, 8.84, 1. 63
7. 12, 6. 92, 6. 13

>0. 05
>13

,_ 61
Ni (p, Y)CU
-Cl
. 3 7 ,(p, )A]r
, . 38
Y

F 19 (p,ay)O 16
U
B 1 0 (> *P . YI )C
'
C13(P!Y)NU
C 1 4 (P.Y)N 1 5

Ne 20 (p. Y )Na 21
Na 23 (p, Y )Mg 24
Ni 60 (p, Y )Cu 61
Ge 74 (p. Y )A. 75
O 18 (p,y)F 19
AX27(p,Y)Si28
Mg 26 (p, Y )Al 27
N* 23 (p. Y )Mg 24
B 1 O (P. Y )C"
Al 27 (p, Y )Si 28

0.7
0.7

<1

9.5

4. 50

0. 05 evb

<1

81 s; 3.7

6. 4 s; 3. 2

0.80
9.92
9.5, 6. 1, 3.8

5
5

F19(P,CTY)O16
M .6O,

Half-life
and
P+ energy
(MeV)

22

5. 92
9. 1, 7.5, 6. 3
7. 12, 6. 92, 6. 13
9.7, 5.5?, 4.2?
7.71
8. 62, 4. 67, 2. 39
11. 30

0. 04 evb

<1

3. 3 h ; 1.2

<5
15

0.0055
0.56

2. 5
450

20.3 min;

1.0

6
12
22. 8 s; 2. 5

<4
1.2

<5. 96

0. 15 evb

<1

3. 3 h;

1.2

4.5

6.3

0.25
2.5
9.4

0. 0075

570

0.71

20. 3 min;

1.0

466

LORENZEN and BRUNE

TABLE A2-I (cont.)


Proton
energy
(keV)
1185
1184
1197
1198
1200
1209
1210
1212
1213
1213
1227
1235
1239
1247
1248
1250
1255
1257
1258
1261
1262
1273
1274
1278
1283
1295
1300
1308
1312
1313
1315
1316
1319
1321
1322?

Reaction

Mg 2 5 (p, Y )Al 2 6
F 1 9 (p,a Y )O 1 6
Ni 6 0 (p, Y )Cu 6 1
.,?7,(p, )Si
\ c .28
Al
Y
24
M (p, Y )Al 2
Ni 6 0 (p, Y )Cu 6 1
N 1 5 (p, Y )C 1 2
Al 2 7 (p, Y )Si 2 8
Na 2 3 (p, Y )Mg 2 4
Ge 7 4 (p, Y )A. 7 5
Ni 5 8 (p. Y )Cu 5 9
A 4 0 ( P , Y )K 4 1
Ni 6 0 (p, Y )Cu 6 1
Ni 6 0 (p, Y )Cu 6 1
P 3 1 (p, Y )S 3 2
C 1 3 (P. Y )N 1 4
Mg 2 6 (p, Y )Al 2 7
Ge 7 4 (p, Y )A. 7 5
_,35,(p, )A
S 4 36
Cl
Y
Al^p.^Si28
Ne 2 3 (p, Y )Na 2 3
Na 2 3 (p, Y )Mg 2 4
Al 2 7 (p, Y )Si 2 8
Ne 2 2 (p, Y )Na 2 3
F 1 9 (p.Y)O i 6
Mg 2 6 (p, Y )Al 2 7
K 3 9 (p. Y )Ca 4 0
Ni 5 8 (p, Y )Cu 5 9
C 1 4 (p. Y )N 1 5
Ni 6 0 (p, Y )Cu 6 1
Al (p, Y )Si
Ni 5 8 (p, Y )Cu 5 9
Ni 6 0 (p. Y )Cu 6 1
Na 2 3 (p. Y )Mg 2 4
F 1 9 (p, Y )Ne 2 0

Gamma-ray energy
(MeV)

Crosssection
(mb)

Resonance Half-life and


width
3 + energy
(FWHM)
(MeV)
(keV)
6 . 4 s; 3.2

7. 12, 6. 9 2 , 6. 13
<5. 99

19
0. 13 evb

110
<1

3 . 3 h; 1.2

6.3

3. 44, 1. 8 3 , 1.61
6.00
4.43

0. 14 evb

425

<10

7 . 2 s; 3.3

<1

3. 3 h; 1.2

22. 5
<0. 21
0.4

<2. 5
4. 63

0 045 evb

6.03
6.04
10.05, 7 . 8 0
8.71

<1

0. 13 evb
0. 1 evb

81 a ; 3.7
3 . 3 h; 1.2

<1

3 . 3 h; 1.2

9
0. 0 6 2

500

<2. 5
<0. 20

<1

7. 12, 6. 9 2 , 6. 13
9.6, 6.3
4.71
11.43
<6. 10

29

19
5

0. 11 evb
43
0. 21 evb

<1

3 . 3 h; 1.2

<0. 16
4.71
6. 11

0. 08 evb

<1

0. 25 evb

<1
2. 1

11

12. 50, 1 . 6 3

0. 081

4.0

81 ; 3.7
3. 3 h; 1.2

467

C HARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

TABLE A2-I (cont. ]


Proton
energy
(keV)
1322
1232
1327
1331
1332
1338
1343
1347
1348
1348
1350
1362
1370?
1371
1375
1375
1376
1380
1387
1381
1386
1388
1395
1398
1399
1408
1415
1419
1422
1424
1425
1431?
1431
1433
1443

Reaction

Gamma-ray energy
(MeV)

-.
Cross-

Resonance

Section

(mb,
Ne22(p.Y)Na23
...60,
>_ 61
Ni (p, Y )C\i
27
Al (p,Y)Si28
Ni 6 O (p, Y )C 6 1
Ge74(p,Y)A.75
,,39/
>.- 40
K (p, Y )Ca
...60,
. _ 61
Ni (p, Y )Cu
...60,
Nx (p, Y>_
)Cu61
19
F (p,Y)Ne20
F19(p.aY)O16
Ne Z 2 (p, Y )N* 2 3
Al27(p,Y)Si28
S34(P#Y)C135
...60,
, _ 61
Ni (p, Y )Cu
19
F (p,oY)O16
Ne22(p,Y)Ni23
Ni58(p,Y)Cu59
Al27(p,Y)Si28

0. 29 evb

i6. 11

0. 06 evb

<6. 12

5.91, 5.74,
6. 13

3. 8

fe. 14

0.1

7.12, 6. 92, 6. 13

89

0. 15 evb

S.6. 16

7. 12, 6.92, 6. 13
4.77, 4. 28, 3.

86

300

0 19 evb

3 . 3 h; 1.2

<1
<1

3. 3 h; 1.2
3 . 3 h; 1.2

5.6
5.6

<1

3 . 3 h; 1.2

11
<1

0.70
0.29

17.23. 12.80

0 053

<1

3. 3 h; 1.2

1270
15

3::

Mg 2 6 (p. Y )Al 2 7
F19(p,Y)Ne20
Ni 6 0 (p,Y)C 6 1
Ne22(p.Y)Na23
_p 3 i , X c 3;:
(P.Y' S

<1

<0. 12

BU(P(Y)C12

P 3 1 (P.Y)S 3 : :
Ni60(p,Y)Cu61
Na23(p,Y)Mg24
Ge74(p,Y)A.75
Ni58(p,Y)Cu59

3 . 3 h; 1.2

0.45 evb
0. 40 evb

0. 2 evb

P (P.Y)S

(MeV)

5.0

<6. 17

Na 23 (p, Y )Mg 24
O(p. Y )F l

<1

3+ enSrgy

<0. 16

Ni60(p,Y)C61
Ne22(p,Y)N23
31

(FWHM)
<

..,--,-,
Half-life and

0.5

<15
15

9.3

6.20

0. 35 evb

<1

4.82, 4.33

1. 7 evb

tO. 3
<2. 5
0.05

12.60, 1.63
56. 22

0. 19
0. 18 evb

<1

3 . 3 h; 1.2

15.7

12

3 . 3 h; 1.2

468

LORENZEN and BRUNE

TABLE A2-I (cont.)


Proton
energy
(keV)
1451
1461
1465
1465
1470
1482
1483
1484
1490
1491
1492
1500
1500
1502
1510
1515
1519
1520?
1522
1527
1529
1530
1533
1538
1540
1544
1550
1559
1566
1566
1570
1571
1577
1580

Reaction

Gamma-ray energy
(MeV)

Crosssection

Resonance

Half.life and
energy

(mb)

Ni 6 0 (p, Y )Cu 6 1
Ni 6 0 (p, Y )Cu 6 1
Mg 2 6 (p, Y )Al 2 7
Ni 6 0 (p, Y )Cu 6 1
_13,
C
(p, Y<.
)NT 14
31
P (p,Y)S32
Ni 6 0 (p. Y )Cu 6 1
Cl35(P(Y)Ar36
Mg 2 4 (p, Y )Al 2 5
...60,
\ ^ 61
Ni (p,Y)Cu
22
Ne (p, Y )Na 23
CU(p,Y)N15
Al 27 (p, Y )Si 28
Ne 2 2 (p. Y )Na 2 3
Cl 3 5 (p, Y )Ar 3 6
Ni 60 (p, Y )Cu 61
Nl 60 (p, Y )Cu 61
Si(p,Y)P
Ni 58 (p, Y )Cu 59
p 3

6.24
<6. 25

0.75 evb
0. 14 evb

6. 25
5.83, 5. 10, 3.07

0. 11 evb
0.074

<6. 27
9.9
3.72, 1.91
6. 28

0. 14 evb

3. 3h; 1.2
3.3 1s 1.2

<1

3.3hi 1.2

20
6
<1

3. 3 h; 1. 2

<5
0. 14 evb

11.61

0.3
<1

7. 2 s; 3. 3
3.3 1s 1.2

520

9.9
6. 30
<6. 30

0. 4 evb
0. 7 evb

<1

4.92

0.012 evb

<1

5
<1

3. 3h; 1.2
3. 3 h; 1.2

9.0

>
,,
Ni 60 (p, Y )Cu 61
<f>. 31
74
Ge (p, Y )A. 7 5
Cl 3 7 (p, Y )Ar 3 8
9.5
Ni 60 ( PlY )Cu 61 ' 6.32
Ni 58 (p, Y )Cu 59
4.93
N 1 4 (p, Y )O 1 5
8.8?
8.99

81 ; 3.7

14

Y ) S 3 2

C 1 3 (p, Y )N 1 4
Ge 7 4 (p, Y )As 7 5
K 3 9 (p ( Y )Ca 4 0
Ni 60 (p, Y )Cu 61
Al 27 (p. Y )Si 28
P 3 1 (p, Y )S 3 Z
Ni (p, y)Cu
Cl 3 5 (p, Y )Ar 3 6

<l

0. 06 evb

<1

3. 3 h; 1.2

9.0
5

0. 35 evb
0. 020 evb
0.037

<1

3. 3h; 1.2
81 a; 3.7

34

2.03 min;

<1

6.5
9. 9, 6. 6, 6. 1
6.35

0. 22 evb

<1

6.36

0. 35 evb

<t

<5

3. 3 h; 1.2

7
10

3. 3h; 1.2

1.7

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

469

TABLE A2-I (cont.)


Proton
energy
(keV)

Reaction

Gamma-ray energy
(MeV)

Crosssection
(mb)

Resonance
width
(FWHM)
(keV)

Half-life and
/3+ energy
(MeV)

1582

Ni58(p.Y)Cu!i9

4.98

0. 066 evb

<1

81 s; 3.7

1588

Ni^p.yJCu''1

6.37, 5.90

0. 9 evb

<1

3. 3 h; 1.2

31

32

1598

1599

Ni 60 (p. Y )Cu (>1

(P.V)S

1605
1607

r 19 (p,a Y )o llS

1610?

