Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 657

Tyulemissov Madi

tmadi1@gmail.com

B.C. -
..

, 1995

81.2 .
31
:
.
(. - . , . ..)

- B.C., ..

31

:; . .: ,
1995.-656 .
JSBN 5-7419-0006-2
-
.
,

.
81.2 .


-

. .
..
..
.
N 063031 28.09.93 .
1.05.94 . 1.07.94 . 60x90/16
. .
. . . 41,0. .-. . 41,65
50000 . . N 1265. .
. , 113556, / 6
. 432601, . , . , 14

ISBN 5-7419-0006-2

, 1995
. . II lax-, 1995
0 ((|>\ ., 1995


,
,
.
,
,
, ,
.

.
:
, , ,
.
1.
3- ,
,
.


40-45 .
,

- ,
, .
2

,
,

.
.
. . ,
( ),
, . . II. ,
. III. ,

. IV. , ,
. V. -
,
. 1 - B.C., .. : 2-
.- 4- ., .- .: , 1992. - 653 .
2
.
3


.

,
,
.
. ,
,
. VI ,
.

(7-24).
,
-
:
I. , ,
,
.
II. ( )
.
III.
.
, 1 .
( ,
, - ),
.
, .
.
,
,
, ,
, . .
(
), , ,
.

6 -8 .

. ()
(IV) " " ( 2-).
, . .
.

( ) .
, . ,
,
, , .
,
- ,
.
, ,
(
).
4

,

.

,
.

4 6 .
, 1 - , 1600-1700 .

, , ,
, , . . . .
.

adjective

['aedsiktiv]

adv adverb ['aedvaib]


Am. American [' ]
(
)

['pa:tikl]

pi. plural [']


predic. predicative [pri'dikativ]
,

Br. British t'britif]


( )
[kon'd 5Ar)k|n]

etc. et cetera [it'setraj

indef indefinite [m 'definit]

n noon [naun]

part ~~ particle

Ant. antonym ['aentsnim]

cnj conjunction

numeral ['njumgral]

prep preposition

[,prep 3 'zijn]

pron pronoun ['prounaun]

sing. singular ['sirjgjub]



Syn. ~~ synonym ['smanim]

v verb [vg:b]

C O NTENTS

..................................................................

11

.............................................................................................................

12

..............

I.

. 1. (12). 2.
(12). 3. (13). 4.
(13). 5. :
, , , D d, , h, , k, L 1, m, N n, , S
s, t, Y (14). 6 . : [], [ ], [], [], [], []; [t],
[d], [n], [1], Ip], [m], [], [h i, [s], [z], [9] (14). 7.
(16).
II. . 1. (16). 2. (18). 3.
(19).
III. . (19).
IV. . 1. .
(22). 2. (23). 3.
(23). 4.
this, that, it (24). 5. be (24), 6 .
(24). 7. .
(25).
V. - . (25).
<
VI. . (28).
2
I.

II.
III.
IV.

V.
VI.

.........................' . ...............................................................................

29

. 1. : F f, G
g, , R , V v, W w, X , Z z (29). 2. : [i:], [:],
[ju:], [], [a:], [ou], [au], [f], [v], [j], [6], [w], [], []
(29). 3. (31).
(31).
. 1. (32). 2. : )
(32); ) (33). 3.
(33).
. (34).
1. (37). 2.

(38). 3. it (38). 4.
this that (38). 5.
() (38). 6 .
(39).
- . (39).
. (45).
7

LESSON
.
.
III.
IV.

V.
VI.

47

. 1. : J j, U
(47). 2. : [], [], [:], [:], ], [*], ), lo h
[rjk](47). 3. (48).
. 1. : ) (49); )
(49).
. (49).
. 1.
(51). 2. (52). 3.
: (53). 4. to be
(53). 5.
(54). .
to be (55). 7. 112 (55). 8 . (55).
- . (56).
. (64).

LESSON 4 ......................................................................................................... 66
I. . : [:], [], [], [] ( 66).
II. . : -
(67).
III. . ( 68).
IV. 1.
(70). 2. The Present Continuous Tense (71). 3.
"to be going + " (72). 4.
(73). 5.
(73). 6 .
13-19 (74). 7. (74).
V. - . (75).
VI. . (85).
LESSON 5
I.
II.
III.
IV.

V.
VI.

.........................................................................................................

. 1. : Q q
( 88 ). 2. : [], [jus] (88).
. . (88 ).
. (89).
1. to have , Simple
Present Tense (90). 2. some,
any, no (91). 3. (92). 4.

of (93).
- . (93).
. (104).

LESSON 6

.........................................................................................................

I. . : [], []; [3] (107).


. . (108).
III. 1. there is/are (109). 2.
(110). 3.
(110). 4. (111).
IV. - . (112).
V. . (120).
8

88

107

BASIC COURSE
LESSON S E V E N ..............................................................................................

126

I.

New Grammar Structures: 1. Objective Case of Personal


Pronouns (126). 2 . Indirect Object (127). 3. Tag Questions
(128). 4. Negative Form of Imperative Mood (130). 5. Tenses
(131). 6 . The Simple Present Tense (133). 7. Ordinal
Numerals (137). 8 . No Article before the Names of Streets,
Squares, Parks, Underground Stations and Airports (138).
II. Text: My Family (139).
LESSON E I G H T ...............................................................................................
Conversations: A. Introductions (149). B. Greetings and Asking
about Health (150). C. In the Canteen (150).

147

LESSON N I N E ..................................................................................................
I. New Grammar Structures: 1. Modal Verbs can", "may", "must"
(153). 2. Indefinite Pronouns/Adjectives (157). 3. Imperative
Sentences (158).
II. Word-building: Composition (159).
III. Text: Mr Payne Goes Shopping (160).

153

LESSON TEN ..................................................................................................


Conversations: A. Shopping (166). B. Congratulations (166).
C. Saying Goodbye (166).

166

LESSON E L E V E N ...........................................................................................
I. New Grammar Structures: 1. The Simple Past Tense (174). 2.
The Verb "to be" in the Simple Past Tense (176). 3. Complex
Sentence (181).
II. Text: George Volkov (181).

174

LESSON T W E L V E ...........................................................................................
Conversations: A. At a Reception (187). B. After a Visit to
London (187). C. A Cup of Tea (187).

187

LESSON THIRTEEN
................................... ...............................................
I. New Grammar Structures: 1. The Present Perfect Tense (194).
2. The Gerund (199).
II. Word-building: I. Affixation (200). 2. Conversion (200).
III. Text: Going Out (201).

194

LESSON FOURTEEN ....................................................................................


Conversations: A. Talk on Theatre and Cinema (208). B.
Invitations (208). C. Tea P arty (208).

208

LESSON FIFTEEN
......................................................................................
I. New Grammar Structures: 1. The Simple Future Tense (216).
2. Equivalents of Modal Verbs "can" and "must" in the Simple
Future and the Simple Past Tense (220). 3. Ways of Expressing
Future Actions (223). 4. Attributive Clauses (223). 5.
Adjectives "another" and "other" (225). 6 . The Use of the
Definite Article before the Nouns "sun", "moon", "sky (226).
II. Text: P&ns for the Summer Holiday (226).

216

LESSON SIXTEEN
.......................................................................................
Conversations: A. Transport: At a Railway Station (235).
Booking Airline Tickets. At the Airport (235). B. An Enjoyable
Holiday (235). C. It is Nice to See You again (235).

235

LESSON SEVENTEEN
................................................................................
I. New Grammar Structures: 1. The Simple Present Tense in
Clauses of Time and Condition (243). 2. The Future
Continuous Tense (245). 3. Comparative Structures (247). 4.
"It" as Subject (249). 5. The Article with Uncountable Nouns
(250). 6. The Past Continuous Tense (250).
II. Word-building: Affixation: Noon-forming Suffix "-ion" (254).
. Text: A Football Match (255).

243

LESSON EIGHTEEN ....................................................................................


Conversations: A. A Football Match (264). B. Wales v.
England (264). . I Cant Accept Your Invitation (264).

264

LESSON NINETEEN
....................................................................................
I. New Grammar Structures: 1. Impersonal "it" (272). 2. Absolute
Form of Possessive Pronouns (274). 3. Degrees of Comparison
of Adjectives and Adverbs (275). 4. Comparative Structures
(279). 5. The Use of the Article with Some Nouns (280). 6 . "To
get", "to become", "to grow", "to turn", to look", "to feel" as
Link-verbs (281).
II. Word-building: 1. Adjective-forming Suffixes -al", "-ful", -y"
(281). 2. Adverb-forming Suffix -ly" (282).
HI. Text: Climate of Great Britain and Russia (282).

272

LESSON TWENTY
................................................. ......................................
Conversations: A. W eather (290). B. Its Too Wet to Go for a
Walk (290). C. A Visit to an Exhibition (290).

290

LESSON TWENTY-ONE
.............................................................................
I. New Grammar Structures: 1. The Present Perfect Tense (301).
2. The Present Perfect Continuous Tense (303). 3. Compounds
of "some", "any", "no", "every" (306). 4. Present Participle in
the Function of an Attribute (310). 5. Article with an Apposition
(311).
II. World-building: Noun-forming Suffix "-ing" (311).
HI, Text: A Visit to the Houses of Parliament (312).

301

LESSON TWENTY-TWO .............................................................................


Conversations: A. Telephone Conversations (319). B. You
Should Spend a Holiday in the Highlands (319).

319

LESSON T W E N T Y -T H R E E .........................................................................
I. New Grammar Structures: 1. The PastPerfect Tense (329). 2.
Reflexive and Emphatic Pronouns(331).
3.Substantivized
Adjectives (333).
IL Word-building: Prefix -un" (333).
III. Text: George Bernard Shaw (334).

329

LESSON T W E N T Y -FO U R .............................................................................


Conversations: A. Can You Tell Me about Russian Writers?
(342). B. Tell Me about British Writers, Please (342). C. Could
you advise me an English Novel to Read? (342). D. I am Fond
of Music (342).

342

10

4 cl


D d

F f

3 )d
&Qs
9 L

Gg
h

J j

L 1

[1]

N n

[bit]

[si:]

p p

[di:]

Q q

[kju:]

[:]

[:]

[ef]

S s

ifb ,

[d3i:]

T t

3 t

[eitfl

U u

U u .

[ai]

V v

V o .

[d3ei]

W w

[kei]

X x

[el]

Yy

[em]

Z z

J f n
(D e
f

m tA tr r v

[]
[ou]
[pi:]

[es]
[ti:]
[ju:]
[vi:]
['dAblju:]
[eks]
[wai]
[zed]

I.
1.
26 ; 6
20 , 20 24
.
, .


(, [0], [ ], []
).
.
2.
12 8
. : [:], [], [ ], [ ], [:], [], [ :], [],
[ ], [:], [:], [].
: [:], [:], [:],
[:], [ :] : [ ], ], [], [], [], [], [].
(
: Pete [pi:tj ( ) pit [p it] ).
: [e i], [a t], [au], [], [ou ], [ ], [] [].
,
,

,
. , ,
, ,
.
( )

, :
1)
,
,
12

,
(, my [m ai], day [d e i], [ :]);
2)

,
(, main [mein ]
made [m eid ] mate [m eit]).
3.
-

.

: .

. :
) be [] ,
, : Pete
[P U ];
) table ['teibl ],
, 1.

. :
) ,
: pen [p en ], desk [desk];
) ,
: apple
].
4.
1. [], [ t ], []
(. . )
, .
2. [b], [d ], [g]
.
3. [d ],
[z ], [m ], [n ]
.
4.
, ,
; ,
; ,
(
, act [aekt], a black desk [s'blaek'desk]).

5
A

D
E

a
b

d
e

[ei]
[bi: ]
[si:]
[di: ]
[i: J

H
I

L
M

h
i
k
1
m

M l
[a i]
[kei ]
[el]
[em ]

N
P
S
T
Y

n
P
s
t

[enj
[pi:]
[es]
[ti: ]
[wai ]

6.
[], [a i], [ ], [], [ ], [], [t], [d ], [n ], [1], [], fb ],
[m ], [k], [h ], [s], [z], [d]

[ei]

lei]
name

bad

[]
'

[:]

[ai]
nice

[]
it

[wai]

[ai]
my

[]

]
desk

ai
[ei]
ay

main [mein]

day [del]

ie

[ai]

tie [tai]

i+ Id
i+ nd

laild]
[aind]

mild [maild]
kind [kaind]


b [b ], d Ed], h [h ], k [k ], 1 - [ 1 ] , m - [ m ] ,
n In ], p [pL t [t]

14

'

[ S]

, ,

cen t [sent]
pencil ['p en sl]

ca t [kset]
pact [psekt]

1 .

sat [saet]
step [step]

2 .

desk [desk]

3.

desks [desks]
cats [kaEts]

ties [taiz]
b ed s [bedz]

[S]
S

U]

: 1. , ,
, . : pit
[]. (1), ,
: Will you...?
2.

: Bill

[bi!].

black [blaek]

ck



[]
ck

kn

[n]

knit [nit]

11

[i]



[ 1] 11

till [til]
knell [nel]
all [o:l]

th

1 .

that [daet]

m
2 .

bathe [beid]

ss

[s]

less [les]

s'

[z]

easy [M:zi]
15

7.
(
, , ) , ,
, (
, ,
[ ]).

[eil

[]

'This is " desk.

[' 8 is iz ""'Idesk]

[sen]

[], []

'T hats "apple.

['daets ""laepl]

[Z], Is]

'T hats a VtieHis 'nam es 11.

['daets tax]
['hiz 'neimz
]

is

[IZ]

II.
,
, , .
,

.

, .
1*

.

,
.
:
(. 2).

", (
),
16


, ,
.
!


, .
:

. J be

,

,
. ,
.
,

* ,
,

,
,
,
.

.
:
1)
( ),
2) (. 2),
3) ( . 3),
4)
(.
4 ),
5)
(.
5 ),
6) ( . 2).
,
,
, .
Its

Bill.

Its Bill.
17

2.
.
*
, ,
.
: ,
.
, , ,
.
[' ]
: pencil ['p cn sl], table ['teib l].
[, ],
: intonation
[,m tou'neiJn ]
. , . .

( ), .
, ,
( , ,
, , ,
); (
, , , ,
)
. ,
.

.

.
'T his is

pencil.

.
, ,
.
.
, ,
.
18

T his is black pencil.


( , ..) .
3.


,
.
, , ,
, ..
.

III.
I. .* ,
ft], [d], [ [1 ]
,
. , |] f]
.

-J in
.J ill
"Inill**

din
tin
till

dim
Tim
mill

it
lit
bit

2. . ,
[ai] .

-)\
.J m y
^by

die
He
tie

line
dine
mile

lime
dim e
time

bind
mind
mild

3. . ,
fp ], ft], [] ,
.

-J p in e
-J p ile
^ p in
^pill

time
tile
tin
till

kind
kin
kill
kid

kite
lit
bit
pit

pipe
type
lip
dip

like
lick
kick
Dick

*
( ),
. (: in din dim).
** ,
.
19

4. . ,
[s] [z] .
[2 ]

[S ]

>sin
_/ silk
^ sick

side nice kites


site miss bits
sit kiss sits

- J lies
-J d ie s
-J tie s
"I pies

dim es
lines
m iles
binds

pins
bills
sides
lids

5. .

-J my
J by
J die
4 tie

mile
mild
mind
kind

in
ill
is
it

pies
ties
lines
sides

nice
mice
miss
kiss

bits
lips
kicks
sits

6 . . ,
^ .
[].

-J e n d
_Jden
~^ten

pen
dell
tell

let
met
net

set
desk
best

7. , ,
[1] []
.

.J m id d le ['m id i]
.^ p en cil ['p en slj
^little ['litl]

settle ['setl]
kitten ['k itn ]
mitten ['m itn ]

8. . ,
[} .
.
^man

-J b a n
~^can

lad
bad
sad

mat
cat
cap

map
back
black

9. .
, []
. .

.J th a n
that

then this [d is]


them 'this is

lithe
tithe

*
( )
" ,
. (: ten Ted tet.)
20

10. . ,
[ei] ,
.

^m ay
- J day
~^say

main
lain
plain

name
pale
tale

date
late
cake

table
cable
stable

11. . ,
[h] .

-J hi
-
Miand

him
hen
hint

help
hide
has

his
hat
hit

12. , ,
ck.

-J c e n t
.J r ite
-^pencil
""Inice

can
cane
came
candle

lack
back
neck
deck

13. .
.

[ ] - [] []
-J pin-Jpen ~lpan
tin
lid
bid
pit
[b]
bale
bin
bit
bet
bat

ten
led
bed
pet

[p i
*~}pale
pin
pit
pet
pat

tan
lad
bad
pat

[d ]
- J d ie
dine
dime
din
dim

[t]
"H ie
tine
time
tin
Tim

tei ] [ai]
rbay "by
may
pay
main
pain
Id]
-^ d a y
den
Dan
dad

my
pie
mine
pine
[d]
'"'Hhey
then
than
that

14. ,
,
.
lei]

-J m aymainmade mate
_J lay lainlaid late
_ j pay palepaid pace
say sam e spade space
[ai]

^my _^mine _^tnind ^mice


by
bide bite
21

tie
lie

time
line

tide
lithe

kite
like

[ae]

-J ban
man
clan
pan

-J bad
"'Ibat
mad mat
clad
clap
pad
pat

15. .

day, man, mail, than, kind, name, hi, sick, knelt, desks,
ties, pay, him, his, lines, m iddle, kitten, that, them
16.
. .
,
[]. .

^pie
tie
"

a ""^lamp
a """Ibed
^

a "'Icat
a ~"\hat
~"\

17. .
.

18. . ,
.

my

Miat
"cap
'I name
tie
d a p p le

his "\lamp
his
~"ipen
his
pencil
his ld e s k
his ~^nam e

IV.
1. .
-,
.

.
22

:
the ( ).
()
.

, ,
[]: [ ' ], a bed [s'b ed ].
, ,
, []:
apple [ '].

; , ,
, ,
.

: " ?", " ?",
" ?", "
?".
'T his is an "dapple. , ( ,
)
'T h ats \ tie. , ( , )
.
.
'This is ~^. .
My 'nam es Bill. .

2.
he , ,
.
H es " Ben. . ( .)
, ,
.

3.
, his .

.
, , .
My 'nam e is
Ben. .
His 'nam es "l Tim. .
23

4. this, that, it
this , , that
,
. This
, , that
,
.
this that :
) .
'This
'That
'This
'That

is
is
is
is

a S table. .
"desk. .
"lBen. .
"'iTim. To .

it What is this?
?
.
It is a "Stable. .
) ( ) (. 2).

5. be
(The Present Indefinite Tense)
be :
3- is. be
-.
'This is ~\pencil. .
His 'name is ~(1. . ( .)
'That #isn*t
p e n c il () .

.

. isn t
.

6.

,
.
'This is a 'nice
24

\ tie. .

'T h a ts a 'nice "~\hat. To .


'T his is a 'nice d a p p le . .
.
, .


:
) ( ).
'T hat is a 'nice

\ hat.

) ( . 2).
7. .
(
)
: .

.
.
.
.
.

1
'name is ^ B en'T his is a "Stable.


( ),
'T his is an dapple.
My 'nam e is ""1.
(
) (
).
- , , ,
,
.
This is a desk . ()
His name is Ben, ()
-
.
apple f'aepl]
bad [basd]
bed [bed]
black [blaek]

cat [kaet| ,
desk [desk)

hat [hast]

25

his [hiz, iz] pron (.


.)
is [iz, s, z] 3- . 4.
be (, ,
, ..)
it [it] pron 1 . (. .); 2 . , , (.
.)
lamp [lsemp]
[] (
)
my [mai] pron , ,
nam e [neim] , ;
names Ben. .
nice [nais] , ,

pen [pen] n
pencil ['pensl] n
pie [] n 1 . ; 2 . (.)

table ['teibl] n
that [daet] pron , ,
this [dis pron , ,
tie [tai] n

Ann []
Ben [ben]
Bill [bil]
Dick [dik]
Ted [ted]
Tim [tim]

.
1. a)
b)

'This ('that) is a ('nice) "'Hie.

Its a ('nice)

'This is my "'itie.

Its my ~'ltie.

'This 'isnt a ('nice)


'This 'isnt my

2. a)
b)
3. a)
b)

'This is

^tie.

\tie.

It 'isnt a ('nice) -\tie .


It 'isnt my "Hie.

Its ~\1

XBill,

'This 'isnt

\tie-

It 'isnt "iB ill.

\Bill.

My 'names ^Tim.
His 'name 'isnt ~^Tim.

.
1. ,
.

1. This is a pen. Its . 2. T hats a pencil. Its


pencil. 3. This is a map. Its a map. 4. T h ats a lamp. Its a
lamp. 5. T h ats an apple. Its an apple. 6. This is a black hat.
Its a black hat. 7. T hats a bad apple. Its a bad apple, 8.
This is a nice tie. Its a nice tie. 9. T hats a black pencil. Its
a black pencil. 10. This is a black desk. Its a black desk. 11.
This is my desk. Its my desk. 12. T hats my bed. Its my
bed. 13. T hats his cat. Its his cat.
2.
26

. ,
.

"This is a
hat.
"Thats a Miat. Its a "~^hat.
1. This is an apple. 2. This is a bed. 3. This is a map. 4.
This is a black desk. 5. This is a nice hat. 6. This is a black
cat. 7. This is a bad lamp. 8. This is a nice tie.
3. .
.

tie (his)
'T his is a ^tie. ('T h ats a ^ tie.) Its his ""Uie.
desk (m y), hat (m y), pencil (m y), lamp (h is), pie (m y),
map (h is), apple (my)
4.
. .
,

'T his is "tie. (nice)


'T h a ts a 'nice tie. Its a 'nice ~"^tie.
1. This is an apple, (nice) 2. T his is a desk, (black) 3.
This is a cap. (black) 4. This is a hat.
(nice)
5.This is a cat.
(black) 6. This is a lamp, (bad)
5. .
, .

1. This is a tie. 2. T h ats a desk. 3. This is a table. 4. This


is a nice apple. 5. T hats a black hat. 6. This is a bad map. 7.
T h ats his pencil. 8. T hats an apple.
6. He .

This is a "~\pen. (pencil)


It
isn t a pen. Its a ^ p e n c il.
1. This is a desk, (table) 2. T hats a pencil, (pen) 3. This
is a hat. (lamp) 4. T hats an apple, (pie) 5. This is a bad
lamp, (nice) 6. T hats a nice hat. (bad) 7. This is his tie,
(my) 8. T h ats his pencil, (my) 9. This is his map (my)
7. 6 .

:
:

'T h ats his "^desk.


It ^is n t his desk. Its " desk.

8. , .

a)

My
His

'nam es

^Ben.
Ted.
' .
^ iT im .
^Len,
27

b)

My
His

'nam e is n t

Bill.
* .
^ T ed .
4 Dick.
"^Ben.

9. , .

VI.
1. , .

, , , D d, , h, I
, S s, t

k, L 1, m, N ,

2. . .
3.
.
4. . .

cable, space, time, day, back, late, them , m iss, mind, by,
knelt, lines, m iddle, little, plain, hide, hand, candle, than
5. , .

[n eim ], [sa id ], ['aepl], [kaindj, [d esk], [m ai], [ta i],


[m em ], [m is], [daim ], [p e i], [silk ], ['litl], [help], [keim j,
['eibl ]
6.
.

pencil

table

desk

hat

7. 7 .
, .

a)
b)

: 'T his is a "Stable.


; ^isn t a table. Its a"''Idesk.
; 'T h ats a 'bad "^hat.
: It "M snt a bad hat. Its a ""\nice hat.

8. .

I.
. . 2.
. . 3. .
. 4. . . 5.
. 6. . 7. .
.
28

2
I.
1.
F
G

f [ef J
g [:]
[ou ]
r [ a: ]

V v [vi: ]
W w ['dAblju:]
X x [eks ]
Z z [zed ]

2.
[:], [u :], [ju:], [u], (o:J, [ou], [auL [f]> WL [jl, [0],
[w ], [], [g]
.

[ei]

[ei]

[]

[:]

[:]
he

[]

[ou]

[ou]
close

[ju:]

[ju:], [u:]
student
rule

[wai]

[ai]

[ 1]


I .
2 . +

[:]
car

[]

easy

[]

[j]


yellow

. , 1, j
[:]. , rule [ru:l].
29

meat [mi:t]
meet [mi:t]

[:]

00

[u]

lu:]

too ftu: ]
room [ru:m]

ew

[ju:]

new [nau]

ou

[au]

sound [saund]

ow*

[au]

now [nau:]

[ou]

(
)

coat [kout]

ow

[ou]

o+ld

[ould]

a+ ss
a+ st
a+ th

[a:s]
[a:st]
[a: 0]

1 .
2 .

book [buk]
good [gud]

snow [snou]
yellow ['jelou]
old [ould]
class [kla:s]
past [pa:st]
path [pa:9]

f - [f], V - [vj, X - [ks], z - [z]


*
,
ow.
30

1 . , , u
2 .
3.

[]

1 .
2 .

red [red]
green [gri:n]

th

[]

1 .
2 .

thin [Bin]
teeth [ti:0]

ve

[v]

twelve [twelv]

[w]

we [wi: ]

[w]

white [wait]

[h]

who [hu; ]

[r]

write [rait]

wh

wr

game [geim]
glad [glaed]
big [big]

3.
[t], [d], [n J, [1], [s] [z],
[5] [0],
, . . .

4.

the

and

[di:J

[ [:]

Open the book, ['oupn 5 ~^buk]


The apple is good. [5i: aepl iz ""Igud]

[aend]

[and],
[], [n]

This is his book and thats his notebook,


['dis iz hiz .Jb u k 'daets hiz
^n o u tb u k ]
31

.
1.
, ,
: notebook
['noutbuk], classroom ['kla:srum ].
2.
)
,
, , . .
(
,
"" "").
'Is 'this - J ?
,
,
,

.
,
, (
) ,
; ,
.
Ts "this -Stable?
*
1) :
'T his is my /textb ook and 'thats his "^textbook.
2) :
'Is the 'notebook

thick?

3) (. 4),
4) (.
4),
5) (.
6),
32

6) (. 3)*
7) :
'Will you _^help , please?
8) :
.JW h at did you say?
)

:
^ . 'How do y o u ~ ld o .
3.
, ,
,
.

1) (,
, , ):
'T h ats a 'nice ~^hat.
'This 'isn t a black ^pen.
2) , . e. ,
:
My 'pen and his - J pencil...
3)
:
'Take 'this -^ p en , 'that 'black -/p e n c il and his "^imap.
4) ,
:
On -J S u n d a y 'Pete and _JA nn...
5) ,
6) ,
,
7) ,
. . .
,
.
,
* , 2, 3, 4, 5.
33
2

.

, .
.
1. . ,
[f] {v 1
.

fine
- /f a in t
~^fan

felt
fed
fit

vim
vise
vice

live
life
stiff

cave
slave
save

2. . ,
[j] .

^jell
"'l jap

yes
yet

3. . ,
[].

/m ainly
^tiny

N elly
telly

pygmy
happy

4. . ,
[:] .

-J be
_>m e
^knee

been
dean
keen

deed
bead
plead

Pete
deep
keep

5. . ,

[0].

/ thane
-/t h e m e
-U h in

thimble
theft
thick

teeth
myth
fifth

6 . . , [t]
[d] , [0] [] .

_^day
den
seed

^ they
then
seethe

-J tin ~^thin
tick
thick
meet
myth

7. ,
[S] - [03 - [31.

/seem
sin
sick
34

-J them e
thin
thick

"^them

then

this

8 . .
[w].

-J way
- J we
^wine
^ w in

well
went
wife
west

why
when
while
white

twin
twenty
twelve
twist

9. .
[w] [].

_^wain "vein
wail
veil

wine vine
went vent

wise vice
west vest

10. . ,
[].

_^rain raise train


write "marry
_^rail rag
green wreath "carry
"''Iran red
French wrap
"ferry
11. , [:]
.

too
~"\noon

moon
soon

spoon
mood

rule
rude

plume
flute

12. , ,
[j] .

_Jnew 4
~"lfew

sew
news

muse
fuse

tube mute
'student 'pupil

13. . ,

[].

_^good
look
goody book

took
nook

14. ,
[] [:].

- J nook
look
book

~
moon
boot

foot
cook
took

food
cool
spoon

15. , ,
[ou] .

_Jno
.J s o
~^go

know
mow
snow

tone old note


open cold hope
close told smoke

coat
boat
float

'yellow
'fellow
'mellow

16. . ,
[: 1
.
35

-J bar
-J fa r
_^car
^Istar

arm
"army
farm
barn

art
part
start
park

ask
mask
task
path

class
pass
last
past

17. , ,
[auj .

_ in o w
_Jhow
"ldown

brown sound
round count
found out

18. , ,
[] .

-^ gay
_^go
"''I gain

game
gamble
glad

gleam
glase
gloom [u: ]
glide
good [u ] globe

egg
big
bag

19. : ) [k sj;
) [z].

a) _^mix
fix
b) -^Z oo
_Jzoom
^zone

six
text
zeal
zip
"zippy

20. .
, , .

classroom ['kla:srum]
notebook ['noutbukj
textbook Ttekstbuk]
21. ) ,
,
( ).

' goo book


'thiclQ textbook
'gooq V tgxtb ook
) ,
, [] .

'Is 'this -Jp en ?

'Is 'that a -^pencil?

36

'Is 'that a 'good - J textbook?

'Is 'this 'hat -Jn ice?

'Is the 'apple .J g o o d ?

)
. , [], [d], [s] [5] [0]
.

'O p en _th e "^textbook,

please.

'R ead ^ th e "^Itext, -^ p lease.

Its ^thick.

Its "^ithin.

IV.

I.
the
,
.
; ,
( ),
, , , .
The map is good. ( ) .
This is an apple. Tfye apple is red. .
( ) .
37

[di: ]
, , []
, :
the apple [di: ':p l]t the book [de 'buk].
2.


.
This pencil is red. .
The textbook is good. .
Bill is ill. .
3. it
3- it
,
.
This is a textbook. It is good. * .
That is an apple. It is red. . .
Read the tex t, please. Read it, p lea se. ,
. , .
It , , .
4. this that

this that
(
the).
This hat is white. .
That pen is green. .
5. ()

to. to
[te ] [tu 1
: to take [ta 'teik j , to open [tu 'oupn ]
am b.
38

6.

to.

.
"Close the book.

'Give tie.

() .


, please
[pli:z] ,
.
/.:
Give me a "'l , - J please.
V. -
. ( )
am [aem, , m] v 1- .
be ,
and [send, and, , ] cnj
book [buk]
[:]
classroom
['kla:srum]

( , )
close [klouzj v
easy ['i:zi]
give [giv] v
green [:]
good [gud]
he [hi:J pron
him [him] pron , ; Give him
this book.
I [ai] pron ; I am Ben.
Ben.
ill [il] a, predic. ; be ill
; He is ill. ,
in [in] prep, (

-.); is in the class
room.
me [mi:] pron. , ; Give me

that pencil,
no [nou] part
notebook ['noutbuk] n
old [ould] ; This is an old
notebook,
open ['oupnj v
please [pli:z] ; Open the
book, please,
read [ri:d] v
red [red]
room frum] n
student ['stju:dsnt] n
take [teik] v ; Take my pen,
please.
text [tekst] n ; Read the text,
please.
textbook f'tekstbuk] n
thick [0ik]
thin [0in]
too [tu:] adv , (,
,
) ; is a student too.
white [wait]
yellow ['jelou]
39

.
1 . 'Is 'this a J pencil?

'Yes, it
'No, it "'bisnt.

2. a) 'This 'pencil is "ired.


The 'pencil is V ed .
b)'This 'pencil " W t red.
The 'pencil
isnt red.

Its ~^red.
It 'isnt V ed .

c) 'Is 'this 'pencil -Jred ?


