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Resistance

Voltage (V)
Current (A)

2093 Ohms
8
10
0.003
0.004
57
59

6
0.00
27

12
0.0057

Voltag
e (V)
6

Curre
V/I
%
nt (A)
Error
0.002 2222.2 6.1740
7
22
19
8
0.003 2240.8 7.0662
57
96
38
10
0.004 2178.6 4.0921
59
49
76
12
0.005 2105.2 0.5859
7
63
13
Table A. Current and Voltage for the resistance of 2093 Ohms

Current Vs. Voltage


14
12
10
8

Voltage (V)

6
4
2
0

0.01

0.01

0.01

Current (A)

Figure 1.1 Best fit line of the direct relationship between Voltage and
Current
Resistance
Voltage (V)
Current
(A)
Voltag
e (V)
5
10
15

5
0.000
Curre
nt93
(A)

4940 Ohms
10
15
20
0.001
0.002
V/I
% Error0.0040
92
92
1

0.000
93
0.001
92
0.002

5376.3
44
5208.3
33
5136.9

8.8328
76
5.4318
49
3.9875

92
0.004
01

20

86
4987.5
31

77
0.9621
69

'
Table B. Current and Voltage for the resistance of 4940 Ohms

Current Vs. Voltage


25
20
15

Voltage (V)

10
5
0

Current (A)

Figure 1.2 Best fit line of the direct relationship between Voltage and
Current
In 1826, George Simon Ohm mathematically described the relationship of the
potential difference and current in an ideal conductor. This quantities are measured
using SI Units as a convention, Volts (V) for the potential difference and Amperes (A)
for the current (Young and Freedman 2010).. After conducting the assigned
experiment, the following data was gathered and their calculated percent error.
For the analysis of the gathered data, regression analysis was used like getting
the equation of the best fit line, Pearsons coefficient and regression slope. The
equation of the best fit line is given by the array of the current which are gathered
during the experiment versus the voltage which increases by 2 V and 5V increments
respectively:
y = 1990.2x + 0.7605 (a)
y = 4880.2x + 0.5679 (b)

The slope of the best fit line, 1990.2 and 4880.2, is close to the actual value of the
potentiometer which is measured by the ohmmeter as 2093 and 4940 ohms
respectively. The computed percent error of the resistance is almost 5% and 2%
which indicates that, for the both of them, the slope of the best fit
line is the accurate approximation of the actual value of the resistor
(potentiometer set on specific resistance). The values V/I of Table
A are similar in a way that the values fluctuate near the actual value
of the resistor which is 2093 ohms. The same thing applies to Table
B. Comparing the two tables, it can be inferred that the values of
V/I is somewhat almost the same value as the specific resistance
of the set up potentiometer used in the experiment. Furthermore,
getting the Pearson Coefficient gives 0.9986 and 0.9997 which
implies that there is a very strong positive association between the
values of current and voltage.
This statistical analysis follow the Ohms law given by the formula
E=IR (2)
Where E is the voltage or potential difference across the circuit, I is the Electric
Current and R is the resistance.
This Ohms law shows that the voltage or the voltage is directly proportional with the
electric current (EI). It means that as the voltage across the circuit increases, the
amount of current passing through the conductor also increases. This makes sense
because more voltage means more push exerted from one point to another point thus
stronger the current.

1. Tipler, P. J. (2008). Physics for Scientist and Engneers (6th ed.). USA: W.H.
Freeman and Company.
2. Young, H. D., & Freedman, R. A. (2012). Sears and Zemansky's University
Physics: with Modern Physics (13th ed.). CA: Pearson Education, Inc.

3. Voltage, Current, Resistance, and Ohm's Law. (n.d.). Retrieved September 6, 2015,
from https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/voltage-current-resistance-and-ohms-law
4. Ohms Law and Resistive Circuits. (n.d.). Retrieved September 7, 2015, from
http://www2.cose.isu.edu/~hackmart/114-214ohm.pdf
5. DC Circuits. (2009). Retrieved September 7, 2015, from
http://www.physics.sjsu.edu/becker/physics51/dc_circuits.htm