S 3 4 ( P , Y )C1 3 5

1618?

Si(p,Y)P

1620

1620

82>.Y>AI;;5
Nl60(p.Y)CuM

1635?

Si(p,Y)P

5
6.38, 5.00

2. 3 vb

<1

3. 3 hi 1.2

6.39, 5.01

2. 0 evb

<1

3.3 h; 1.2

6.0

3.40, 2.90, 1.34


6.40, 5.02

1635

Cl(p,Y)Ar

1639

Ni 6 0 (p, Y )Cu 6 1

<6. 42

1640

N15(P,OY)C1;1

4.43

1640

Al27(p,Y)Si2fl

1643

Ni 6 O (p, Y )Cu 6 1

1643

Ge74(P>Y)A.75

1645

1653

Cl(p >Y )Ar


...60,
> 61
Nl 2 8 (p,y)Cu
Si (p, Y )P 2 9
Ni 5 8 (p, Y )Cu 5 9

1656

Ni 6 0 (p, Y )Cu 6 1

1659

Al 27 (p. Y )Si 28

1660

MgZ4(p.Y)Al25

1660

Cl(p,Y)Ar

1663?

Si(p,Y)P

1663

Ni 5 8 (p, Y )Cu 5 '

1665

Ge74(P>>)A.75
>_ 61.
XI.6O,
Ni
(p,y)Cu

1649
1650

1669
1674

Cl(p>Y)Ar
-t.6O, i_ 61.
Ni (p,y)Cu

1679

Ni 6 0 (p, Y )Cu 6 1

1680?

Si(p.y)P

1680

Cl(p,Y)Ar

1670

1685

*. 43

36

7.2 ; 3. 3

1.8 evb

<1

3. 3 h; 1.2

0. 14 evb

<1

3. 3h; 1.2

340
0. 35 evb

68
<1

3. 3 h; 1.2

~15
i6. 43

0. 29 evb

4. 30
5. 05

50
0. 045 evb <l

6. 44, 5. 97

1. 0 evb

3.88, 3.43, 2. 93

5.06, 4. 15, 3.28

<1

<1

0. 1

0. 16 evb

<1

3.3 h; 1.2
4. 20 a; 4. 0
81 s; 3.7
3.3 h; 1.2
7.2 B; 3. 3

81 ; 3.7

~15
i6. 45

0. 4 evb

<1

3. 3 h ; 1.2

5. 50, 5. 08

1. 0 evb

<1

3.3 h; 1.2

6. 46

0. 5 evb

<1

3.3hi 1.2

9.6

15

470

LORENZEN and BRUNE

TABLE A2-I (cont.)


Proton
energy
(keV)

Reaction

Gamma-ray energy
(MeV)

Crosssection
(mb)

Resonance
width
(FWHM)
(keV)

S34(P.Y)CI35
Ge 7 4 (p, Y )A8 7 5

1690
1690
1691
1694
1698
1698
1699?
1700
1710
1711
1716
1721
1725
1726
1734
1739
1742
1748
1755
1757
1764
1765
1769
1770
1774'
1781
1783
1797
1800?
1805
1810?
1807
1833
1833
1844

Si(p, Y )P
N14(p,Y)O15
Mg24(p,Y)Al25
Ni58(p,Y)Cu59
Ni58(p,Y)Cu59

1849?

Si(p, Y )P

Fl9(p.Y)O16
Ni 6 0 (p, Y )Cu 6 1
_12,
,..13
C (p,v)N
Ni60(p,Y)Cu61
Si(p, Y )P
..27/(p, )Si
...28
Al
Y
Cl(p, Y )Ar
Ni 6 0 (p, Y )Cu 6 1
Ni58(p,Y)Cu59
Ni 6 0 (p, Y )Cu 6 1
Cl37(p.Y)A38
Al27(p,Y)Si28
Ni 6 0 (p, Y )Cu 6 1
Ni 6 0 (p, Y )Cu 6 1
N14(p,v)O15
_13,(p, )N
>.,14
C
Y
Cl(p, Y )Ar
Ni 6 0 (p, Y )Cu 6 1
...60,
. _ 61
Ni (p, Y )Cu
Cl(p, Y )Ar
O18(P,Y)F19
Ni 6 0 (p, Y )Cu 6 1
Si(p, Y )P
Al27(p,Y)Si28
Ni60(p,v)Cu61
Ni 6 0 (p, Y )Cu 6 1
,,34,
,_,35
S (p, Y )Cl
_ 74,
, . 75
Ge

Half-life and
+ energy
(MeV)

-30

7. 12, 6 92, 6. 13
6.48, 5 52
3.51, 2. 37, 1. 14
<6.48

35

1. 0 evb
0.035
0. 3 evb

<6.49
5. 11, 4. 20
i 6 . 50
5.2, 3

0. 23 evb
0. 35 evb
0. 11 evb

6. 52
<6. 52
9.0?
9. 17, 6. 43, 2.74

0. 7 evb
0. 3 evb

70

3. 3 h; 1 . 2
9.98 min; 1.2

<1

3. 3 h; 1 . 2

<1

3. 3 h; 1 . 2
81 s; 3 . 7
3.3 h; 1 . 2

<1

<1
<1
5

<1
<1
5

340

3. 3 h; 1.2
3. 3 h; 1. 2
2.03 min; 1.7

0.075

6. 54
&6. 55

0. 5 evb
0. 6 evb

<1

9.6
5.6. 55

0. 75 evb

<1

3. 3 h; 1.2

<6 56
<6. 57

0. 55 evb
0. 45 evb

<1

3. 3 h; 1 . 2
3. 3 h; 1 . 2

<1

3,3 h; 1. 2
3. 3 h ; 1 . 2

<1
20

(P,V)AB

9.0?
4.05, 2. 43, 1.62
5. 22
5.23

0. 063 evb
2. 1 evb

<1

iO. 1

2.03 min; 1.7


7.2 0; 3. 3
81 s; 3 7
81 s; 3 . 7

471

CHARGED-P ARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

TABLE A2-I (cont. )


Proton
energy
(keV)

Gamma-ray energy
(MeV)

Reaction

1860?
1870

S34(plY)Cl35
Ca 4 0 (p, Y >Sc 4 1

1879?
1890
1892
1906
1916
1926

Si(p, Y )P
Al 2 7 (p, Y )Si 2 : 8
P31(p,Y)S32

1931
1940
1945

O'8(P,Y)F19
Al Z 7 (p. Y )Si 2 ; 8

9.8

F19(P,<Y)O16

6-7

1972

Ge 7 4 (p, Y )A,; 7 5

1979
1985

N15(P,OY)C12

2000?
2000
2010
2025
2026
2026
2027

2074
2079
2083
2090
2120
2120
2130
2135
2161
2180
2200
2210
2212
2282

Ge 7 4 (p

Y )A.*
32

Crosssection
(mb)

10.68

24
~15

P 3 1 (P.V)S
Ge 7 4 (p, Y )Ai: 7 5

Ci3(p,Y)N14
Mg24(p,Y)Al25
C 1 4 (p, Y )N 1 E '
F19(P,OY)O16

Al 2 7 (p,Y)Si 2 8
P31(P.Y)S32
Ge74(p,Y)Al75
C (p, v)N
Al Z 7 (p,Y)Si 2 8
Si28(p.Y)P2"
C 1 3 (P,Y)N 1 4
P31(P.Y)S32

Li 7 (p >Y )Be 8
N20(p,Y)Na21
Ge74(p,Y)Ai75
Al27(p,Y)Si28
Al27(P.Y)Si28
Ge74(p,Y)Ai.75
Al27(p,Y)Si28
Al27(p,Y)Si28

Half-life and
0 + energy
(MeV)

0. 596 s; 5.6

75

P31(P.Y)S32
Li7(p,Y)Be8

Resonance
width
(FWHM)
(keV)

..15
1.5
40
35

4.43
10.77
1 9 . 0 ? , 16. 1?
5. 10, 4.80
3.77, 3.27

35

23

~20

0. 15

7.2 ; 3. 3

18

6-7

120

10.81

13.5
55

4.74
5. 10, 4. 39
10.90
19. 12, 16.21

12

0.20

4. 20 ; 4. 0

45
5

400
~15

40

22. 8 r, 2. 5

472

LORENZEN and BRUNE

TABLE A2-I (cont.]


Proton
energy
(keV)
2295
2315
2320
2340
2342
2344
2350
2400
2440
2480
2510
2520?
2528
2542
2543?
2553?
2558?
2564
2564
2570?
2575
2575?
2593
2630
2630
2664
2800
3000

Reaction

Gamma-ray energy
(MeV)

Ge 74 (p, Y )A. 75
F l9 (p.Y)O i6

6-7

P31(P,Y)S32
P31(P.Y)S32

11.09
11. 11

Ge 74 (p, Y )A. 75
Al 27 (p. Y )Si 28
N 14 (p. Y )O 15
Mg 24 (p. Y )Al 25
Ge 74 (p, Y )A. 75
N 14 (p. Y )O 15
!

F V^)O

16

Si(p,Y)P
Ge 7 4 (p. Y )A. 7 5
Al Z7 (p, Y )Si 28
Si(p,Y)P
Si(p,Y)P
Si(p,Y)P
Be 9 (p, Y )B 10
Be 9 (p >aY )Li 6
Si(p,Y)P
N 14 (p, Y )O 15
Si(p,Y)P
Ge 74 (p. Y )A 75
B U (p. Y )C 1 2
r l9 (p.rv)O 16
Ge 74 (p. Y )A. 75
F'V^O16
-.15,
,_12
N (p,oY)C

Crosssection
(mb)

Resonance Half-life and


width
+
energy
(FWHM) fi (MeV)
(keV)
27
85

8
8
15

9. 5?

14

3.65

0.3

2.03 min; 1.7


7.2 s; 3.3

11

9.7?

11

6-7

30

2. 03 min;

1.7

15

8. 1, 0.7
3.56

39
39

9.8?

1000
44

13.94, 4.43, 2. 14

300

6-7

90

6-7

60

10

4.43

750

45

2. 03 min; 1. 7

CHARGED-PARTICLE NUCLEAR EXCITATION FUNCTIONS

473

APPENDIX 3

BIBLIOGRAPHY
1.

Cross-sections for charged-particle reactions at higher energies


LANGE, J., MUNZE::,. H., Rep. KFK-767 (1968).
KELLER, K.A., LANGE, J., MUNZEL, H., PFENNIG, G., in Landolt-Bornstein, New Series 1/5,
Springer Verlag( 1973), Vol.a, Q-Values; Vol.b: Excitation Functions for Charged Particle Induced
Nuclear Reactions;
V o l e : Systematics of Excitation Functions for Nuclear Reactions Induced
by p, d, s He and a-?articles.

2.

(p, y) reactions
BUTLER. J . W . , Rep. NRL-528S! ( 1 9 5 9 ) .

3.

Detection limits and sensitivities for charged-particle reactions


on light elements
MARKOWITZ, S.S., MAHONY, J . D . , Anal. Chem. 34(1962) 329.
RICC1, E., HAHN, E. L., Anal. Chem. 39(1967) 794; 40(1968) 54.
ENGELMAN, Ch., Isot. Radiat. Technol. ji (1970) 118.
ENGELMAN, Ch., J. Radloanal. Chem. 2(1971) 89, 281.

4.