'Is the 'pencil J red?

'Yes, it ~4is.
'No, it "lisnt.

3. a) 'Bills a ('good) ^student,


b) 'Bill 'isn t a ('good)~"lstudent.

H es a ('good) ^student.
He 'isn t a ('good) ""^student.

c) 'Is 'Bill a ('good) -7 student?


'Is he a ('good) -^student?

'Yes, he "U s.
'No, he
isnt.

4. 'Open the ^book,


please.
'Read the "'Itext, -Jplease.
'Please 'read the ""Itext.
'Give me the ""Ibook,
please.

it, 7please.
'IR ead it, J please.
'Please ""bread open) it.

.
1. ;
.
.

Ts

'this
'that

a -Jbook?
a textbook?
a coat?
a room?
a classroom?
a thick book?
a thick textbook?
an easy text?
a green coat?
a white hat?
a red apple?
a yellow pencil?

'Y es, it \ is.


'N o, it ""Hsnt.

2. .

This is a car. (Yes.)


Is this a car? Y es, it is.
40

1. T hats a lamp. (No) 2. This is a green coat.


3. T h ats a thin book. (No) 4. This is a white hat.
5. T h ats an easy text. (No) 6. This is an old tie.
7. T hats a green pencil. (No) 8. This is a red
(Yes)

(Yes)
(Yes)
(Yes)
apple,

3. ,
, , .
.

This
That
The
My
His

textbook
book
car
text
classroom
coat
apple
pencil
hat

is
isn t

old.
thick.
green.
easy.
good.
white.
red.
yellow
black.

4. .

This coat is green, (yellow)


This coat isn t green. Its yellow.
1. That pencils black, (red) 2. This textbook is thin,
(thick) 3. Thalj apples red, (green) 4. This classroom is bad.
(good) 5. His cats white, (black) 6. His ties yellow, (green)
5, ,
. , .
, .

Is

the desk

black?

his hat
the text
that coat
this pencil
the classroom
this tie
the notebook
that book

green?
easy?
black?
yellow?
good?
nice?
thin?
thick?

Y es, it is.
N o, it isn t.

Ben
Is

Bill
Ted

a student?

Yes, he is.
N o, he isn t
41

6. 5 , 5 5
. .
7. . ,
- .

'Open

the book,

Close

the textbook,

Take

the notebook,
it,

Give me

the pen

Give him

that pencil,

please.

that red apple,


that green tie,
Read

the text,
it,

8. it.

Read the text, please.


Read it, please.
1.
Open the textbook, please. 2. Close the notebook,
please. 3. Read this text, please. 4. Open the notebook,
please. 5. Please close the book.
D.
.
, .

Im "Dick "iGreen. Im a """Istudent. Im in the ""'Iclassroom. 'This is my ^desk. "This is my "^textbook and 'thats
my
notebook. My "textbook is - J thick and my "notebook is
~^thin.
'That is 'Tim 'i Brown. 'Tim is a "student ^ ito o . He is a
"Igood student. "That is his "idesk. "This is his
textbook
and 'that is his
notebook. His 'textbook is - J thick and his
"notebook is ~1thin.
"Ted 'Black is ""inot in the classroom. He is "Hll.
Dick:
Tim:
42

''lTim, 'is "this 'textbook _-^good?


"Yes, it \i s . 'Is "that a _Jblack pencil?

Dick:
Tim:

"No, it -M sn t. Its a ^ r e d pencil.


'Give me 'that "'Ipencil, .J p lea se.

I. .
2. .

1.
Is Dick a student? 2. Is Dick in the classroom? 3. Is his
textbook thin? 4. Is his notebook thick? 5. Is Tim Brown a
student too? 6. Is he in the classroom? 7. Is his notebook
thin? 8. Is Ted Black in the classroom too? 9. Is he ill? 10. Is
Dick a good student?
3. ( ),
.

. ( )
dialogue f'daibg] ,
hello [he \ lou]
M r (. m ister ['m ista]) -,
, -,
T his is 'M r 'Brown. ,
- .
How do you do. ['hau dju: ~^du:]
.
(
)
diplom at ['diplom at] n
day [dei] n
today [ta'dei] adv

Its a nice day today, isnt it? [its


'nais 'dei fcT^dei, -Jizn t it]
. He ?
friend [frend] n
from [fram]; be from ; He is
from Kiev, [hiz frsm "Utiev]
,
cold [kouldl
Its a 'cold 'day to"^day, J isnt it?
,
?

F. Dialogues
1
M r Brown: H e ^ U o , 'Mr - J Smith. "This is 'Mr Pet~^rov.
M r Smith: "How do you
d o1
Petrov: "How do you
do.
M r Brown: 'Mr Pet'rov is diplomat.

2
M r Smith: He~"Ulo.
Petrov: . Its a "nice 'day t o - d a y , - J isn t it?
Mr Smith: 'Y es, it ~"lis.
3
Bill: He"~Mlo, -J Dick. 'T his is my 'friend "Tim ""iGlebov.
Dick: ' How do you ""l do.
Tim: 'How do you "ldo.
Bill: "Tims from
Kiev.
43

4
Tim :
Dick:
Tim:

He \llo .
HeMlo. 'Its a 'cold 'day to""\day,
"Yes, it ~^is.

isn t it?

N ote ( )
1. 'How do you ^ d o. .
,
. How do you do
How do you do. ,
, - ,
. ( is from Kiev . .)
1. .
2. . ,
( ).

1.

2.

3.

4.

M r Brown: H ello, Mr Smith. T h is...


M r Smith: How...
Petrov: How...
M r Brown:
Mr Petrov is...
M r Smith: H ello.
Petrov: Hello. Its a...
M r Smith: Y es,...
Bill; H ello, Dick. T his...
Dick: How...
Tim: How...
Bill: T im ,...
Tim: Hello.
Dick: Hello. Its a...
Tim: Y es,...

3. .
4. ,
?

1.

Petrov: H ello, Mr Brown. This is Mr Lunev.


M r Brown: ...
Lunev: How do you do.
Petrov: Mr Lunev is from Kiev.
2. A: Hello.
B: ...
A: Its a nice day today, isn t it?
B: ...
3. A; Hello.
B: ...
' A: Its a cold day today, isn t it?
44

4.

Ben: Hello, Dick. This is my friend Ted Smith.


Ted: How do you do.
Dick: ...

5.
.

1.

M r Smith: Hello, Mr Lunev. T his is Mr Brown.


Lunev: .
M r Brown: How do you do.
2. Lunev: .
M r Smith: Hello. Its a cold day today, isn t it?
Lunev: .
3. M r Smith: Hello.
Petrov: . ,
?
M r Smith: Yes, it is.
4. P e tw v : , - . ,
- .
M r Brown: How do you do.
Lunev: .
6. .

1. ,
.
2. - .
3. ,
( ).

VI.

1. , .

F f, G g, J j, , R , V v, W w, X x, Z z
2. . .
3.
.
4. .

fine, yet, 'm ainly, dean, fifth, thick, that, well, when,
rail, write, soon, new, 'student, old, close, art, car, snow,
last, now, brown, out, glad, good, game, bag, zone
5. ) ,
.
45

thick

tw enty

textbook

happy

.
\.

) :

Bill
_^thin

_JTim
^notebook

"^pencil
"

6.
:

My nam es Ann,

Is this a nice tie?


7. ,
(
).

1. . . 2. ?
. . 3. ?
. 4. .
. 5. ? .
, 6. ? .
, 7. , . 8.
, .
8.
.

1. This is ... textbook. ... textbook is old. 2. "Is that ...


easy text?" "Yes, it is. ... text is very easy." 3. This is ...
apple. ... apple is good. 4. "Is that ... cat?" "Yes, it is. ... cats
white." 5. "Is ... pencil red?" "No it isn t. ... pencil is black."
6. Open ... textbook, please. Read ... text, please. 7. "Is Bill ...
good student?" "Yes, he is. H es ... very good student." 8. Mr
Petrov is ... Soviet diplomat.
9. .

1.
? . . 2.
? . . 3. ? 4.
? . . 5.
, . .
46

? . . 6. ,
. 7. , .
10. .

1.

- : . , -
.
- : .
: .
2. : .
: . , ?
: .
3. : ().
: (). , ?
: .

LESSON* 3
I.

1.
J j e i ] U u [ju: ]
2.
[], [], [], [aaej, [{], [<], ] , [g], [rjk]

1 .
2 .
+

1 .

2 .

'woman

[ei]

[!]

laej

[:]

[:]

[]

[]
'absent

[aij

[ai]

[]

[]

[ou]

[ou]

[]
on

[ju:]

[ju:], [:]

[ ]

[:]

[:]
fork

'

[]
'factory
]
'minus

* lesson [iesn]
47

+
a+th

[]
[]


(
)

son [SAn]
mother [' ]

ore
oor

[:]

[:]
door [do:]

+ 1+

[:]+

small [smo:l]
talk [ts:kl
wash [woj]

[W3]


(
)

wa

[dd

jam [d3em]

, ,

page [peicfe]

she [Ji:]
fish [fij]

itfl

1 .
2 .

chess [ tjes]
teach [ti:tj]

tch

match [ma&tj]

ture

picture ['piktja]

sh

ch

3.
, ,
, ,
[]. ,
48

,
.
T he 'teacher is ^good. [do 'ti:tj9nz "'igud]
'What 'colour is the ''lpen? ['wDf^Alariz ~^pen ]
II.

1.
)

*

'W hats your 'I?

'What 'colour is the ~?

'How old is she?


6 )

. ,

, .
Good - ,

7bye.
. j
III.

Exercise 1. . ,
[cfc] .

.J J a n e
"'Uim

jam
jazz

jet
joke

gym
gin

page
stage

* exercise ['eksssaiz] n
49

Exercise 2. . , [$] .

J shine
-J s h e
'Ishow

shave
shell
shelf

shift
sheep
sheet

fish
dash
dish

"Swedish
'D anish
"Finnish

Exercise 3. . ,
.

child
^ c h in
\chill

chose
chat
chess

beach match
teach catch
speech "kitchen

"lecture
"picture
"mixture

Exercise 4. . , []
.

run
_^sun
^ fun

lunch bus
luck
plus
puck fuss

cup
cut
shut

"funny son
"sunny month
'lucky 'London

"other
'mother
'brother

Exercise 5. .
[ ].

-^sum m er
number
winter

'other
'm other
'brother

"teacher
"chatter
"matter

"letter
"better
"butter

Exercise . . ,
[]
( [wo]).

-^ on
^Tom
-J rob
~"1rod

clock
rock
sock
box

not
lot
got
hot

want
"wanton
"wander
"waddle

what
watch
wash
waffle

Exercise 7. . ,

[=].
_^door
- ) floor
-^m ore
^bore

wore
tore
store
score

_^halt
^salt
'Ualk

born
corn
torn
forn

ball
wall
tall
small

sort short
port fork
sport forth

"corner
"former
"border
"scorer

north
"forty
"shorter

Exercise 8. .
[:] [:].

-J.far " for


barn born
.Jfarm ""'Iform card cord
50

part port
farce force

Exercise 9. ,
[], [], [tjl .

[ ],

child, fork, clock, class, 'yellow , jam, stage, room, new,


sheet, born, not, 'funny, ch ess, door, box, snow, meet, bold,
'summer, 'butter
Exercise 10, . ,
[]
. [] [rj].

-J bring
_^ring
.J s in g
"'I thing

'evening
'reading
'opening
'closing

'talking
'm eeting
'greeting
'skating

. ng

1].
.J long J gong

J song

thong

Exercise 11. . ,
[] [kj,

_^bank link drink


_-?sank
rink tank
thank think zink
Exercise 12. .
,
are [, ],
arent [a:ntl.

1.

T hese are books. ['di:z ~"\buks]


T hese books are good. ['di:z 'buks ~^gud]
Those are apples, ['douz ^aeplz ]
Those apples are red. ['douz ^ a sp lz ~~\red]
2.
T hese arent d e s k s .[ 'di:z 'a:nt
d esks]
T hese desks aren t brown. ['di:z 'desks 'a:nt
* ]
T hey arent students, [dei 'a:nt ""lstju:dents ]
VI.

1.
,
, . . ,
: .
1.

-s
.
51

[z ]
-s

^ [s ]
a
a

tie ties [taiz ]


teacher teachers ['ti:tj3zj
room rooms [rumz ]
maps [maeps J

2. , s,
ss, sh, ch, x,
-e s, [iz ].
a match matches ['msetjiz]
3. , -
, -es
.
a factory , factories [Taekteriz]
,
,
,
-s.
a day days [deiz ]
4. ,
f, fe, f
V -es*
sh elf sheives [jelvz ]
5.
.
a man [niaen ] men [men ]
a woman ['wumsn ] women ['wim in 1

a child [tjaild] children ['tjildrsn j


2.

.
T his is a book. T hese are books.
52

3. :

I
you
he
she
it

we
you
they

:
.
3- :
he ( )
, she ( )
it ( )
, "".
3- they ,
.

.
is ill. .
. I
,
.
Mary, Peter and I are students.

4. to be
(T he Sim ple Present T ense ['sim pl 'preznt 'ten s])
I

am

You

are
('not)

She

a "^student.

is
a ""ipen.

It
We
You

are

('not)

""^students.

They

53

'

'Are

you

Is

'Yes, " .
'No, I am ~^not.
a ^student?

he
she

'Yes, he "'Us.
'No, she ^ i s n t.

it

'Are

we
you
they

a Jpen?

'Yes, it " lis .


'No, it
isnt.

-/students?

'Yes, we ~~\are.
'No, we are ""Inot.
'Yes, they 'lare.
'Yes, they are ""^not.

1- am.
[ ]
am
[ , ]

3- is.
_
is

[izj

^
[z, s]

to be are
.
[: ] /

/ , [:] //'

are ^
[ ]

[ J

5.
this , , these [di:z ]
that , , those [3ouz ]
T hese , this,
54

, , those
, that, ,
.
these those
, this that:
) *
These are shelves. ['di:z
Those are apples. ['<3ouz

jelvz ] .
:piz J To .

. ,
who [hu:] (), these those .
Who are they?
dei] ? ( ?)
They are teachers. .
they.

) .
Theses pictures are nice. .
Those books are good. .
6. to be
,
: who [hu: ] , what
[wDt 3 , . .
,
, ;
.
.
.
What is this? f'wDi iz ~^dis] ?

7. 1 2
1
2
3
4
5
6

one [WAn]
two [tu: ]
three [0ri: ]
four [fa:]
five [faiv]
six [siks ]

7 seven ['sevn ]
8 eight [eit]
9 nine [nain J
10 ten [ten]
11 eleven [1'levn ]
12 twelve [tw elv]

8.
, ,
.
Give that textbook, please. ,
.


.
Show Jim my pictu re, please.
, .
. ' it,
,
to.
Show it to Jim . () .
V. - *

A. Vocabulary* (Text and E xercises)


ab sen t ['asbsant] ;
to be absent ; 'Is
'Ben /absent today?
blackboard ['blaekbo:d] n

blue [blu:] ; This is a blue


hat.
brown [braunj
child
[tjasld]
(p i
children
['tjildrsn])
'] n ; 'W hat [wot]
'colour is the ~ \hat?
?
cup [] n
dark [da:k] ; dark blue
-; dark brown
factory ['faektsri] n ,
fork [fo:k] n
glass [gla:s] n
grey [grei]
"How "^o ld is he? ?
knife [naif] n
large [la:d 3 } ; This is
large room,
fate [leit] ,
; to be late ; 'Is
Ann 7late?
man [maen] n (p i men [men]) 1 .
2. ; Dick is a
good man.
match [maeij] n
new [nju:]
oclock [a'klok]; It is four oclock.

on [on] prep ( -

); His books are


on the desk,
page [peicfe] n ; Open the
textbook at [at] the page ten.
picture ['piktja] n ,

plate [pleit] n
she [Ji:] pron
shelf [jelf] n
show [Jou] v ; Show me
the new cups, please,
son [sAn] n ; My son is student,
spoon [spu:n] n
teacher ['ti:$ 9] n (),
()
they [dei] pron
time [taim] n ; 'W hat [wot]
~"ltime is it? ?
wall [wo:l ] n
what [wot] pron , ; 'W hat is
\ this? ? 'W hat ~^is he?
( )? 'W hat
'colour is the ~^hat?
?
who [hu:] pron ;
Whos she?
( ,
)?
woman
['wuman]
(pi
women
['wimm]) n
you [ju:] pron (); 'Are you a
-/teach er? ?
your [jo:] pron ,

* vocabulary [vs'kaebjutari] n

56

. Basic Sentences*
I . a) 'These are ('new) "Ebooks,
b) 'These 'aren t ('new) ""Ibooks.

Theyre ('new) Ebooks.


They 'aren t ('new) E books.

c) 'Are 'these('new) - J books?


'Are they('new) -Ebooks?

'Yes, they ~1are.


'No, they d a re n t.

2. a) 'These 'books are "Inew.


b) 'These 'books 'a re n t ~"\new.

The 'books are \new.


The 'books 'aren t *^new.

c) 'Are 'these 'books .Jnew ?


'Are the 'books -Jnew?
'Are they -J new?

'Yes, they ".


'No, they arent.

3. a) I am (Im) a "^student,
b) Im 'not a "^student.

They are (Theyre) ""1students.


They 'a re n t ^ stu d e n ts.

c) 'Are you a -/student?


'Yes .
' 7No I am *.

'Are they - J students?


'Yes, they ".
'No, they d a r e n t.

4. Special questions
( )

a) 'W hat
"is she?
Whos
she?

1
>
J

b) 'W hats " this?


'W hat are
these?

,

)?

'
V
J

) 'W hats his "?


?

d) 'W hat 'colours the "?


?

Shes
" teacher

teacher.

Its a ~^cup.
'This is a
.
'These (they)
are cups.

A cup.
"lC ups.

His 'nam es
"'I Dick.
'Dick ^Smith.
Hes
(D ick
" Smith).

~.
(D ick
" Smith).

Its "'Iblue.

"IBlue.

* basic sentences ['beisik 'sentansizj .


57

e) 'W hat ""Itime is it?


?

It's "seven
oclock.

f) 'How "loid is he?


?

H es "'Hen.

~"lTen.

'Bills -/te n
and -JT im s
seven.

*JTen and
seven.

g) 'How 'old are 'Bill and ^Tim?


?

Seven.

. Exercises
Exercise 1.
.

bed, classroom , friend, name, pencil, table, book, cat,


desk, diplomat, hat, map, student, day, pie, tie, factory,
picture, teacher, shelf, child, woman, man, spoon
Exercise 2. .

1. T hese are notebooks. T hese are thin notebooks.


T h ey re thin. 2. T hose are cups. Those are blue cups. T h ey re
blue. 3. T hese are apples. T hese are green apples. T hey are
green. 4. Those are pictures. T hose are good pictures.
T h ey re good. 5. T hese are shelves. T hese are brown shelves.
T h ey re brown. 6. Those are coats. T hose are grey coats.
T h ey re grey.
Exercise 3. .

This is a (thick) notebook.


T hese are (thick) notebooks.
1. This is a blue plate. 2. T hats match. 3. This is a brown
shelf. 4. T hats glass. 5. This is a large factory. 6. T h ats an
easy text. 7. T h ats a good textbook. 8. This is a grey hat. 9.
T hats a blackboard. 10. T hats a spoon.
Exercise 4.
. , .

Are those (blue) cups?


Y es, they are.
No, they arent.
a fork, a glass, a large classroom, a lamp, a brown hat, a
green wall, a white shelf, a large factory
58

Exercise 5, , .

T hese coats are blue, (dark blue)


Oh no. They arent blue. T hey are dark blue.
1. T h ese hats are grey, (black) 2. Those textbooks are
new. (old) 3. T hese notebooks are thick, (thin) 4. Those
matches are bad. (good) 5. Those shelves are yellow, (brown)
6. T hese maps are old. (new) 7. T hose children are bad.
(nice) 8. T hose plates are green, (grey). 9. Those blackboards
arc yellow, (brown)
Exercise 6 .
.

His friends are students. (No)


Are his friends students? No, they aren t. T hey aren t
students.
1. His friends are teachers. (Yes) 2. T hey are students.
(No) 3. He is a teacher. (Yes) 4. She is a teacher. (No) 5.
They are teachers. (No) 6. T hese men are teachers. (Yes) 7.
Those women are teachers. (No)
Exercise 7.
.

1. T h ese pictures are nice. 2. Those books are old. 3.


T hese maps are new. 4. T hese walls are dark green. 5. Those
factories are large. 6. T hese cups are red. 7. Those hats are
dark blue. 8. His children are nice.
Exercise 8. ,
.

What are these? T h ese (they) are pencils.


What are those? T hose (they) are pencils too.
cups, plates, knives, forks, pictures, desks,
shelves, m atches

spoons,

Exercise 9.
. , .

1.

W hats this? (a hat, a fork, a knife, a picture, a tie,


cat) 2. What are those? (knives, glasses, matches, coats,
factories, ties, shelves) 3. W hos he? (a student, a teacher) 4.
Who are they? (students, teachers) 5. W hats his name? (Jim,
Bill, Ben) 6. What colours the cup? (blue, dark blue, red,
yellow, dark brown) 7. What colours his coat? (green, dark
green, dark blue, grey, black, brown, dark brown) 8. What
colour are the shelves? (white, brown, dark blue, green, grey,
59

red). 9. How old is his son? (two, four, six, seven, nine,
eleven, twelve) 0. How old are his sons? (2 and 5, 3and 6,
4 and 8, 7 and 12) 11. What time is it?(2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 11,
12 o clock)
Exercise 10. 12 ,
what, who, what colour, what time, how old, .

D. Text
My 'son is a "^student. His 'name is "iNick. 'This is his
^classroom . It is ~Uarge. The 'walls are "^Igrey. 'T hose
are~"tpictures. They are on the
walls. 'T h ese are *1 desks.
The 'desks are
brown.
'T his is his 'idesk, 'T h ese are his .J notebooks and
^ textbooks. T hey are on the " Id esk . The 'textbooks are
"new. 'T h ese are "'l shelves. They are 'brown and 'iyellow.
'That is
blackboard. It is
brown.
It s 'nine o "^clock. 'N ick and his
friends are in the
^classroom . His 'friends are 'students ". 'Dick is
^absent today. He is 4ill. 'Ann is ~"lnot in the classroom.
She is ^ n o t ill. She is ~*Uate.
T he 'teacher is in the ^classroom . 'What "Uime is it? It
is 'nine o ^clock. _ J ls 'Dick
absent today? 'Y es, he \i s .
H es 4ill. 'Is 'Ann 'ill _^too? 'N o, she l i s n t. She is "Hate.
'What are ^ th o s e ? 'T hose (they) are ^shelves. 'What
"^colour are they? T hey are 'brown and ""'Iyellow.
'Are you a
student? 'Yes, I " lam .
'What la r e you? Im a "^student. (W ere "^students).
'Are 'N ick and his 'friends 'students -Jtoo? 'Y es,' thevW
"'Iare.
'Are they in the - J classroom? 'Y es, they "I are.
~"\Nick, 'show me the 'new
textbook,
please. 'Open it
at 'page ~ lte n
'Read 'text 1 3 , -^ please.
Exercise 1. .
Exercise 2. ( ).

1.
a)
2.
a)
3.
a)
4.
a)
60

T he walls are
blue, b) grey.
T hese are his notebooks and
textbooks, b) pencils.
Nick and his friends are
in the room, b) in the classroom.
Ann is
ill, b) late.

5.

Are Nick and his friends


a) teachers too? b) students too?
6. Nick, show me
a) the notebook, please, b) the new textbook, please*
7. Read text
a) 3, please, b) 7, please.
Exercise 3. .

1.
Is Nick a teacher? 2. What is he? 3. Is his classroom
large? 4. What colour are the walls? 5. Are the pictures on the
walls? 6. Are his notebooks and textbooks on his desk? 7. Are
his textbooks new? 8. What colour are the shelves? 9. What
colour is the blackboard? 10. What time is it? 11. Is Dick
absent? 12. Is he ill? 13. Is Ann ill too? 14. Is the teacher in
the classroom?
Exercise 4, ) , b) ,
.
Exercise 5. .
.

. Vocabulary (D ialogues)

)
T hats all right] [ daets : V a n ]
( ), (
)
excuse [iks'kju:z] v ,
; E x ^ c u s e -/m e . ,
, (
, ,
.
.)
goodbye [gud -Jb ai] (. [
_ /b a i])
bye [-Jb a i], bye-bye [bai-Jbai]
. ,
Hope to see you soon, ['houp V9
"""I si: ju: su:n]
.

meet [mi:t] v (); 'M eet (my friend) Mr


Brown. (
) - .
British ['britiJJ ,

businessm an ['bizmsman]
, ,
How are you? ['hau
a: ju:]
?
fine [fain] , ;
Pm fine.
.
thank
[Baerjk]
v ;
" thank you ,
And "? (And 'how are "?)
?
I Sorry. ( " sorry.) .
, (

F. Dialogues
1
Mr Brown: He'Ilo, Mr P e O r o v . 'M eet
^ S m ith .
/V/rov; 'How do you ~"ldo.

(my 'friend)

Mr

61

M r Sm ith: 'How do you ''tdo.


M r Brown: 'Mr 'Smith is a 'British

businessm an.

2
Ben: ~11.
Peter: He~Mlo. How you?
Ben: Im " Ifin e, ""thank you. And ?
Peter: Im 'fine _^too. Its a 'nice ~*\day today, - J isn t it?
Ben: Y es, it is.
3
Stu den t:
Teacher:

Sorry, Im M ate.
T h ats all -bright.
4

Ben: Ex"^cuse J m e . 'Is this _^your textbook?


Peter: N o, it " ^ isnt. That is my -Jtextb ook .
5
Bill: Good _^bye.
Peter: - J Bye. 'H ope to ""Isee you soon.
Exercise 1. .
Exercise 2.
*. .
Exercise 3. . ,
, .

1.

\: H ello, Mr Smith. Meet M r Jones.


S: How do you do?
J: How do you do?
: M r Jon es is a British businessm an.
<Ai: Brown, Benson; A2: Brown, diplomat; Benson,
businessm an)

2.

A: H ello.
i: H ello, how are you?
2. fin e, thank you. A n d y o u 7.
:T m fin e too. Its a nice day today, is n t it?
A 3: Y es, it is.
(A t. And how is your son? And how is your wife?
B 2: H es fin e, thank you. Shes fine, thank you.)

*
. ,
.
62

3.

A: Excuse me. Is this his notebook!


: No, it isn t. Its my notebook.
(A* pen, pencil, textbook; : pen, pencil, textbook)

Exercise 4, .
Exercise 5, ,
? .

1.

A;
B:
P:
A:

H ello, Mr Brown. Meet Mr Petrov.


**
How do you do?
Mr Petrov is a diplomat.

2.

A:
P:
A:
P:

H ello, Peter.
**
Im fine, thank you. And you?

3.

S: Sorry, Im late.
TV

4.

A:
P:
A:

H ello, Ben. T his is Mr Petrov.


How do you do.
Mr Petrov is from Moscow ['moskou ].

5.

A:
B:
A;
B:
A:
B:

H ello.
**
How are you?
*
Im fine too. Its a nice day today, isn t
***

6.

A: What are you?


B: *

7.

A:
B:

Excuse me. Is this your pencil?


***

8.

A:
B:

Its a cold (nice) day today, isn t it?


**

9.

A:
B:

G oodbye. Hope to see you soon.


* * *

Exercise 6.
. .

1.

M r Smith: H ello. Meet my friend, Mr Brown.


Petrov: .
M r Brown: How do you do,
M r S m ith : Mr Brown is a British businessm an.
63

2.

3.
4.

5.

Ben:
Tim :
Ben:
Tim :

: H ello.
. ?
fine, thank you. And you?
.
, ?
Ben: Yes, it is.
S: Sorry, I m late.
TV .
M r Brown: H ello.
Petrov: . ?
M r Brown: I m fine, thank you. And you?
Petrov: .
?
M r Brown: H es fine, thank you.
Bill: Goodbye.
Peter: . .
V

Exercise 7. .

1. - ,
, . -
, . ,
.
2. , ,
( ).
, .
, .
3. , .

VI.
Exercise 1. .

.
J j, Q q ,
Exercise 2. .
Exercise 3.
.
Exercise 4. .

sham e, sham , joke, jam, cage, chess, peach, stretch, row,


rainy, tune, but, butter, June, found, card, pass, past, park,
port, call, walk, m ixture, ladder, w hen, common, write,
wrench, wheat
Exercise 5. .
64

1. T h is is a child. 2. T h a t is a man. 3. T h is is his


notebook. 4. That coat is blue. 5. That classroom is large. 7.
T his desk is brown.
Exercise 6. to be.

1. ... these women old? 2. My teacher ... a nice man. 3.


Anri ... absent today. Tom ... absent today too. 4. T hese ...
knives and forks. 5. His son ... ill. 6. "What colour ... those
cups?" "They ... blue." 7. T hose ties ... dark green. 8. "What
... this?" "This ... a new factory." 9. "Who ... they?" "They ...
students." 10. "... the factory large?" "Yes, it ... ."
Excrcisc 7. , .

1. Peter Brown is ... teacher. He is in ... classroom. T hese


are ... desks. ... desks are dark brown. Those are ... books and
... textbooks. T hey are on ... desk. That is ... blackboard. ...
blackboard is dark green.
This is Tom, and that is Bill. Tom and Bill are ...
students. They are ... good students. T hey are in ... class
room. 2. "Whats Mr Brown?" H es ... British diplomat." 3. "Is
Mr Hill ... diplomat too?" "No, he isn t." "Hes ...
businessman." 4. "What colour is ... desk?" "Its brown."
Exercise 8. .

1. The plates are white. (1) 2. These are green glasses. (2)
3. She is a teacher. (1) 4. His name is Jim (1) 5. Its ten
o clock, ( 1 ) 6 . My son is six. (1)
Exercise 9. 15 , what is...,
who is..., what colour..., how old..., what time... .
Exercise 10. .

1.
(Lavrov). .
(Nick Ivanov). .
. 2. - ( )?
. 3. ?
. 4.
/
? . 5.
? . 6. ?
. 7. ? . 8.
? . 9. ? .
. 10. . 11.
, . ?
IX, . 12. ( )?
.
Exercise 11. .
65

1.

- : , - . ,
- .
: .
- : .
- : - .
: .
: . ?
: , . ?
: .
, ?
: , .
: , .
: .

2.

3.

LESSON 4
I.

[:], [d i ], [ , []


1 .

1 .

2 . r+"

2.
[:]
large

[]
name

[]
bad

[:]

[:]
he

[]
pen

term

[]
'better

[ai]

[ai]
nice

[]
ill

girl

[]. []

>

66

[]
'beggar

[wai]

[ai]
my

myth

lju:]

[ju:], [u:]
'student,
rule

[]
cup

[ou]

[ou]
note

[]
on

[I]

Byrd

[:]

[I]

easy

turn '

fork

[]
'doctor

[j]

'yellow

oi
oy

[1]

voice [vois]
boy [boi]

[19]

clear [klig]
deer fdi3 ]
here [hia]

air
are

[]

chair [tjes]
care []

wor

[wa:]

work [wa:k]

ear
eer
ere

II.
: -



-
, .

,


-

.

^ B e n , 'close the "Ibook.


~ \M r /G reen , 'close the
^book.
IM rs
Brown is
'watching T *\V
(and Mr Brown is sitting and reading a book).
67

Thank you ,
- .
" Thank -J y o u .

.
, Thank you
.
Thank you.

III.
Exercise 1. . , [rj]
.

^ lo n g
J gong
-J so n g
^ th r o n g
-J reading
standing

ring
bring
sing
thing
'writing
'taking

'answering
'doing
'playing
'showing
'giving
'asking

'morning
'evening
'opening
'closing
'sitting
'watching

Exercise 2. . ,
[].