Compilations of charged-particle reaction cross-sections;


Special topics concerning charged particles
JARMIE, N . , SEAGRAVE. J . D . , R e p . L A - 2 0 1 4 ( 1 9 5 6 ) P - F .
SMITH, D . B . ( C o m p . a n d E d . ) , R e p . L A - 2 4 2 4 (1961) N e - C r .
AJZENBERG-SELOVE, F . , LAU8ITSEN, T . , N u c l . Phys. 1 1 ( 1 9 5 9 ) 1.
AJZENBERG-SELOVE,, F . , R e p . LAP-99 ( 1 9 7 0 ) .
AJZENBERG-SELOVE,, F . , R e p . LAP-100 ( 1 9 7 1 ) .

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS
B. BULOW, B. FORKMAN
Department of Physics,
University of Lund
and
Department of Nuclear Physics,
Lund Institute of Technology,
Lund, Sweden

ABSTRACT: A compilation is given of about sixty (y.n) cross-sections in the giant resonance region,
which are sometimes complemented with cross-sections for other types of reactions. Special reference is
taken to needs in activation analysis.

INTRODUCTION
Photonuclear absorption
The photonuclear absorption cross-section is comparatively small
and has a maximum value of only a few millibarns per nucleon. If a
photonuclear interaction takes place, the nucleus can be excited in a number
of different ways, depending on the energy of the photon.
At low energies (10-25 MeV), the dominant feature of the photo-absorption
cross-section is the giant resonance which occurs in all elements. Light
nuclei have a resonance peak, at an energy around 22 MeV, which value
decreases to about 13 MeV for heavy ones (Fig. 1).
The resonance width is about 4 MeV for spherical nuclei and increases
to about 8 MeV for strongly deformed ones (Fig. 2). The energy dependence
of the giant resonance absorption cross-section for medium and heavy nuclei

100

<

i i r i i r pr

x-p-p-~

80

IS
UJ

401

80

' 'i2o' ' ' 160

FIG.l. Giant resonance energy times A* as a function of A (Ref.[lJ).


absorption experiments and for heavy elements from neutron yield.

240

Data for light elements from total

475

476

BULOW and FORKMAN

has often been approximated by a Lorentz-shaped resonance line, with the


width T:
k2r2
<r(k) = a.
o (kg - k 2 ) 2 + k 2 r 2
For deformed nuclei, the giant resonance splits into two main peaks.
For light nuclei, the giant resonance shows considerably fine structure
related mainly to the properties of individual levels but also to collective
surface vibrations.
The giant resonance results primarily from electric dipole absorption
and can be explained as a vibration of the groups of neutrons and protons
confined in a nucleus with a rigid surface. The cross-section integrated
over the resonance is of the order of the classical value of the dipole sum
J crdE = 0. 06 NZ/A

(MeV barns)

where En is the meson production threshold and a is the electric dipole


absorption cross-section. Consequently, the integrated cross-section is
approximately proportional to the mass number. In Fig. 3 the integrated
cross-sections up to 30 MeV are given.
I

i J

"J
*T
a1

r
(MeV)

'.
.

a
a*

t 't

- (N=50)

(Z = 50)(N=82)

100

FIG.2.

r
150

< N : 126.Z = 82

200

Giant resonance width as a function of A (Ref.[2]).

477

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

1.6

1.2

0.8

0.4

0l_L 1 , 140, 1

I , I I I , I , I , I I I I
80

120
160
MASS NUMBER, A

200

240

FIG.3. Integrated absorption cross-sections normalized to the classical dipole sum rule value. For more
detailed information see Ref.[ 3 ] .

In the energy region above the giant resonance, but below about 200 MeV,
the photon mainly interacts with n-p clusters (quasi-deuterons) inside the
nucleus. In this region the cross-section drops to small values. Thus the
integrated cross-sections given in Fig. 3 are expected to almost exhaust
the dipole sum. New resonances appear in the cross-section curve when
the photon energies are above the photomeson threshold at about 150 MeV
(Fig.4). These resonances are related to the baryon resonances. The
average photonuclear cross-section is about 0.30 mb per nucleon for photon
energies between 300 MeV and 1000 MeV.
Nuclides produced in photonuclear reactions
In the giant resonance region, the most probable result of photonuclear
absorption is the emission of a single neutron, but other processes must
also be considered such as the emission of gamma rays, the emission of
more than one neutron and, particularly for light nuclei, the emission of
charged particles. Medium- and high-energy photon spallation yields are
systematically treated in Ref. [4].
Bremsstrahlung spectrum
Since there exist no intense monochromatic photon sources, the bremsstrahlung beam obtained when electrons hit a target is used as photon source
in almost all photo activation studies. The energy spectrum of the photons
in a bremsstrahlung beam from a thin target is well known and is shown
in Fig. 5.

478

BULOW and FORKMAN

PHOTON WAVELENGTH (cm)


1CJ12

10"'3

600

100
PHOTON ENERGY (MeV)
FIG. 4.

1000

Reaction mechanism and cross-section as a function of the photon wavelength and energy for

Au.

The spectra shown are calculated from the spectrum formulae given
by Schiff [ 6 ] . The average angle of emission of the photons 0 is, for
relativistic electrons,
6 = m 0 c 2 /k 0
k0 being the maximum photon energy.
Bremsstrahlung activation yield
Let n(k, kQ)dk be the number of photons with energies between k and
k + dk per unit radiator thickness per second in a bremsstrahlung beam
where k 0 is the maximum photon energy.
The energy content of the beam in the sample is then
U(k0) = j /kn(k,
o

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

479

FIG.5. Dependence of thi: bremsstrahlung spectrum shape on the election kinetic energy for a platinum
target normalized to one at zero energy (Ref.t 5]).

where f(k) is a correction factor which accounts for the distortion of the
bremsstrahlung spectrum by the effects of photon absorption in the machine
target, in the walli-i of the accelerator chamber and in the sample.
We define the number of equivalent quanta Q by

i . e . Q is the number of quanta with energy ko that have the same energy
content as the bremsstrahlung beam and define the cross-section per
equivalent quantum, a q , by
?a(k)n(k, k())f(k)dk

The bremsstrahlung activation yield measured in monitor response units


can be written
/cr(k)n(k,ko)f(k)dk
UR(k0)

k0R(k0)

The monitor measures only some part of the energy content of the
beam and thus R(kc) gives the sensitivity of the monitor for a kpbremsstrahlung beam.

480

B O L O W and

FORKMAN

While f(k) and RQzJ are quantities specific for the laboratory, n(k, k0)
can be tabulated for a bremsstrahlung spectrum. The relation between the
number of photons per MeV per incident electron per g cm"1 of a radiator
(Z,A) is
n ( k , k o ) = f - a(k,ko)brems

Z2 1
111.84 -j- - $(Z,k,k 0 ) (MeV"1
where r.
NA
a

-1

2
cm )

is the classical electron radius

is the Avogadro number


is the fine structure constant.

In Tables I andll, $(Z, k, k0) defined from the bremsstrahlung crosssection integrated over angles given by Schiff [6] has been used. The
value of Z used in $(Z,k, kQ) was 78 (platinum) and the screening constant
was taken to be 111.
k.

J*(k, kjdk is tabulated in Table I, *(k, k0) is tabulated in Table II for


different k 0 in the giant resonance region.

TABLE I. VALUES OF J $(k,kQ)dk (Ref. [7])


o

(MeV)

ko
/ *(k,ko)dk
o
(MeV)

10

03.55488

13

04.78641

ko

16

06.04665

19

07.32788

22

08.62522

27

10.81470

32

13.02999

36

14.81454

44

18.41618

52

22.04727

481

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

T A B L E II.

V A L U E S O F * ( k , k n ) (Ref. [7])

*(k,k o )

(MeV) (k =10MeV)
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00

.02933
.161(26
.22660
.27063
.30926
.34821
.39085
.43959
.1(9629
.56252
.61(010

(MeV) (k =19MeV)
0

19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00

.02687
.16080
.22024
.25731
.28386
.30476
.32262
33907
.35519
37176
38935
.40838
.42918
.45198
.47700
.50438
.53426
.56676
.60200
.64010

*(k,k o )

(MeV) (k =13MeV)
0

13
12
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00

.02814
.16239
.22271
.26222
.29321
.32093
.34829
37720
.40900
.44469
.48504
.53068
58215
.64010

(MeV) (k =22MeV)
0

22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00

This table is continued on the next page.

.02649
.16040
.21981
.25661
.28250
.30229
.31852
33275
.34601
35905
37239
.38643
.40146
.41772
.43539
.45461
.47548
.49812
.52258
54895
.57728
.60764
.64010

(k,k o )

(MeV) (k0 =i6MeV)


16
15
14
13
12
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00

.02739
.16140
.22105
.25883
.28676
.30985
33081
35136
.37269
39564
.42083
.44875
47975
.51414
55217
.59406
.64010

(MeV) (k =27MeV)
27
26
25
24
23
22
21
20
19
18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02
01
00

.02604
.15997
.21949
.25620
.28170
.30068
31563
.32805
.33891
.34891
35855
.36820
37813
38855
.39964
.41151
.42428
.43803
.45283
.46873
48577
.50401
.52347
.54418
.56618
.58948
.61411
.64010

BULOW and FORKMAN

482

TABLE3 II (cont.)
k

*(k,ko)

(MeV) (k =32MeV)

(MeV) (k =36MeV)

32
31
30
29
28
27
26
25
24
23
22
21

20
' 19

18
17

16
15
14
13
12
11
10

09
08
07
06
05
04
03
02

01
00

.02573
.15970
.21938
.25619
.28163
.30037
.31483
.32647
33625
.34483
35270
.36020
36759
37508
.38283
39096
.39958
.40875
.41854
.42902
.44021
.45216
.46490
.47846
.49285
.50810
.52423
.54124
55915
.57799
59774
.61844
.64010

*(k.k o )

36
34
32
30
28
26
24

8
6

.02554
.21935
.28178
31479
33550
35057
.36335
37568
.38869
.40308
41931
.43771
.45849
.48182
.50782
53657

.56816

.60265
.64010

22
20
18
16
14
12
10

$(k,ko)

(MeV) (k =44MeV)

44
42
40
38
36
34
32
30
28
26
24
22
20

18
16
14
12
10

8
6

4
2
0

.02527
.21938
.28224
31534
33553
34931
35990
36909
37797
.38720
39725
.40841
.42090
.43488
.45046
.46772

.48674
.50757
53025
.55482
.58129
.60971
.64010

*(k,ko)

(MeV) (k =52MeV)
0

52
50

48
46
44
42
40
38
36
34
32
30
28
26

24
22

20
18
16
14
12
10

8
6
4
2
0

.02508
.21943
.28273
.31613
.33631
.34967
35936
.36713
.37402
.38070
.38761
.39504
.40322
.41229
.42236
.43352
.44583
.45936
.47412
.49017
.50753
.52621
.54623
.56762
59039
.61454
.64010

Comments

In the following compilation, (7, n) cross-section curves are given,


which are sometimes complemented with cross-sections for other types
of reactions. Preference has been given to monochromatic photon data
when such are available. Estimates of non-tabulated cross-sections can
be made from Figs 1, 2 and 3. When data for monochromatic photons are
not available, continuous photon data have been used and the graphs are
marked with "brems". For some nuclei equivalent data exist from several
laboratories. They are then given without preference, for comparison.
The separation energies of particles or groups of particles have been taken
from Ref. [ 8] and are given in MeV. For further cross-section data and
more detailed information, refer to the Photonuclear Data Index, Ref. [3],
and the Photonuclear Data Center at NBS which offers a digital data library
of cross-section data.