-/b a n g in g
" bringing

ringing
'singing

'flinging
'springing

Exercise 3. ,
[] [],

-^ ran
ra in
sun

~"lrang
ring
sung

sin sing
kin king
thin thing

Exercise 4. . [:].

_^her
.J s ir
_^fur
"""Iburn

turn
term
girl
bird

nerve
serve
third
first

'certain
'curtain
nurse
curse

world
word
work
'worker

Exercise 5. ,
[] [:].
68

/B e n
ten
stern

burn
turn
term

get girl
set serve
b e t birth

well world
wet work
w e s t worst

Exercise 6. . ,
[] .

/b o y
_^joy
- J to y
"~\coy

coin
coil
soil
point

noise
voice
choice
hoist

Exercise 7. . ,
[] .

-J dear
" rear

clear
hear

mere
here

beer
cheer

peer
steer

Exercise 8. . ,
[ 1 .

7mare
- /b a r e
^dare

fare
hare
stare

chair
hair
pair

Exercise 9. ,
[ 1] [].

_^mere
beer
deer

"'I mare

bare

dare

cheer chair
steer stare
here hair

Exercise 0. .
[:] [:]

/burn " born


turn
torn
firm
form

w o r ld warn
curl
corn
worm warm

word ward
shirt short
thirdthorn

Exercise 11. :
) .

thirteen students ['03:ti:n 'stjuidsnts]


fourteen girls ['fo:ti:n 'gs:lz3
fifteen teachers ['fiftirn 'tktjsz]
sixteen women ['siksti:n 'w im m ]
seventeen men ['sevnti:n 'm en]
eighteen boys ['eiti:n 'boiz]
nineteen books ['nam ti:n 'buks]
b) ,

room fourteen ['rum fo:'ti:n]


room eighteen ['rum ei'tiin ] *
69

page sixteen sik s'tim ]


page seventeen [' sevn'ti:n]
Exercise 12. ,
.

'Read
'Write
'Open
'Open

'lesson six 'Ueen.


'exercise eigh "'iteen.
your 'books at 'page nine ~^teen.
your 'books at 'page thir "^Iteen.

Exercise 13. ,

.

'Is
'Is
'Is
'Is
'Is
'Is
'Is

'this a
pen or a "^pencil?
'this a - J black or a " pencil?
Mr 'Brown a --^teacher or a
diplomat?
'this 'pencil - J black or ~^blue?
'Ann 'reading a -/b o o k or a "^textbook?
'Ann 'reading a /book or 'writing a
letter?
'Jim 'going to 'play / chess or 'watch T "~W?

VI.
1.
(Present Participle ['preznt 'pa:tisiplj)
(Present Participle)

-ing.


, - , , ,
,
- .
to open opening ,

to read reading ,
,
-ing
:
) ,
to give - giving ['givig]
to take - taking ['teik ig ]
70

)
, ,
-ing .
to sit - sitting f'sitir)]
,
-ing.
to play - playing ['pleurj]
to study - studying ['sudnrj]


the Present
Continuous T ense.
2,

The Present Continuous Tense


( )

am

You

are

She
(It)

is

We
You
They

are

'reading

('not)

a "Ibook.

Am

'Yes, I "la m .

Are

you

'No, I am """Vnot.

'Is

she
he
(it)

'Are

we
you
they

'W hat

are
is

'reading

a .Jbook?

'Yes, he " lis


'No, he
isn't.

'Yes, they "


'No, they are "Inot.

you
he,

doing?

I am 'reading a ""\book.
Hes 'reading a "Ibook.

71

The Present Continuous T ense


, .

now [] , .
is reading a book now. .
:
1. , ,
, Continuous.
: to hear [ta 'hia] , to see [ta 'si:] , to feel [t9
'fi:l] , to know [t9 'nou] , to u nderstand [ta .Anda'stsend]
, to like [to 'laik] .
2. Continuous to be
to have [hasv] ( , ).
3. to have breakfast , to have dinner
. to have
Present Continuous Tense.
They are having dinner now. .

3. "to be going [bi: ' ] + "

'going to 'watch T -JV tonight.


He is 'not going to 'play ~~\chess
tomorrow.
'Are you 'going to 'watch T _JV
tonight?

(
)
.
(
) .
(
)
?

"to be going + "


,
.

: tonight [ta'nait] ,
tom orrow [ta'morou] .
. to
go [] , ,
to be going.
I'm going to the Zoo tomorrow. ( )
.
72

4.

'Is
'Is
'Is
'Is
'Is

'this pen or
pencil?
'Ann a - J teacher or a "^student?
this 'pencil ?red or ""Igreen?
'P eter in .JMoscow or in
Minsk?
'Jim 'playing J chess or 'watching T^V?

Its a
pencil.
She's a ^student.
Its
green.
He's in "'IMinsk.
H es 'playing ""'Ichess.

,

, . .,
(
, , . .).
, ,
.
or [: ]
:
[ ]
or
[]

,
.
'Is 'this 7pen or
pencil?
'Is 'this 'desk
" yellow?

brown or

5.


.
This is coffee. .
is having bacon and eggs, to a st, jam and tea.

.
73



,
,
, .
This is coffee. The coffee is very good. .
.
6. 13 19
(Cardinal num erals,* 13 19)
13 19
-teen.
-teen ,
.
13
14
15
16

thirteen ['0s'ti:n3
fourteen ['fD:'ti:n]
fifteen ['fif'tim ]
sixteen ['sik s'ti:n ]

17 seventeen ['sevn'ti:n]
18 eighteen
['ei'tim ]
19 nineteen ['n ain 'tim ]


.
, ; 'Room fif'teen ['rum
fif'ti:n ], ,
: 'seventeen 'boys ['sevntiAi
'boiz ].
. ,
,
: 18- Page 18, 5 Room 5.

7.
:
) .
Peter is at h om e. .
) .
Peter is in O m sk. .
The books are on the shelf. .
,
where [w es] ,
.
* cardinal numerals [ka:dinl 'nju:m 9rlz]
74

'W here are the Ebooks?

The 'books are on the


^desk.
They re on the
desk.

On the "'Idesk.

'W here is ^Jim?

H es at

At Thorne.

'W here is he ^from?

H es from "I Kiev.

home.

From "\K iev.

V. -
A. Vocabulary (T ext and E xercises)
about [a'bautj prep ,
(^ ,
. .)
after E'a:fta] prep (

)
answ er ['a:ns 9] v ; to
answ er a letter (a question
['kwestjn])
( )
ask [a:sk] v ; to ask a
question ; The
teacher is asking questions and we
are answering them, to ask smb..
about sm th. -.
-.
bacon ['beikn] n
, ,
boy []
breakfast ['brekfast] ; to
have [haev, havj breakfast
;
They
are
having
breakfast now. for breakfast
. She is having butter,
toast and coffee for breakfast,
butter ['bAts] n
chess [tjes] n ; to play
[plei] ch ess ;
Peter and Tom are playing chess
now.
coffee f'kDfi] n ; to have cofee
; Are you going to have
coffee now?
daughter ['do:t9 ] n ; How old is
your daughter?
do [du:] v ; What is he doing

now?
dog [dog] n
door [do:] n ; Close the door,
please.
egg n ; bacon and eggs
; to have bacon
and eggs

evening ['i:vnitj] n ; It is eve


ning. , in the evening
; Good evening.
.
F rench [frentj] ; a
F rench
teacher

() ;
Is Jane a French teacher?
girl [:1] n ,
home [houm] n , ; at
home , ; Mr and Mrs
Green are at home now.
jam n ,
letter ['lets] n ; to write (to
answer) a letter (
) ; Is Peter writing
a letter?
little 1'litl] ,
( )
morning ['msmirj] ; It is
morning. , in the m orning
; Good morning.
.
orange
['Drin(d) 3] n
orange juice [d3 u:s]
; Is this orange juice?
question n ; to answ er (to
ask) a question 75

( ); Mary is
answering a question.
Saturday ['ssetodi] n ; Is it
Saturday?
schoolboy ['sku:lbDi] n
schoolgirl ['sku:lg 9:l] n
sit v ; to sit in an arm chair
(at a table) (
); Is Jane sitting in an
armchair?
studies ['sUdiz] n p i ; Mary
is asking Peter about his studies,
tea [ti:] n ; to have tea
th eir [deal pron , (. .); Their books are
on the desk.

toast [toust] n , ,
,
( )
visit ['vizit] v (~.),
( -.); to visit an
old friend
; They are going to visit their
old friends tomorrow,
watch TV ['wDtJ ti:'vi:]
; Im going to watch
TV in the evening,
wife [waif] n ; His wife is a
French teacher,
write [rait] v ; to write a
letter (exercises)
()

. B asic Sentences
1. a) H es (he is) 'reading a ~~\book.
Were (we are) 'watching T "~W.
b) He 'isn t (is 'not) 'reading a ~\book.
We arent (are 'not) 'watching T 'W .
c) 'Is he 'reading a -Jbook?
Yes, he "Iis.
'No, he "Hsnt.

'Are you 'watching T_/V?


'Yes, we 'I are.
'No, we are 'inot.

2. a) Shes 'going to 'write a ^letter in the evening.


T heyre 'going to 'play ""ichess tonight.
b) She 'isnt 'going to 'write a "^letter in the evening.
They 'a re n t 'going to 'play ~~\chess tonight.
c) 'Is she 'going to 'write a
-^letter in the evening?
'Yes, she .
'No, she "Usnt.

'A re they 'going to 'watch


T fV tonight?
'Yes, they ""Ure.
'No, they are ^ n o t

d) 'W hat are they " doing?

They are 'playing "'Ichess.

3. 'Is
'Is
'Is
'Is

Its a ~~\desk.
Its ""igrey.
Its ' pencil.
H es
opening the door.
1

'this a -/d e sk or a "liable?


'this 'coat -Jg rey or """?
'this a green or a 'Iblue pencil?
'Jim -Jopening or "^closing the door?

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

76

. E xercises
Exercise 1. (Present Participle)
. .

to close, to give, to take, to have, to write, to play, to do,


to show, to answer, to open, to read, to ask, to sit, to watch
Exercise 2. .
, . .

1.

2.

3.

4.

A: 'Are 'Ann and 'Peter 'watching T - J V now?


B: 'N o, they are "'Inot.
A: 'What are they
doing?
B: T hey're 'playing
chess.
( : writing letters, reading books)
A: 'Is 'Bill at T h o rn e now?
B: 'Y es, he .
A: 'W hats he "doing?
B: 'H e s 'r e a d in g s ' French book.
(B: writing a letter, watching TV , showing Ann his
picture, playing chess)
A; 'Are you /op en ing or "closing the book?
: Im
closing it
(A: notebook, textbook, door)
A: 'Is 'Peter 'writing - J a letter or 'reading book
now?
: H es 'reading ~.
(A: watching TV, playing chess B; watching TV,
playing chess)

Exercise 3. ,
.

Close the book, please.


T: What are you doing?
S i: I m closing the book.
7V W hats Peter doing?
S 2: H es closing the book.
1. Open the textbook, please. 2. Show me that picture,
please. 3. Give him your notebook, please. 4. Close the door,
please. 5. Give me your textbook, please. 6, Read text 4,
please.
Exercise 4. , .
77

Is Tom reading a book? (to watch TV)


N o, he isn t. H e s watching TV.
1. Is he opening the door? (to close the door) 2. Is Jim
asking questions? (to answer questions) 3. Is he reading text
2? (to read text 3) 4. Are they playing chess? (to watch TV)
5. Is Bill showing his new picture to Peter? (to show it to
Nick) 6. Are they reading the new text? (to answer questions)
Exercise 5. .
.

1. Are you opening or closing the d o o r? 2. Is Mr Green


reading a book or writing a letter? 3* Are they playing chess
or watching TV? 4. Is he opening his notebook or closing it? 5.
Is he giving his picture to Jane or to 6. Is she showing
her textbook to P eter or to Nick?
Exercise 6. , ,
Present Continuous.

1. Peter and Ben are at home now. They (to play) chess.
Nick is at home too. He (to watch) TV. 2. Ben (to show) me
his new picture now. His picture is very good. 3. "What is Ann
(to do) now?" "She (to write) a letter to her friend." 4. "Peter,
close the door, please." "What Peter (to do)?" "He (to close)
the door." 5. "Open your books at page nineteen and read the
new text." "What the students (to do) ?" "They (to read) the
new text."
Exercise 7.
. .

Is Mr Brown a teacher? Is Mr Brown a doctor?


Is Mr Brown a teacher or a doctor?
1.
Is Ann a student? Is Ann a teacher? 2. Is this shelf
brown? Is this sh elf black? 3. Is this a new book? Is this an
old book? 4. Are they answering questions? Are they asking
questions? 5. Are you opening the notebook? Are you closing
the notebook? 6. Are Peter and Bill playing chess? Are Peter
and Bill watching TV? 7. Is Jane reading text 3? Is Jane
reading text 4? 8. Is Ben giving his new picture to Tom? Is he
giving his new picture to Jane?
Exercise 8. , .
78

am

He, she

is

We
You
They

are

going

to watch TV tonight,
to read this book tomorrow,
to write a letter to him tonight.
to show Peter the new pictures
tomorrow.
to play chess tomorrow.
to have coffe now.
to go to the Zoo tomorrow,
to the theatre tonight,
to Minsk tomorrow.

Exercise 9. , , .

: Read text 4, please. What are you going to do?


S: Im going to read text 4.
1. Read the n sw text, please. 2. Close the book, please. 3.
Open your notebook, please. 4. Show Peter that picture,
please. 5. Take that textbook, please. 6. Give George a pencil,
please.
Exercise 10. .

Peter is not reading the new text now (tonight)


Peter is going to read the new text tonight.
1. T hey are not playing chess, (tomorrow) 2, Im not
watching TV now. (tonight) 3. Ann is not writing a letter now.
(tomorrow) 4. T he children are not watching TV. (tonight) 5.
We are not reading the new text, (tomorrow) 6. They are not
having breakfast now. (in the morning) 7. We are not having
tea now. (at five o clock) 8. T hey are not answering my
questions, (tomorrow)
Exercise 11. .

1.
Jane is answering his questions. (1) 2. H e asking
P eter questions. (2) 3. They are going to watch T V tonight. (3)
4. H e's going to M insk tomorrow. (3)
Exercise 12. .

1:

A: 'Are you 'going to "watch T~)W tonight?


B: 'N o, Im ^not. Im 'going to 'write ^ letters to my
friends.
2. A: 'What are you 'going to ^do in the evening?
B: I m 'going to 'play chess.
79

3.

A:
B:

'Are you 'going to _JZoo tomorrow?


'N o, Im . Im 'going to the "^theatre.

Exercise 13. .

1.
2.
3.

A; What are you going to do tonight?


B: ...
A: Are they going to read text 5 or 6?
B: ...
A: ...
B: B ens going to play chess in the evening.

Exercise 14. ,
,

1.
Im going to read text 12. (14, 17, 18, 19) 2. Please
open your books at page 7. (9, 11, 13, 15, 16, 18) 3. Please
go to room 4. (8, 10, 12, 14, 17, 19)
D. Text
It is Saturday. It is nine o clock in the morning. The
G reens are at home. Mr George* Green is a british diplomat.
His wife Laura** is a French teacher. Their son David*** is a
student. Their daughter Amy is a schoolgirl.
T he G reens are sitting at the table. T hey are having
breakfast. Mr Green and David are having bacon and eggs,
toast, butter, jam and tea. Mrs Green and Amy are having
orange juice, toast, jam and coffee. Mr Green is asking Amy
and David about their studies. Amy and David are answering
his questions.
After breakfast they are going to visit the Browns. Amy is
going to show her new little dog to her friend Jane Brown.
It is evening.
"'Whats 'Mr 'Green doing now?" "Hes 'reading a
book."
"Ts Mrs 'Green 'reading a _^book or 'watching T
?"
"Shes 'watching T ."
"Ts 'Amy 'watching T - J V or 'playing ~^chess?"
"Shes 'watching T I V ."
"'Whats David doing?"
"Hes 'writing letter to his friend."
Exercise 1. .
* George [:]
** Laura ':]
*** David t'deivid]
80

Exercise 2. ( ).

1. It is
a) nine o clock in the morning, b) ten o clock in the eve
ning.
2.
Mr George Green is
a) a British businessm an, b) a British diplomat.
3. T heir daughter Amy is
a) a student, b) a schoolgirl.
4. Mr Green is asking
a) Mrs Green questions, b) Amy and David about their
studies.
5. After Breakfast they are going to visit
a) the Petrovs, b) the Browns.
6. Mrs Green is
a) writing a letter, b) watching TV.
Exercise 3. .

1.
What time is it? 2. Is Mr Green a British businessm an
or a British diplomat? 3. Is his wife Laura a French teacher?
4. What is their son David? 5. Is Amy a student or a
schoolgirl? 6. Are the Greens sitting at the table? 7. What are
they doing? 8. What are Mr Green and David having for
breakfast? 9.What are Mrs Green and Amy having for
breakfast? 10. What is Mr Green asking Amy and David
about? 11. Are Amy and David answering his questions? 12.
What is Amy going to show her friend?
Exercise 4. .
Exercise 5. , .

. Vocabulary (D ialogues)
w here [we9] adv , ; Where is
Jane? Where are you going on
Saturday?
?
garden ['ga:dn] ; in the garden

with [wid] prep ; to play chess with
; Jane is
playing chess with Peter,
h er [ha:] (. .);
Her son is a teacher,
sitting-room I'sitirjrum] n .
Is Jane in the sitting-room?

Sunday ['SAndiJ n ; on
Sunday
take smb. to (,
) -. -. "Where are
you going to take your children on
Sunday?" "I am going to take them
to the Zoo."
the Zoo [zu:] n
theatre [' 0i9t 9] n ; to go to the
theatre ; Are you
going to the theatre on Sunday?
be well ,
; "How are you?" T m
81

well, thank you." ,


. "Very well,
thank you." ,
,
weekend f'wi:kend]

( ); Have
nice weekend.
.
The sam e to you.
.

F. D ialogues
1
Peter: Its a 'nice "^Iday today, - J is n t it?
George: 'Y es, it . _^me, 'w heres ?
Peter: S h es in the garden. Shes 'playing with her ^ d o g .

2
George: 'Where are 'Tom and David?
Peter: T hey are in the sitting-room . T h ey re 'playing
ch ess. Your 'D avid is a 'very 'nice .
George: Your 'Tom is a ^ v e r y nice boy, .
3
George: 'What are you 'going to 'do on "^Sanday?
Peter: Im 'going to 'take 'Jane to the "^Zoo, 'Are you
'going to the 'Zoo -Jtoo?
George: "^N o, Im 'going to 'take 'Amy to the theatre.
4
Petrov: Good
morning. How you?
M r Brown: Im , - J thank you. And _^you?
P.:
'V ery n w e l l . - J Thank you.
M r B.: G ood .J b y e . Have a nice w eekend.
P .:
T hank you. T he 'sam e to .
Exercise I. .
Exercise 2. . ,
.

1.

A:
me, 'w heres ~ \P e te r l
: H es in the
sitting-room . H es 'watching T "W.
(A: John, David; B: the garden, playing with his dog;
the sitting-room , playing chess with Tom)
2. A: 'What are you 'going to 'do on ~*\Sundayl
B: Im 'going to 'take 'Jane to the theatre.
(A: Saturday; B: the Zoo)

82

3.

A: 'How is your mother?


; S h es ~*\well, thank you.
(A: daughter, Ann; : fine, very well)

Exercise 3. ,
? .

1.

: Good morning, Mr Green. This is Mr Stankov.


G:
S: How do you do.
: Mr Stankov is a teacher.
: Its a very nice day, isn t it?
:
: G oodbye.
: H ello. How are you?
:
: Very w ell, thank you.
; Excuse me, w heres Peter?
:
: W hats he doing?
: What are you going to do on Saturday?
:
: Are you going to take your daughter to the theatre on
Sunday?
:
: Are Tom and David in the sitting-room ?
:
: Are they playing chess or watching TV?
:
: A nd where are Jane and Amy?
:
: G oodbye. Have a nice weekend.
:

2.

* *

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

* * *

**

8.

**

Exercise 4. ?

1.

2.
3.
4.
5.

* *

Good m orning. How are you?

V ery well. Thank you.


* *

P eters in the garden. H es playing with his dog.


Bye. Hope to see you soon.


*

Thank you. T he sam e to you.


83

6.

:
A:
B:

W ere going to visit the G reens.


...
Mrs Green is a French teacher.

Exercise 5.
(
). .

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

; . ?
: Im fine, thank you. And you?
: , .
.
: T he same to you. Bye.
S: . , .
: T h ats all right. Good morning. Now open your book
at page 19 and read the new text.
: , ?
: S h es in the sitting-room . S h es watching TV.
: ?
: N o, she is n t. She is in the garden. S hes playing with
her new dog.
: ?
: Davig Green.
: ?
: H es a student. David is a very nice boy.
A: What are you going to do now?
: 4- .
A: Is the text easy?
: , . 5-
.
A: What are you going to do on Sanday?
: . ?
A: Im going to take my daughter to the Zoo. G ood-bye.
Have a nice w eekend.
: . .

Exercise . .

1. - .
. , .

.
2. ,
. ,
. ,
.
3. . - , .
4. ,
84

, ,
.
5.
(),
. ,
.
VI.
Exercise 1.
, .
Exercise 2. . .
Exercise 3. .

thing, song, 'singing, 'turning, 'parcel, worst, voice,


'curtain, toy, dear, dare, beer, bare, warm, short, 'eigh'teen,
peach, show, 'newspaper, zone, game, 'happy, w hite,
"twenty,- to id, 'fellow, 'rainy, last, park, m ix, out, 'm oisture,
'common, chain
Exercise 4, ) ,
.

breakfast
daughter
orange
on Sunday

well
_J sitting-room
- J schoolgirl
garden

b) .

Bill

Ann

Peter

" Y

maatmm

Bob Smith

Thank you

85

Exercise 5.
.

Is he a teacher or
a diplomat?
Are they reading text
4 or text 5?
Im very w ell, thank
you.
Exercise 6. , .
1. "Is this ... new plate?" "No, it is n t 2. "Is he reading
book?" "No, he isn t. He is playing chess." 3. "Is he going to
write ... letter tonight?" "Yes, he is. He is going to write ...
letter to his friend." 4. "What colour is ... coat?" "Its black" 5.
Show me ... picture, please. 6. Open ... textbook a t ... page 15,
please. 7. He is closing ... door. 8. Ann is going to ... Zoo on
... Sunday. 9. Bill is having ... bacon and eggs, ... toast, ...
butter, ... jam and coffee. 10. Is she going to have ... tea or ...
coffee? 11. It is ... Sanday. It is morning. It is ten o clock in
... morning. 12. Mrs Smith is ... French teacher. 13. Have ...
nice weekend. Thank you. ... same to you.
Exercise 7. to be.
1. The books and the notebooks ... on the desk. 2. "... you
going to the theatre tonight?" "Yes, I ..." 3. "Good morning.
How ... you? "I ... w ell, thank you." 4. "How ... he?" "He ...
fine, thank you." 5. "... it Saturday today?" "Yes, it ... ." 6.
'H ow old ... your son?" "He ... fourteen." 7. "... you a teacher
or a student?" "I ... a student" 8. ... those classrooms large? 9.
"... she a French teacher?" "Yes, she ..." 10. ,!What ... Amy
doing now?" "She ... writing a letter." 11. "... you going to
play chess with Mike or with Peter?" "I ... going to play chess
with Peter." 12. He ... having toast, jam, and tea; 13. ... it
Saturday or Sunday today? 14. ... you going to the theatre on
Sunday?
Exercise 8. .
1.
"Wheres Bill?" "Hes ... the sitting-room . H es
watching TV." 2. "Wherere the books?" "Theyre ... the

86

shelves." 3. "Are the students ... the classroom?" "Yes, they


are." 4. "Where is Mr Petrov ... ?" "Hes ... Kiev." 5. The
teacher is asking Peter ... his studies. 6. The Browns are
sitting ... the table. 7. ... breakfast they are going ... the Zoo.
8. Bill is going to show his new books ... his friends.
Exercise 9. .

1. She is having orange ju ice, to a st, butter, jam and coffee


for breakfast. (1) 2. Jim is asking Bill about his stu dies. (1) 3.
T heir daughter Amy is a schoolgirl. (1) 4. On Sunday h e s
going to visit the Sm iths ( 1 ) 5 . D avid is writing a letter to his
friend. (2)
Exercise 10. ,

1.
.
.
. . 8 .
. .
. 2. . 9 .
. . .
.
, .
. .
. 3. .
,
. 4. . 5.
(
). 6. ? 6
. 7. ? . 8.
? -. 9.
? . 10.
?
. 11. 19- ? 12. 17- ? 13.
?
.
Exercise 11. .

. .
, - . ?
. . ?
, .
?
.
?
, . .
.
87

. . .
2. , .
. 18-
.

LESSO N 5
L
1.
Q q [fcju: 1
2.
[ ] ]

[]

poor []

+*

[]
[ju9]

sure ]
[pjus]

qu+

[kwj+

quite
[kwait]

II.



, . .
.
\ ,
. , ,
.
*
,
.
88

,
, , . .
'N ick is a fvery
'good doctor.
III.
Exercise 1. . ,
[] fjua] .

|jU3]

[]
tour
mure
sure [jus ] pure

moor
poor

cure
'mural

Exercise 2. ,
[w]. [] [t]
[wj.

queen
Jquite
-J quest
question
quick

twin
twinned
twirl
twelve
'twenty

twill
'twilight
twelfth
twice
twist

Exercise 3. [:], [], [ ], [], [], [] [ou]*.


.

,_^me
^he
/s h e
~^tea

: ]
green
'easy
'evening
'please

[ae]
Jm an
'absent
-J jam
match
/th a n k 'factory
"~Mamp
'Saturday

[e ]
7ten
-J p en

well
'yellow
French
'tw enty

^pencil
friend

[]
/ on
orange
/sorry
morrow

[a i]
-J I
/ my
_^bye
^tie

e'leven
'textbook
'breakfast
'question

time
'm inus
to'night
write

/n o
/ go
^show
he~Mlo

from
dog
clock
what

[]
/so n
J Sunday
/colour
"Abutter

[ou ]
'Soviet
those
hope
'notebooks

1 - 4 .
89

Exercise 4. .

cloud, 'bedroom, see,


small, quite, 'm oment,
a'bout, 'lesson, re'peat,
ar'rive, poor, blow, toast,
pound, a'gree

work, flat, fond, uncle, mine, cold,


mild, 'doctor, U ni'versity, them ,
sir, 'tw ilight, 'horror, 'husband,
door, 'corner, 'envy, sure, 'centre,

Exercise 5.
. . ,
.

a) 1. Peter has a nice dog. 2. John has a daughter and a


son, 3, Jane has som e French books. 4. His daughter Ann is a
schoolgirl. 5. Its six o clock now. 6* T hey are sitting at the
table now.
b) 1. Is this a brown or a black pencil? 2. Is that an
English or a French book? Is that coat blue or green? 4. Is it
Saturday or Sunday today? 5. Is Jane writing a letter or
reading the text? 6, Are you going to see the Browns or the
Smiths on Sunday? 7. Have you a brother or a sister? 8. Has
he got a new or an old car?
Exercise 5. ,
.

1.
Tom has a very nice dog. 2. Jane is fond
m athem atics. 3. T hey are two bedrooms and a sitting-room in
their flat. 4. Their father is a very interesting man.
VI.
I. to have ,
Sim le Present T en se
I
You
We
They

have
'not

He
She
It

has

'Have

I
you
we
they

'H as

he
she
(it)

90

a "Ison,
children.

a -/so n ?

a -Json?

'Yes, I " have.


'No, I havent.

'Yes, he ~^has.
'No, he hasnt.

of

to have :
) not.
:
havent ['haevnt J h asn t ['hasznt].
I havent a book, [ai 'haevnt ]
H e h asn t a pencil, [hi 'haeznt ^ p en sl ]
) .
N o ,
.
I have pencil. , (
)
My elder sister has children.
.
: 1. to have ,
Present Continuous.
2.

to have got to have
, . have got , ,
.
has a mother and a father.



: Ive got, h es got, theyve got, I havent got, she h asnt
got . .
H es got (he has) a new French textbook.
I haven't got a thin notebook. (=1 havent a thin
notebook.^ I have no thin notebook.)
H ave you got a red pencil? (-H ave you a red pencil?)
2, som e, any, no
I have some 'English Ebooks.
He has some "cofee in the cup.
'Give me some "^pencils
I 'haven't any ^ p ic tu re s.
She 'hasnt any ibutter at
home.
'Have you any 'French /books?
'Yes, I ""'lhave.
'No, I havent.


.
, (
)
-/please.
.
.
- () ?
.
.
91

1. som e, ,
:
)
* .
has som e English textbooks.
.
)
. som e
.
Give me som e butter, please. ,
.
2. a) Any
,
.
T h ey havent any French textbooks.
.
Have you got any milk at home? ?
)
any
, .
Give him any book, please. , ,
.
3. N o
,
.
not.
has tea in his cup. (=He h asnt (got) any tea in his
cup.)
I have no French books. (=1 havent (got) any French
books.)
3.

: .

, ,
(, )
.
,
,
92

w hose [hu:z] ?
? ? ? ,
,
.

-*s ( s
)
: my sisters coat [ 'sistsz 'kout ]
, P eters room ['pi:tez 'rum ] .

( ,
men, w om en, children)
(): her daughters notebook [ha:
'dDtsz 'noutbuks ] , his so n s books [hiz
'sAnz 'b u ks] , : their childrens room
[ 'tjildranz 'rum ] .
4.
o f
,
,
of: the room of my son .
, , , of.
V. -
A. V ocabulary (T ext and E xercises)
bedroom ['bedrum] n
brother ['] n
come [] v ; My
brother is coming tomorrow.
(,
) ,
doctor ['dakta] ,
family ['faemili]
father ['fa:da]
flat [fleet] ; a two(three-, four-) room flat (-, -)
; They have a threeroom flat
fond ffand] (.
); to be fond of ,
; Ann is fond of English.

guest [gest} n , to have a guest


(guests) (
) ; We are going to have guests
on Saturday,
how many ['hau meni] (
.
.);
How many
children has your brother?
interesting ['intristigl
, ,
; an interesting
man (book, etc.); Peter Hornby is
a very interesting man.
journalist ['d 39:nhst] n ;
His father is a journalist
lesson [lesn] n , , to
have a lesson (
); They are having an
English lesson now.
93

m agazine [maegs'zrn] n
m athem atics [,mse09'maetiks], maths
[mae8s] . ; My
brother is fond of mathematics
(m aths).
m other [' ] n
new spaper ['nju:speip 3 ] n
school [sku:I] n ; to be at
school 1. ; His
sisters are at school. (They are
schoolgirls.) 2 .
; Is Jane at school
now?
second-year student ['sekQnd jia
'stjuidantj ;

see [si:] v 1 . ; 2 . ,
; ; Peter is
coming to see us tonight,
sister ['sista] n
small [snre:l]

them [dem] pron (.


they) ,
TV set ['ti: vi: 'set]
uncle [']1] n ; His uncle Ben
is a programmer,
university [,ju:ni'v 3 :siti] n
; to be at university 1 .
; 2 .
; Is John at
university now? .

,

: Moscow Univetsity
. Oxford
I'oksfad] Univetsity
; is a student at
Moscow University. John is at
Oxford (University),
work [wa:k] n ; Mary is fond
of her work.

B. B asic Sentences
1. a) I have a Smother (a "^father, a ^brother, etc).
He has 'two ^children.
They have some 'French ~\books.
b) I 'havent "brother.
He 'hasnt 'two "^children.
They 'havent 'got any 'French
Ebooks.
c) 'H ave you a

sister?

Has he any .^children?


Have they any

notebooks?