483

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

The survey of literature pertaining to this compilation was concluded


in January 1974. Simultaneously with the compilation of the present crosssection data, B.L. Berman has compiled photonuclear cross-sections
obtained with monoenergetic photons. To make our compilation as complete
as possible, we have used results from Berman's atlas [9] .

Example of how to determine the yield curve


Problem: We want to determine the (7, n) yield curve for gold for 19 MeV
bremsstrahlung.
Solution: Look at the page with the gold cross-section. We choose the
upper figure, from which we get the a(k)-value. From Table II
we find k and 3>(k, k0) and derive the following:

= 19 MeV
$(k, k0)

(MeV)

CT(k)

(mb)

(mb- MeV"1)

0.40838
0.38935
0.37176

5.9
42.4
84. 1

0.3012
1.8343
3.1265

13

0.35519
0.33907
0.32262

170.6
323.5
517.6

5.5087
9.1408
12.8452

14
15
16

0.30476
0.28386
0.25731

505.9
376. 5
211.8

11.0127
7.1249
3.4061

17
18
19

0.22024
0.16080
0.02687

100.0
61.8
40.0

1.2955
0.5521
0.0566

8
9
10
11

12

> = 56.2046

a(k.)

56.2046

484

BULOW and FORKMAN

FIG. 6.

Oq(k0) as a function of k0

As

and with the value of J$(k, ko)dk from Table I we get the cross-section
per equivalent quantum

a q (k 0 ) =J u(k)
o

56.2046 19
= 145.7 mb
7.32788

, ko)dk

if f(k) = 1

In similar ways we get aq(k ) for other values of kQ:


kQ = 16 MeV

aq(k0) = 39.9553 16/6.04665 = 105.7 mb

k0 = 13 MeV

aq(k0) = 12.7755 13/4.78641 = 34.7 mb

k0 = 10 MeV

aq(k0) = 1.1876 10/3.55488=

Figure 6 gives Oqtko) as a function of k0.

3.3 mb

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

485

REFERENCES TO INTRODUCTION
[1]
[2]

HAYWARD, E . , P h o t o n u c l e a r R e a c t i o n s , NBS Monograph 1 1 8 , Washington, D . C . ( 1 9 1 0 ) .


CARLOS, P . , BERGERE, R . , BEIL, H . , LEPRETRE, A . , VEYSSIERE, A . . N u c l e a r Physics A219 (1914) 6 1 .

[3]

FULLER, E . G . , GERSTENBERG, H . M . . VANDER MOLEN, H . . DUNN, T . C . , Photonuclear Reaction

[4]
[5]
[6]
[7]

D a t a , NBS S p e c i a l P u b l i c a t i o n 3 8 0 , Washington, D . C . (1973).


JONSSON, G . G . , LLNDGREN, K . , Physica Scripta 7_(1973) 4 9 .
KOCH, H . W . , MOT2:, J . W . , Rev. M o d . Phys. 3 ^ ( 1 9 5 9 ) 9 2 0 .
SCHIFF, L . I . , Phys. Rev. 3 3 ( 1 9 5 1 ) 2 5 2 .
PENFOLD, A . S . , LEISS, J . E . , Analysis of Photo Cross Sections, Physics Research Laboratory, University

[8]
[9]

of Illinois ( 1 9 5 8 ) .
WAPSTRA, A . H . , GOVE, N . B . , N u c l e a r Data Tables ( 1 9 7 1 ) .
BERMAN, B . L . , Atlas of Photoneutron Cross Sections obtained with M o n o e n e r g e t i c Photons, R e p .
UCRL-74622, Lawrence L i v e r m c r e Laboratory, California ( 1 9 7 3 ) .

GRAPHS OF CROSS-SECTIONS
Symbols

atomic number

A
G

nuclear mass number


photon

neutron

proton

fis

fission

tot

total photon absorption

Lorentz line width

Po

proton ground-state transition

brems

bremsstrahlung

mono

monoenergetic

Compt scatt

Compton scattering

a(y, Tr.)

a(y, n) + a(y, pn) + cs(y, 2n) + . .

486

BULOW and FORKMAN

CONTENTS LIST OF GRAPHS

Element

Page

Element

Page

1
2
3

D
He
Li

deuterium
helium
lithium

487
488
489

40
41
42

Zr
Nb
Mo

zirconium
niobium
molybdenum

521, 554
522, 554
523

4
5
6

Be
B
C

beryllium
boron
carbon

490, 557
491
492, 557

45
46
47

Rh
Pd
Ag

rhodium
palladium
silver

524, 555
525, 555
526, 555

7
8
9

N
O
F

nitrogen
oxygen
fluorine

493
494, 557
495

48
49
50

Cd
In
Sn

cadmium
indium
tin

527, 555
528, 555
529

11
12
13

Na
Mg
Al

sodium
magnesium
aluminium

496
497
498, 557

51
52
53

Sb
Te
I

antimony
tellurium
iodine

530, 555
531, 555
532

14
15
16

Si
P
S

silicon
phosphorus
sulphur

499, 558
500
501

55
56
57

Cs
Ba
La

caesium
barium
lanthanum

533, 555
534, 556
535, 556

18
19
20

Ar
K
Ca

argon
potassium
calcium

502
503
504, 558

58
59
60

Ce
Pr
Nd

cerium
praseodymium
neodymium

536, 556
537, 556
538, 556

21
22
23

Sc
Ti
V

scandium
titanum
vanadium

505
506
507

62
63
64

Sm
Eu
Gd

samarium
europium
gadolinium

539
540
541

24
25
26

Cr
Mn
Fe

chromium

508
509
510

65
67
68

Tb
Ho
Er

terbium
holmium
erbium

542
543
544

27
28
29

Co
Ni
Cu

nickel
copper

511
512
513

71
73
74

Lu
Ta
W

lutetium
tantalum
tungsten

545
546
547

30
32
33

Zn
Ge
As

zinc
germanium
arsenic

514
515
516

79
82
83

Au
Pb
Bi

gold
lead
bismuth

548
549
550

34
37
38
39

Se
Rb
Sr
Y

selenium
rubidium
strontium
yttrium

517
518, 554
519, 554
520, 554

90
92
93

Th
U
Np

thorium
uranium
neptunium

551
552
553

manganese
iron
cobalt

Giant dipole resonance in A = 90 nuclei

554

Giant dipole resonance in 103 * A s 133 nuclei

555

Giant dipole resonance in N = 82 nuclei

556

Total photonuclear absorption: atot

557, 558

487

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

DEUTERIUM

2.5

Data point
designations
see reference

12
E-y(MeV)

Ref:

16

20

Proc. Int. Conf. Photonuclear Reactions and Applications (1973) Asilomar, page 323
G. Breit

eoo
v\
coo

**

&

120

WCI3SMAH I t 7 % )
7 WHETSTCNE <tM%)
O ALLCH
PAHTWI

oly.toO

90

400

200

o
60
CKCITATKW ENCRCV (MiVI

R e f : Nucl. Phys. A201 (1973)

593

30

J. E.E. Baglin

100

200 300

For data points see reference


Ref:

Proc. Int. Conf. Photonuclear Reactions and Applications (1 S'73) A s i l o m a r , page 3 6 3


E. B. Dally

400

488

BULOW and FORKMAN

HELIUM

(mb)

20

22

24

26

28

30

32

34

He(y,p) Nucl. Phys. A148 (1970), 211, Meyerhof et al.


Phys. Rev. 2_ ( 1 971 ) 723, B.L. Berman et al.

Ref:

'H.(y,n) { _

*H(r,p)

aermon < 01 <7O)


W b b e t Q1I73)

_P-Oorfcilw. ( M l

ISO
125

0
(mb)

1.00
O

(mb)

0.50
0.25

10

12

14

16

20

22

24

30

32

20

30

40

SO

60

E r c - (MeV)

E Y (MeV)

Ref: Phys. Rev. Lett. 2k_ (1970) Ref: Proc, Int. Conf. Photonuclear
1594, B. L.Berman et al. Reactions and Applications (1973;
Asilomar, page 1^9
D. V. Webb et al.
Z

ABUND

100.0

G,N
20.6

G,P
19.8

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

28.3

26.1

28.3

489

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

LITHIUM

o ( j . Tnl

/
0

fpm

I- - I - . -

' HIMH

orKj.nl-Mj.pnll

' ' ' .

''.I

'.2n)*(j.pJn)l

ol(y.2n)+(| .p2n)

'!.)

(Mi)'

I.-.
(I.I)

* ) 0 1 2 U M > t 2 0 2 2 M 2 l 2 t 3 0 3 2 3 4

M '

12

Ev(MeV)

Ref:

Phys. Rev. Lett. JJ5 (1965) 727


R T n -,.,
al.
1

Ref:

a
o. ly. Herman
et

ABUNI)

6
7

92.6

Proc. Int. Conf. Photonuclear


Reactions
and Applications
/,nnn\
j ,
^,
(1973)
Asilomar,
page 175
R.L.Bramblett et al.

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

5.7

h.6

27.2

3.7

26.i*

7.3

10.0

12.9

11.8

33.5

490

BULOW and FORKMAN

BERYLLIUM
6.00

*.00

a
(mb)

2.00

12.00

'Be

o(y.Tn)

S.OO

a
(mb)
4.00

15.00

5.00

2S.00

Ey (MeV)

Ref:

Proc. Int. Conf. Photonuclear Reactions and Applications (1973) Asilomar, page 151
R. J. Hughes et al.

ABUND

G,N

100.0

1.7

See

G,P
16.9

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

20.6

18.9

29.3

total cross-sections for the nuclear photoeffect.

491

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

BORON

(mb)

12

16

12

24

20
E Y (MeV)

28

28

Nucl. Phys. A215 (1973) 1*7


R.I. Hughes and E. G. Muirhead

Ref:

16

20
E Y (MeV)

AB1JND

10

19.6

11

80.it

G, P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

8 .1+

6.6
11.2

27.0
19.9

8.3
18.0

23.5
30.9

G,

11

.5

For (VvP) cross-section data see


Sov. J. Nucl. Phys. 21 (197O) U, I. Sorokin et al.

492

BULOW and FORKMAN

CARBON

20

10

30

25

35

E Y (MeV)

Ref:

Ref:

(y,tot)
(y,po)
(y,n)

Nucl. Phys. A128


Nucl. Phys. 58
Phys. Rev.

Phys. Rev. i i 2 (1966)790


S. C. Fultz et al.

12
13

98..9

G, N
18 7

1 .1
,

k .9

ABUND

Ref:

G, P
16 .0
17 .5

1969) 426,
1964) 122,
1966) 790,

N. Bezi<S et aL(fig)
R. G. Alias et al.
S. C. Fultz et al.

Sov. J. Nucl. Phys. v4 (1972)


B. S. Ishkhanov et a l .
G, 2N
31 .8
23 7

See total cross-sections for the nuclear photoeffect.

G, NP
27 .4
20 .9

G, 2P
27 .2
31 .6

493

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

NITROGEN
20
18

i (>. Tnl.UVEHMOHE

UN

16

- ( I , no). OTTAWA
(, p.). VAL I MELBOURNE

12
0

(mb)

10
8
6

12

(y,Tn)

111 M I J ' 11 ' 1! * ' '


^nfiW*!!.1*..
._
,a*1^* * * ' . .
* *

14

16

18

20 22
E Y (MeV)

brems

"26

2 30

Phys. Rev. CZ_ (1970) 2318


B.L.Berman et al.

Ref:

Proc. Int. Conf. Photonuclear Reactions and Applications (1973) Asilomar, page 727
J. M.Dixon

AHUND

G fN

G ,P

G,2N

G, NP

2P

14

99.6

7.6

15

0.4

10 .6
10 .8

30 .6
21,.4

12 .5
18 .4

25 .1
31 .0

10 .2

494

BULOW and FORKMAN

OXYGEN
i

Ir~iT^T

20

i i

25

E Y (MeV)

y.tot)
Nucl. Phys. AT28 (1969) hz6,
y,p)
Phys. Rev. Lett. V5( 1 965)367,
y,n)
Phys. Rev.
1^3 TT966) 712,
y , t o t ) t h e o r y Nucl. Phys. Agj>( 1967)271 ,

Ref:

15

N. Bezi< et a l . (fig)
R- C. Morrison et a l
B. C. Cook et a l .
B. Buck et a l .

Olv.n)
016

10

brems

0
(mb)
5

it

'\

<\
1

0
IS

EY(MV)

Ref:

Phys. Rev. 133 (i964)B869


R. L. Bramblett et a l .
A

16

IS

20
22
Ey(MeV)

24

26

Sov. J. Nucl. Phys. J_2 (i 971 )**8k


B. S. Ishkhanov et a l .

ABUND

G, N

G,

99.8

15 . 7

12 . 1

G , 2N

G, NP

G, 2 P

.9

23 . 0

22

28

See total cross-sections for the nuclear photoeffect.

495

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

FLUORINE

17

Ref:

23

20

E v (MeV)

Proc. Int. Conf. Photonuclear Reactions and Applications (197_'3) Asilomar, page 525
R.Bergere et

al.

19 F
15 -

oC(Y,n) +(Y.pn)*(Y.2n)]i

(mb) 10
f*\ A

5-

M
i

10

Ref:

Z.PhysrLk

19

i
i

'

ABUND
100.0

A A '""
1

Ui

261

(1973)

G,N
10.k

18
E Y (MeV)

125,

22

26

D. C a t a n a

et

al.

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

8.0

19.6

16.0

23.9

496

BtlLOW and FORKMAN

SODIUM

EY(MeV)
Total photoneutron cross-section.

Ref: Plotted points:


R. A. Alvarez et al.
Phys. Rev. C4 (1971) 1673

Dash-dotted curve:
D. S. Fielder et al.
Proc. of the Int. Conf. on Nucl. Phys.
Paris 1964, page 1025

Dashed curve:
K. Sato
J. Phys. Soc. Japan 1^ (1963) 1353

ABUND

G, N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

11

23

100.0

12.4

8.8

23.5

19.2

24.1

497

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

MAGNESIUM

Ref: Phys. Rev. C4_ (1971) 149, 1673

24>25f26

Mg

Fultz et al.

o(Y.n)

Dolbilkin et al. (7, total)


Nucl. Phys.
23. (1965) 137

20,

Min & Whitehead(brems)


Phys. Rev.
137 (1965) B301

Miller et al. (mono)


J. de Phys.
2,7. (1966) 8
Anderson et al. (brems)
Nucl. Phys. A127 (1969)

(mb).

Fultz et al. (mono)


Phys. Rev.
C4 ( i 9 7 i )
Webb et al. (brems)
Nucl.Phys. A159 (i97O) 81
EY(MeV)

Z
12

2k
25
26

AB1JND

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

7-7

16.5
7.3

11-7
12.1
14.1

29-7
23.9
18.4

24.1
19.0
23.1

20.5
22.6
24.8

10.1
II .2

11.1

(fig)

498

BULOW and FORKMAN

ALUMINIUM

37

Upper curve

<r[(y,n) + (y.pn) + 2(y,2n)]

Lower curve

(j(y,2n)

Ref:

Phys. Rev. i43 (1966) 790,

u
27

Al(y,n) 2 6 Al m

Ref:

Z
13

17

20

S. C. Fultz et al.

23

26

29

EY(MeV)
Nucl. Phys. 64, (1965) 486,

M.N.Thompson et al.

Proc. Int. Conf. Photonuclear Reactions and Applications (1973) Asilomar, page 525
R. Bergere et al.
A
27

ABUND
100.0

See

G,N
13.1

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

Gf2P

8.3

24.4

19.4

22.4

total cross-sections for the nuclear photoeffect.

499

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

SILICON

o(Y.tot)
(mb)
brems

20 *

20

15

113

25

E-y(MeV)

Ref:

fy,tot)
(y,n+np)

Nucl. Phys. Al 17 (1968) 124,


Nucl. Phys. 65 M 9 6 5 ) 577,
Phys. Lett. 6_ (1963) 213,

20

N. Bezic" et al. (fig)


P. P. Singh et a l .
J. T. Caldwell et a l .

"Si
Jl IV <J[(y,n)*ty.pn)]

15

(mb) 10

11 *
"V

Ref:

17 20 23 26 29
Ey (MeV)

Proc. Int. Conf. Photonuclear Reactions and Applications (1973) Asilomar, page 525
R.Bergere et al.
A

A BUND

G,N

28

92.2

29
30

h.7
3.1

See

G,P

G , 2N

G, NP

17.2

11.6

30 .5

2k . 6

19 . 9

8.5

12.3

25 .7

20 . 1

21 . 9

10.6

13.5

19 . 1

22 . 9

2k . 0

G, 2 p

total cross-sections for the nuclear photoeffect.

500

BULOW and FORKMAN

PHOSPHORUS

20

17

Top curve represents

ff(y,n)

Lower curve represents


Ref:

23

E Y (MeV)

+ ff(y,pn)

<r(y,pn)

Proc. Int. Conf. Photonuclear Reactions and Applications

(1973) Asilomar,

page

525

R.Bergere et al.

ABUND

G, N

G ,P

G, 2N

G, NP

G, 2P

15

31

100.0

12 .3

7.3

23 .6

17 .9

20 .8

501

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

SULPHUR

(mb)

23

20

29

26

E Y (MeV)
Ref:

Proc. Int. Conf. Photonuclear Reactions and Applications (1973) Asilomar, page 525
R. Bcrgere et al.

16

32

t r e us

12

I.p.. ii|.anu

\ / \

(mb). / i

V/\-

V\

^ ^ ^

\y

^ - \

20

.
28

,A

vCly. pnl*(j,2n|).

v_ N

./

Si

ffCly

VA.
.

Ref:
Nucl. Phys. A156 (i97O)
D. . Anderson et al.

.i

36

52

60

Ey (MeV)

ABUND

16

32

95 . 0
4 .2

3h
other

0 .8

G,

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

15 . 1

.9

.4

10

.9

28.1
20.1

21.2
21.0

16.2
20.4

G,

11

BULOW and FORKMAN

502

ARGON

E v (MeV)

Top curve represents


Lower curve represents
Ref:

z
18

23

20

17

cr(y,n) + O(y,pn) + a{y,Zn)


,2n)

Proc. Int. Conf. Photonuclear Reactions and Applications (1973) Asilomar, page 525
R. Bergere et al.
A

ABUND

G ,N

G, P

G, 2N

G, NP

G, 2P

kO

99..6

9 .9

12. 5

16 .5

20 .6

22 .8

other

0,A

503

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

POTASSIUM

20

17

29

26

E Y (MeV)

Top curve represents


Lower curve represents
Ref:

23

O(y,n) + ff(y,pn)
a(y,2n)

Proc. Int.Conf. Photonuclear Reactions and Applications

(1973)

Asilomar,

page

525

R.Bergere et al.

19

39
in

ABUND

93., 1
6.,9

G, N

G, P

G, 2N

G, NP

G, 2P

13 .1

6. k

18 .2

16 .6

10 . 1

7.8

25 .2
17 .9

17 .7

20 .3

504

BULOW and FORKMAN

CALCIUM
Ca

100

Wot)

do(Y,P,}

(Y.P.I

da

()

80

- o(y.n)
(mb)

(mb)
40

20

10

Ref:

15

2 0 2 S
E Y (MeV)

(y,tot)

Nucl. Phys. Ai 17 (1968) 124,

N. Bezi<5 et a l . (fig)

(v,n)

Nucl. Phys.

J. E. E.Baglin et

(y,P o )

Phys. Rev.

$k_ (196^) 5^9,


Y^l

(196^)B365,

al.

J.C. Hafele

EY(MV)

Ref:

Sov. J. Nucl. Phys. 1 2 (1971) 6 5 5 ,

B.S. Ishkhanov et a l .

ABUND

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP G,2P

ko

97 . 0

15. 6

8 3

29. 0

21 .4

14 7

44

2 .1

11. 1

12 . 2

19. 1

21 . 8

21 .6

other
See

0 9
total cross-sections for the nuclear photoeffect.

505

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

SCANDIUM

45

Sc

20.

16.

o
(mb)
8.

13

15

17
19
E Y (MeV)

21

23

The smooth curve represents the Danos model fit which is


the sum of the two dashed Lorentz curves.
Ref:

Nucl. Phys. A2O5 (1973) 139


R. H.Sambell and B.M.Spicer

ABUND

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

21

k5

100.0

11.3

6.9

21.0

18.0

19.1

506

BULOW and FORKMAN

TITANIUM

(mb)

30

16

12

18

20

22

24

EY(MeV)

+ 2 a (y,2n)
The solid curve i s

calculated.

Open c i r c l e s represent the

(y,Tn)

cross-section

corrected for neutron m u l t i p l i c i t y .


Refi

Nuovo Cimento 48B (1967) 460


S.Costa, F. Ferrero, C.Manfredotti, L.Pasqualini,
0. Piragina and H. Arenhovel

22

46
47
48
49
50

ABUND

G, N

G, P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2F

8.0

13-2

22.7

8.9
11.6
8.1

21.7
19.2

17.2

7.3
73.9

10.4
10.5
11.4

22.1

11.4

20.5
19.8

19.6

18.7
19.9
20.8

12.2

19-1

22.3

21.8

5.5
5.3

10.9

22.1

507

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

VANADIUM

E Y (MeV)

Top
curve represents
Lower curve represents
Ref:

ff

[(yn) + (y,pn)]
a[(y,2n)+3(V,3n)]

Phys. Rev. 128 (1962) 23^5,

80

S. C. Fultz et al.

oC(v,n)+(v,pn)]

60
ImbUO

20
20

23

26

E 7 (MeV)
Ref:

Proc. Int. Conf. Photonuclear Reactions and Applications (1973) Asilomar, page 525
R. Bergere et al.

ABUND

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

23

50
51

0.2
99.8

9.3
11.1

7.9
8.1

20.9
20.^

16.1
19.0

19.3
20.2

508

BULOW and FORKMAN

CHROMIUM

30

(mb)

20

10
iiiililllllll

20

25

Ey (MeV)
Ref:

Sov. J. Nucl. Phys. n . (1970) 272


B.S.Ishkhanov et al.

E-y(MeV)
Bull. Acad. Sci. USSR-Phys. 22. O9 6 9) 1588
B. I. Goryachev et al.

Ref:

z
2k

ABUND

G, N

G, P

G,2N

G r NP

G,2P

50

4.3

9.6

23.6

21 .1

16.3

52

83.8

12.9
12.0

53
54

9.5

10.5
11.1
12.4

21 .3
20.0

21 .6
18.4

17-7

20.9

18.6
20.1
22.0

2.4

7.9
9.7

509

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

MANGANESE
100
90
80

oij.Tn)

7t'
60

I"
a 4c<

I"
** 20
10
0
100
90

<rCly.nl

80
70

Is0

3. 60
\

A 40

22

2B

E Y (MeV)
Ref:

Proc. Int. Conf. Ptiotonuclear Reactions and Applications

(1973) Asilomar,

page

R.A.Alvarez et al.