2. 'Have you a -^brother or a


sister?
'H as he a -/F ren c h or an
""^English textbook?
3. 'Whose 'book is ~\this?

I have 'no

brother.

He has 'no ^children.


They have 'no 'French "Ebooks.
'Yes, I ^ihave. 'No, I "^havent.
'Yes, he "Ihas. 'No, he
hasnt.
'Yes, they "have. 'No, they
have ".
I have a ""I brother.
He has an
Its

English textbook.

Marys book.
\

94

. E xercises
Exercise 1. ,

a) 1. I have a large fam ily. 2. My sister has a small fam ily.


3. Ann has two brothers. 4. My friend has a sister and a
brother. 5. John has three children. 6. I have some French
m agazines. 7. They have a three-room flat. 8. He has some
thick notebooks*
b) 9. I have no brother, 10. My sister h asn t a fam ily, 11,
They havent any French books. 12. We have no coffee at
home. 3, He h asnt any newspapers. 14, She has no butter at
home.
c) 15. "Have you a large family?" "Yes, I have, I have a
wife and four children," 16, "Has Helen a brother?" "No, she
h asn t. She has a sister." 17. "Have you any thin notebooks?"
"No, I havent." 18. "Has she a green coat?" "Yes, she has."
19. "Have you any butter at home?" "Yes, I have." 20. "Has
she any coffee at home?" "No, she h asn t. She has no coffee
at home."
Exercise 2. , .
.

a) My friend has a son.


My friend h asn t a son. My friend has no son.
1, Peter has a brother, 2. John has a sister. 3. Jane has a
cat. 4. Peter has a dog. 5. Ann has a pencil. 6. T hey have four
English textbooks.
b) Ann has a brother. (Yes) (No)
"Has Ann a brother?" "Yes, she has."
h asn t.")

( No, she

7. Jane has a sister. (Yes) 8. Tom has two brothers. (Yes)


9. His friend has a sister, (No) 10. My brother has som e
English books and m agazines. (Yes) 11, They have some
friends at school. (Yes) 12. We have som e coffee at home.
(No) 13. Jane has som e tea in her cup. (Yes)
c) John has an apple.
Johns got an apple.
1.
Jane has som e oranges. 2. I have four English
magazines. 3. He has som e butter on his plate. 4. She has five
shelves in the bidroom . 5. They have some new English
books. 6. He has som e toast on his plate.
d) Have you a fork and a knife?
Have you got a fork and a knife?
95

1. Have you any matches? 2. Has he any bacon on his


plate? 3. Has she any coffee in her cup? 4. Have they any
French books at home? 5. Has she any new pictures? 6. Has
Peter a dog? 7. Has Mary a cat?
e) Bill has no pencil.
Bill h asn t got a pencil.
1. Mary has no fork. 2. John has no dog. 3. She has no
green pencil. 4. He has no flat in Moscow. 5. I have no car. 6.
Jane has no spoon.
Exercise 3. . ,
.

1.

A:
:
(A,
2. A:
:
(A:
3. A:
B:
(A:
4. A:
B:
(B:

Have you any children?


Y es, 1 have. I have two children.
B: brothers, sisters, friends)
Have you got a red penciP.
Yes, I have, but it isn t very good.
a black pen, a brown pencil, a thin notebook)
Have they got a fwo-room flat?
N o, they havent. They have a three-room flat.
three, three; B: four, two)
Has he a brother or a sister?
He has a sister.
a brother)

Exercise 4. , some any.


.

I. has ... French books at home. 2. Have you got ...


knives and forks? 3. I have ... friends. 4. My friend has ...
maps. 5. I havent ... pencils. 6. Jane h asn t ... brothers. 7.
"Have you ... children?" "Yes, have." 8. "Has he got ... new
pictures?" "No, he h asn t." 9. "Has he ... English magazines
at home?" "Yes, he has." 10. Show him ... pictures, please. 11.
She h asn t got ... coffee in her cup.
Exercise 5.
.

Have you a brother? Have you a sister?


Have you a brother or a sister?
1.
Has John a brother? Has John a sister? 2. Has Jack a
dog? Has Jack a cat? 3. Has Jane a black cat? Has Jane a
white cat? 4. Has your friend a new car? Has your friend an
old car? 5. Have they a new flat? Have they an old fiat?
Exercise 6. .

) 1. Have you a large or a small family? 2. Have you any


96

children? 3. How old are your children? 4, What is your wife?


5. Have you a two-room or a three-room flat?
b)
1. Have you any friends? 2, What are their names? 3.
Have your friends large or small families? 4. Are your friends
in Moscow?
Exercise 7. , to have
to have got.
Exercise 8. , .

Is

Are

Peters son

playing chess now?

Mrs Browns daughter

having an English
class now?

Mrs Blacks sister

having breakfast now?

Mrs Sm iths brother

a student?

Mr Sm iths children
your friend s children

watching TV now?
having dinner now?

her brothers sons

students?

book
picture
pen

is this?

It is

are these?

They are

Whose
hat
pencils
notebooks
newspapers

Mr Browns
book.
my friends
picture.
her
daughters
pen.
his
brothers
hat.
his sisters
pencils.
her so n s
notebooks,
Mr Browns
newspapers.

97
4

Exercise 9. . ,
. .

1.

A: Is this M r Sm ith's new car?


; N o, it isn t. Its his brothers car.
(A: B ens, M arys, Mrs G reens; B: his sisters, her
brothers, her m others)
2. A: Whose book is this?
: Its T om 's book.
(A: dog, magazine*, cat, newspaper; B: my brothers dog,
A nns m agazine, P eters cat, Janes newspaper)
Exercise 10. , , ,
.

1.
Whose room is this?(Jane) 2, W hose children are they?
(my brother) 3. Whose car is this? (Mr Brown) 4 .Whose TV
set is this? (Peter) 6. Whose books are these? (her son) 6.
W hose flat is this? (my friend)
D. T ext
ANDREW* SNEG O V S FAMILY
'Andrew 'Snegov is teacher. He has a 'sm all
family:
a -J w ife and 'two "^children. His 'wife 7Jane is doctor.
His 'son .J P e te r is a 'student at 'Moscow U n i v e r s i t y .
'Peter is a 'second-year student. His 'daughter 7Ann is at
"^school. She is f i f t e e n . 'Ann is 'going to be a
"schoolteacher. She is 'fond of m a th e^ m a tics.
The 'Snegovs have a t three-room flat. They have 'two
-^bedroom s and a "^sitting-room in their flat. Their 'sittingroom is ^ la r g e .
It is "^Sunday. The 'Snegovs are 'going to have guests
today. 'Andrews 'father and -Sm other and 'Janes brother
are 'coming to "^see them.
It is 'six o "^\clock now. The 'Snegovs and their
guests
are 'sitting at the "Stable. They are 'having "^dinner. 'Peter
and _JA nn are 'asking their 'uncle -J P a u l about his "Work.
Their 'uncle is a "^journalist. He is a 'very 'interesting
"Im an.
Exercise 1. .
Exercise 2. ( ).

1. Andrew Snegov is
a) a teacher, b) a doctor.
* Andrew ['aendru:]

98

2. His son Peter is


a) a student at Moscow U niversity, b) at university now.
3. Ann is going to be
a) a schoolteacher, b) a journalist.
4. Ann is fond of
a) English, b) mathematics.
5. The Snegovs have
a) three-room flat, b) a four-room flat.
6. A ndrew s father and mother and Janes brother are coming
to see
a) the Browns, b) them.
7. T hey are having
a) dinner, b) breakfast.
8. Paul is
a) a very good man, b) a very interesting man.
Exercise 3. .

1.
What Is Andrew Snegov? 2. Has he a large or a small
family? 3. What is his wife? 4. How many children have the
Snegovs? 5. What are their childrens names? 6. How old are
their children? 7. Whats Ann going to be? 8. Is Ann fond of
m athem atics or English? 9. Have the Snegovs a two-room or a
three-room flat? 10. Is their sitting-room small or large? 11.
Who is coming to see the Snegovs today? 12. About what are
Peter and Ann asking their uncle Paul? 13. What is Paul?
Exercise
Exercise
Exercise

4. .
5. .
6. , ,
.

. V ocabulary (D ialogu es)


T hat'll do. ['dastl ' Vdu:]
, .
Shall I read text 5? ['Jael ai 'ri:d
'tekst .Jfaiv ]
5- ? 5-
?
repeat [ri' pi: t] v
sentence ['sentans] n ;
Repeat this sentence, please,
after ['cuftaj prep 1 . (

) ;Repeat this sentence
after me; 2 . (
-

); after
classes
be over I'ouva] ,
; The lesson is over.
.
class [kla:s] n ; an English
['irjghjj (French) class
()
; They are having an
English class now. Are Nick and
Paul going to play chess after
classes?

?
99

busy ['bfzi] ; to be busy


; Are you busy
tonight?
? ( )?
to be busy with sm th.
-.

help [help] ; Help me,


please; to help smb. with smth.
-. -.; Johns
sister is going to help him with his
French.

.

F. D ialogues
In the C lassroom
1
Teacher: "Peter, 'read the "^Itext, -^please.
Peter: 'Shall I 'read 'text >5?
Teacher: ^ Y es, please.... 'T hatll "'Ido. R e'peat this
'sentence after I m e ,
please. Its all b r ig h t now.

2
Tearher: ""Uohn, 'go to the - J blackboard and 'write the
^ sen ten ce, please, "The 'Browns are "going to have
'guests on
Sunday."
John: E x ^ c u s e J m e . R e~ ip eat the sentence, _>please.

3
Teacher: The 'lesson is ~^over. G ood-^bye. Have a 'nice
"w eekend.
S tu den ts:
Thank you. The 'sam e to ~^you. G ood-^bye.
After C lasses
1
Peter:
John:
Peter:
John:

'Are you -^ b u sy tonight?


^ Y es, Im 'going to 'see my 'uncle ""Uames.
'Is he - ?
"~, he " I is n t. He is 'going to 'help me with my
^ E n g lis h .
Peter: '1s he an 'English
teacher?
John: 'Y es, he ^is.
100

2
Bill;
N ick:

'Have you 'got the 'new 'English


textbook?
'Y es, 1 ~"\have. Its a 'very ~ \g o o d textbook, 'When
are you 'going to "play 'chess with "I Tom?
Bill: 'After 'classes to"^morrow.

Exercise I. .
Exercise 2. .
, .

1.

:
S:
T:
(T:
77

P eter, read the text, please.


Shall I read text 5?
Y es, Diease.
John, Mike, N ick;.S: 6, 8, 12)
2.
John, go to the blackboard and write these w o rd s,
please.
S: Excuse me. Repeat the w ords, please.
(T : this sentence, these sentences; S: the sentence, the
sentences)
3 A: Are you busy tonight?
: Y es, P m going to see m y brother.
(A: Is Paul, Is Jane; B: H es, his; S h es, her.)
4. A: W hen are you going to play chess with John?
B: After classes.
(A: Tom, Bill, Ben)
Exercise 3. .
Exercise 4. ,
? .

1.

2.

3.
4.
5.

Teacher: Good morning.


S tu den ts: ...
Teacher: Open your books at page 17. Bill, read the
text, please.
B: ...
Teacher: Y es, please.... T hatll do.
Teacher: Peter, go to the blackboard and write the
sentence "Nicks brother is going to see the Browns
tonight."
P: ...
Teacher: The lesson is over. Goodbye.
S: ...
Ben: Goodbye. Have a nice weekend.
S: ...
A: Its a very nice day today, isn t it?
B;
101

6.

7.

Are you busy tonight?


**
Is your sister a French teacher?
**
Is she going to help you with your French?
#
Excuse me. W heres Harry?

Bye. Hope to see you soon.


*
Thank you. The same to you.
How are you?
9.
**
Im fine too. Thank you. What are you going to do
tonight?
*
.
10. A: Are you going to take your brother to the Zoo on
Sunday?
B: ...
8.

Exercise 5. ?

1.

:
:

...
Yes, its a very nice day.

7+

*
il*

: ... Im going to see my sister tonight,


**
/*
B: Im going to the theatre tomorrow.
4': A: ...
B: N ick s brother and his wife are going to see them
tonight.
A:
B: N ick s brother is a doctor.
5. A: ...
B; T hey are watching TV now.
6 . A: ...
B: H es having coffee.
7. A: ...
B: Bye. T he sam e to you.
8 . A: ...
B: Bye. Hope to see you soon.
9. A: ...
; I have three English books.
v*

Exercise 6.
.
.
102

1.

Teacher: Good morning.


: . ?
Teacher: Im fine, thank you. Now open your book and
read the text, please.
: 12- ?
Teacher: Yes, p lease.... T hatll do. Repeat this
sentence, please.
: , , ,
.
2. Teacher: Ben, go to the blackboard and write the
sentence "We are having an English class".
: , , ,
.
3. Ben: , ?
Teacher: Yes, the lesson is over. G oodbye. Have a nice
weekend.
Ben: . . .
4. : ?
Bill: Y es, I am. Im going to see my sister.
: ?
Bill: N o, she isn t. S h es going to help me with my
English.
5. Andrew:
?
Ben: After classes today.
6. A ndrew : When are you going to take your children to
the Zoo?
Peter; .
7. : ?
P eter: T hey are having coffee.
8. : . , .
: T h ats all right. Good morning.
9. : ?
: Jack G reen. H es a student too.
10. A: What are you going to do tonight?
: . .
11. A; H as Volkov a large family?
: . .
.
12. A: And how many friends have you?
: .
Exercise 7. .

1.
.
. 103

. ,
.
2.
"The Smiths are coming to see me tomorrow."
.
. .
3. .
.
4. ,
.
.
5. () ,
. ,
. ,
.
6. , ,
. , .
.
.
7. ,
. ,
.
VI.
Exercise 1. , .
Exercise 2. . .
Exercise 3. .

'cloudy, quite, queer, sure, nurse, a'gree, 'elder, hot,


lump, 'hungry, in'vite, mild, coast, ball, ad'vice, ar'rive,
'dirty, new, 'agreem ent, 'action, 'Africa, 'factor, con'sist, art,
'danger
Exercise 4. ,
.
.

1. Nick has three English books. 2. The Browns are going


to have fifteen guests on Sunday. 3. John Smith is a very
interesting man.
Exercise 5. some any.

1. "Have you ... English newpapers at home?" "No, I


havent," 2. "Has Peter ... sisters?" "No, he h asn t". 3. Show
me ... new pictures, please. 4. Give him ... thin notebooks. He
h a sn t got .... 5. Mike has got ... new French books. 6. They
104

are going to have ... guests tomorrow. 7. Write ... sentences on


the blackboard, please.
Exercise 6. to have
(to have got) to be.
I. My brother ... a new TV set. 2. Mary ... Mr Browns
wife. 2. Ann ... a university student. She ... som e friends.
4. Mr and Mrs Green ... three children: two boys and a
girl. Their sons ... nine and eleven, their daughter ... five
5. "Where ... your son?" "He... at school now. He ... having
- an English class." 6.... they ... a four-room flat or a threeroom flat? 7. "... P eters brother a journalist?" "Yes, he
is. He ... a very interesting man." 8. How many English
books ... she ...? 9. The Petrovs ... a two-room flat. They
... a bedroom and a sitting-room in their flat. 10... you
going to have guests on Saturday? 11. Who ... coming to
see your- mother tomorrow?
Exercise 7. at, on, after, of, about.
1.
B ens two sons are ... school and his daughter is .:.
Oxford (U niversity). 2. Is your mother ... hom e now? 3. Mr
and Mrs Brown and their guests are sittng ... table now. 4.
Peter and Jane are asking their friend ... his work. 5. Is your
brother fond ... mathematics? 6. Bill and Mary are going to
see the Browns ... Sunday. 7. Tom and Nick are going to play
ch ess ... classes. 8. Bill is writing a sentence ... the
blackboard.
Exercise 8. .
1.
Jan e is coming to see them on S u n day. (2) 2. Andrew
Snegov is a teacher. (2) 3. Ann is fifteen . ( 1 ) 4 . Jane is going
to be a doctor .(2) 5. George[s father and m other are coming
to see them today. (2) 6. T hey are having dinner. ( 1 ) 7 . Paul
is having a French class now. (1) 8. I have got ten French
books. (1)
Exercise 9.
a) 1. Have you any brothers or sisters? 2. Have your
brothers (sisters) fam ilies? 3. Are their fam ilies large or
small? 4. How mariy children have they? 5. How old are their
children? 6. What are their names? 7. Are they schoolchildren
or students?
b) 1. Have you any friends? 2. Have your friends any
English books. 3. Are your friends fond af English? 4. Are
your friends going to be English teachers?
105

)
1. What time is now? 2. Are you having an English class
now? 3. Are you asking or answering questions? 4. Is your
teacher asking you questions? 5. What are you doing now?
Exercise 10. .

1. .
. (Olga)
(a teacher of mathematics) . (Zoya)
. .
, ,.
.
. 9 .
, .
.
.
.
.
2. . .
3. ? - . 4.
.
. .
. 5.
? 6. ?
. . 7.
? . 8.
?
. 9. ? . 10.
, . 11.
? .
Exercise 11. .

1. . 15- .
, .
. . ,
.
5- ?
, ... .
, .
2. , "They
are going to see the Browns tomorrow".
, , .
3. . .
.
106

. .
.
4. . ?
.
?
. .
5. (tomorrow nigth)?
.
6. ?
. ?
. .

LESSO N 6
I.

[ ], [],

ire
yre

'tired ['taiad]
'tyre f'taia]

our
ower

[]

our [']
'flower [']

tion
sion
ssion

'station ['steijn]
'tension ['tenjn]
'session t'sefn]

sure

[]

'pleasure [']

[]

'television ['teIlVJ3n]

sion

107

II.
Exercise I. . ,
[] [j] [ ].

_Jwire
_^fire
""I hire

lyre
byre
tyre

tired
fired
hired

Exercise 2. ;
[]
[w].

/o u r
-/f lo u r
-^ sour
hour [']

'flower
' power
'tower
'vowel

Exercise 3. [ae], [:], [:], [u:], [ju:], [:], [au],


[ou], [ ].
, ,
.

[:]
[:]
[]
/large grass
7raw
re'corder
.J ran
shall
-J ban
tank
-/h a r d class
>all
salt
- /a f t e r last
/w all
su'pport
~Jcan
thank
stand happy Particle 'basket "^corner chalk
[u: ]
[ju:]
[:]
M o
boom /y o u
-Nearly
work
Moo
pool
/n e w
Hearn
'dirty
-J through [8ru: ] food J pupil
- /g ir l
'thirty
"^soon
boot
ex^ cu se
""Word
'thirsty
[au ]
_^how
round
a - /lio w pound
-/b r o w n sound
town out

[ou]
Jlow
Jshow
Jow n
Thorne

over
smoke
'yellow
'window

[1]

- /n e a r
_^hear
_^spear
'Itear

real
'really
'nearly
'nearby

Exercise 4. . ,
[d], [t], [s], [z], [n] [d] [0] V .

1.
T he
'textbook
i s _ /th ick
a n d _ th e
'notebook
is_~*U hin. 2. T he 'textbook is o n _ th e "'Idesk. 3. 'I s _ th e
'book o n ^ th e Jdesk? 4. 'R ep ea t_ 'th ese^words,
please.
5. 'R e a d _ th e ^dialogues, -/p le a s e . 6. 'L earn _the 'new
Sw ords, -^ p lease. 7. 'Shall we tran s'late^ the dialogues? 8.
Its round, the "^corner.
108

Exercise 5. ,
[] .

1.
We a re_ in the ' lass room. 2. 'P e te r _ is 'sm oking a
"^cigarette. 3. We a r e _ ' imitating the
sounds. 4.
There are t ten 'desks in the
class room.

III.

1. there is /a r e
is

" book

are

'I books
some """i books

There

is 'no ""book
'isnt "
are 'no Ebooks
'a re n t any
"b books

There

Is

on the desk.

on the desk.

a -/book
there

'Are

'W hat is there

-J books
any -Ebooks

on the desk?

on the
desk?

'Yes, there -U s.
'No, there
isnt.
'Yes, there iare.
'No, there "arent
There is on
the desk. There are
(some) 'I books on
the desk.

there is /a r e
( ) - (
) .
there is /a r e
,
. there is /a r e
, , , ;
.
There*s a boy in the room. .
There are som e desks and chairs in the classroom.
.
109

. there is
th eres [dez] there are ['] ['].

there is /a r e
, to be
, .
There is a textbook and notebooks on the desk.
There are two notebooks and a textbook on the desk.

,
.
There is cup on the table. .
2.

my

you

your

()

he

his

she

her

it

its

()

we

our

you

your

they

their

3.
'How many "Ebooks
are there on the
desk?
?
'How many "Vbooks
have you?
?
'Which 'book are you
'going to "Vtake?
(

)
?
110

There are
three
books on the desk.

I have

Uen books.

Im 'going to 'take the


~ \th in book.

Three.

The ""Uhin book.

4.

'W ho is 'listening to the ~"?


?

~1 am.
Peter is.
^T hey are.

'Which of the . J children is 'going to the IZ o o


on Sunday?
?

"^John is.
'P eter and "Uim are.

'Whose 'children are havind "^dinner now?


?

Peters children are.


""IHis children are.


who , what
, which w hose ,

.
who, what, which
3-
.
. which
( ).
,
of.

...

the children...
the students...

...

Which of

you ...

...

['WIlJ av]

the books...

...

the pens...
them...

...
...


, ,
,
.
1

IV. -
A. V ocabulary (T ext and E xercises)
article ['a:tikl] n ; Are you
going to read this article?
break [breik] n ,
( ); We are going to have a
break now.
but [bAt, bat] cnj , a; Tom isnt at
home but his brother is.
ceiling ['si:lir)] n
chair [tfea] n
chalk [1$:] n ; a stick of chalk
; Peter is writing on
the blackboard with a stick of
chalk.
cigarette [,siga'ret] n
d u ste r f'dAsta] n
G reat Britain ['greit 'b n tn ]

im itate ['lmiteit] v ,
,
intonation [,int3'neijn] n
; Please imitate the intonation,
light green [ ia it gri:n] -; The classroom walls are
light green,
listen to t'lisn ta] v .; We are listening to the teacher,
look through ['luk '0ru:] v

; Nick is looking through


the magazine,
the other ['] ,
( ); I have two brothers,
one is a schoolboy and the other is
a student,
our [aua] pron , , ,
; This is our classroom,
smoke [smouk] v. ; Peter is
smoking a sigarette now.
sound [saund] n : Imitate these
sounds, please,
speaker ['spi:ka] n ,
tape [teip] n
(),
; Are they listening to the new
tape?
tape-recorder ['teiprbkD:da] n
; Is this Johns tape-re
corder?
the United States of America [di:
ju:'naitid 'steits av a'merika]
; The
USA [<5 'ju: 'es 'ei]
wall new spaper
window ['windou] n ; There are
two windows in our classroom.

B. B asic Sentences
a) There is a
textbook on the desk.
There are some
textbooks on the desk.
b) There is 'no "^textbook on the desk.
There 'isn t a " textbook on the desk.
There are 'no ^textbooks on the desk.
There 'arent any ^textbooks on the desk.

112

c) 'Is there a - J textbook


on the desk?

'Y es, there ^ i s .


'N o, there " ^isnt.

'Are there any


-J textbooks on the desk?

'Y es, there ".


'N o, there "darent.

. E xercises
Exercise I. . .

a)1. T heres an English magazine on her desk. 2. T heres


a bed in his bedroom. 3. T h eres some butter on the table. 4.
T h eres a TV set in their sitting-room . 5, T h eres some bacon
on his plate. 6. There are som e red and green apples on the
plate. 7. There are four desks and eight chairs in our class
room. 8. There is a map and two pictures on the walls. 9.
T here are four newspapers and a magazine on his desk.
b) 10. There is no TV set in their sitting-room . 11. There
is no coffee at home. There isn t any coffee at home. 12.
There isn t a fork on the table. 13. There are no children in
the sitting-room . 14. There aren t any cups on the table. 15.
T here aren t any chairs in their classroom.
c) 16. "Is there a blackboard in their classroom?" "Yes,
there is." 17. "Is there any butter at home?" "No, there isn t."
18. "Are there any notebooks on the desks?" "Yes, there are."
19. "Are there any students in the classroom?" "No, there
aren t."
Exercise 2. .

T here is a pencil on his desk, (some)


T here are som e pencils on his desk.
1. There is an English textbook on the teachers desk,
(som e) 2. There ia a pencil on his desk, (three) 3. There is a
girl in the classroom, (ten) 4. There is a bedroom in their flat,
(two) 5. There is a m agazine on her desk, (som e)
Exercise 3.
. ,
. .

1. T here is a blackboard in our classroom. 2. There is a


map on the wall, 3. There is a desk in his room. 4. There are
som e pictures on the walls. 5. There are two windows in our
classroom . 6, There are four sounds in the word. 7. There are
three bedrooms in their flat.
Exercise 4. . ,
.

How many English m agazines are there on her desk? (4)


T here are four m agazines on her desk.
1.
How many schoolchildren are there in the classroom?
(12) 2. How many sounds are there in the word "woman"? (5)

3. How many bedrooms are there in your flat? (3) 4. How


m any bookshelves are there in his bedroom? (8) 5. How many
forks and knives are there on the table? (6) 6. How m any
sisters have you? (2) 7. How many brothers has John? (4) 8.
How many friends has Peter? (10) 9. How many English
books has he? (18) 10. How many red pencils have you? (2)
Exercise 5, , how many,
.
Exercise 6. .

Which of the students is reading the text? (John)


John is. (Johns reading the text.)
1. Which of the boys is watching TV? (Nick) 2. Which of
the girls is going to the theatre? (Ann) 3. Which of the
students are reading the dialogues? (Peter and Nick) 4.
Which of your sisters is coming to see you tonight? (Mary) 5.
W hich of your daughters is going to be a teacher? (Jane) 6.
Which of your sons is going to be a journalist? (Michael) 7.
Which of the newspapers are you going to read? ("The
Morning Star"*)
Exercise 7. , which of,

Exercise 8. , .
. .

1.

2.

A: 'W hos 'watching T ^ lV now?


:
P eter is.
(A: listening to the tape, playing chess with Nick, having
dinner; B: M ichael, John, Bill)
A: 'W hats there on the 'teachers ~^desk)
: T h eres a m a g a ~ \zin e on it.
(B: a tape, a tape-recorder)
D. T ext

OUR CLASSROOM
Our 'classroom is 'not Marge. There is 'one
'b ig ^ w in d o w in it. T he 'walls are 'light
green and the
'ceiling is A w h ile . There are 'no
pictures on the walls but
there is a 'blackboard and 'two >maps. 'One is a 'map of
'G reat
Britain and the 'other is a 'map of the U 'nited
'States of "". There is a 'stick of Jchalk and a
*
, ,
. , "The Morning Star", "The
Times".
114

"lduster on the blackboard. There are 'seven


desks and
'twelve ^chairs in the classroom . T here is a "^tape-recorder
on the teachers desk.
There are 'ten
students and a "^teacher in the class
room. We are 'having an 'English ""'Iclass. We are 'listening to
the _^tape and re'peating
sentences after the
speaker.
We are im itating the 'sounds and the into- ^nation.
/^\/N ow J we are 'having
break. 'Peter is 'sm oking a
c ig a ^ r e tte . 'M ichael is 'reading the W a ll newspaper. There
are som e 'interesting P a r tic le s in it. 'I am 'looking through
T he 'M orning ^ S t a r .
Exercise 1. .
Exercise 2. . ( )

1.
a)
2.
a)
3.
a)
4.
a)
5.
a)
6.
a)
7.
a)

On the walls there are no


maps, b) pictures.
One is a map
o f France [frarns], b) of Great Britain.
We are listening to
the teacher, b) the tape.
We are im itating
the sounds, b) the sounds and the intonation.
N ow we are having
a French class, b) a break.
Michael is reading
the new text, b) the wall newspaper.
Im looking through
the new English book, b) "Ttie Morning Star".

Exercise 3. .

1. Is the classroom large? 2. How many windows are there


in the classroom? 3. What colour are the walls? 4. What colour
is the ceiling? 5. Are there any pictures on the walls? 6. How
many maps are there on the walls? 7. What is there on the
blackboard? 8. How many desks (chairs) are there in the
classroom? 9. What is there on the teachers desk? 10. How
many students are there in the classroom? 11. Are they
having an English or a French lesson? 12. What are they
listening to? 13. What are they doing? 14. What is Peter
doing? 15. What is Michael reading? 16. What is John*
looking through?
Exercise 4. .
Exercise 5. .
Exercise 6. ,
.
* John I.
115

E. Vocabulary (D ialogu es)


corner ['::] n
round [raund] prep .
(
, ,
); round the corner
; There is a busstop round the
corner.
What day is it today?
?
week [wi:k] n
What time is it? ?
watch [wDtJ] n (,
); She has a very nice
watch.
; What time is it by your watch?
?
fast [fa:st] ; My
watch is fast. ,
slow [slou] ; My watch
is slow. .

tran slate [m en sieit] v


(-.); Shall I translate the new
text?
? to tran slate smth. from ...
into ['intaj -.
; Peter is
translating the new text from
English into Russian now,
R ussian t'rAjn] n
take down ['teik 'daun] v
; Take down these sentences,
homework ['houmwaik] n
;
Take
down
your
homework, please,
learn [1:] v ( .); Ben is going to learn French,
word [wa:d] n ; Learn the new
words, please,
do [du:] v , ; to do
ones
work
(homework,
exercises); Do exercise 3 on page

15.

Days of the week

street [stri;t] n ; in the street



bus [bAsl n
H urry up! ['hAri J ] !
(!)
busstop ['bASStop] n
; W heres the busstop?
nearby ['n o b a i] adv ,

M onday ['mAndi]
T uesday ['tju:zdi]
W ednesday ['wenzdi]
T hursday ['03:zdi]
Friday ['fraidi]
Saturday ['saetadil
Sunday ['SAndi]

F. D ialogues
In the C lassroom
1
Teacher: 'P eter and 4John, read the "^dialogues,
-J p le a se . ... " T hatll Mo.
S tu den t: Shall we trans-^late the dialogues?
Teacher: ""iYes,
please.
2
Teacher: 'P lease, re'peat these 'words "Rafter me:
"_^ban, -J e a n , _Jtank,
thank."
S tu den t: "^Ban> _^can, .J ta n k ,
thank." 'Is it all
-b righ t now?
116

T:

"lY es. 'Take 'down your ^hom ework. 'Learn the


'new J words and 'read the
dialogues. ~"
'exercises / 1 and "2. The 'lesson is "'lover. 'Good
?bye.
S tu den ts: 'G ood - /b y e .

In the Street
John: Good
evening. How ~"\are you?
Peter: Good evening. ^ F in e,
thank .J y o u . And
'how are /you?
John: 'Very - W e ll,
thank you. And, 'what about
your -/w ife ?
Peter: S h es 'fine "Hoo. ~ \O h , ^ t h e r e s your - / b u s 1,
'Hurry -J u p . Bue-/b y e .
John: - J Bye.

2
A:
B:
A:

E x \c u se / me. 'Is there a -/b u s s to p nearby?


^Y es. Its 'round the ^corner.
^ Thank you.

A;
B:

3
'What ^day is it today?
Its
Monday.

A:
B:
A:
N:

4
What tim e is it by your watch?
I m afraid, my watch is fast. Its tw enty-five
m inutes to twelve.
N ick, and what time is it by your watch?
My watch is slow. Its twenty m inutes past eleven.

N ote
1. Oh, theres your bus. .
Exercise 1. .
Exercise 2. . ,
.
*

1.

: John, read the te x t, please.


J: Shall I translate the te x tl

117

2.

3.

4.