ABUND

G, N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

25

55

100.0

10.2

8.1

19.2

17.8

G,2P
20.it

510

BULOW and FORKMAN

IRON

o<7,Tn)
60

(mb)
20

12

-ji

14

16

18

20

22

(MeV)

The solid curve is calculated.


Ref:

z
26

Nuovo Cimento 51B (1967) 199


S.Costa, F. Ferrero, C.Manfredotti, L.Pasqualini,
G. Piragino and H.Arenhovel
A

ABUND

54

5.8
91 .7

13 .k
11 .2

1O .2

20

2 .2

7.6

10 .6

18 .8

56
51
other

0.3

G, N

G, P
8 9

G, 2N

G, NP

G, 2P

24 .1

2 0 .9

15 .k

2 0 .k

18 .3

17 .8

19 .6

PHOTONUCLEAR

511

CROSS-SECTIONS

COBALT
100
90
0

At$-

70

<rt|.Tn)

y. "P '%

SO
50

30
20
10
0

(y,i)

(f,M)T

('.2i)

(r,3a)

100
90

aC(j.n)*(

SO
70
60

so

20
10
0

1,

40
35

(rCty.2n)-*-(Y>

30
25
"

iwyl,]

15

f(r,i)

10

(T.H)'

*(wi)

16

22

(r.)

''1

26

EY(MeV)
Ref:

Proc. Int. Conf. Photonuclear Reactions and Applications (1973) Asilomar, page 5U7
R. A. Alvarez et al.

ABUND

G, N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2p

27

59

100.0

10.5

7.**

19.0

17.^

19.2

512

BULOW and FORKMAN

NICKEL
1
ffl(.Tn)
\
\

IIHI"

II

i ,'

ir.M)

i.

im)
K)

12

IS

II

20

22

24

2<

Ev (MeV)

Ref:

Proc. Int. Conf. Photonuclear


Reactions and Applications
(1973) Asilomar, page
^
S. C. Fultz et al.

28

Ref:

ABUND

G, N

G.P

G,2N

58
60

67.9

12.2

8.2

61

1.2

62

3.6

6h

1.1

26.2

11.4

7.8
10.6

9.7

Proc Int. Conf. Photonuclear


Reactions and Applications
(1973) Asilomar, page 551
S.C. Fultz et al.

G,NP

G,2P

22.5

19.6

14.2

9.5
9.9

20.4

20.0

19.2

17.4

16.9
18. 1

11.1

18.4

20.5

12.5

16.5

20.9

19.9

513

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

COPPER

"e.
oly.Tnl

1-

I-

o(j.Tn)

''"'V,'!'..,

j'(Ml

oC(j.n)*

J.
i-

<y

sx
J 19

'illlHil

I_

Ref:

P h y s . Rc?v.

ABU1TO

29

63
65

133 (196k)

G,

B1149,

S. C. F u l t z e t

al.

G,P

G , 2N

G, NP

G, 2P

6 9 ,, 1

10. 9

6 .1

19 . 7

16 . 7

17 . 2

3 0 , ,9

9. 9

7 .k

17 . 8

17 . 1

20 . 0

514

BULOW and FORKMAN

ZINC

EY(MeV)

Ref:

Phys. Rev. L e t t . 2j> (1970) 685,

B. C. Cook e t a l .

fff(y.n) + 2(y,2n) + (y,np)]


Solid curve is calculated
Open circles give the (y,Tn) cross-section corrected
for neutron multiplicity
Ref:

z
30

For

Nuovo Cimento
A

48B (1967) 460,

S.Costa et al.

ABUND

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

48.9

11.9
11.1

7.7
8.9

21 .0

18.6
18.8

13.8
16.4

7.1
10.2

8.9
10.0

19.0
18.1
17.3

19.1

64
66
61

27.8

68
other

18.6
0.6

(y,p)

4.1

see

16.0

17-3
18.5

Nucl. Phys. A213 (1973) 388, G.E.Clark et al.

515

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

GERMANIUM

8
6
4
2

(mb) 6
4
2
O
3
2
I

76

12

17

22

27

32

G(r.np)74Go

37

42

E Y (MeV)

Ref:

32

Nucl.Phys. A213 (1973) 371, J. J. McCarthy et al.

70
72
73
74
76

ABUND

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

20.5
27.4
7.8
36.5
7.8

11.5
10.7
6.8
10.2

8.5
9.7
10.0
11.0
12.0

20.0
18.2
17.5
17.0

18.8
19.0
16.5
20.2
20.7

15.1
17.6
18.5
19.9

9.4

15.9

516

BULOW and FORKMAN

ARSENIC

0 C(yn)*( 7 .p n)3

135

75
90

As

/"'..

0
(mb)

i
i

ii

45

ii

A T W

i
r

1 /m^ n \
\ ^ I nf

10

(y,2)

18

22

t-}

26

30

EY(MeV)
Dashed curve: estimated maximum systematic error owing to bremsstrahlung normalization.

IB

22

26

30

34

Ev(MeV)

Ref:

Phys. Rev. 177 (1969)


B. L. Berman, R. L. Bramblett, J. T. Caldwell,
H. S. Davis, M. A. Kelly and S. C. Fultz

ABUND

G,

33

75

100.0

10 . 2

G, p

G, 2N

G,NP

G, 2P

6. 9

18 . 2

17.1

17 .9

517

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

SELENIUM

o (7, Tn)
brents

90

<mb> 6 '
30

i
o1'^
12

16

18

20

22

E Y (MeV)

The solid curve i s calculated.


Ref:

Nuovo Cimento 51B (1967) 199


S.Costa, F. Ferrero, C.Manfredotti, L.Pasqualini,
G. Piragino and H.Arenhovel

34

76
77
78

G, N

G, P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

9.0

11.1

16.4

7.4
10.5

19-2
18.6

19.8

7.6

9.5
9.6
10.4
11.4

16.9
20.1
20.4

17-3
18.4
20.6

21 .2

ABUND

80

23.5
49.8

82

9.2

other

0.9

9.9
9.3

12.3

17.9
16.9
16.0

518

BULOW and FORKMAN

RUBIDIUM
'

150

'

' 1 '

1 . . .

. . .

Rb
t

100

(mb)

50

. a. . 1 . . .

12

1 . . .

1 . . .

16

20

E Y (MeV)
o[(Y.n)*(Y.pn)J

See compilation for giant dipole resonance in

Ref:

A > 90 nuclei*

Nucl. Phys. A175 (1970 609


A.LeprStre, H.Beil, R.Bergere, P.Carlos,
A.Veyssiere and M. Sugawara

ABUND

G, N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

37

85
87

72.2
27.8

10.5
9.9

7.0
8.6

19-**18.6

17.5
18.5

17-7
20.5

519

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

STRONTIUM

(mb)

10

18

22

26

E Y (MeV)

See compilation for giant dipole resonance in

Ref:

A ~ 90 nuclei.

N u c l . Phys. V^ ( i 9 7 i )
609
A. LeprStre, H. Bell, R.Bergere, P.Carlos,
A.Veyssifere and M.Sugawara

ABUND

38

86
87

9.9

88
other

7.0
82.6
0.5

G, N
11 5
8 .4
11 .1

G, p

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

9.6
9.4

20.0
19.9
19.5

20. 1
18. 1

16 .6
18 .0

20. 5

19 .2

10. 6

520

BULOW and FORKMAN

YTTRIUM

o[(Yn).(Y.pn)3

(mb)

'

'

'

Ev(MeV)
Dashed curve: estimated maximum systematic error owing to bremsstrahlung normalization.
Ref:

Phys. Rev. 162


B. L.Berman e t

10

Ref:

Z
39

Nucl.Phys.

A
89

12

(1967)
al.

14

IS

IB

175 (1971)

1098

20

22

609,

24

28

A.LeprStre

et

al.

ABXJND

G, N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

100.0

11.5

7.1

20.8

18.2

177

See compilation for giant dipole resonance in A - 90 nuclei.

521

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

ZIRCONIUM

9 1

Z r

/
\
1

10

16

92

1 is

\
'(Ml)

'(r..)

12

18

22

Ey(MeV)

16

Zr
J.pnU

- " '

lit , Hlt|||i(||l,|ll|l|l
20

2*

32

12

Phys. Rev.

16

III It

I'll 11 III
I H{M t'M,I
I7,w 1

EY(MeV)

Ref:

94

A
/ 1,

Zr

30

22 26
(MeV)

20

1 |l

28

2i

(MeV)

162 (1967)

1098,

B. L. Berman e t

al.

ABUND

G, N

G, p

G, 2N

G,NP

G,2P

90

51.5

12.0

8. k

21 . 3

19.8

15.4

91

11.2

7.2

19 . 2

15.6

16.3

92

17.1

8.6

7
k

15 . 8

17.3

17.1

9**

17.^

8.2

10.

18.9

2.8

7.8

11.

.9
^t^ . 3

17.8

96

3
5

18.5

21.2

8.
9.

14

See compilation for giant dipole resonance in

A - 90 nuclei.

32

522

BULOW and FORJCMAN

NIOBIUM
i

93
200

Nb
-

150

100

o
(mb)

50
Stau
.

10

12

16
18
E Y (MeV)

20

22

1 .

. .

24

j
x oC(y.2n)!]

Ref:

Nucl. Phys. 175 (1971) 609


A. Lepretre, H.Beil, R Bergere, P.Carlos,
A.Veyssiere and M.Sugawara

ABUND

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

41

93

100.0

8.8

6.0

16.7

14.7

15.4

See compilation for giant dipole resonance in A 90 nuclei.

523

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

MOLYBDENUM

(mb)

10

18

22

26

Ev (MeV)
Experimental total photoneutron cross-section
(T|"(y,n) + (7,pn) + (y,2n)]
Ref:

N u c l . ]?hys.

A129

for Mo isotopes

(197^)

6i,

P.Carlos

et

al.

ABUND

G.N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

hz

92

"I 5.8

12.7

7.5

22.8

9^*
95
96

9-1

9.7

15.7
16.5

8.5
8.6

17.7
17.0

9.3
9.2

16.5
16.0

15.5
14.2

19.5
17.3
15.9
17.8
16.1
17.9

12.6
1^.5
15.1
16.1
16.5
17.3
19-5

97
98

9.5

7.*
9.2
6.8

23.8

8.6

9.8

100

9.6

8.3

10.6

18.0

524

BULOW and FORKMAN

RHODIUM
i

103 Rh

200

.*.

o
(mb)

100 -

*******

A*
*

* * * * * * *

...

t
I

22

18

10

EY(MeV)

Top curve represents (j[(y,n)


Lower curve represents
Ref:

ff(y,2n)

Nucl. Phys. A219 (197U) 39


A.Lepretre et

+ (y,pn)]

103
See

ABUND

100.0

al.

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

9.3

6.2

16.8

15.U 1 6 . 3

giant dipole resonance i n 103 s A s 133 n u c l e i .

525

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

PALLADIUM

Pd
200

. . * . ."[(v.nj+ly.pn)]

(mb)

100
o(y.2n) *

10

Ref:
z
46

14
18
EY (MeV)

Nucl. Phys. A219 (i97M 39, A. Lepretre et al.


A

ABTJND

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

13.3
14.9

102

1.0

10.6

7.8

18.9

17.7

104

1 1. 0

10.0

8.7

17.6

18.0

105

22.2

17.1

15.8

9.3

16.6

18.3

108

27-3
26.7

7.1
9.6

8.8

106

9-2

10.0

15.8

18.5

110

11.8

8.8

10.5

15.0

18.7

See

giant dipole resonance in

101 5 A <
: 133

15.7
16.4
17.8
19.2

nuclei.

BULOW and FORKMAN

526

SILVER

un

(mb)

( m b ) o

20

26

32

E Y (MeV)

Ref:

Phys. Rev.

177 (1969)

17^5,

B.L.Berman et

al.

aC(v.n)^.pn

Ag
200
'
0
(mb)

100
'

"'

10

Ref:

o(
.

12 14 16 18 20 22
Ev(MeV)

EY(MV)

Nucl. Phys. A219 (1974) 39


A.Lepretre

et

Ref:

Bull. Acad.Sci. USSR

22 (1969) 1889

al.

B.S. Ishkhanov et al.

Z
47

ABUND

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

107

51.4

9.6

5.8

17.5

15.4

15.1

109

*+8.6

9.2

6.5

16.5

15.7

16.4

See

giant dipole resonance in

103 A 133

nuclei.

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

527

CADMIUM
1

Cd

200 -

.*

oC(y,n)+(y,pn) 3

100

oly

.*

>

10

14

18
Ev(MeV)

Nucl. Phys. A219 (i97i) 39,

Ref:

'i

22

A. Lepretre et al.

AIIUND

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

110

12.4

8.9

17.2

18.1

9.1

16.9

15.9

9.6

16.4

18.5

9-8

15.9

16.2

9.0

10.3

15.6

18.8

15.4
16.2
16.8
17.6
18.3

8.7

11.1

14.8

19.1

103 s A s 133

nuclei.

111

12.8

112

24.1

9.9
7.0
9.4

113

12.3

6.5

114

28.9

7.6

116

other
See

1.9
giant dipole resonance in

528

BULOW and FORKMAN

INDIUM
i

115
240

In

180

'

(mb)'2o

1
'f

o
'-r.n |

|'7,2n |

12

16

''

20

(mb)

l ' 1 'T!3|tl'l||l

2*

28

16

12

32

20

Ref:

2*

28

EylMeV)

E Y (MeV)

Phys. Rev. 186 (1969) 1255, S.C. Fultz et al.


i

In

oC(Y,n) (Y.pn)]

200

(mb)
*

100 -

\
o(Y.2n)
A'

n * i

10

Ref:

12 14

16 18 20 22
E Y (MeV)

Nucl. Phys. A219 (197^) 39, A.Lepretre et al.

49

113
115

ABUND
h.3
95.7

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP G,2P

9.h
9.0

6.1
6.8

17.1
16.3

15-5 15*7
15.9 17.1

See giant dipole resonance in

103 s A 133

nuclei.

32

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

529

TIN
1

'

'

'

'

n)]

200/"*

'.

100v
.

'

.
* *

124

Sn

120

Sn"

(mb)

.'

*'

^y:'* A*

118

Sn"

117

Sn"

\
\

ft

" 6 Srf
\

12

16

20

E v (MeV)

Kef:

z
50

N u c l . Ptiys.

A21 9 ( 1 9 7 ^ )

61,

P.Carlos

et

al.

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

1.0

10.8
9.6

7.5
9.3
9.4
10.0

19.0

17.6
18.3
16.2
18.8

12.9
16.1
16.9

119

14.3
7.6
24.0
3.6

120

3 2.9

9.1

122

4.7
5.9

8.8

1 12
116
117
118

124

other

ABJND

6.9
9.3
6.5

8.5

9.9
10.7
11.4
12.1

17.1
16.5
16.3
15.8
15.6
15.0
14.4

16.5
19.0
19.8
20.4

17.5
18.2
19.0
-

l.O

S e e also: Phys. Rev.

186

(1969) 1255,

S. C. Fultz et a l

530

BULOW and FORKMAN

ANTIMONY

300

200-

o
(mb)
100-

10

18

22
E-y (MeV)

Top curve represents

ff[(y,n)

Lower curve represents

Ref:

Z
51

Nucl. Phys. A219 ( 197*0 39,

ABUND

G,N

26

30

+ (y,pn)]

<x(yf2n)

A. Lepretre et

G,P

G,2N

al.

G f NP

G,2P

121

57.2

9.2

5.8

16.3

1^.9

16.5

123

42.8

9.0

6.6

15.8

15.4

18.0

See

giant dipole resonance in

103 s A * 133

nuclei.

531

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

TELLURIUM
T

300 -

Te

.*
*4
o[(v.n)+(v.pn)]

200
0

(mb)

100

fl(V|2n)/.^

Ref:

l f

12

16

Nucl. Phys.

A2 1 9 (197*0

52

122

20
EY (MeV)

39,

A.Lepretre

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

2.5

9.8

8.0

17.3

13.8

17.5
15.2
17.8
18.0

15.2
15.8
16.4
17.6

18.0

18.5

124

k.6

9.4

8.6

125

7.0

6.6

8.7

126

18.7

9.1

15.7

128

31.8

9.1
8.8

9.6

130

34.5

8.4

10.0

15.1
14.5

See

al.

ABUND

17.0
16.4
16.0

other

et

G,2P

0.9
giant dipole resonance in

103 s A s 133

nuclei.

532

BULOW and FORKMAN

IODINE

I200

I
1r,|

,'lI'l'l
' '^

oC<Y,.nMv..pn>:

fuo

y \%

'(T.M)

'(.*)

0[lj.2n)*(j.p2nU

1 .

12

16

20

24

26

32

EY(MeV)

Ref:

Phys. Rev. 1 48 (1966)


R. L. Bramblett et

53

127

1 1 98

Ref:

Nucl. Phys. A133 (1969)


R.Bergere et

al.

al.

ABUND

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

Gf2P

100.0

9.1

6.2

16.2

15.3 15.3

533

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

CAESIUM

360

133

3?D

90

Cs

00

280

a (Y.2n)

tc

l|

||

?i0

?nn

(mb)

160

120

ao
HO

to

!|l

1mb)

to

16

12

20

24

28

'(y- 2 ">

'iy. )

16

12

EYIMeV)
Ref:

Phys. Bev.

'ly."'

20

24

Ev(MeV)

177 (1969)

17^5,

B.L.Berman e t

al.

133Cs

300

*. ot(Y,n)+ (Y.pn)]

ill
OIII
I111 111 I I

20
,.'

||i

30

200

(mb)

>

100

, . 2 n , ^

10
Ref:

z
55

Nucl. Phys.

14

18
EY(MeV)

A219 (197*0 39.

22
A.Lepretre e t

al.

ABUND

G ,N

G,P

G , 2N

G,NP

G, 2 P

133

100.0

9.0

6 .1

16 . 2

15.0

15 . 2

See

giant dipole resonance in

1O3 s A s 133 nuclei.

28

534

BUU)W and FORKMAN

BARIUM
400
360

A
" \

320
. 280
240
I 200

/
/

>

i i6o

Tn)

- I .

rl,. Tn)

120
-H

'0.2.)
V.3

tiy,2i

Tlr,i,

400
360

320
a

5 240

| X 160
2 120
" 80
40

1
I

. . '

2n.
I

60

it".

i'

16

V i

20

|l

(r.3.r

56

E Y (MeV)

Phys. Rev. 2 (1970) 2318


B. L. Berman et al.
A

ABUND

GfN

134

2.4

135

6.6

136

7.8

137
138
other

*****

'()

E Y (MeV)

Ref:

"ll'H

tir,3ii
24
28

t|T.2ll

12

P2n

lit

TlM|

>>!

" " '

"in 1

& 40

<.P

CMP

V..)

1
,t ! ,.
r.3.1' Y'ljii I

'ail,

.'',

280

Ref:

Nucl. Phys. A172 (1971)426


H. Beil et al.

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2p

9.5

8.2

16.7

17.1

14.3

7.0

8.3

16.4

15.1

14.8

9.1

8.5

16.1

17.4

15.^

11.3

6.9

8.7

16.0

15.^

15.8

71.7

8.6

9.0

15.5

17.3

16.4

0.2

See compilation for giant dipole resonance in

N = 82 nuclei.

535

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

LANTHANUM

300 -

(mb)

10

18

22

30

EY(MeV)
--Y.n
*Y.2n

Ref:

Nucl. Phys. A121 (1968)


j
R. Bergere, H.Beil and A. Veyssiere
See compilation for giant dipole resonance in N > 82 nuclei.

ABTJND

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

57

139

999

8.8

6.2

16.1

i4.8

15.2

other

0.1

536

BULOW and FORKMAN

CERIUM
i

Ce

300

(mV 00
100

18

22

26

30

Y.2n
Ref:

Nucl. Phys. A1 33 (1969)


R.Bergere, H. Beil, P.Carlos and A.Veyssiere
See compilation for giant dipole resonance in

z
58

N 82 nuclei.

ABUND

G,N
G.

G
P
G ff P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

l40

88.5

9.2

142

11.1

7.2

8.1
8.8

16.7
12.6

16.9
15.6

H.3
15.8

other

0.4

537

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

PRASEODYMIUM
390
WO

ff(f.Tn)

250

f 200

ii
10

12

E v (MeV)

I I

o"C(|.n)(y.pnO

Ref:

't

Nucl. Phys. A172 ( 1 97 1)


H.Beil et al.

. ilnr.!. 1 1'. ,jl


1 .itHiil-'i;

n)

",)[

', " i i i

r,2)
H

20

26

12

10

12

Phys. Rev. 2h. (1966) 1198


R.L.Bramblett et al.

Ref:

Ev

E-y(MeV)

Ref:

24

(MeV)

Phys. Rev. C (1970) 1129


R.E.

Sund et al.

ABUND

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

59

1^1

100.0

S.h

5.2

17.3

1^.^

13.3

See compilation for giant dipole resonance In

N a 82 nuclei.

538

BULOW and FORKMAN

NEODYMIUM
r~ii
i

<
200

100
\
; '
148,
Nd
0

(mb)
/ . A

\
Nd
144.
Nd
143

142
.

><l

10

12

14

16

18

20

Nd
I

22

E Y (MeV)

+ (y,pn) + (y,2n)]
Ref:

z
60

Nucl. Phys. A219 (1974) 61 , P.Carlos et al.


A

ABUND

1^2
143
144

^k5
^k6
148
150

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

27.1

9.8

7.2

12.2

6.1

17.9

16.6

12.5

7.5

15.9

13.4

23.9

7.8

13.1

8.0

13.9

15-3

8.3

8.0

17.2

5.7
7.6

13.8

13.6

13.7

14.4

8.6

13-3

15.5

5.7
5.6

7.3
7.4

15.1

9.2

12.6

15.9

16.2

9.6

12.4

16.5

17.6

See compilation for giant dlpole resonance in

N a 82 nuclei.

539

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

SAMARIUM
i
, , . . , . . . . . . . . * ' * ' > " "

200

* ,
* "

100

V-H-....*.'

'

/>>'-

15

Sm_

(mb)

" , . - /

'

"

f* *
1)

'"Sm

.-. -1
..

' 5 0 Sm_
-

ID

'"StT^

I)

>

*Sm'
i

10

18

22

EY(MeV)
Ref:

z
62

Nucl. Phys. A219 (197^) 61, P.Carlos et al.