(:
T:
S:
(T :
A:
:
(Bi
A:
B:
(B:

exercise 7, the dialogue; / : the exercise the dialogue)


Take down your homework. Do exercises 3 and 4.
Excuse me. Repeat the homework, please.
8 and 10, 13 and 16, 18 and 19)
How are you?
F ine, thank you.
Very w ell, thank you. Im w ell, thank you.)
What day is it today?
Its Sunday.
T uesday, Thursday, W ednesday)

Exercise 3. .
Exercise 4. ,
? .

1.

Teacher: Good morning.


S tu den ts: ...
Teacher: Open your books at page 19. John and Peter,
read the dialogues, please.
Peter: ...
Teacher: Y es, translate them, please.

2.

Teacher:
John: ...
Teacher:
words
John: ...
Teacher:

John, read the text, please,


Y es, please. ... T hatll do. Please repeat the
"this, these, that, bathe".
Y es, its all right now.

3.

Teacher: C lose your books. The lesson is over.


Bill: ...
Teacher: Take down your homework. Learn the new
words. Read text 6 and do exercises 1 and 2.
G oodbye.
S tu den ts: ...

4.

A: Good morning. How are you?


B: ...

5.

A:
B:

H ow s your wife?
...

6.

A:
B:

Oh, theres your bus. Hurry up. Bye.


...

1.

A:

What time is it by your watch?

D.
XJt

*+

:
:
9. :
:
:
10. A*
:
11. :
:
:
8.

Its a cold day today, isn t it?


*

Im going to see my sister tonight.


*

No, she is n t.
What day is it today?
*t

Is there a busstop nearby?


**

Thank you.

Exercise 5.
?
1.
2.
3.

4.
6.
7.

: Shall I translate the text?


; ***?*
: Very w ell, thank you.
: * *?
; Its W ednesday.
: * ?#
; Y es, its round the corner.
: * *?*
*
: Im going to the theatre on Friday.
: *?*
: I m afraid my watch is slow, its ten to one.
*

Exercise 6.
.
.

1.

2.

3.

Teacher: Good morning.


: .
Teacher: John and Tom, read the dialogues, please.
: ?
Teacher; Yes, please.
: ?
Teacher: Yes, please.
Teacher: Take down your homework. Learn the new
words and do exercises 3 and 5.
: ?
Teacher: Yes. G oodbye. Have a nice weeKend.
: . .
; Good evening. How are you?
: . .
?
: Fine, thank you. And what about your mother?
119

4.

5.

6.
7.

: .
. . .
: Bye. Hope to see you soon.
A: Excuse me. Is there a busstop nearby?
: . .
A: Thank you.
A: What day is it today?
: .
A: When are you going to see the Browns?
: .
: ?
: On Saturday.
: What are you doing?
5; .

Exercise 7. .

1.
. ,
. .
2. .
, ,
(). ,
.
3. , .
4. ,
. ,
.
5. ,
.
.
Exercise 8. .

Exercise 1. , , .
Exercise 2. . .
Exercise 3. .

'office, 'elder, floor, dic'tate, 'paper, can'teen, roast beef,


stay, 'latest, know 'G erm an, meet, ice, cream, talks, 'prob
lem, prime, re'turn, France, ar'riving 'learning, re'port,
'party, 'central, Spain, trade, May
Exercise 4. ) .
.
120

Bill
Peter
ceiling

Friday
thank you
good evening
happy
b ye-b ye
b) .

^tape-recorder
R ussian
homework

nearby
. J W ednesday
e x ^ c u s e _Jrme

Exercise 5.
,
. .

1. Our classroom is large. 2. Is it a map of Great Britain?


3. What is his daughter doing now? 4. Who is playing chess
now? 5. Is Tom or is Nick taking down the homework? 6. Are
you going to be a teacher of mathematics? 7. Is it W ednesday
or T hursday today? 8. When are you going to see them? 9. Is
there a busstop nearby? 10. How many sounds are there in
the word "street"? 11. Is the busstop round the corner? 12.
John is n t at school but Bill is.
Exercise 6. .

1.
T he busstop is round the corner (1) 2. It is Tuesday
today. ( 1 ) 3 . There are three maps on the classroom walls. (1)
4, P eter is fond of French. (1) 5. The Browns are going to
have guests tom orrow, (2)
121

Exercise 7. some, any, no.

1. There is ... big window in our classroom ... ceiling is


white and ... walls are light blue. There are ... desks and
chairs in it. On ... walls there are two maps. One is .. map ot
Great Britain and ... other is ... map of ... U nited States of
America. 2. Is there ... tape-recorder on your teachers desk?
3. There are four students and ... teacher in ... classroom .
T hey are listening to ... tape. ... students are repeating ...
sentences after ... speaker. 4. There are ... interesting articles
in our wall newspaper. 5. Shall we translate ... dialogues? 6. I
have two sisters but I have ... brother. My brother is at school.
7. Peter is looking through "... Morning Star". 8. "Is there ...
busstop nearby?" "Yes, its round ... corner."
Exercise 8. .

1. Take ... your homework, please. Do exercises 3 and 5 ...


pages 10 and 1 1 .2 . There are four desks and seven chairs ...
the classroom . 3. John is looking ... "The Times". 4. The
students are repeating sentences ... the speaker. 5
the walls
there are some pictures and two maps. 6. Is this a map ...
Great Britain? 7. "Is there a busstop nearby?" "Yes, its ... the
corner." 8. "Theres your bus. Hurry .... Bye." 9. Please,
translate the dialogues ... English ... R ussian.
Exercise 9. .

1. .
. ,
. .
.
.
.
2. , .
.
,
.
-

. .
.
3. . : ,
. . ,
.
. .
, ,
.
122

4. . .
, .
.
.
5. .
.
.
Exercise 10. .

1. , .
?
, .
2.

, .
?
, .

3. , , .
2 4 17 19.
.
, , ,
.
4. ?
.
5. : there, throw,
thrill, Thursday.
, , , .
6.

?
.
?
, .

7. ?
, .
8. . .
.
.
.
.
9.

.
, . ?
, . ?
. ?
. .
123

BA SIC C O U R SE

Act as interpreter [in'tarprits].
.
Answer these questions. .
Ask questions to which the italicized [Ttaelisaizd] words
are the answers. ,
.
Ask your colleagues ['kalirgz ] these questions and sum up
the answ ers.
.
C hoose [tfu:z] the proper ['] adverb ['aedvarb] or the
adverbial [aed'vaibial ] phrase [freiz ].
.
Complete [ksm'plKt] the sentences.
.
Fill in the blanks with m issing remarks [ri'marks].
.
Fill in the m issing active f'aektiv] words. ^
.
Find in the text (in the dialogues) English equivalents
[l'kw ivabnts ] for these words and word com binations
[.kom bi'neijnz ]. ( )
.
Form ... from th ese nouns [naunz], verbs, etc.
... , . .
Give a summ ary ['sAmari] of the text.
. ( .)
Give a summary of the text and discuss [dis'kAS ] it.
.
Insert [in'ssrt ] articles where necessary ['nesasari ].
, .
Insert prepositions [.preps'zijnz ] or adverbs.
.
Join th ese sen ten ces using...
, ...
Learn these speech patterns ['psetnz].
.
124

Look up the words you do not know in the dictionary.


, .
Make the necessary substitutions [,sAbsti'tju:fnz ] and
reproduce [,ripre'dju:s] the dialogues.
.
Make up eight (ten, etc.) sentences using...
( . .) , ...
Make up sentenced using the table and translate them.
, , .
Make up ten (twelve) questions based [b eist] on the text
and answ er them. ()
.
Make up situations [,sitju'ei{nz j. .
Make up stories ['stoirizj on these topics ['topiks].
.
Open the brackets f'braekits] and put [put] the verbs in
the proper tenses.
.
Pay attention jb'tenjn] to... ...
Point out the suffixes ['sAfiksiz ]... ...
Put these sentences into...
...
Quote [kwout ] the sentences in which these words and
word com binations are used in the text (in the dialogues).
,
( )
.
Read and translate these sentences.
.
Replace [ri'p leiz]... w ith... (-.) (-.)
Respond [ri'spond] to these statem ents ['steitm snts ].
.
/
Substitute the words given in brackets for the italicized
words. ,
.
Think of the questions and statem ents to which the
following ['fDlouirj] sentences are the answers (responses)
[n 'sp on siz J. ()
?
Transform
[traens'fo:m ] these sentences according
[3'ko:dig] to the m odel ['m odi].
.
Translate into English. .
125

U se active words and word com binations.


.
U se the words given ['givn] below [b i'lo u l.
, .

L E SSO N SEVEN
I. NEW GRAMMAR STRUCTURES
1. Objective Case of Personal Pronouns

( )
**
.........
Nominative Case
( )
I

Objective Case

( )

me

you

you

he

him

she

her

it

it

, (, )

we

us

you

you

they

them

*r



.
Give her this book, please. ,
.
Look at them , please. , .
: 1. it ( )
,
, to. :
Give that book, please. Give it to m e, please.
Show them the picture, please. Show it to them , please.
Show Peter the new magazines, please. Show them to Peter, please.
Pass Ann the cup, please. Pass it to A n n, please.
* objective [ab'cfcektiv], case (keis], personal ['p 9:snl]
** nominative ['nominativ]
126

2. who whom,
, ,
.
Who ( whom) are you going to see tonight?
?
Exercise I. Transform these sentences according to the model.

Show Ann your new picture, please.


Show it to Ann, please.
1. Give Mary that brown pencil, please* 2. Pass Peter the
new textbook, please. 3. Give John those m agazines, please.
4. Show them your new coat, please. 5. Show us P eters letter,
please. 6. Pass Nick a cup of coffee, please.
Exercise 2. Translate into English.

I.
, . 2.
, . 3.
, . 4. ,
. 5. , . 6.
, ,
2. Indirect Object*
( )
to take, to give, to p ass [pa:s]
, to show (to bring, to pay, to sehd, to tell** .)

. to
. :
Give the book to N ick, please. Give N ick {him) the
book, please.
Pass the fork to your sister, please. Pass your sister
(her) the fork, please.
. , to read
to write , ,
.
Read the letter to him (to Peter), please.
Exercise 3. Make up sentences using the verbs to give, to show, to take, to
pass, to read, to write and the nouns spoon, knife, a cup of coffee,
letter, plate, new spaper, magazine.
* indirect object [,indi'rekt 'Dbcbikt]
** .
127

3. Tag Q uestions ( )

Tag questions

1. a) You are a "^student,


- /a r e n t you?
,
?

2.

'Yes, I ~. .

'No, I am ^n o t.
.

b) There is an 'English
magazine on the
desk, /isn 't there?

,
?

'Yes, there ~ \is. .

'No, there lis n t.


.

) 'P eter has a ""Marge


family, /h asn t he?

'Yes, he ~"ihas. .

'No, 'h e ^h asn t.


.

'No, I am ""Inot
( ).

'Yes, ,
. (,
.)

'No, there ""Hsnt.


(
).

'Yes, there "is.



.

'No, he ^h asn t.
. (
.)

'Yes, he ~>has.

.

a)

b)

You ~~\arent
student,
- /a r e
you?

,
?

There " isnt


English magazine on
the desk, _7is there?

) "^ h asn t a large


family, - /h a s he?

?

:
( )
.
to be, to have

( ).
128


, .
'John is 'watching T ^V , - J Isnt he?
, ?
,

(,
, ,
).
.
,
.
" "isnt a teacher, _Jis he?.....No, he
,
? ( ).


.
"
h asn t an English textbook, _Jhas he?" "Yes, he
~"lhas." , ?
. (,
).
Exercise 4. Read these tag questions and answer them.

1. Peter is going to the theatre tonight, isn t he? 2. John


has some friends at college, h asn t he? 3, Your friends
family is large, isn t it? 4. Your brother is well now, isn t
he? 5. There are ten pupils in the classroom , arent there?
6. His brother isn t a journalist, is he? 7. Johns wife isn t
a French teacher, is she? 8. You havent any French books,
have you? 9. There a ren t any pictures on the w alls, are
there?
Exercise 5. Substitute the words given in brackets for the italicized words.
Reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.

3.

4.

A:

Peter is absent today, isn t he?

B: Y es, he is. H e's ill.


(A: late, happy; : Their bus is very slow. His mother
is well now.)
A: His wife isn t a teacher, is she?
B: N o, she is n t. She is a stu den t.
(A: worker, student, doctor; : engineer, doctor, worker)
A;
B:
(A:
A:
B:

You havent a red pencil, have you?


No, I havent.
any cigarettes, a watch, any chalk)
You are going to the theatre tomorrow, arent you?
Y es, I am.

(A:
A:
B:
(A:
A:
B:
(A:

,5.

6.

the Zoo, school, college)


M arys going to play tennis, is n t she?
Y es, she is.
chess)
T hey have no children, have they?
N o, they havent.
French books, car, flat in Moscow)

Exercise 6. Translate into English.

1. , ? . 2.
, ? . 3*
? ,
. 4. , ? . 5.
? . 6.
, ? , . 7.
? ,
.
4.
Negative Form o f Imperative Mood*
( )
Please do 'not close the
window. He ,
.
Please 'dont open your
books. He ,
.
Please 'd on t give him 'this ""lmagazine. He
, .

do [du: ]
not.
dont [dount].
. (
, ) :
; . .
please.
Exercise 7. Change these sentences according to the model.

Close the door, please.


D ont close the door, please.
1. Open the window, please. 2. Please take those
newpapers off the table. 3. Read Johns letter, please. 4. Go
into the sitting-room , please. 5. Give this m agazine to Bill,
please. 6. Pass it to her, please. 7. Show them the new
textbook, please. 8. Play chess with Ben, please. 9. Go to the
blackboard, please.
* negative t'negativ], imperative [im'perativ], mood [mu:d]
130

5. T en ses ( )
, ,
3 :
( ), ( ), (
) , .
4 :
(Simple, Continuous, Perfect, Perfect C ontinuous),
3
(Present ['preznt ] , Past [pa:st ]
Future [ fjurtjs] ), . .
12 .
8
(Simple 3, Continuous 2, Perfect 3).

,
to be, to do, to have, will, shall.

to be, to have to do.
,

.

The Active
Voice
the Simple
Present
Tense



They play chess
on Saturday
and Sunday.

the Present
They are playing
Continuous
chess now.
Tense
They have lived in
the Present
Moscow for
Perfect Tense
twenty years.
the Present
They have been
Perfect
playing chess
Continuous
for three hours.
Tense

.


.

131

The Active
Voice

the Simple
Past
Tense

They played chess


last Saturday.

the Past
Continuous
Tense

They were playing


chess at twelve
oclock last
Sunday.

the Present
Perfect
Tense

They have already


played chess
today.

the Past
Perfect
Tense

They had played


chess before we
returned.

the Past
Perfect
Continuous
Tense

They had been


playing chess
for three hours
before we
returned.

the Simple
Future
Tense

They will play


chess tomorrow.

They will be
the Future
playing chess
Continuous
at this time
Tense
tomorrow.

the Future
Perfect
Tense

They will have


played chess by
the tim e we
return home.

the Future
Perfect
Continuous
Tense

They wilt have


been playing
chess for about
three hours by
the time we
return home.

.


12

.


.


,
.



,
.

.



.


(

),

.


(
),

.

,


.
132

6. The Sim ple Present T ense ( )


I, We
You
They

'read

He,
she (it)

'reads

I, We
You
They

'do 'not
'dont

'read

the
'newspapers

every ^day.

the
'newspapers

every ""iday.

He,
doesnot
she (it) 'doesnt
I, we
you
they

'Do

'read
'Does

'When

do

the
'newspapers

every
day.

'Yes,
do.
'No, I
"'I dont.

he, she
(it)

'Yes,
he~"l does.
'No, he
doesnt.

i, we
you
they

I 'read
them in
the
""I morning.

'read
he, she
does
(it)

the "^news
papers?

He 'reads
them in
the
morning.

Simple Present
( 3- )
( to).
3-
-s -es.
[z ] : plays [pleiz]
/
: reads [ri:dz ]
-s
\
[s ] : writes
[raits ]
: passes ['pa:siz ]
-es [iz ] <
:
watches
['WDtjlZ ].
,
, 3-
-es: to study studies ['sU d iz].
133

to do to go 3-
-es: to go goes [gouz], to do
does [dAz].
Simple Present
to do.

dont [dount ] doesnt [dAznt ].
to
have,
,
: to have breakast
(lunch, dinner, supper) ( ,
to do.
Do you have lunch at home?
He doesn 't have lunch at home.
Simple Present T ense
,
. :
I ie a r n 'grammar 'rules 'every
day.
. I am 'learning
a 'grammar "'Irule (now).
().
Simple Present T ense
: every day (eve
ning, morning) (, ), in the evening
, in the morning , in the afternoon
[ ' ] .
,
.
In the - J morning he 'lstens to the
radio.
My 'son 'w atches tele-Jvision every "^evening.
Simple Present T ense
: alw ays ['o:lwiz] , usually
t'ju:3u3h] , often f'Dfn] , seldom ['seldsm J
, never ['n ev s] , som etim es I'sAmtaimz] .

.
to be .
I 'always 'read the 'newspapers in the "morning.
He 'usually 'com es 'home at
ning.
134

seven o clock in the eve

: is "seldom late.
never
,
.
'never 'watches T ^ W in the morning.
.
Exercise 8. Write the 3rd person singular form of the following verbs.
Transcribe them.

to see, to show, to play, to give, to learn, to listen, to


open, to read, to smoke, to take, to thank, to write, to watch,
lo pass, to do, to go
Exercise 9. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

I
You
We
T hey

usually
always
often
seldom

write letters
watch TV
learn grammar
rules
play chess

in the eve
ning.
after classes,
in the
morning.

He
She

always
som e
times

listens to the
radio
has dinner

in the
morning,
at seven in
the evening.

do not
dont

watch TV
go to school
have lunch at
home
smoke

in the
morning,
on Sunday,
on Tuesday
and
Thursday.

does not
d oesn t

have a French
class
go to college
go to the
theatre

on Friday,
on Sunday,
every
Saturday.

often

go to the
theatre
have lunch at
home
play chess with
Ben

on Sunday?

I
You
We
T hey

He
She

Do

you
we
they

135

Does

he
she

always
usually

listen to the
radio
have an
English class

in the
morning?
on
W ednesday?

Exercise 10. Change these sentences according to the model.

He 'opens the 'window in the "^morning. (always)


He
always opens the window in the morning.
1. He listens to the radio in the evening, (always) 2. They
have tea in the morning, (often) 3. Peter has coffee in the
morning, (usually) 4. She watches TV in the afternoon,
(never) 5. My friend and I play chess on Sunday,
(som etim es) 6. He goes to the theatre on Saturday, (often) 7.
She listens to the radio in the morning, (always)
Exercise 11. Transform these sentences according to the model. Give short
answers to the questions.

He "Soften watches J T V on "^Friday.


"'Does he -S often watch TV on Friday?" "Y es, he
^does."
1. He opens his window every morning. 2. T hey often play
chess on Saturday. 3. We always listen to the radio in the
morning. 4. She w atches TV every evening. 5. He has
breakfast at seven o clock in the morning. 6. I have an English
class every Tuesday. 7. He usually has lunch at twelve
o clock. 8. He often goes to the theatre on Sunday.
Exercise 12. Transform these sentences into tag questions and give answers to
them.

He 'alw ays has 'dinner at "Thorne.


"He 'always has 'dinner at Thorne,
he ~^does. ('N o, he ^ d o e s n t)"

doesnt he? "Yes,

1. T hey usually play chess in the evening. 2. She often


watches TV on Saturday. 3. T hey dont listen to the radio in
the evening. 4. T hey alw ays have breakfast at home. 5. He
d oesnt have a French class on Tuesday. 6. She d oesn t go to
college on Sunday. 7. He always opens the window in the
morning.
Exercise 13. Transform these sentences into negative.

She 'writes 'letters to her


mother 'every
Friday.
She ^ d o esn t write letters to her mother every Friday.
1.
We have a French class every Tuesday. 2. My sister
goes to college every day. 3. Her brothers play chess every
136

day. 4. They always have breakfast at home. 5. She goes to


the theatre every Saturday.
Exercise 14. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.

3.

A: Do you play chess every day?


: N o, I d on t. I play chess every Tuesday.
G4, B: have an English class, go to college)
A: Tom seldom watches T V in the afternoon. And do
you?
: I often watch TV in the afternoon.
(A: listens to the radio, has a French class; : listen to the
radio, have a French class)
A: Do you always listen to the radio in the evening?
B: N o, very seldom . I usually listen to the radio in the
morning.
(A: in the morning; : in the afternoon)

Exercise 15. Translate into English.

1.
. 2.
. 3.
. 4.
. 5.
? . 6.
? . 7. . 8.
. 9. , ? 10*
? 11.
. .
Exercise 16. Say what you usually do on week-day* and on Sanday.

7. Ordinal** N um erals ( )
Cardinal (
)

Ordinal (
)

Cardinal (
)

Ordinal (
)

one

first

seven

seventh

two

second

eight

eighth

three

third

nine

ninth

four

fourth

ten

tenth

five

fifth

eleven

eleventh

six

sixth

twelve

twelfth

,
(first, second, third),
* week-days ,
** ordinal [':1]
137


-th.
,
, .
T he second lesson is very difficult.
The twelfth lesson is easy.
, ,
ie: twenty twentieth [4w enti30],
thirty thirtieth ['0:0], etc.

-th
tw enty-fifth, two hundred and seventy-sixth.

: 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 5th (
).
.
, . , , ,
,
.
Room 12 (twelve)
Bus 78 (seventy-eight)
Exercise 17. Pronounce and put in writing the following ordinal numerals.

3- , 8-, 2-, 5- , 12-, 14-, 17-, 21-, 34-, 33~,


99- , 837- , 2582-
8. N o Article before the N am es o f Streets, Squares, Parks,
Underground Stations and Airports
( , ,
, )
, , ,
: Oxford
Street ['oksf3d stri:t] , Red Square ['red
sk w e s]. , Trafalgar Square [trs'foelga
skwea] , H yde Park ['haid pa:k]
- , Sokolniki Park , Bond Street
Underground Station [bond stri;t 'Andagraund steifn ]
( ), Revolution Square Underground
Station [,reva'lu:Jn skwea 'And^graund steijn ]
( ), London (Heathrow) Airport
['Lmdsn ('hi:0rou ' ] (
), Vnukovo Airport .
. ,
street sq u are
.
138

II. T E X T

Learn these speech patterns


1. At ten minutes past eight we leave home fo r work or
school.
.
Exercise !. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

He
She

leaves for

school
work
college
the factory

at half past seven.

2, It takes us five minutes to get there.


() , () .
How long does it take you to get to college?
() ,
?
Exercise 2. Make up sentences using the tables and translate them.

It takes

him
her
them
me
Peter

ten
minutes
forty
minutes
twenty
minutes
an hour

How long does it take you

to get

to get

to
to
to
to

college,
school,
Pushkin Street,
Vnukovo
Airport,
to the factory,
home.
to school?
to the factory?
to Sokolniki Park?

3. Nick likes reading books. .


Exercise 3. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

He likes

coming to school early,


waking up early.

She

doesn't like

smoking.
playing chess.

Exercise 4. Translate into English.

1. ,
. 2. ,
139

. 3.
, . 4.
. , . 5.
. 6.
? . 7.
. 8.
. 9. ( )
. 10. . 11.
.
Exercise 5. Make up eight sentences using patterns 1, 2 and 3.

Learn these words and word com binations

chief [$:f] ,
, ; chief ingineer
; My brother is
chief ingineer in a big factory.
work [wa:k] v 1. ,
; 2. , ,
; Where does your mother
work? to work in a factory (in
an office)
( ); Does your son
work in a factory?
same pron , ,
; We work in the
same factory.
secretary ['sekratri] n
office f'ofisj n ,
, ; to work in an
office; H er sister works in an
office.
eldest E'eldist] ()
( , ,
,
); My eldest sister is
secretary in an office.
program m er ['prougraems] n

younger [']] (no


); Ann is Mary's
younger daughter.
140

go to school ,
; Does your
younger son go to school?
form n ( ); Her
daughter is in the first form, isnt
she?
live [liv] v ; Where does he
live?
block of flats
floor [fb:] n ; the ground
[graund] (first, second, etc.)
floor (Br.) (,
. .) ; the first
(second, etc.) floor ( M )
( . .) ;
Their flat is on the ninth floor
(Br.).
.
house [haus] ,
get up v , ;
When do you usually get up?
early [':1] adv ; My younger
sister always gets up very early.
shave v
have (take) a show er ['jaus]
; Do you have a
shower every morning?

wake up v 1. ; When do you


usually wake up Jane and Peter?
.
up
: When do you wake up
your children? When do you
wake them up? 2. ;
I often wake up at five in the
morning.
underground ['Andsgraund] n
; Oxford Street Underground
Station
; to go by underground

tube [tju:b] n (in London) ;
to go by tube ;
Hes going there by tube, isnt
he?
get v , ;
going to get home by
underground; to get to
(-.); Is John going to
get to the factory by tube?
there [] adv , ; How
are you going to get there?
dictate [dik'teit] v ;
Please dictate these letters to
Jane.
paper ['peipg]
translation [trains'leifn] n ;
;
When are you going to look
through the papers and
translations?
receive [n'si:v] v 1.
(); 2. ; He
receives letters from his mother
every Wednesday.
visitor ['vizita] n ; Are
you going to receive visitiors after
lunch?
canteen [kasn'ti:n] n ,
( ,
. .)
roastbeef t'roustbi:f]
steak [steik] ; Are you
going to have roastbeef or steak
for lunch?

from prep , (
>
); Nick usually comes
home from school at one oclock
go for a walk ;
They often go for a walk after
dinner.
come back v ; When
are you going to come back?
rule [ru:l] n ; He doesnt
like learning grammar rules.
ho u r ['] n ; half an hour
; a q u arter of an ho u r
; an hour and a
half ; two (three,
four, etc.) hours and a half
(, . .)
; It takes my son two
hours and a half to do his
homework.
like v , ; He likes
apples; to like doing smth.
-; She likes
playing chess.
borrow t'borou] v (
), ; to borrow
books from smb.
~. ( , );
Dont borrow books from him.
library ['laibrori] n ; I
often borrow books from the
school library.
stay v , , On
Sunday she often stays at home
and reads books.
till prer ( ,

); Im going to work till
six oclock in the evening.
college ['kolidj] n (Br., Am,) ; to be at
college ; At
what college is John?
m em ber ['memba] n ; m em ber
of a family (society)
()
society Isa'saigti] n ; What
school societies are you a
member of?
141

th e latest news ['leitist nju:z]


; They are
listening to the latest news on
the radio,
go to bed ; When
do you usually go to bed?
m inistry ['ministri] n
foreign ['form] ;
M inistry of Foreign Affairs
[s'feaz]
; His eldest
brother works in the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs.

radio ['reidiouj n (
); on the radio
know [nou] v ;
,
; Do you know Peter
Brown? He knows French,
doesn't he?
language ['laeggwitfc] n ; Does
your brother know any foreign
languages?
Spanish ['spasm J] n

Exercise 6. Read these sentences and translate them into Russian. Pay attention
to active words and word combinations.

I. Her eldest sister is a programmer. She works in a big


factory, 2. "Does your younger sister go to school?" "Yes, she
does. S h es in the second form. 3. My m other usually gets up
at a quarter to six. 4. My eldest sister usually wakes me up at
half past six. 5. "How is he going to get there?" "Hes going to
get there by underground." 6. He always leaves for work at a
quarter to eight. 7. W hose translation is this? 8. I usually have
roastbeef or steak and a cup of coffee for lunch. 9. Does he
usually come home from school at half past one? 10. Do you
often borrow books from the school (university) library? 11.
He is going to stay at university till eight o clock today. 12.
Do you listen to the latest news on the radio every morning?
13. My younger sister is a secretary in the M inistry of
Foreign Affairs. 14. How many foreign languages do you
know?
Exercise 7. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.

A: Do Peter and Nick work in the sam e office?


B: Y es, they do.
(A: live in the sam e house, go to the sam e school, have
lunch in the sam e canteen)
A: I often have bacon and eggs for breakfast.
: I never have bacon an d eggs. I usually have tea and
toast.
(A: coffee; B: coffee)
MY FAMILY

My 'nam e is 'P eter Se~^dov. I am 'forty-'six years old.


I am 'chief engi'neer in
factory.1 I have a 'wife and
1 three "^sons. My 'wife is 'forty-^two. 'Mary and
142

- J I 'work in the 'sam e


factory. She is a
secretary in the
office.
Our
eldest son . J Boris is 'tw en ty-^ two. He is a
^programmer. 'G eorge, our 'second _^son, is n i n e t e e n .
He is a 'first-year 'student at 'Moscow U n i v e r s i t y .
Our
younger son _^Nick is twelve. He 'goes to
school. He is in the 'fifth 'Iform.
We 'live in
Moscow. We have a 'fo u r-'ro o m _^flat ^ in
a 'new 'block of
flats. Our 'flat is 'on the 'second "floor.
Our 'house is in Ostozhenka Street.
'Mary and - J I J 'usually 'get -J u p early, at 'half past
\s ix . I 'shave and have a "'ishower. Then I 'wake up 'Boris
and ~^Nick.
At ""^half past
seven we have
breakfast. We 'usually
have 'bacon and _^eggs, \ - J toast and 'tea or ^coffee for
breakfast.
At 'ten 'm inutes past -h eig h t J we 'leave 'home for
_^work $ or
school. Our 'house is 'near 'Gorky Park
^ U n d erg ro u n d -^ Station, S and it 'takes us Tfive "^minutes
to get there.
My 'wife and - J l J 'get to the
factory J at a 'quarter to
"^nine.
I
'usually have a Tlot of
things to do2 in the office. I
dic'tate -^ letters, \ 'look through 'papers and t r a n s la t io n s
J and re'ceive ^visitors.
'Mary and J M
'always have 'lunch in the 'factory
can^U een. We 'usually have 'roastbeef or J steak J and
coffee for lunch.
'N ick 'comes 'hom e from -^school J at 'half past _^one or
at 'two '~clock. He has - J lunch and 'then 'goes for a 'walk
in 'iGorky Park. At ""'Ifour o _^clock J he 'comes
back J
and 'does his
homework. He 'writes ~Jexercises, J
trans'lates 'English 'texts into ^ R u s s ia n J and 'learns
"^rules. It 'takes him ttw o 'hours and a 'half to 'do his
homework. 'N ick 'likes 'reading "Ebooks. He 'often
'borrows E b o o k s from the
school library.3
'Mary and - J l 'come 'home at a 'quarter past ^six. At
seven o >clock \ we have
dinner. After -^ d inn er J I
usually 'look through the -^new spapers ^ or 'watch
tele'*vision.
-^G eorge 'often 'stays at
u n i v e r s i t y till 'nine
o ^ c lo c k . He 'reads 'b o o k s-in the tcollege "^library.
'George is a 'member of sorpe uni'versity so "^cieties.
At 'ten o 7clock we 'listen to the 'latest 'news on the
- J radio \ and at 'half past e^Ieven \ we 'go to ""^bed.
143

T o-Jn igh t we 'have a """Iguest.


Michael, my 'younger
brother, is 'coming to ""~\see us.
Michael is
diplomat.
He 'works in the 'M inistry of 'Foreign Af""\fairs. 'Michael
knows I three-'foreign Slanguages: -^ E n glish, -^Spanish
and
German*

N otes
1. I am chief engineer in a factory.
*

, ,
,
.
2. I have a lot of things to do. *
3. from the school library ;
university societies .

.
Exercise 8* Read and translate the text.
Exercise 9. Find in the text English equivalents for these word combination and
sentences.

1. . 2.
. 3.
. 4.
. 5.
. 6* .
Exercise 10. Quote the sentences in which the following words and word
combinations are used in the text.

At Moscow U niversity, to go to school, block of flats,


early, to leave for, canteen, from school, to learn, to like, on
the radio, Spanish.
Exercise 11. Answer these questions using active words.

1.
What is Peter Sedov? 2* How many people are there in
P eters family? 3* What is P eters wife? 4. What are P eters
sons? 5. At what tim e does Peter usually get up? 6. Who
wakes up their sons? 7* At what tim e do the Sedovs leave
home for work or school? 8. What does Peter usually do in the
144

office? 9. Does Nick do his homework after lunch or after a


walk? 10. Nick often borrows books from the school library,
d oesn t he? 11. Why does George often stay at university till
nine o clock? 12. Who is coming to see the Sedovs tonight? 13.
What is Michael?
Exercise 12. Insert prepositions from ...into, till, through, in, near, fcr, at, up,
to.

Mike is a university student. He goes ... the university


every d ay.... the morning his mother wakes him ... . He gets
..., w ashes and shaves. Then he has breakfast. He often has
bacon and eggs, coffee and toast ... breakfast. He does not
look ... newspapers ... the morning, he looks them ......... the
evening. Mike usually leaves ... the university ... a quarter ...
eight. He lives ... Taganskaya Underground Station and it
takes him ten minutes to get there. Mike often has lunch ...
the U niversity canteen. He often stays ... the library ... 8 p.m.
He translates texts ... French ... R ussian and does exercises.
Exercise 13. Make up ten questions based on the text and answer them.
Exercise 14. Give a summary of the text.
Exercise 15, Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

A \: You usually get up at seven in the morning, d on t


you?
B: Y es, I do. And what about you?
: I get up at half p a st seven.
C4i: six, half past six; : a quarter to seven, ten m inutes
past seven)
2. A: D oes Peter Bodrov live in M insk?
B: Y es, he does. He works in the M inistry of Foreign
Affairs there.
(A: Kiev, Kishinev; : in a big factory, in an office)
3. A: W hen do you come home from the office?
B; At half p a s t six. It takes me an hour to get home.
(A: the factory, the m inistry, the university; : a quarter
to seven, a quarter past six, half past four)
Exercise 16. Open the brackets using the verbs in Simple Present or Present
Continuous.

1.
My friend s name (to be) George Lobov. He (to live) in
Kishinev. He (to be) chief engineer in a big factory. He
usually (to come) to the factory at a quarter past eight.
George (to have) a lot of things to do. He (to read) papers,
(to write) business letters and (to receive) visitors.
145

His wife Jane (to work) in the sam e factory. She (to be) a
programmer. Jane (to like) reading. She often (to borrow)
books from the factory library. There (to be) a lot of
interesting books there.
2.
My brother and sister (to have) lunch in the canteen
now. 3. "What Nick (to do) now?" "He (to do) his homework.
It usually (to take) him an hour and a half to do his
homework."
Exercise 17. Ask questions to which the italicized words are the answers.

1. His elder sister lives in O m sk . (1) 2. His younger son


often goes for a walk in Gorky Park. (I) 3. His elder brother
is a do cto r. (1) 4. Mary usually comes home at h alf p a st five.
(1) 5. It takes my daughter three hours an d a half to do her
homework. (I)
Exercise 18. Insert articles where necessary.

1. This is ... nice street. Its ... Ostozhenka. 2. Mr Brown


lives near ... H yde Park, He often goes for a walk there. 3.
T hey are going to leave for ... Sherem etyevo Airport now. 4.
It takes him ten m inutes to get to ... Sokolniky Underground
Station. 5. His elder sister is ... chief engineer in ... big
factory. 6. At half past seven we leave ... home for ... work or
.. school. 7. He usually gets to ... office at ... quarter to nine.
8. He usually looks through ... newspapers after ... lunch.
Exercise 19. Make up situations using the verbs given below.

a) My Friends Morning: to wake up, to get up, to shave,


to have a shower, to have breakfast, to have coffee, to leave
home for work.
b) My Friends (Sisters, Brothers) Day: to wake up, to
get up, to take a shower, to have breakfast, to leave for school
(work, the factory, university), to have classes (to have a lot
of work), to come back, to have lunch, to go for a walk, to do
o n e s homework (to watch TV, to read books).
Exercise 20. Make up ten sentences using the verbs to get, to take, to go, to
come in the word combinations that you know.
Exercise 21. Translate into English and give a summary of the texts.

1.
26 . .
7 , .
, .
146

. 12 .
.
.
6 .
, .
.
.
2.
7 .
, .
.
, . 12
.
5 . .
.
.
,
.
Exercise 22. Read and translate the text. Look up the words you do not know
in the dictionary. Give a summary of the text.

Today we have a house-warm ing party.* We have a threeroom flat in a new building in the centre of Moscow. Our
house is quite near Pushkin Square. Our flat is on the ninth
floor. My parents are going to come to the house-warm ing
party.
My parents do not live with us. T hey live in a small town
near Moscow. T hey are old. They do not work. They are
pensioners. We often go to see them. T hey have a two-room
flat on the ground floor in a new block of flats. There is a nice
lawn in front of their house.
Exercise 23. a) Make up a story on one of the topics, b) Write a story on one
of the topics.

1.
My fam ily. 2. My friends fam ily. 3. My day. 4. My
friend s day.

L E S S O N EIG H T
Conversations: A. Introductions. B. G reetings and Asking
about H ealth. C. In the Canteen.
* a house-warming party ['hauswDimirj 'pa:ti]
147

Learn these speech patterns


1.

d like som e salad, steak and a cup of coffee.

Exercise 1. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

Id like
H ed like

a cup of coffee.
a cup of tea.
some ice-cream ,
some apple-pie.
to go for a walk.
to look through the papers.
to meet Mr Brown.

2.
Would you like som e apple-pie? ['wud ju 'laik ssm
-J aeplpai ]
Exercise 2. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

Would you like

a cup of tea?
a cup of coffee?
som e ice-cream?
steak now?
to go for a walk?
to have lunch
now?

Y es, please.
No, thank you.

Exercise 3. Translate into English.

1. He ?
2. . 3.
. 4.
? 5.
? 6.
?
Exercise 4. Make up six sentences using patterns 1 and 2.

Learn these words an d word com binations


introduction [.intra'dAkJnJ n (
) ,

introduce [,intra'dju:s] v
, ; Mr Ktorov, Id
like to introduce Mr Black to you.
R ussian ['$]
quite [kwait] adv ,
; That house ts quite new.
148

! dont quite know.


, ,
feel v (+ predic.) ;
to feel well
; Im not feeling very well
today; to feel cold; I feel cold.
,
well ; Are you well?
?

really I'risli] < . .


) . ? ?
!
cold , ;

(
); to catch (a) cold
; Im afraid Im catching
a cold; to have a cold
; Jane has a cold,
too adv T hats too bad.
. . How
are you? Not too well.
.
( .)
hear [] v , ;
I can hear you very well.
. I m sorry to
hear that. ( ).
Do you hear me?

salad ['sseted] n ; Would you


like some salad?
ice-cream n ; Id like
some ice-cream,
apple-pie ['seplpai]
; Id like a cup of tea and
some apple-pie.
pass [pa:s] v ; Pass her
the letter, please,
salt [sD:lt] n (.) ;
Pass him the salt, please.
H ere you are. h is ju ^ a :] ,
. ,
.
bread [bred] (.) ;
rye [rat] (black) bread
; Pass me the rye bread,
please.
Not at all. ['n3t at ~:1] He
! , (
)

A. INTR O D U CTIO NS*


1
M r Holt: Good morning, Mr Morris. This is Mr Bobrov.
Bobrov: How do you do.
M r M orris: How do you do.
M r H olt: Mr Bobrov is from R u ssia.1

2
M r Black: Good evening, Mr Norris. Meet Mr Popov.
M r Norris: How do you do.
Popov: How do you do.
M r Black: Mr Popov is from Moscow.
3
M r White: Mrs N orris, Id like to introduce my Russian
friend Mr Ktorov.
M rs Norris: How do you do.
Ktorov: How do you do.
M rs Norris: How do you like London?
Ktorov: Its quite different from what I expected.2
*
149

. G R EETIN G A N D ASKING ABOUT H EA LTH 3


1
M r Green: Hello.
Bobrov: Hello. How are you?
M r Green: Im not feeling very well.
Bobrov: Really? W hats the trouble?4
M r Green: Im afraid Im catching a cold.

2
M r N orris: H ello. How are you?
Bobrov: Fine, thank you. And what about you?
M r N orris: Not too well, I afraid.
Bobrov: Im sorry to hear that.
C. IN THE C ANTEEN
1
A:

Id like som e salad, steak, and a cup of coffee for


lunch. And what about you?
B: I d like roastbeef and some ice-cream.
A: Would you like som e apple-pie?
B: Y es, please.

2.
A:
B:
A:
B:
A:

Excuse me, pass me the butter and the salt, please.


H ere you are. Pass me the rye bread, please.
H ere you are.
Thank you.
Not at all.
N otes

1. Mr Bobrov is from R ussia. ,


,
.
2. Its quite [kwait 1 different ['difrant] from what I expected
[iks'pektid ]. , .
3. Greeting and Asking about Health: greeting ['gri:tii]z J
; to ask about health [hel0]
.
4. W hats the trouble [ ]? (
)?
150

Exercise 5. Read and translate the dialogues.


Exercise 6. Find in the dialogues English equivalents for these sentences.

1.
? 2. ! 3. ,
4.
. 5. ( ).
Exercise 7. Quote the sentences in which these words are used in the dialogues.

to be from, to introduce, too, salad, to pass, here you are


Exercise 8. Fill in the missing remarks. Reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.

3.
4.

A;

Good morning, Mrs Smith. Id like to introduce


Mr Tabakov to you.
M rs S: ...
T: ...
A: Good evening, Mr W hite. Meet Mr Krotov.
M r W: ...
K:
A Mr Krotov is a businessm an.
A How do you like Irkutsk?

A How are you feeling today?

A Im sorry to hear that.

A Really? W hats the trouble?

A What would you like to have for lunch?

A What about some ice-cream?

A Pass me som e toast, please.


*
A Thank you.

5.

* * *

6.

Exercise 9. Think of the questions to which the lollowing sentences are the
answers.

1* . ...
; Its quite different from what I expected.
7
m

/ *

B:
A:
:

* * *

Not too w ell, Im afraid.


...
I think Im catching a cold.
151

3.

4.

5.

:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:
:

**
Im not feeling very well.
**
**
I d like som e salad, steak, and a cup of coffee.
***?*
No, thank you.
Here you are.
**
Not at all.

Exercise 10. Reproduce the dialogues in pairs.


Exercise 11. Translate these dialogues.

1.

2.
3.

4.

6.

, - . ?
.
?
, .
?
, .
?
.
.
()?
, .
?
, .
, , , .
.
.
. ( .)
?
, .

Exercise 12. Make up dialogues based on these situations.

1. ( , . .)
.
().
2.
. , ,
.
3. .
, ().
,
.
152

L E S S O N N IN E
1. NEW GRAMMAR STRUCTURES
1. Modal Verbs "can", "may, "must
( can, m ay, must)
can
'cannot
'can t
I, you
He, she

may,
may 'not

We, they

'm aynt

"Ido it.

must,
must 'not
'neednt
'Yes, I "lean.
'No, I cannot.
'No, I cant.

'Can

'May

, yOU
he, she
we, they

'Must

J d o it?

'Yes, he Smay.
'No, he
mustnt.
'No, he "^m aynt
'Yes, he ^must.
'No, he ^neednt.
'No, he ^mustnt.

, can, m ay,
must ,
(, ,
),
,
,
. , may
, m ust
, 3- Simple Present
-s. ,
, to.

to do.
153

,
( )
, (
) .

:
cant [ka:nt], m aynt [m ein t], m ustnt [mAsnt].
can
,
.
'Can you read 'English
books?
? (
?)
'cannot 'play
chess.
. ( .)
You can 'go "Snow. . (
, .)

.
not cannot ['kaenot].

may
,
.
, .
Yoy m ay 'go "Snow. . (
.)
m ay 'com e 'back to^morrow. , ,
.
: I. , ,
.
2, may
m ust not, m ustnt [mAsnt]
.
'M ay l'take 'this -/book? ?
'N o, you ~~}mustnt. , . 'No, you " S maynt. (
).

must
.
Must ,
,
, .
You m ust ~~(1 it. . (
.)
154

You m ust see the 'new ^ lib r a r y .


. (
.)
m u st be at "home now. , , .
. m ust
need
neednt. N eednt , .
'M ust I show him the ^letter? 'No, you ~~\needrit. He , (
)
N eednt .
You 'n e e d n 't^ id o it now. He ( )
.
Exercise 1. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

I
He
His friend
T hey

Can

Must

can

you play chess?


w rite English?
he
translate this text
she
into English?

play chess.
read English.
give you the book.
show you the pictures.

Yes, I (he, she) can.


No, I (he, she) can t.

I
he

do the homework
now?

Yes, you (he, she) must.

she

w rite the letter?

No, you (he, she) n eed n t.

get up at six in
the morning?

May

I
he
she

go there?
work there?
look through these
papers?

Yes, you (he, she) may.


No, you (he, she) m ustnt.
No, you (he, she) m aynt.

155

Exercise 2. Read these dialogues and translate them. Make the necessary
substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.

3.

4.

A: 'May I 'have a 'cup o f


tea?
B: ~^Here you -Jfare.
(A: a cup of coffee, a cake, a blue pencil)
A: 'May I -J g o now?
B: 'Y es, you ^may*
{A: stay in the college library, have lunch now, smoke
here)
A: 'Must I 'look through the 'papers -J now?
B: 'N o, you
n eed n t.
(A: learn the new words, do it, translate this text)
A: 'W heres 'Peter ~~\now?
B: He must be in the
library.
(B: at home, at college, at school, in the canteen)

Exercise 3. Answer these questions.

1. Can you play chess? 2. Can your wife (sister, brother)


write English? 3. Can you show me the new textbook? 4. Must
you stay in the library tonight? 5. Must pupils do their
homework every day? 6. May I take your pencil? 7. May the
children go for a walk now? 8. May I stay here till seven? 9.
May he go home? 10. May I smoke here?
Exercise 4. Make up twelve affirmative, interrogative and negative sentences
using the modal verbs m ust, can, may and the words given below.

to smoke, to leave for work, to come back, to have lunch,


to go for a walk, to go home, to stay till six , to go there, to
look through, to go to see, to translate, to read
Exercise 5. Translate into English.

1.
? , . 2.
? ,
. . 3.
. 4.
? , . 5. ? , ,
. 6. ? , ,
. 7.
? , .
. ,
. 8.
? . 9.
? , .
156

2.

Indefinite Pronouns/A djectives*

( / )

many [' ] ,
few [fju:] ( )
a few ,

much []
little ( )

a little

I 'havent 'm any English


E b o o k s.
'Have they - J m a n y friends?
There were a 'few
"'I students in the
library.


books
pencils
newspapers
men
children

time
coffee
tea
bread
butter
meat
fish

There 'isn t 'much "Stea in


your cup.
'Have you got -J m u c h time?
T heres a little A b u tte r on
his plate.

: 1.
m any m ach .
a lot of ().
There are a lot o f books on the shelves. .
They have a lot o f time. ..
: They havent much time. .
Many m uch
.
Many students are listening to the tape.
.
2. few little .
not many, not much
very few, very little.
I have very little time. .
has very few friends. .
*
adjective ['sedsiktiv].
:
, .
157

Exercise 6. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to the use of the
indefinite pronouns.

1. We have very little butter at home. 2. Peter has very


few friends at school. 3. He h asn t got much work to do. 4.
Have they many children? 5. Do you see many people in the
street? 6. "Is there much or little coffee in Anns cup?"
"Theres a little coffee in her cup." 7. There are a few English
books on the shelf. 8. There are a lot of English and French
books in the college library. 9. He usually has a lot of work to
do in the office.
Exercise 7. Fill in the blanks with many, much, few, a few, little, a little and
a lot of.

1. There are not ... books on the desk. 2. Mr Brown


receives very ... visitors on Tuesday. 3. She types ... letters
every day. 4. There are ... students in the canteen. 5. Id like
... coffee, please. 6. There is not ... butter at home. 7. There
are very ... children in the park. 8. I have ... cigarettes at
home.
Exercise 8. Translate into English.

1.
. 2.
. 3.
. 4.
. 5. . 6.
. 7. . 8.
.

3. Imperative Sentences ( )
him
'Let

her

Sdo it.

them

r .
j
.
1^ 3to.

'Let us

"Sgo there.

'L ets

have S dinner now.

'read the new 'Itext.

Exercise 9. Transform these sentences according to the model. Translate them


into Russian.

a) He may watch TV tonight.


Let him watch TV tonight.
158

1, He may close the window. 2. He may look through the


papers. 3. They can play chess. 4. They may see the picture.
5. The children may go home now.
b) We can play chess after dinner.

Lets play chess after dinner.


1. We can have steak and coffee for lunch. 2. We can
translate the text after lunch. 3. We can leave home at eight
o clock. 4. We can listen to the radio after breakfast. 5. We
can have a cup of tea now.
Exercise 10. Make up eight imperative sentences.
Exercise 11. Translate into English.

I. , 2.
. 3.
. 4. . 5.
. 6, ,
7 .
. 8. .
II. W ORD-BUILDING *

( )

Composition** ( )

.
book
()

shop
()

bookshop
( )

: grandfather,
: cigarette-box.
:
1) :
notebook ['noutbuk];
2) :
: shop-assistant
I'jopxsistent ];
3)
( ): armchair [ ' ].
*
**

w ord-building ['w 9 ;dbildir)]


com position I'kDmpg'zifn]

159

Exercise 1. Read these compound* words. Pay attention to the stress. Translate
them.

'bathroom, 'bookcase, 'bedroom, 'coffee-table, 'notebook,


'newspaper, 'underground, 'textbook 'birthday, 'two-room
Exercise 2. Read these compound words and translate them (see the
dictionary).

handbag, shopwindow, pay-day, airport,


handwork, grandchild, granddaughter, grandson

handbook,

III. TEXT
Learn this speech pattern
Mr Payne wants Jane (her) to go there* - ,
() .
Exercise 1. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

I want
He wants

Peter
you
him
her
us
them
me

to
to
to
to
to
to

com e back at ten.


translate the new text.
look through this translation.
dictate som e letters to the secretary,
go for a walk now.
com e home for lunch.

Exercise 2. Translate into English.

1.
, . 2.
, . 3. ,
. 4. ,
.
Exercise 3. Make up ten sentences using the speech pattern to want smb. to do
smth.

I^earn these w ords and word com binations


go shopping ['fapirj]
; My mother usually goes
shopping on Tuesday morning,
teach [ti:$] v , ; to
teach smth. to smb. (to teach
smb. sm th.) -. .; Does your mother teach
French to foreign students?
time [taim] n ; He goes to see

his mother three times a week,


superm arket [,sju:p9'ma:kit] n
; I go shopping to the
supemarket three times a week,
buy [bail v ; What are
you going to buy in the
supermarket?
all [:1] indef pron ; Would you
like to take all? Thats all. ()

* compound [kam'paund]
160

. .
need [ni:d] v ; Do you
need these books?
walk [wa:k] v ,
; Are you going to walk there?
along b 'b rj] prep ; There are
some shelves along the bedroom
walls.
counter ['kaunts] n
put [put] v , ; Please
put the books on that desk,
purchase ['parijas] n
bascart ['ba:ska:t] n

(
)
loaf [louf] (p i loaves); white
loaf ( ); rye
trai] loaf

fresh [frej] ; fresh bread


(eggs, fruit, etc.); Is the bread
fresh?
meat [mi:t] n (.) ;
We need some meat for dinner,
fish [fij] n (.) ;
Please buy some fish in the
supermarket,
sausage ['saisicfe] n (.)
; Is there any sausage at
home?
cereals ['siam lz] n pi. (
, . .)
vegetables ['vecbatablz] p i
; What vegetables are you
going to buy in the supermarket?
fruit [fru:t] n (.) ;
Would you like to have some
fruit?
potato [pa'teitou] n
potatoes
tomato [t3'ma;tou] n ;
tomatoes ;
cucumber ['kjurkamba] n
lemon ['1] n

departm ent [di'paitmant] n ,


; M e n $ D epartm ent
;
departm ent store [sto:]

birthday ['b3:0dei] n
; Tomorrow is my mothers
birthday; birthday party ['pa:ti]

invite [m'vait] v ,
, ; Who are you
going to invite to your birthday
party?
present ['preznt] n
for [fo:, fo] prep ; Can you buy
a present for Jane today?
want [wont] v , ; I
dont want to go there,
clothes [kloudz] n (.)
; womens clothes

shoe [Ju:] n ,
goods [gudz] n p i , ;
sports [spo:ts] goods
; le ath e r ['1]
goods
and so on ,
; You can buy there pens,
pencils, notebooks and so on.
glove [gUv] n ; a pair of
gloves (shoes) [ ' av
glAvz] ()
sweater ['sweta] n ; What
colour is that sweater?
like [laik] v , ;
Do you like this colour?
box of paints (
); Im looking for
a box of paints,
tired [taiad] ,
; to be tired ,
; You are very tired,
. arent you?
caf ['kaefei] n ; Is there a
cafe nearby?
Exercise 4. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to active words
and word combinations.

1. How many tim es a w eek do you have an English class?


2 . 1 can buy all I need in the supermarket. 3. Are w hite loaves
fresh? 4. How much meat do we need? 5. You must buy
tomatoes and potatoes here. They are very good. 6. "Where
can I buy a present for my sister?" "In the department store.
161
6

Its round the corner." 7. "Wheres the sports goods


department?" "Its on the fourth floor." 8. "May I see those
sh oes, please?" "Here you are." 9. How many friends are you
inviting to your birthday party? 10. "He isn t very tired, is
he?" "Im afraid, he is."
MR PAYNE GOES SHOPPING
Mr 'Roger 'P ayne lives in
London. He is a 'teacher of
English. He 'teaches 'English to 'foreign .^ stu d en ts at St
'G iles 'School of
Languages.1 Mr 'Payne has T four
'classes 'four 'tim es a "^Iweek. He "Mikes teaching English.
Mr 'Payne has a _^w ife, a -^daughter and a ~^son. His
'w ife, 'Grace J Payne, is a 'teacher *\too. She 'teaches
'French at 'London U n i v e r s i t y . His 'daughter 'Jane is
f i f t e e n and his 'son _JD ick is
twelve. T hey are at
compre"^ hensive sch ool.2
'Mrs
Payne 'usually goes 'shopping on
Monday and
"^W ednesday. ~^Mr J Payne goes 'shopping on 'Saturday
morning.
It is
Saturday today. Mr 'P ayne is 'going "^shopping
now. He 'usually 'goes to the s u p e r b market. He can 'buy T
all they "^need there. He 'walks along the ^counters and
'puts his 'purchases into the "^bascart. He 'buys 'two 'white
-^ loaves and 'one "^rye loaf. The 'bread is G a lw a y s fresh
there. 'Then he 'buys some _^m eat, Jfish, D bacon,
sausage and
cereals. He 'also buys 'vegetables and
fruit; p o-^tatoes, to ^ m a to e s , -^cucum bers,
apples,
^ o r a n g e s and "Clemons.
Today Mr Payne must go to a department store.
Tomorrow is his so n s birthday. Dick is inviting a few friends
to his birthday party. Mr Payne must buy a present for his
son. He wants Jane to go to the department store with him.
T hey are going to a big department store in Oxford Street.
There are a lot of departments in the store: wom ens clothes,
m ens clothes, sh oes, sports goods, leather goods and so on.
On the ground floor Mr Payne buys a tie and Jane buys a
pair of gloves. Then they go to the second floor, to the M ens
Department and buy a blue sweater for Dick. Dick likes that
colour. T hey also buy a box of paints for him. They are very
tired. Now they can go to a cafe and have tea.
N am es
Roger Payne ['rod^s 'p em ]
Grace [greis]
162

N otes
1. St G iles ['seint 'cfeailz] School of Languages
,
,
.
2. comprehensive [,kom pn 'hensiv] school
(, :
grammar school, secondary modern school
technical school)
Exercise 5. Find in the text English equivalents for these word combinations
and sentences.

1.
. 2. ()
. 3. - (
). 4. , . 5.
. 6. , .
7. . 8. .
Exercise 6. Quote the sentences in which the following words and word
combinations are used in the text.

to live, School of Languages, to teach, department store,


supermarket, to need, along the counters, fresh, sausage,
birthday, to need, gloves, tired, cafe
Exercise 7. Answer these questions,

1.
Where do the Paynes live? 2. What is Roger Payne? 3.
Who does he teach English to? 4. How m any times a w eek
does he have English classes? 5. Is Mr P ayn es fam ily large?
6. What is his wife? 7. Are his children at college or at school?
8. How many times a week does Mrs Payne go shopping? 9.
What day is it today? 10. Who is going shopping today? 11.
Where does he usually go shopping? 12. Can he buy in the
supermarket all they need? 13. Where does Mr Payne put his
purchases? 14. What does he usually buy? 15. Why* must Mr
Payne gp to the department store today? 16. Whose birthday
is it tomorrow? 17. What do they buy in the department store?
18. What colour does Dick like? 19. Where do Mr Payne and
Jane have tea?
* why [wai] adv
163
6*

Exercise 8. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1. A:
Must I go shopping now?
B: Y es, I want you to go now.
(A: invite John to my birthday party, go to see them
tonight; B: to invite him, to go to see them tonight)
2. A: W heres M ary! I d on t see
her here.
B: She must be in the leather goods departm ent.
(A: Bill, him; B: in the sports goods department)
3. A; Im afraid I can t go to the theatre tonight.
: I m sorry to hear that.
04: go shopping after classes, go to the department store
with you)
4. A: Can Ben go to the Z o o tod a y?
B: No, he cant.
(A: come to the party, buy a present for John; B: Y es, he
can. N o, he cant.)
5. A: May I invite Fred to the party!
B: Y es, you may.
(A: smoke here, have lunch now, see Mr Brown today)
Exercise 9. Answer these questions using modal verbs.

1. May I go shopping after ten? 2. Must he buy fruit too?


3. May I put my books on the desk? 4. May they come and see
you tonight? 5. What departments must we go to? 6. We can
have tea in the cafe, cant we? 7. Who can help me with my
homework? 8. What exercises must we do? 9. Can you bring
me the books tomorrow? 10. Can they com e and see us
tonight? 11. May I introduce Mr Brown to you?
Exercise 10. Insert prepositions where necessary.

1.
I usually go shopping ... the supermarket ... Monday
and Thursday. 2. "Is there a supermarket nearby?" "Yes, its
... the corner." 3. Who teaches German ... your brother? 4. Let
the children go ... a walk ... Izmailovo Park. 5, How many
people are you going to invite ... your birthday party? 6.
There is a big department store ... Sokol Underground
Station. 7. Do you want Peter and John to go.... Sheremetyevo
Airport tonight? 8. Can you buy a brown sweater ... Fred? 9.
"... which floor is the M ens Department?" "Its ... the fourth
floor." 10. We can have coffee ... the cafe.
Exercise I I . Make up twelve questions based on the text and answer them.
Exercise !2. Give a summary of the text.
Exercise 13. Substitute personal pronouns in the objective case for the italicized
nouns.
164

1. Let Peter "buy som e oranges and lem ons, 2. Let M ary go
shopping today. 3. Let M ike buy a pair of gloves. 4. I want
John to read this book too. 5. Do you want Ben to invite Tom
an d Peter to his birthday party? 6. Let M ary walk along the
counters and buy all she needs.
Exercise 14. Open the brackets using the proper tenses. Give a summary of the
texts.

1. Today (to be) M onday. Mrs Brown (to go) shopping


every Monday afternoon. Now she (to be) in the supermarket.
She (to buy) some cakes and two white loaves. Her daughter
Susan (to like) cakes. Mr Brown (not to like) cakes, he (to
like) fruit: apples, oranges, lem ons and so on. Mr Brown (not
to be) at home now. He (to work) in the City.* Susan (to be)
at school. She (to have) a French class now.
Mrs Brown (to walk) along the counters. She can buy all
they (to need) in the supermarket.
2. It (to be) Sunday morning. Mrs Brown (to be) in the
kitchen; She (to cook **) the Sunday dinner. Her husband
and children (to be) at home and they can have dinner in the
afternoon.
Mr Brown (not to go) to the office on Sunday and he can
work in the garden. He (to grow ***) vegetables and flowers.
His flowers (to be) very nice.
Exercise 15. Make up situations using modal verbs and the active words given
below.

a) three tim es a week; to go shopping, to buy, purchases,


to put into a bascart;
b) to teach, a School of Languages, four times a week, to
like teaching, to help, a foreign language;
c) supermarket, meat, fish , cereals, vegetables, fruit, to
like, to need;
d) birthday, to invite friends to a birthday party, to buy a
present, a big department store.
Exercise 16. Translate into English.

1. .
.
.
, . , ,
*
the City ['siti] ( ;
)
** cook [kukj v
*** grow [groul v
165

, , . .
. . 2.
.
. .
. -
. 3. ?
, . , 4. ^
? .
5. ? , .
. 6. ? , ,
. ? , , .
.

7.

8.

,
,
,
,
,
,
.

Exercise 17. a) Make up stories on these topics, b) Write a story on one of the
topics.

1. I am going shopping today. 2. I am buying a present for


my friend. 3. My m other goes shopping.

LESSON TEN
C onversations: A. Shopping. B. Congratulations. C. Saying
goodbye.
Learn this speech pattern
1.
looking fo r a navy blue raincoat, - .
Exercise 1. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

Im
H es
Shes

looking for

a blue tie.
a brown hat.
a French textbook,
his pen.
her notebook.

Exercise 2. Make up three sentences using pattern 1.


166

Learn these words and word com binations


shop-assistant I'jDp9,sistont] n
,

custom er

['kASt9m9j

navy blue

['neivi'blu:] -

raincoat ['reikout] n
coat Ikout] n
size [saiz] n ; Whats your
size? ?
try on E'trai 'on] v ; Can
I try on those brown shoes?
pay [pei] v ; Where must I
pay?
cashiers [ko'Jiaz] desk ;
Please pay at cashiers desk,
bookshop ['$] n

help v ,
; to help smb, do smth.
-. -.;
I can help you translate the text.
Can I help you?
? ?
street-guide ['stri:tcjaid]
; a (street-) guide to
London
; looking for a guide to
Moscow.
altogether [,:'] adv ;
How much is it altogether?
?
change [tjeinds] n ; Here is
your change.
Its a pleasure ['p le;p ].
. (=
.)
congratulations [kan.graetju'leijnz]
p i
M any happy f'hsepi] retu rn s
[ri't9:nz] of the day.
,
happy ['haepi] ; I'm
happy to hear that.
. Happy birthday.
,
collect [ks'lekt] v , ^
; Does Jane collect
guides to cities?
stam p [staemp] n ()
think [0irjk] v , ,

, ; I think
Peter can help John. I think so.
() , . (
, .) dont think so.
. I dont think
he collects stam ps. (
),
. .


.
wonderful ['wAndgfl]
, ; Old Tallinn
['ta:lin] is wonderful,
say [sei] v , ; to
say to smb. -.; He
can say that to George; to say
goodbye to smb,
(-.); I d like to say
goodbye to you. Im leaving for
home tomorrow.,

well int ! , (

); Well, I can do it today.
,
.
so [sou] adv 1. ,
, ; ,
(
);
Must you go so soon? It takes so
much time.
; 2. ()
, ; Pm afraid
so. , .
How are you getting on?
?
by the way [wei] ;
By the way, would you like some
apple-pie?
class [kla:s] n , ,
; English (
French) class
()
; I have an English class on
Tuesday and Friday,
in prep ; Im having an
English class in an hour.

.
See you later. .
See you soon. .
167

. See you later,


See you soon ,

.
fly ( ); Im
going to fly to London on
Thursday.

then adv , ;
Goodbye then.
() ; Then why
are you leaving?
?