ABUND

G,N

G.P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

10.6
6.ft

6.3

19.0
1ft.8

16.2

10.6
12.ft

UU

3.1

1^7

15.0

148

8.1

1^9

11.3
13.8

150

7.k

8.0

152

26.7

8.3

8.3
8.7

22.7

8.0

9.0

5.9

7.1
7.6
7.6

1ft.5
1ft.0
13.9
13.9
13.8

13.ft
15.3
13.5
15.5
16.6
16.5

13.0
13.6
1ft.2
15.7
16.9

540

BULOW and FORKMAN

EUROPIUM

oC(Y.n) (Y.pn)3

270

iii,

153

Eu

180

0
(mb)

90

i
T

'(r,n)
12

(y.2n)
16

."in

20

f
28

EY(MeV)
Dashed curve: estimated maximum systematic error owing to bremsstrahlung normalization.

12

16

20

24

E v .(MeV)

Ref:

z
63

Phys. Rev.

185 (1969) 1576,

B. L. Berman et

al.

ABUND

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

151

^7.8

8.0

k.9

14.4

12.9

13.2

153

52.2

8.6

5.9

1^.9

1^.2

Ik.6

541

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

GADOLINIUM

oC(Y.n).(Y.np) ]

360

240
0

I
f

(mb)

120

60Gd

%ffil1i

111 f

Ur.n)

10

hrM) . . \\ { I .

(y.2n)

18

26

22

30

E-y(MeV)
Dashed curve: estimated maximum systematic error owing to bremsstrahlung normalization.

U
Ref s

Phys. :Rev.

6k
155
156
157
158
160
other

18
22
EY(MeV)

(1969J 1576,

26

30

B. L. Berman e t a l .

ABUND

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

2. 1

8.7
6.4
8.5
6.4
7-9
7.5

7.6
7.6
8.0
8.0
8.5
9.3

15.1
15.1
15.0
i4.9
14.3
13.4

16.2
14.1
16.2
14.4
16.O
16.0

13-5
14.1
14.7
15.2
15.9

14.7
20.5
U5.7
2'u9
21 .9
0.2

542

BULOW and FORKMAN

TERBIUM

l Tk

ha
ff(j.Tn)
.

F11

j -

V,
'"'*,,:

iwl

ol(.Tn)

-I,

I
'Hi

I i| i li

is

" "' ' "V,,i

-Ml;

....,..,

300
2W

oC(y.n)*(j.pnl]

12C.

/t

Ill
''!'mi. iI*
ill

AVi..

*!.)

*,
/
'(T.3.!

12

16

20

24

12

28

Ref:

16

20

24

28

E v (MeV)

E Y (MeV)

Phys. Rev. 122 (196*0 B869


R. L.Bramblett et al.

Ref: Nucl. Phys. A121 (1968) 463


R. Bergere et al.

ABUND

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

65

159

100.0

8.1

6.1

1^.9

14.0

-\k.6

543

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

HOLMIUM
400
MO

I'l,
'

a((.Tn)

..(''ll,
'III'
ll

olj.Tn)

'l

' 240

! 200

\
/
so
IT

'"'"

'**'

(rt( , . n , , , p n ) :
.

t
1

! 200

',
1
1

ICO
| 120

4n tut tl

- VTT-VT,
240
216
1*2

1 i

1U

I'"

1
1

< 120

16

20

2t

10

28

IS

22

26

30

E Y (MeV)

Ey (MeV)

Ref:

"i

Nucl. Phys. A121 (1968) 463


R.Bergere et al.

Ref:

Phys. Rev. 185 (1969) 1576


B. L-Berman et al.

ABUND

G,N

G,P

Gf2N

G,NP

G,2P

67

165

100.0

8.0

6.2

14.7

13.9

14.8

544

BULOW and FORKMAN

ERBIUM

10

22

18

26

Ey(MeV)

Ref:

Nucl. Phya. A133 (1969)

*H 7

R. Bergere, H.Beil, P.Carlos and A.Veyssiere

z
68

ABtJND

G,N

G,P

G,2N

16k

1.6

8.9

6.9

167

33.4
22.9
27. 1

8.5
6.4

14.9
0.1

168
170

other

G,NP

G,2P

15.8

15.3

7.3
7.5

15.1
14.9

15-3
13-8

12.3
13-5
14.3

7.8

8.0

\k.2

15.3

7.3

8.6

13.3

15.3

15.O
-

545

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

LUTETIUM

18

26

22

Ey(MeV)

Ref:

z
71

Nucl. Phys. A 133 (1969) 4i7


R.Bergfere, H.Beil, P.Carlos and A.Veyssiere
A

A BUND

G,N

G p

G, 2N

G, NP

G,2P

175

97.4

7.7

5.5

14 .4

13 .0

13 5

176

2.6

6. 3

6 .0

14 .0

11 .8

14 .1

546

BULOW and FORKMAN

TANTALUM
350

300

oly.Tnl

/*

.Tn)

'.
\
\

HI

500
400

oC(y n) ty. pn

\
\

!*
'
i

3 200

4'

j WO
0

Vtt1

200

'(.>

ID

18

22

26

Ref:

In
\

urn

"lllll

w
12

Ev (MeV)

>2nll

"ilk

I"

n)

18

24

30

36

E v (MeV)

Phys. Rev. 12g. (19^3) 2723


R.L.Bramblett et al.

Ref:

Nucl. Phys. A121 (1968) 463


R.Bergere et al.

ABUND

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

73

181

100.0

1.6

5.9

1^.2

13.3

13.9

547

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

TUNGSTEN

450

186 w

100

OC(y.n) + lf.pn>]

350

,',

300

',

2S0

(mb) 200

ISO

,.

100

SO
(r..>

'r. *">

Ir.M
18

'

24

30

(MeV)

Ref:

Phys. Rev.

IMeV)

185 (1969) 1576,

B.L.Berraan et a l .

400
(mb)200

10

15

20

25

E Y (MeV)
Dashtsd curves show the cross-sections
corrected for multiplicity
Ref:

74

Sov. J. Nucl. Phys. V (1973) 1,

Yu.I. Sorokin et al.

ABUND

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

182

26.4

8.1

7.1

14.7

14.7

13. 0

183

14.4

6.2

7.2

14.2

30.6

7.4

7.7

13.6

13.3
14.6

13. 5

184
186

28.4

7.2

8.4

13-0

15.2

other

0.2

14. 3
-

548

BULOW and FORKMAN

GOLD

10

14

E-y (MeV)

The solid line is a Lorentz line.


Ref:

Nucl. Phys. A159 (1970) 561 ,

A.Veyssiere et al.

600

400-

200-

24

Upper curve: o(y,n) + a(Y,np)


Lower curve: a(y,2n) + 3a(y,3n).

Ref:
Z
79

Phys. Rev. 127 (1962)1273 ,

S.C. Fultz et al.

ABUM)

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

197

100.0

8.1

5.8

14.7

13.7

13.9

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

549

LEAD
207p b
/

1
\

. ll'-l

(.)

12

16

20

24

28

10

V
w lllil'l'l
'Ml .
IB

E Y (MeV)

Ref:

r it 1 .1 i

22

26

30

36

(MeV)

Phys. Rev. 136 (196U) B126,

R.R.Harvey et al.

x>
SCO

208 R b

fff(].n)*(j.pn)3

SOO

ao

()| |J

mo

10

' )1
18

22

ll
6

26

12

18

Ref:

Phys. Rev. _l_3_6 (1964) B126


R.R.Harvey e t

z
82

ABUND

2*

E Y lMeV)

E, ,{MeV I
Ref:

al.

Nucl. Phys. AT_5_2 (


A.Veyssiere et al,

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

6.6

14.4
14.8

12.3

14.0
14.9

204

1.5

8.4

206

23.6

8.1

7.3

15.2
14.8

207

22.6

7.5

14.8

208

52.3

6.7
7.4

8.0

14.1

13.7
14.7
15.4

550

BULOW and FORKMAN

BISMUTH

15

20

25

Ev.(MeV)

a
(mb) 100

15
20
EY(MeV)
Ref :

Z
83

Phys. Rev. 136 (1964)


R.R.Harvey et a l .

25

B126

ABUND

G,N

G,P

Gf2N

G,NP

209

100.0

7.5

3.8

ik.h

ii.-\

G,2P
n

.8

PHOTONUCLEAR

551

CROSS-SECTIONS

THORIUM

400-

(mb)

200-

Ref:

Nucl. Phys. A199 (1973) ^ 5 ,

5.0

6.0

7.0

A.Veyssiere et a l .

8.0

E v (MeV)
Ref:

N u c l . P h y s . A2O6 ( 1 9 7 3 ) 5 9 3 , M . V . Y e s t e r e t a l .

ABUND

G,N

G,P

G,2N

G,NP

G,2P

90

232

100.0

6.4

7.8

11.6

13.7

13.7

552

BULOW and FORKMAN

URANIUM

Ref: Nucl. Phys. A199(1973)^5


A.Veyssiere et al.

Ref: Phys. Rev. 133 (1964)B676


C D . Bowman et al.

I r . O CROSS-SECTIONS FOR
THREE URANIUM ISOTOPES
. 2J8U

0 "

(mb)

5.0

54

58

6.2

6.6

70

74

78

Ev(MeV)
236

U: Nucl.Phys. A206 (1973) 593, M.V. Yester et al.

Ref:

z
92

Nucl.Phys. A212 (1973) 221, R.A.Anderl et al.


A

235
238

ABUND

G, N

G, P

G, 2N

G,

NP

G, 2P

0.7

5. 3
6. 1

6. 7
7. 7

12 . 1

11

12

11 . 3

13 .6

99.3

.k

553

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

NEPTUNIUM

237 Np

(Y.2n)
o(Y.fis)
o o (Y.tot)

400

o
(mb)
200

Ref:

Nucl. Phys. A1 99 (1973) ^5


A.Veyssilre, H.Beil, R.Bergere,
A. l*e;pre*T*e and K. ifembatli

P.Carlos,

IS)

ABUND

G, N

G, p

G, 2N

G,

NP

G, 2 P

93

237

6 .6

h. 9

12

.3

11

.U

12 . 0

554

BULOW and FORKMAN

Giant dipole resonance in A 90 nuclei


i

| .

| .

oC(Y.n)*(v.pn)*(Y.2n)]

93

Nb

o
(mb)

12

16

20

2U

EY(MeV)

Ref:

Nucl. Phys. A 175 (1 971 ) 609


A. LeprStre et al.

28

555

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

Giant dipole resonance in 103:5A133nuclei


i i "

( '

Pd

Imb)
H,

Cd

16

21

32

\ly (MeV)

Ref:

Nucl.Phys. A219 (197^) 39,

16

24

E Y (MeV)

A.Lepretre

et a l .

556

BULOW and FORKMAN

Giant dipole resonance in N= 82 nuclei

(mb)

10

12

16

18

E Y (MeV)

Ref:

Nucl.Phys.Ai2i. (1971)
H. Beil et al.

20

557

PHOTONUCLEAR CROSS-SECTIONS

Total photonuctear absorption; a t o t

Imb)

IS

a
(mb)

7!

IT

EjtMtV)

Al

,,tf !

n
Ey(MeV)

(See also next page)

~rr

558

BULOW and FORKMAN

Total photonuclear absorption: o*tot


(cont.)
eo

0
1mb)

i
i i

to

i'
20

Si

ii * '
t

tJ L,

II

26

(MtVI

31

Ey (MeV)

KEy)

70

100

70

110

Ey (MtVI

100

E^(MtV)

-c _60NZ
~
A
10

Z/EyJ^/odyJdEy
A

Ey=35MeV NBS
oEy= 35MeV Ahrens et al
aEy=140MeV Ahrens et al

Imb)

Ref:

Nuclear structure studies using electron


scattering and photoreaction
Sendai Conf. 1972, page 213,
J#Ahrens et al.

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