A. SHOPPING
Shop-assistant: Are you being served?1
Custom er: No. Im looking for a navy blue raincoat, size
44.
Shop-assistant: How do you like this raincoat?
Custom er: Well, I like it. How much is it?
Shop-assistant: 55.99 p.2
Custom er: Where must I pay?
Shop-assistant: At the cashiers desk over there.
* * *
Shop-assistant: Can I help you?
Custom er: Yes. How much is this street-guide to London?
Shop-assistant: Its 99 p.
Custom er: Id like two guides, please. How much is it
altogether?
Shop-assistant: 1.98 p. H eres your change; 3.02 p.
Custom er: Thank you.
Shop-assistant: Its a pleasure.
B. CONGRATULATIONS
Peter; Hello, John. Many happy returns of the day.
Dick: Happy birthday, John, We know youre collecting
stamps. Here are a few foreign stamps. I dont think
you have them.
John: Oh, thank you very much. T h ey re wonderful.
C. SAYING GOODBYE
M r Brown: Well, Im afraid I must be going.3
John: Oh, must you go so soon?
M r Brown: Im afraid so. My mother isn t very well.
John: Im sorry to hear that. Please, give her my best
regards.4
M r Brown: Thank you. Goodbye.
John: G oodbye.
168

Michael: H ello, Jill. How are you getting on?


Jill: Fine, thanks. And how re you?
Michael: Im fine too. By the way Im having a French
class in half an hour. Goodbye. See you later.
Jill: See you soon.

Ivanov: Td like to say goodbye to you.


M r Green: When are you leaving?
Ivanov: Im flying home on Saturday.
M r Green: Goodbye then, and all the very b est.5

N otes
1. Are you being served [sarvd] ? ? (
- ?) Present
Continuous Passive.
2. 55.99 = fifty-five pounds ninety-nine pence
.
3. I must be going. . .
4. give her my best regards [ri'gardz]
( ).
5. all the very best
Exercise 3. Read and translate the dialogues.
Exercise 4. Find in the dialogues English equivalents for these word
combinations and sentences.

1.
? 2. . 3.
? 4. . (
.) 5. . 6. ,
. 7. , . 8.
( ) .
Exercise 5. Quote the sentences in which these words are used in the dialogues.
169

size, to try on, to pay, street-guide, change, pleasure,


happy, afraid, to get on, a French class, soon, to say
goodbye, to fly
Exercise 6. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1C ustom er: Im looking for a brown sweater.


S hop-assistant: How do you like this sweater?
(A: a blue raincoat, a grey coat, light brown shoes; : this
raincoat, this coat, these shoes)
2. Shop-assistant: Can I help you?
C u stom eri: Id like a pair o f brown leather gloves.
Shop-assistant: W hats your size?
C u s to m e r : Eight.
(C u sto m ers a pair of dark brown shoes, a blue hat, a navy
blue raincoat; C u stom en : Eight and a half, twelve,
sixteen)
3. Custom er: How much is it altogether?
Shop-assistant: 1.85 p2. heres your change:^ 3.15 p.
(Shop-assistant: 24.85 p, 5.15 p; 2.70 p, 2.30 p;
99.99 p, 0.01 p)
4. A: Im afraid, I must be going.
B: Its so early. D ont go, please.
(B: Oh, must you go so soon?)
5. A: How are you getting on?
B: Fine, thanks.
(B: Not too w ell, Im afraid. Im not feeling very well.)
6. A: Im afraid I must be going. M y mother isn t very
well.
B: Im sorry to hear that. Give her my best regards.
04: father, daughter, wife; B: him, her, her)
7. A: By the way I m having an English
class in ten
m inutes. G oodbye. See you later.
B: See you soon.
(A: a French class, a Spanish class, a German class)
8. A: When are you leaving?
B: I m flying home on Sunday.
(B: on T hursday, on W ednesday, on Monday)
Exercise 7. Fill in the missing remarks. Reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.
170

Shop-assistant: Are you being served?


Customer: ..
S-a: Would you like to try on this coat?
C: ..
C: Well, I like this coat. How much is it?
S-a: ..

3.

: Where must I pay?


S-a: ..
C: May I try on those black shoes?
S-a: ..
: I dont like them. Id like to try on those brown
shoes.
S -a ...
C: T h ey re all right. How much are they?
S-a:
A: Can you tell me how to get to the Sports Goods
Department?
B: ...
A: Thank you.
C: How much is this street-guide to Leeds?
S-a: ..
C: And how much is this book?
S-a:
C: How much is it altogether?
S-a: ..
C: Thank you.
S'-: ..
A: H ello, John. Can you go to the department store
with me?
J: ...
A: Lets go there after lunch.
. .

4.

5.

. .

6.

V*

7.

8.

9.

**

A: H ello, George.Many happy returns of the day.


G*
w *
A: I know youre collecting stamps. Here are a few
stamps. I dont think you have them.
G*
A: Im having an English class in ten minutes.
G oodbye. See you later.
B: ...
A: Id like to say goodbye to you.
B: ...
A: I m flying home on Tuesday.
B: ...

Exercise 8. Think of the questions and statements to which the following


sentences are the answers.

1.
2.

S h op-assistant: ...?
C ustom er: N o, Id like a pair of brown leather gloves.
S-a: ...?
C: I m looking for a light green sweater.
171

3.

S -a : ...
: Y es, Id like to try it on.
4. S-a: ...?
C: No. Im looking for a grey coat size 40.
5
C*
?
S-a: 3.25. heres your change: 1.75 p.
6. A: ...
B: Thank you very much. Come into the living-room,
please.
7. A * *
Oh, must you go so soon?
8. A *?
Im afraid so. My father is n t feeling very well.
?
9. A
Fine, thanks.
10. A
Im flying to Leningrad on W ednesday and Id like
to say goodbye to you.
4

**

* * *

Exercise 9. Reproduce the dialogues in pairs.


Exercise 10. Act as interpreter.

1.

2.

5.

172

S-a: Can I help you?


: - , 42.
S-a: I d on t think we have light-grey coats this size.
We have navy blue coats. Would you like to try on a
navy blue coat?
: , .
: ?
S-a: 33.99
: ?
S-a: At the cash iers desk.
: Id like these two books. How much is it altogether?
S-a: 2 50 .
: Where must I pay?
S-a: ( ).
: afraid I must be going.
: ?
A: My wife isn t feeling very well. Im afraid sh e s
catching a cold.
: .
.
: .
: When are you leaving?
: .
: G oodbye then, and all the very best.

Exercise I I . Translate into English.

1.

2.

3.

5.

6.

7.
8.

?
. .
, , .
. ?
3 .1 7 .
?
, .
?
, .
. ?
4.78 .
.
0.22 .
.
, . .
.
, , .
. .
, .
?
, . .
.
, . ?
. ,
.
.
?
.
.
.
. .
. .
.
?
. .
.

Exercise 12. Make up dialogues based on these situations.

1. In a department store. 2. In a bookshop. 3. Saying


goodbye.
173

L E S SO N ELEVEN
1. NEW GRAMMAR STRUCTURES
1. The Sim ple Past T ense ( )

I, you
He, she
We, they
I, you
He, she
We, they

'lived
in 'Kiev last
**4year.

did 'not live


'didnt live

in 'Kiev
last
year?

'Yes, I \did.
'No, 1 "'bdidn t.

last

I 'lived in VKiev
last year.

'Did

you
he, she
they

'live

'Where

did

you

'live

'When

did

you

'live

in YKiev

lived

in 'Kiev
last
""U did.
?
Peter did.

'Who

^year?

I 'lived in Kiev
Xlast year.

Simple Past T ense


(standard) (non
standard).

( to) -(e )d .
[d ]

-(e )d

[t ]
[id ]
[d], [t]

[d ]
to shave shaved [Jeivd ]
to open opened [oupnd J
to play played [pleid ]
174

[t 1
to smoke smoked [smoukt ]
to work worked [ws:kt ]
to wash washed [wojt ]

[id J
to want wanted ['w ontid]
to translate translated [traens'leitid 1
: 1. ,
,
-ed: to try tried [traid].
2. ,
: to stop stopped [stapt].


Simple Past,
.
.
3
. ( Simple Past, Past
Participle).
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to
to

be was [woz, W3 z ] , were [ws:, w a] been [bi:n]


buy bought [bo:t ] bought
come came [keim ] come [ ]
do did [d id ] done
drive drove [drouv ] driven [dnvn ]
get got [got ] got
give gave [geiv ] given [givn ]
go went [went ] ' gone [ ]
have had [haed, had ] had
hear heard [ha:d ] heard
know knew [nju: ] known [noun ]
learn learnt [to:nt] learned [b :n d ] learnt, learned
leave left [left ] left
make made [m eid] made
pay paid [p eid ] paid
put put [put ] put
read read [red ] read [red ]
say said [sed ] said
see saw [ sd : ] seen [si:n ]
take took [tuk] taken [teikn ]
teach taught [to:t ] taught
tell told [tould 3 told
think thought [0o:t] thought
wake woke [wouk ] woken [woukn ]
write wrote [rout] written [rith]
175

2. The verb "to be in the Simple Past T ense


I

She

was [woz]
was 'not
'wasnt ['wDznt]

We
You

were two]
were 'not
'werent [wa:nt]

at Thorne

'W as [woz]

I
he
she

'W ere [wa:]

we
you
they

'Yes, I ~"\was.
'No, I "W asn 't.
at _^home

yesterday?

at ~Miome

yesterday?

'W ho
was
'When

were

you

yesterday.

at
Thorne?

'Yes, they ~\were.


'No, they
werent.

" I was.
""i Peter was.
I ""4was at -Jhom e
"^yesterday.

, to be,

to do, did.
D id you go to see them last Sanday?
?
Y es, I d id . .
No, I d id not. (N o, I didn't.) .
He d id not ( d id n 't) go to the department store yesterday.
.
They d id n 't have lunch at home yesterday.
.
to have (
)
to do.
H ad you that textbook last year?
?
hadnt any friends there. .
: We d id n t have a French class last Friday.

.
176

to be
to do.
"Were they at home yesterday?" "Yes, they were." "No,
they were not (w erent)."
Simple Past .
:
1) ,

: yesterday ['jestad i] , the day before yesterday
, yesterday morning (afternoon)
( ), last night [n ait] , last week (month
[0 3 , year [ja: ]), (
, ), an hour (a week, a month, a year) ago ['
( , , ) .
worked in a factory last year.
.
T hey lived in Tomsk two years ago.
.
Was he busy yesterday? ?
. ,
when , Simple Past Tense.
When d id he buy that textbook? ?
bought it a week ago. .

2)
.
open ed the window, d id his physical exercises, shaved
and washed and then had breakfast. ,
, ,
.
3) ,
.
alw ays played chess on Sunday mornings.
.
Exercise 1. a) Give the Simple Past Tense form of the following standard verbs.
Transcribe and pronounce them.

to close, to excuse, to listen, to live, to open, to receive, to


shave, to show, to play, to stay, to collect, to dictate, to
translate, to start, to help, to like, to look, to pass, to smoke,
to thank, to work, to w ash, to watch
b) Give the Simple Past Tense form of the following non-standard verbs.
Transcribe and pronounce them.
177

to be, to buy, to teach, to think, to com e, to give, to do, to


get, to go, to have, to hear, to leave, to know, to make, to
learn, to pay, to put, to read, to take, to tell, to wake, to
write, to drive.
Exercise 2. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to the use of the
Simple Past Tense.

a) 1. His elder brother worked in a big factory two years


ago. 2. Her younger sister lived in Kiev a few years ago. 3.
T hey watched TV last night. 4. Mary helped us to type the
letters yesterday. 5. T hey got to the department store in the
afternoon. 6. They went to see the Browns last night. 7.
P eters m other taught French to us last year. 8. He d id his
homework and then went for a walk in H yde Park. 9. My
elder brother was ill last week.
b) 10. He d id not receive any visitors yesterday. 11. T hey
d id not translate the new text the day before yesterday. 12.
She d id not listen to the latest news last night. 13. Peter d id
not write a letter to his father last M onday. 14. Jane d id not
tell us about that yesterday. 15. He d id not teach French last
year, 16. She was not ill last week.
c) 17. "Did you show them your new pictures yesterday?"
"Yes, I d id " 18. "Did Peter stay in the college library the day
before yesterday?" "No, he d id n 't" 19. "D id they look
through the newspapers yesterday morning?" "Yes, they d i d
2 0 ." D id he buy the new textbook yesterday?" "No, he d id n 't
21.
"D id you read the book last week?" "Yes, 1 did." 22. "Did
you have lunch in the factory canteen yesterday?" "No, I
d id n 't." 23."D id they leave for work at half past seven
yesterday morning?" "Yes, they did." 24. "Was he very tired
yesterday?" "Yes, he was."
Exercise 3. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.

3.

178

A:
B:
A:
(A:
A:
B:
A:

Mary showed me her new gloves yesterday.


Did you like them?
Y es, I did.
hat, coat, watch; : it, it, it)
Did they have a German class last Friday?
N o, they d idnt and did you?
I d idnt either.
(A: watch TV, translate the new text, look through
the m agazines)
A: Peter went for a walk Iasi night, didnt he?
B: Y es, he did.
(A: last Sunday, after dinner, after classes)

4.

5.

6.

7.

A:
B:

How long did it take you to get to the office?


It took the h alf an hour.
(A: the m inistry, the airport, the factory; B: forty
m inutes, an hour and a half, tw enty m inutes)
A: You had lunch in our factory canteen yesterday,
didnt you?
B: Y es, I did.
A: How did you like it?
: It was very good.
04: last T uesday, two d ays ago)
A: Mr Brown is in L on don , isn t he?
B: N o, he isn t. He was there a m onth ago.
(A: Paris, Moscow; B: a week ago, two months ago)
A; The people there were w onderful, w erent they?
: Y es, they certainly were.
(A: very, good, very nice)

Exercise 4. Transform these sentences into tag questions and give answers to
them.

He stayed at home last Sunday.


"He stayed at home last Sunday, d id n t he?" "Yes, he
did."
I. He liked your new picture. 2. John dictated a few letters
to the secretary yesterday morning. 3. My younger brother
collected foreign stamps last year. 4. H is m other woke him up
at six yesterday morning. 5. T hey cam e to see us last night.
6. My brother had a lot of friends at school. 7. Jane was ill
last week. 8. He did not watch TV last night. 9. She did not
go to school the day before yesterday. 10: H e did not know
about the textbook. 11. T hey did not have lunch in the factory
canteen last Friday. 12. She was not very tired yesterday. 13.
They had no English books last year.
Exercise 5. Make up questions according to the model.

His brother collected stamps last year, (his sister)


Did his sister collect stamps too?
1.
His elder sister worked in a big factory two years ago.
(his younger sister) 2. He listened to the latest news last
night, (they) 3. His friend lived in London last year, (his
friends family) 4. We played chess last night, (they) 5. Peter
bought som e white and brown bread. (John) 6. Nick did his
homework after classes. (Bill) 7. Mr Brown took his children
to the Zoo la st Sunday. (Mr Smith) 8. He had lunch at one
o clock, (they) 9. He went shopping yesterday. (Mrs Brown)
10. Peter was ill last week. (Ben) 11. Jill was here yesterday.
(Jane)
179

Exercise 6, Answer these questions according to the model.

Did you see Peter in college yesterday?


No, I didnt. He w asnt in college yesterday,
1. Did you see Nick at Bills birthday party? 2. Did you
see Mary in the library last night? 3. Did you see Mr Brown
in the canteen? 4. Did you see them at the party 5. Did you
see John and Peter in the cafe?
Exercise 7. Answer these questions according to the model.

Do you usually get up at seven o clock? (yesterday)


I usually do, but I didnt get up at seven yesterday.
1. Do you usually play chess on Saturday? (last Saturday)
2. Does your sister go shopping every day? (yesterday) 3. Do
you write letters to Peter every Friday? (last Friday) 4. Do
you usually have lunch in the factory canteen? (the day
before yesterday) 5. Does Jim go to see his mother every
Saturday? (last Saturday) 6. Is your son usually tired after
classes? (yesterday)
Exercise 8. Use these sentences in the Simple Past Tense. Add adverbial
modifiers of time given in brackets.

The bread and the cakes are fresh, (yesterday)


The bread and the cakes were fresh yesterday.
1, He is at hom e, is n t he? (last night) 2. There are not
many students in the library, (last Tuesday) 3. Are there
many people in the sports goods department? (yesterday
afternoon) 4. Is Dick there, too? (last Saturday) 5. Jane is ill.
(last month) 6. He works in an office, (last year) 7. I often go
to the theatre on Sunday, (last Saturday) 8. Jane goes
shopping three tim es a week, (last week)
Exercise 9. Use the italicized verbs in the Simple Past Tense. Give a summary
of the text.

Peter is a student at Moscow U niversity. He usually gets


up at seven o clock, shaves and washes in the bathroom and
has breakfast. At a quarter to eight he leaves for college. He
goes there by bus. It takes him half an hour to get there. He
usually has lunch in the U niversity canteen. Peter often stays
in the library till nine o clock in the evening. At half past nine
he com es home.
Exercise 10. Translate into English.

1.
. . 2.
? . 3.
? 4.
180

? , ! 5.
? 6.
? . 7.
? . 8.
? . 9.
? . 10. , ? . (
). 11. -?
. ?
. 12. ?
. , ,
. 13. ? .
3. Com plex* Sentence ( )

.

. : that
, if
.
I saw that he was very happy. ,
.
If Tom can t do that, let Nick do it.
, .
. that,
, .
I saw he was very tired.

II. TEXT
Learn this speech pattern
She goes to school by bus (by tube, etc.).
( . .).
Exercise 1. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

I
They

go
went

He
She

goes
went

to
to
to
to

school
college
the library
the supermarket

by bus.
by tube.
by underground.

* complex ['kompleksl
81

Learn these words and word com bin ation s


return [ri'ta:n] v ; to
return home
( ); When are the
Petrovs going to return home?
head-m aster ['hed'ma:st3] n

Russian Embassy [embasil
,

for ffo:, fa] prep ,


; They lived in London
for two years,
lecturer ['1] n ,
(,
,

); Is Mr Wilson
a lecturer at London University?
Teacher Training College

geography [cfci'agrafi] n
; a teacher of geography
()
; Who is your sons teacher
of geography? When do you
usually have a geography class?
physical ['fiziklj exercises
; to do physical exercises
; Do you do
physical exercises every morning?
hand [haend] n ; to wash
ones hands
face [feis] n ; Did Paul wash
his hands and face?
tooth [tu:0] n (p i teeth [ti:9]) ;
to brush ones teeth
; "Paul, brush your teeth and
wash your face and hands," said
Jane.
during ['djuarirj] prep
, , ; They
usually listen to the latest news
during breakfast.
.
during
when (): "When did
you translate the text? "During
our English class."
for
how long (
, ): "How
182

long did he stay here?" "He


stayed there for three years."
start [sta:t] n 1. ; When
did your English class start
yesterday? 2. (-.);
When does he start work?
also ['d:1sou] adv , ;
Peter is also a student. He also
came back yesterday,
go by bus (by tube [tju:b], by car,
etc.) (
, . .); Did you
go there by bus or by tube?
.
,


: to go by
tube, - to go by
underground, - to go
by subway,
drive, drove, driven [draiv, drouv,
drivn] v 1. , ; He
usually drives to the Embassy in
his car; 2. , ,
, ; to drive a car
() ; Can
your brother drive a car?
class register ['recfeista]

call [:1] n ,
(. phone
[foun] call); to make a phone
call ; Did he make any
phone calls yesterday?
twice [twais] adv (
); twice a week (a m onth)
( ); Jim
goes to see his mother twice a
month.
time n ; He stays in the college
library three times a week.

.
.visit E'vizit] ,
; How many times a week
does he visit his brother?
go back v ; After
lunch he went back to college
yesterday,
go out v ,
, . .

Exercise 2. Read these sentences and translate them. Pay attention to active
words and word combinations.

1. T he Volkovs returned hom e from London last month. 2.


Did Janes father return to Moscow from Kiev last week? 3.
Who teaches geography to you? 4. He did his physical
exercises and then took a shower. 5. He always brushes his
teeth in the evening. 6. When did they start work? 7. You
went to college by tube yesterday, d id n t you? 8. He made a
few phone calls last morning. 9. When did he go back to his
office? 10. Did you go out last night? 11. Did they drive to the
office in P eters car?
GEORGE VOLKOV
Last month George Volkov and his fam ily returned to
Moscow from Great Britain. George was H ead-m aster of the
Russian Embassy school in Great Britain for four years. Now
George is a lecturer at the Teacher Training College.
George and his fam ily lived in London. They had a
threeroom flat in a new block of flats in Kensington High
Street.
George has a w ife and two children his son Paul is
eight and his daughter Ann is twelve. His wife Helen is a
teacher of geography. She taught geography at the Embassy
school. Paul and Ann went to school.
'G eorge and -J H elen 'usually 'got 'up at a 'quarter to
~~\seven. They 'did their 'physical "^exercises. 'Then
'G eorge ^shaved and 'took "shower. At a 'quarter past
- J seven 'H elen 'woke 'up 'Ann and _^Paul. 'Ann and _^Paul
w ashed their 'hands and - J faces, and 'brushed their
teeth.
At a 'quarter to -h eig h t the 'Volkovs had "^breakfast.
During .Jb reak fast they 'listened to the 'latest "^Inews.
At 'ten m inutes past -h eig h t the 'school bus 'took 'Ann
and 'Paul to
school. T heir 'classes 'started at ~Mialf past
eight.
If 'H elen had a ge'ography class in the
morning she
"also went to school by the school bus. If she had a 'class in
the ^ a fte r n o o n , she 'went to 'school by 'bus or by ~^tube.
'G eorge 'usually 'left for 'work at 'eight . He
'drove to the 'school in his *\car. It 'took him only .J te n
'm inutes to 'Iget there.
George usually had a lot of things to do. He looked
through class registers, m ade phone calls and spoke to the
183

teachers and pupils. Twice or three tim es a week he visited


classes.
George often had lunch at home. He usually had salad,
roastbeef or steak and a cup of coffee for lunch. After lunch
he went back to the school.
In the evening George and Helen som etim es went out or
had guests at home.
On Saturdays the Volkovs often w ent for a walk in H yde
Park.
Narries
K ensington High Street ['kensirjten hai stri:t] -- ( )
Exercise 3. Read and translate the text.
Exercise 4. Find in the text English equivalents for these word combinations
and sentences.

1* . 2.
. 3. . 4.
. 4.
. 6. . 7.
. 8. . 9.
. 10.
.
Exercise 5. Quote the sentences in which the following words and word
combinations are used in the text.

last m onth, for three years, to teach, physical exercises,


to take a shower, to wake up, teeth, during, the school bus, a
geography class, by bus, ten m inutes, phone calls, after
lunch, to go out, to go for a walk
Exercise 6. Write out all the combinations in which the verbs to go, to take, to
have, to g et are used in the text.
pxercise 7. Answer the questions.

1.
W hen did George Volkov and his fam ily return to
Moscow from Great Britain? 2. How long did the Volkovs stay
in Great Britain? 3. What did George Volkov do in Great
Britain? 4. In what street did the Volkovs live? 5. Where did
H elen work in London? 6. What subject* did she teach at the
Em bassy school? 7. Paul and Ann went to school, d id n t
they? 8. W hen did George and Helen usually get up? 9. Did
George usually take a shower in the morning or in the eve
ning? 10. At what time did the Volkovs have breakfast? 11.
* subject t'SAbcfelkt] n
184

They listened to the latest news during breakfast, didnt


they? 12. At what time did Ann and Paul leave for school? 13.
At what tim e did their classes start? 14. Did H elen always go
to school by the school bus? 15. How long did it take George
to get to the school? 16. Where did George usually have
lunch? 17. What did he often have for lunch? 18. Did George
go back to the school after lunch? 19. Did the Volkovs often
have guests? 20. T hey som etim es went out, d idnt they? 21.
What did they often do on Saturdays? 22. What is George
doing now?
Exercise 8. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

A: D oes your geography class start at 8.30?


: It starts at 8.30 on T uesday and at 11.30 on
Thursday.
(A: English, German, French)
A: TDid you go there by bus or by tube?
: I went there by tube.
A: How long did it take you to get there?
B2: It took me fo rty m inutes (to get there).
(B \ : bus, trolley-bus ['trolibAs]), underground; B 2 : half
an hour, fifty m inutes, fifteen minutes)
A: How often did Peter go to the library?
B: Twice a week.
(A: go to see h is mother, go for a walk; B: three tim es,
four times)
A: Do you often go out?
: N o, not very often. Three or fo u r times a month.
(B: two or three, four or five)
A; D id you drive to the office in Peter s car?
: N o, I d idnt. I went there by bus.
(A: N ick s, B ens; B: by underground, by tube)
A: Your son is also at college, isn t he?
B: Y es, he is. H es a secon d year student.
(A: Peter, John, his son; : first, third, fourth)
A: You also go to the office by bus, dont you?
B: N o, I d on t. I always go by tube.
(A: tube; B: bus)

Exercise 9. Insert prepositions or adverbs where necessary. Give a summary of


the text.

Mr Brown is a British business man. He works ... a firm.


Y esterday Mr Brown w o k e ........ seven o clock. He got ... and
did his physical exercises.
that he went ... the bathroom.
He w ashed, brushed his teeth and shaved. Then he went ...
the sitting-room . It was half ... seven.
185

His wife brought him his breakfast. ... breakfast Mr Brown


looked ... the "Financial [fai'naenjl] Times."
... ten minutes ... eight he left ... work. Mr Brown drove ...
his office. It took him an hour to get there.
Mr Brown said "good morning" to his colleagues. He had
a lot of things to do. He dictated letters ... his secretary,
looked ... the letters and telegrams, made phone calls and
received visitors.
... half past four Mr Brown finished (['fm ijt] )
work and drove home. He got home ... half past five. His wife
and children were ... home. He had dinner ... his fam ily. ...
dinner he played chess ... his son.
At ten o clock he listened ... the latest news. Then he had
a shower and went ... bed.
Exercise 10. Insert articles or possessive pronouns wherever necessary.
1. "I have ... lot of things to do today. "Can I help you?"
"Im afraid you cant. Thank you." 2... classes started at 8.30.
3. We usually listen to ... latest news in ... morning. 4. "Is Mr
Green receiving ... visitors now?" "No, he is n t. H es making
... phone calls." 5. "Is Peter having breakfast?" "No, he isn t."
"He is doing ... physical exercises." 6. "Is your sister ...
teacher of English?" "Yes, she is." "Does she teach English at
... school or at ... college?" "She teaches it at ... college." 7.
"Many happy returns of ... day." "Thank you very much." 8.
You bought... present for your daughter, d id n t you? 9.
"When do you usually listen to ... latest news?" "In ..
morning." 10. "Does he drive to ... office in ... car every day?"
"No, he d oesn t." "On Monday and Thursday his wife goes
shopping in ... car." 11. Peter said "goodbye" to ... friends and
left for ... home. 12. "When does ... French class start?" "At ...
quarter to ... nine." 13. If she has ... class in ... afternoon she
goes to college by bus. 14. Please wash ... hands and face and
brush ... teeth. 15. He was very tired and went to ... bed at
half past nine yesterday. 16. My friend is ... student at St.
Petersburg U niversity.
Exercise 11. Ask twelve questions based on the text and answer them.
Exercise 12. Give a summary of the text "George Volkov".
Exercise 13. Make up questions to which the italicized words are the answers.
1. T hey returned to Moscow from Sochi two m onths ago.
(1) 2. He has an English class fou r tim es a week. (1) 3. M y
eldest brother can drive a car. (1) 4. T he Browns went out
yesterday. (1) 5. My father came back from the office a t a
quarter to seven yesterday. (1) 6. John's wife is also a teacher
of French. (1) 7. George Volkov is a lecturer at the Teacher
Training College. (1)
186

Exercise 14, Open the brackets using the verbs in Simple Present or Past, or
Present Continuous.

1. "When the Browns (to return) to London from Paris?"


"I think they (to come back) two months ago." 2. "When you
usually (to start) work?" "I usually (to start) work at nine
o clock in the morning." 3. "He (to drive) to the office in his
car every day?" "No, he d oesn t. Som etim es he (to go) there
by tube. 4. "How long the Volkovs (to stay) in London?"
"They (to stay) there for four years." 5. "What Mr Smith (to
do) now?" "He (to look) through the letters and telegrams." 6,
"Can your younger sister drive a car?" "Yes, she can. She (to
drive) to the office in her car every morning." 7. "The Volkovs
(to have) breakfast now?" "Yes, they are. T hey always (to
have) breakfast at this time."
Exercise 15. Translate these sentences.

1.
? ,
. 2. .
. 3.
. 4. -
? ( ...) 5.
? .
. 6. ,
? , . 7.
? ,
, .
8. , (Pushkin
Square)? , .
Exercise 16. a) Make up stories on these topics, b) Write a story on one of the
topics.

1.
What I did yesterday. 2. What my friend (my son, my
brother) did yesterday.

L E S S O N TWELVE
Conversations: A. At a Reception. B. After a Visit to London.
C. A Cup of Tea.
Learn these speech pattern s
1. Could you introduce me to some of your colleagues
['koli:gz] ? He
?
187

Exercise 1. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

Could you

introduce me to Mr Brown?
help me?
show me that navy blue raincoat?
come to our French class?
translate this letter into English?
play chess with Jim?

Exercise 2. Translate into English.

He

/
?
?
?

?
2. When could I see you? (
) ?
Exercise 3. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

When could

see your stamps?

we
she
they

have an English class?


go for a walk?
come to see us?

Exercise 4. Make up six sentences using patterns 1 and 2.

Learn these w ords and word com bin ation s


reception [ri'sepjn] n ;
Could you go tomorrows
reception?
arrive [a'raivj v ; to
arrive in Moscow (London,
Russia, etc.)
(, . .);
The French Foreign Minister
[ministg] arrived in London
yesterday; to arrive at an
airport (a station, a small
town); When did they arrive at
Vnukovo Airport?
here [hia] adv , ; I live
here. Put it here, please,
only {'ounli] adv ; He
arrived in Moscow only
yesterday. Only she knows.
.
188

professor [pra'fesa] n
country ['kAntri] n ; Russia
is a very large country,
colleague ['::! n ,
,
with pleasure
free [fri: ] ,
( ); Are you
free tonight? Could we go out?
between [bi'twi:n] prep
(
-. );
Could you come between eleven
and twelve in the morning?
suit [sju:t] v
, ,
; to suit smb.
, -.; Does

there? He stayed there for ten


days. ()
,
exam [ig'zaem] .
exam ination [ig,zsemi'neijn]
; an exam (exam ination)
in m athem atics (English, etc.)
no (
. .); to
take an exam ination
; When are you going to
take an examination in
geography?; to fail an
exam ination
; Jane failed the
geography examination
yesterday. How are your exams
going? ?
the best of luck ()
! !
sugar 1'$] ; a lump of
sugar

this time suit you?


( )?
perfectly ['pa:fiktli] adv
, ; It suits me perfectly,
visit [ 'VL ZI t ] ; to be (to go)
on a visit to G reat Britain,
(Moscow etc.) (
)
( . .); A Foreign
Minister is on a visit to G reat
Britain now.
call smb. up ['ko:l '] v
-. ; Could
you call me up tomorrow
morning?
answ er ['a:ns9] n
long [brjl adv , ;
How long were you there?
?
stay [stei] v ,
; How long did he stay

A. AT A RECEPTION
1
Volkov: Mr Shastri, this is Mr Ivanov, a Moscow
teacher. He arrived here only the day before yesterday.
Mr Ivanov, this is Mr Shastri, a professor from India.
Ivanov: How do you do, Mr Shastri.
M r Shastri: How do you do. Its a nice day today,
is n t it?
Ivanov: Y es, its a very nice day. How do you like it
here?
M r Shastri: It is a very interesting country.
Ivanov: By the w ay, could you introduce me to som e of
your colleagues, Mr Shastri?

M r Shastri: With pleasure.

2
Ivanov: When can I see you?
M r Shastri: Im free between ten and eleven tomorrow.
D oes that suit you?
Ivanov: Perfectly.
B. AFTER A VISIT TO LONDON
A:

Where were you last week? I called you up but


there was no answer.
189

: I was in London.
A: How long were you there?
: 1 stayed there for ten days and came back last
night. By the w ay, I met George Volkov there and
we went to the theatre together.
A; What did you see?
B: O thello ['01] at Covent G arden.1
C. A C UP OF TEA
J an e:
M ary:
Jane:
M ary:

Would you like a cup of tea?


Only, if its not too much trouble.2
How do you like it?
A little milk and no sugar.
N otes

1. Covent ['kovsnt] Garden or Covent Garden Royal


[' Opera ['] House "" (
).
2. if its not too much trouble

Exercise 5. Read and translate the dialogues.


Exercise 6. Find in the dialogues English equivalents for these word
combinations and sentences.

1. . 2.
. 3.
? 4. .
5. . 6. ?
Exercise 7. Quote the sentences in which the following words and word
combinations are used in the text.

professor, to suit, before, to call up, how long, sugar


Exercise 8. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce tbe dialogues.

1.

2.

3.

4.

A: Mr Brown, this is Mr P etrov, a Moscow U niversity


professor. Mr P etrov, please meet Mr Brown, a London
U niversity professor.
B: How. do you do.
P: How do you do.
(A: Pankov, Pavlov, Popov)
A: Its a cold day today, isn t it?
B: Y es, it is. By the w ay, how do you like it
here?
A: W ell, its a very interesting country.
(A: nice, very cold, very nice)
A: Could you introduce me to som e o f your colleagues?
B: With pleasure.
(A: Mr Benson, your brother, Mrs Smith)
A: When could I see you?

5.

6.

7.

8.

: Im free between two an d three in the afternoon.


D oes it suit you?
A: Perfectly.
(B: at five o dock, in the morning)
A: Can you come at ten tom orrow m orning ?
B: Y es, it suits me perfectly.
04: at two in the afternoon, at five tomorrow, between ten
and eleven tomorrow)
A: Where were you la st night? I called you up but
there was no answer.
: I went to a birthday p a rty.
(A: yesterday morning, last Sunday; B: shopping, for a
walk in the park)
A; Did you stay there long?
B: For ten d a ys.
( : two w eeks, a m onth, a month and a half)
A* Would you like a cup o f tea l
B: Only, if its not too much trouble.
(A: a cup of coffee, to have lunch now)

Exercise 9. Fill in the blanks with missing remarks. Reproduce the dialogues.

I.

A: Professor Brown, m eet my colleague Professor


T enson.
B:
A: How do you like St. Petersburg?
B:
A: Could you introduce me to Professor Garin?
:
A: When can I see you?
B:
A: Perfectly.
A: Where were you last Sunday? I called you up but
there was no answer.
B:
A: Did you stay there long?
B:
A: Is Great Britain an interesting country?
B:
A: H ello, Tom. Many happy returns of the day.
T:
A: Would you like a cup of coffee?
B:
A: How do you like your coffee?
B:
A: Are you being served?

2.

3.

4.

* *

5.

6.

7.

* *

8.

* *

9.

191

: ***
A: How much is it?
: ***
10. A: How is your mother?
:
A: Give her my best regards.
: **
11. A; When do you have an English class?
: *
A: Well, goodbye then. See you later.
: **
12. A: I d like to say goodbye to you.
: *
A: Im flying home on Thursday.
: *
Exercise 10. Thank of the questions and statements to which the following
sentences are the answers.

. *

A'
9
: Y es, its a cold day today.
A/ 1*
'
7*
B: T hey arrived only yesterday.
A^ it
** *
B: Canada* is a very interesting country.
A*
^
B: With pleasure. Would you like to meet Professor
Stolbov? H es from Moscow.
A
N o thanks. Im trying to give up.
?
A
I was in Rostov. I arrived only this morning.
A
I stayed there for a week.
?
A
T hey start tomorrow.
?
A
Only if its not too much trouble.
?
A
N o milk and no sugar.
A
Thank you for the stamps. T h ey re wonderful.
A

2
3
4

* 4*

L *

* J l*

5.

* * *

6.

'

* * * *

7.

4 4 * *

8.

* * *

9.

* *

10.

* * *

* 4 *

* Canada ['kaensda] n
192

11* :
:
12. A:
B:

... ?
At the cashiers desk over there.
...?
I m afraid so. My mother is n t very well.

Exercise 11. Reproduce the dialogues in pairs.


Exercise 12. Act as interpreter.

1.

2.

3.

4.

: - ,
- .
: How do you do, Mr Petrov.
P: .
A: W hen did you arrive in London?
P: .
?
A: I like it very much. Its a very interesting country.
A: H e
, - ?
5: With pleasure. When could you come to my office?
What about ten o clock tomorrow morning?
: .
. .
S: G oodbye.
: .
:
.
: Thank you.

Exercise 13. Translate into English.

1.

2.

- .
, - .
, - .
- .

?
.
?
?
, . .
.
.
.
3. ?
.
.
193

4.
5.

6.

?
.
- ? .
.
, ,
,
?
, , .
, .
.

Exercise 14, Make up dialogues based on these situations.

1, Introduce your colleague to a foreign colleague. 2, Ask


Mr Stone w hen you could see him. 3. Ask your friend why he
did not answer your phone call last Saturday. 4, Offer a cup
of tea to your guest.

L E S S O N T H IR T E E N
I. NEW GRAMMAR STRUCTURES
1.
The Present Perfect Tense
( )
> you
We, they

have

He
She

has

I, you
We, they

have 'not
'havent

He
She

has 'not

Have

I, you
we, they

Has
194

'looked
through

the

'looked
through

the " I papers yet.

papers.

'hasnt

he
she

'Yes, I ""Ihave.
'No, I ^havent.
'looked
through

the -/p ap e rs
vet?
V

'Yes, he ^ h a s .
No, he ^hasnt.

Present Perfect T ense


to have Simple Present (have, has)
Past Participle ( )
.
Past Participle
Simple Past, . .
( to) - (e)d: to live lived, to
stay stayed, to study studied, to wash washed, to
translate translated.
Past Participle
.
(, . 175).
:
#}*, (Simple P a st),
(Past Participle).

to have
: Ive, w eve,
theyve, h es, sh es, its, havent, h asn t.
H es rea d that book. ( ) .
S h es gone for a walk. .
Present Perfect T ense
,
- ,
.
.
W eve done our homework and can go for a walk now.

.
H as your brother left for Riga?
?
Present Perfect :
) .
H ave you d icta ted the letter? ?

) ever ['ev3 ]
(- ), never ['nevs] (), often ['D:fn] (
), already [3:l'redi>] (), yet (
, ),
195

just [d3 Ast] ( ), lately ['ieitli ] (


, ).
H es just com e back from London.
.
V ve already seen his new picture.
.
H ave you ever had lunch in this cafe? -
?
.
. yet
lately.
I havent seen him lately. .
hasnt listened to the latest news yet.
.
Has he got up yef! ?

)
,
: today, this week, this
month, this year . .
He h asn 't m ade any phone calls today.
.
Present Perfect
, when,

.
When d id the geography class sta rt? It began an hour ago.
When d id you see him? I saw him yesterday.
Present Perfect
.
H as he com e back yet? ?
Exercise 1. Give the Past Participle of the following standard verbs. Transcribe
and read them.

to answ er, to stay, to play, to study, to try, to like, to


work, to walk, to introduce, to help, to hope, to type, to wash,
to pass, to brush, to watch, to live, to arrive, to receive, to
shave, to open, to return, to call, to invite, to dictate, to
translate, to visit

196

Exercise 2. Make up sentences using the table anu translate them.

I
You
We
have
They
He
She

has

I
You
havent
We
They
He
She

Have

Has

I
you
we
they
he
she

h asnt

already
ever

often
just
already
never

helped them,
translated texts into
English,
returned from Rostov,
told him about that.
read this book,
written a letter to them

invited them
listened to the latest
news
answered his letter
met Mr Brown
seen them
done her homework
passed your exam in
English
typed the letters
looked through the
papers
met Mr Smith
arrived

yet.
today,
this week,
this month,
lately.

yet?
today?
this month?

Exercise 3. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

A: I havent read this book yet. Have you?


: N o. I havent read it either.
(A: done my homework, had lunch, shaved; : done
it, had it, shaved)

2.

Ai: W hats Peter doing?


B: H e s reading a book.
: H as he done his homework yet?
B: Y es, he has.
(A 2 : written the letter, listened to the latest new s,
looked through the papers)

3.

A:
B:
A:
(A:

I met P eter yesterday.


H ow s he? I havent seen him lately.*
H e s fine.
N ick, John; : this month, this week)

4.

A:

Peter has just come back from M insk.


197

: Oh, has he? How did he like it? I was there last
year and I liked it very much.
(A: London, Kiev, Samarkand)
Exercise 4. Respond to these requests according to the model.

Please help Peter do his homework, (already)


Ive already helped him.
i. Please close the window, (already) 2. Please show Mike
your coat, (just) 3. Please translate this text into R ussian,
(just) 4. Please take a shower, (already) 5. Please wake up
John, (just) 6. Please look through these telegram s, (already)
Exercise 5. Respond to these questions according to the model.

A nns going to buy a new coat. And Mary? (today)


M arys bought a new coat today.
1. Johns going to play the piano. And Mike? (just) 2.
H es going to read this book. And Bill? (this week) 3. Jane
went for a walk an hour ago. And Peter? (just) 4. H es going
to take a shower. And John? (already) 5. They were very
busy last week. And Mr Green? (this week) 6. T hey came
home two hours ago. And Peter? (just)
Exercise 6. Respond to these statements according to the model.

Mr Smith has already stayed there for a week. (Mr


Brown)
Has Mr Brown stayed there for a week, too?
1. Peter has just gone for a walk. (Tom) 2. John has
returned from Moscow this week. (Bill) 3. Jane has typed a
lot of letters today. (Mary) 4. My brother has bought the new
French textbook today, (your friend) 5.
already spoken
to him. (he) 6. My mother has just gone to bed. (your
mother) 7* S h es seen them today, (you) 8. My friend has
read this book this month, (your friend)
Exercise 7. Open the brackets and use the proper tenses (Simple Present,
Simple Past, Present Continuous and Present Perfect Tense).

1.
I (to be) a student. I (to have) an English class now.
We (to do) just exercise five and now we (to answer) the
teachers questions. 2. "You (to buy) already fruit and
vegetables?" "Yes, 1 have." "When you (to go) shopping?" "I
(to go) shopping after lunch yesterday." 3. "He (to come) just
to the office. Its five m inutes to nine." "And when he (to
198

com e) to the office yesterday?" "He (to come) at ten to nine


yesterday." 4. Peter (to leave) for school fifteen m inutes ago
but Ann (not to leave) for college yet. 5. Peter (not to go) to
see his mother yesterday. His elder brother Nick (to go) just
to see her. She (to be) ill lately. 6. "When you (to go) to the
theatre?" "I (to go) to the theatre last Saturday." 7. "She ever
(to drive) a car?" "Yes, she has. She can drive a car very
well." 8. "He (to ask) me to write a letter to Peter last week."
"You (to write) a letter yet?" "Yes, I have."
Exercise 8. Translate into English.

1.
, , . . 2.
? .
. 3.
? 4.
? . 5. -
? ? .
. 6. ?
. . 7. ?
"". . ?
. 8. . , 9.
? .
.
2, The Gerund* ()
.
.
( to) -ing.

(, to like, to enjoy, to be fond
of, to give up .).
, . .
I like reading books. , (
,)
She likes watching TV.
.
enjoyed seeing old friends. . (
.V.)
I am fond of translating from English into R ussian.
.
* gerund ['(teerend]
199

II. W ORD-BUILDING
1. A ffixation* ( )
, ,

.

,
.
-, -
,
.
to work worker
to sleep sleeper
- . ,
.
to read to reread
to do to redo
Exercise 1. Translate these words. Say what verbs they are formed from.

a) listener, reader, translator, driver, player, visitor;


b) to rewrite; to rename, to replay.
Exercise 2. a) Form nouns from these verbs using the suffix -er. Translate
them.

to drive, to pay, to buy, to receive, to translate, to walk


b) Add the prefix re- and translate the verbs .

to open, to write, to name, to do


2. Conversion** ( )

.
,
,
( ).
,
.
* affixation bacfik'seijn]
** conversion [: 1]
200

to look a look
to sleep sleep
a hand to hand
Exercise 3. Form nouns from these verbs by means of conversion. Translate
them.

to work, to visit, to answer, to walk, to shave, to wash, to


stay, to study, to help, to hope, to return, to drive
.
(. . )
.

III. TEXT
Learn these speech patterns
1. I f s very nice o f you to ask us. ()
, .
Exercise 1. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

It

is
was

nice of

you
to invite us.
him
to say so.
Peter
to come and see us.
them
to help us.
2. It was tim e to leave for the cinema.
.
Exercise 2. Make up sentences using the tabie and translate them.

to leave for college,


to leave for work.
It is
time
to go to bed.
was
to start work,
to get up.
T hey enjoyed the film .

3. a)
.
b)
enjoyed rereading that book.
.
Exercise 3. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

I
Peter
Mrs Brown
They

enjoyed

the book.
the party.
the film.
seeing him.
reading the book.
201

4.
We'd "love to come, [wid ~ \ to ] (We would
(wod ] ^ l o v e to come.) ()
.
Exercise 4. up sentences using th'e table and translate them.

Id
H ed
Wed

love

to
to
to
to

meet him.
have lunch with you.
see the new film,
stay in St. Petersburg.

Exercise 5. Complete these sentences using patterns 1, 2, 3, 4.

1) I. ... to go and see them. 2. ... to do that. 3.... to give


me the book. 4. ... to show us your new pictures. 5. ... to invite
them.
2) 6. Its time to... . 7. It was time to... . 8. 1 think its time
to... . 9. He says its time to... .
3) 10. He enjoyed. ... 11. Did they enjoy... ? 12. The
children enjoyed... , d idnt they?
4) 13. Id love to... . 14. Wed love to... . 15. H ed love
to
Exercise 6. Translate into English.

1. , ? . 2.
,
. 3. ? .
. 4.
. 5.
. 6.
.
Exercise 7. Make up eight sentences using patterns 1, 2, 3 and 4.

Learn these words an d word com binations


lecture [lektfa] v ;
to lecture on smth.
rio...; What does Mr Wilson
lecture on?
lecture n ; Did you listen to
Mr Wilsons lecture yesterday.
Russian n 1. , ; Is
he a Russian?
literature ['litra^oj ;
English (R ussian, French, etc.)
literature
be fond of [ b l 'fond 9V] ,
-.; Mr Wilson is

202

fond of Russian literature isn't


he? to be fond of doing smth.
-.; He is
fond of driving a car.
art [a:t] n ; My eldest
brother is fond of art.
be about to do smth.
() -.;
was about to leave for work.

.
when [wen] cnj (
-

); John was about to start


work when Mr Brown came into
the room,
telephone ['telifoun] n ;
sytt phone
ring (rang, rung) [),)] v
( ,
..); She was in the kitchen
when the telephone rang,
answer a ca^l
; Who*answered your call
yesterday?
about adv , ;
It was about five oclock then. I
think Peters father is about fifty,
invitation [,invi'teijn] n
; at the invitation of
-.; Mr Brooks
came to Russia at the invitation
of Moscow University,
spoken ['spoiikn] ;
spoken English (Russian,
G erm an, French etc.)
(
, ,
. .); ant. written; I think
spoken English is very difficult,
speak (spoke, spoken) v ;
-. ;
Can he speak English? to speak
to smb. about sm th.
() -. .; What did John speak to Peter
about?
cinema ['sinimal n ;
Lets go to the cinema tonight.

film [film] n
ask [a:sk] v ; to ask
smb. to dinnelr; It is nice of you
to ask us to dinner,
talk [t3:k] v ,
; to talk to (with) smb.
about sm th. (
) -. -.;
What are they talking about?
plan n , ; plan(s) for
() ; What are your
plans for the weekend?
sum m er ['sAmsj n ; What are
your plans for the summer?
? in
sum m er ; I usually get up
at six o clock in summer,
dub [dAb] v ; Is the
film dubbed?
subtitles ['SAbtaitlz] n pi.
acting ['aektig] n ,
excellent ['eksabnt]
beautiful ['bjuitsfl] ,

marvellous ['m a:vbs]


? , ;
His acting is marvellous?
reread [ri:'ri:d] v
novel ['navi) n ; Would you
like to read this novel?
favourite ['feivrit] ,

writer ['raits] n ; My
favourite English writer is . P
Snow.
- . .

Exercise 8. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to active words
and word combinations.

1,
"Did Mr Scanlon lecture on French literature
yesterday?" "Yes, he did." 2. I know she is fond of Russian
literature. 3. T he telephone is ringing. Please answer the call.
4. Did she teach spoken French at Oxford? 5, "Have you seen
the new film?" "Yes, I have. I liked it very much. Its
marvellous. And have you seen it?" "Oh, yes, I enjoyed seeing
it too." 6. "Can Peter speak English?" "He certainly can." 7.
"What are they talking about?" "I dont know." 8. "Have you
read A itm atovs new novel?" "Yes, I have. Its excellent, I
think. By the way, Aitmatov is my favourite writer." 9. "Is
spoken English difficult?" "I d on t think so." 10. "Did Mike
203

talk to Peter about our plans yesterday?" "I think so." 11. "Is
the film dubbed?" "I d on t think so."
GOING O U T 1
Mr and Mrs Wilson were at home last Saturday afternoon.
Mr Wilson is a lecturer at Edinburgh U niversity. He lectures
on R ussian literature. Mr Wilson and his wife are fond of
R ussian literature and art.
T h ey were about to have dinner when the telephone rang.
Mrs Wilson answered the call. It was Mr Petrov, a teacher of
R ussian from Moscow. Mr Petrov came to Scotland about a
year ago at the invitation of Edinburgh U niversity. He
teaches spoken R ussian to English students. Mr Pet_^rov J
in'vited the -^W ilsons $ to 'come and have "'Idinner with
him J 'next "' Friday.
He 'said, "'Would you 'like to 'go to the -^cinem a after
dinner? T hey are 'show ing2 a "^Russian -J film "'Crime and
Punishm ent"3 at the Odeon."
"Its 'very ^nice of -^ you to ~^ask us," said Mrs Wilson.
"WedM ove to come. 'Johns 'been t so ~^busy lately, S we
'havent gone 'out ^much. 'Thank you T very "^much."
(N ext Friday)
At /N /d inn er J the 'W ilsons and Mr P e t^ r o v J 'talked
about their 'plans for the "'Isummer. 'Then it was 'tim e to
'leave for the
cinema.
T he 'film was ^ n o t dubbed J but there were 'English
"^subtitles. T he 'acting was ^ excellent J and the /^ c o lo u r s
were
beautiful. Mr Pet'rov and the 'W ilsons en"^joyed the
film.
"'W asnt Sm oktu'novsky 'Imarvellous?" J Mrs ,W ilson
,said w hen they x a m e .out of the cinema.
"He "''Icertainly was, J
w asnt he?" Mr Wilson said.
"His 'acting is
wonderful. You _^know4 Ive just r e t r e a d
the
novel," he .w ent ,on to ~^say5, " D o sto /\/y ev sk i J is
my 'favourite 'R ussian "^writer."
N am es
D ostoyevski [dosts'jevski 1
Edinburgh ['ed n b srs] .
Scotland ['sk o tb n d ]
W ilson ['w ilsn ]
204

N otes
1. Going out. .
2. They are showing ... at the Odeon ['o u d isn j
...
3. "Crime and Punishment" I'pAniJmant]

4. You know... ... ...
5. he went on to say ; to go on to do
sm th. -.
Exercise 9. Read and translate the text.
Exercise 10. Find in the text English equivalents for these word combinations
and sentences.

1.
. 2. . 3.
. 4. .
5. . 6. ,
( ).
7. . 8. . 9.
.
Exercise 11. Quote the sentences in which these words and word combinations
are used in the text.

to lecture, to be about to, to ring, spoken, to show, to ask,


lately, plans, to enjoy, certainly, favourite
Exercise 12. Answer these questions.

1. When did the telephone ring? 2. Who answered the


call? 3. It was Mr Petrov, w asnt it? 4. Who does Mr Petrov
teach spoken R ussian to? 5. What did Mr Petrov say to Mrs
Wilson? 6. At dinner they talked about their plans for the
summ er, d id n t they? 7. Did they enjoy the film? 8. The film
was dubbed, w asnt it? 9. How did they like Sm oktunovskys
acting? 10. Were th ex o lo u rs good? 11. Who is Mr W ilsons
favourite R ussian writer?
Exercise 13. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

A: M r Petrov has lectured on Russian literature to our


students this month.
: How did you like his lectures?
A: T hey were excellent.
(A: Mr Wilson, on English literature; Mr Bell on
French literature)
205

2. A: Did you like the film ?


: I enjoyed it.
{A: the novel, the book, the ballet)
3. A: Could you com e to see us next S atu rday?
B: Wed love to. W eve been very busy lately and
havent gone out much. Thank you very much.
(A: Friday, Sunday)
4. A: I know you like reading books.
B: Oh yes, Im fond of reading.
{A: driving a car, watching TV, playing chess;
B: driving, watching TV, playing chess)
5. A: When did hr rail you up?
: I was abo.r vj leave for work when he called me up.
(A: get up, con>e back; B: got up, came back)
Exercise 14. Imen articles where necessary.
1. Its ... French film, isn t it? 2. Mr Wilson is ... lecturer
at ... Edinburgh U niversity. 3. Mr Black answered ... call. 4.
T he G reens came to Moscow about ... year ago at ...invitation
of Moscow U niversity. 5. We have invited ... Petrovs to have
dinner with us. 6. Would you like to go to ... cinema? T h ey re
showing ... new film at ... Metropole. My brother has already
seen it. He enjoyed it very much. 7. ... film is excellent. ...
colours are beautiful and ... acting is wonderful. 8. ... Browns
were about to leavfc for ... London Airport when ... telephone
rang.
Exercise 15. Insert prepositions and adverbs.
1. "Do the Sedovs often go ...?" "No, they d ont. Mr Sedov
has been very busy lately." 2. "When did you go ... the
cinema?" "I went ... the cinema the day ... yesterday." 3.
"Have you got any plans ... the summer? "No, I havent. And
what ... you?" "I havent either." 4. "Have you talked ... Mr
Petrov ... his work?" "No, not yet." 5. "What is Mrs Brown?"
"Shes a teacher ... French ... school." 6. Mr Green lectures ...
English literature ... Moscow University. He cam e... Moscow
... two years ago. 7. "Im fond ... Leo T olstoys novels. He is
my favourite R ussian writer," said Mr Green. 8. When the
telephone rang she went ... the sitting-room to answer the
call.
Exercise 16. Ask questions based on the text and answer them.
Exercise 17. Give a summary of the text "Going Out"

206

Exercise 18. Open the brackets and use the verbs in Present Perfect or Simple
Past.

1. Last Sunday my friend (to invite) me to have lunch and


then to go to the cinema together. "It (to be) nice of you to
ask me. I (to be) very busy lately and (not to go) out much,"
1 said to him. 2. He (to be) in the bathroom when the
telephone (to ring). 3. "Can he speak English well?" Yes, he
can. He (to stay) in England for three years and (to study)
English literature at Oxford University". 4. "He (to teach)
ever at school?" "Yes. It (to be) fifteen years ago." 5. "You (to
buy) an excellent present for Peter." "Im glad you like it." 6.
"Who (to answer) the call when Mr Brown (to ring) you up?"
"My sister did."
Exercise 19. Ask guestions to which the italicized words are the answers.

1. She enjoys teaching at school. (2) 2. T ik h o n o vs acting


was marvellous. ( 1 ) 3 . Peter is fond of buying presen ts for his
friends! (2) 4. The Orlovs havent gone out much lately. (1).
Exercise 20. Translate into English.

1. . . 2. .
, ,
, . . 3.
. , , .
. 4.
(H eller)? , .
? . 5.
? .
. 6. , ?
, . 7.
? . 8.
, . 9.
(; )?
, ,
. 10.

. . .
?
, . 12. ,
.
Exercise 21. Answer these questions and sum up the answers.

a)
1. Do you often go out? 2. Have you often gone out
lately? 3, Do you ever invite friends to dinner? 4. When did
207

you invite friends to dinner? 5. Are you going to invite any


friends to your birthday party?
b) 1. Do you often go to the cinema? 2. What films have
you seen this month? 3. Which of them did you like? 4. Who
is your favourite actor?
Exercise 22. Make up situations using the words given below,

a) Invitation to Dinner: to ring up, to answer a call, to


invite, its very nice of you to..., Id love to.....
b) Two Friends Talk about Their Plans for...: to meet, to
talk about, plans for, together, 1 want you to go.
c) A Talk about Film: favourite, wonderful, subtitles, you
know, to go on to say.
Exercise 23. a) Make up stories on these topics, b) Write a story on one of the
topics.

1.
Going out. 2. A visit to the cinema. 3. What I have done
this week.

L E SSO N FO U R TEEN
Conversations: A. Talk on Theatre and
Invitations. C. Tea Party.
Learn these speech patterns

Cinema.

B.

1.
Id (/ would) advise TV to repeat the play.
() .
Exercise 1. Make up sentences using the table snd translate them.

Id advise

you to invite the Browns to dinner,


him to call her up in the evening,
her to reread the novel,
them to go there by bus.

2.
It's ( it w as) very kin d o f you to invite us.
.
Exercise 2. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

Its very kind of


It was

208

you to help her.


him to buy a present for Mary,
you to come to my birthday'party.
you to introduce me to Professor
Sokolov.

3.
H ow about a piece of cake? He
?
Exercise 3. Nake up sentences using the table and translate them.

How about

a piece of apple-pie?
some ice-cream?
a cup of coffee?
some salad?

Exercise 4, Make up nine sentences using patterns 1, 2, 3.

Learn these words and word com binations


TV; to see sm th. on TV
() -. ;
I saw a very interesting film on
TV last night,
play Iplei] n
enjoy every m inute of it
; "How
did you like the play?" "We
enjoyed every minute of it."
part [pa:t] n ; to play the part
of (-.); Who
played the part of Othello? the
leading ['li:dig] part
; Who plays the leading part
in the film?
brilliantly ['briljontli] adv
, ; He plays the
part of Hamlet brilliantly,
be based [beist] on
; The film is based on
Dostoyevskis novel "The
Brothers Karamazov",
docum entary [,d3kju'mentri]
; docum entary
film ;
docum entary material
[mD'tiorial]
; His last book is based
on documentary material,
believe [bi'li:v] v ; Do you
believe him?
true [tru:] , ,'
; Is the news true? It is
true to life.
(),
repeat [ri'pi:t] v ; Repeat
after me, please.
, . They are
going to repeat that programme
tomorrow.

musical l'mju:zikl] n ,

local I'louklJ ; the local
cinema (
)
; W hat's on at the local
cinema (at our local)?
book v ; to book seats
(); to
book tickets [ tikits] for the
theatre (concert, cinema, etc.)
(
, )
screen version ['va:Jnj
; This film is a jscreen version
of Turgenevs novel,
famous ['feimasj ,

playwright ['pleirait] n
near [] prep ,
; He lives near University
Underground Station,
actress ['aektnsl ri
show n 1. ( ); When
does the show start at our local?
2. , (
, , .
.); Have you seen any good
shows lately?
-
( , .
.)?
everyone ['evriWAn] pron ,
(. .
.); Everyone is here. ,
flop [] , ,
; complete [kam'pli:t] flop
; The play was
complete flop.
.
209

pick up v ( -/),
( -.); Could you
pick me up at two oclock?'
be able to , ;
Are you able to come?
fire ['fais] n
cosy ['kouzi] ; This is a
very cosy room,
piece [pi:s] n , ; a
piece of meat (bread, apple-pie,
cake, etc.) but a lump of sugar

concert ['ksnsat] n
meet (met) v ; to meet
smb. -.,
-.; She met one of
her old friends in Moscow,
drive [draiv] n , ;
to go for a drive
( ); We are
going for a drive after lunch,
in the country ;
; They live in the
country. Lets go for a drive in
the country.

A. TALK ON THEATRE AND CINEMA


1
A:
B:
A:
B:
A:

B:
A:

Would you like to come to the cinem a


tonight?
Id love to. W hats on?1
T h ey re show ing2 the musical "MyFair Lady"3 at our
local. Ive booked two seats.
Isn t the film a screen version of "Pygmalion", a play
by Bernard Shaw, the famous English playwright?
Y es, it is. By the way, Audrey Hepburn plays the
leading part. S h es my favourite actress. Lets meet near
the cinema at 6.15. The show starts at 6.30.
Fine. See you later.
See you soon.

2
M ary: John, w ere going to the show tonight. Ive booked
two seats.
John: Peter Smith went there last night and he d id n t like
it.
M ary: I d on t care about Peters opinion.4
John: Well, everyone says the show s a com plete flop.
There were only a few people there last night.
M ary: What a pity!5
B. INVITATIONS
1
George: Would you like to come to a concert with me
tomorrow afternoon?
Alice: Id love to. Thank you very much.
210

George: Fine. Lets meet here about one o clock.


Alice: Good. See you tomorrow.
George: Goodbye.

2
M ichael: Why dont we go for a drive in the country today?
Ann: That would be very nice. Thank you.
M ichael: I can pick you up at 11 o clock.
Ann: Good. See you soon.
M ichael: Bye.
C. TEA PARTY
(The Browns invited the Ivanovs to tea.)
M rs Brown: Im so glad you were able to come.
Ivanova: Its very kind of you to invite us.
Ivanov: Yes. This is the first time w ere in an English
home.
M rs Brown: P lease, make yourselves com fortable.6 Sit here
in this armchair, Mrs Ivanov. Its near the fire.
Ivanova: I must say this is a very cosy room.
M rs Brown: Y es, I like it too. Now, Mrs Ivanov, do you
take milk and sugar in your tea?7
Ivanova: Y es, please. Two lumps.
M rs Brown: How about a piece of cake?
Ivanova: Y es, please.
M rs Brown: And how do you like your tea, Mr Ivanov?
Ivanov: N ot too much milk and two lumps, please.
N otes
1. W hats on? ? ( , )
2. T h ey re show ing... ...
3. the musical "My Fair Lady"
.
4. I d ont [] about P eters opinion [s'pinjan].
.
5. What a pity f'piti ]! ! !
6. P lease, make yourselves
[jo:'selvz] comfortable
['kAmfstsbl ]. , (
).
7. Do you take milk and sugar in your tea?
?
Exercise 5. Read and translate the dialogues.
211

Exercise 6. Find in the dialogues English equivalents for these word


combinations and sentences.

1. . 2.
. 3. . 4. . 5.
. 6.
?
Exercise 7. Quote the sentences in which the following words and word
combinations are used in the dialogues.

to be based on, acting, advise, to book a seat, screen


version, playwright, actress, everyone, concert, in the
country, cosy, piece, lump.
Exercise 8. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1. A: How did you like the film ?


: I enjoyed every m inute o f i t
(A: the play, the show; : I d id n t like it. It was a
complete flop.)
2. A: Who played the part o f P eter I* in the film " Young
R u ssia "?
: Zolotukhin did.
(A: Donat as, "None Wanted to Die";** B: Adomaitis>
3. A; Would you like to come to the cinem a tonight?
r
B: Id love to. W hats on?
(A: the theatre)
4. A: When does the show start?
B: At seven oclock.
(B: eight, six-th irty, six)
5. A: Why don t we go fo r a drive in the country today?
B: That would be very nice,
(A: go for a walk after lunch, go to a concert tonight)
6. A: I can pick you up at 10 oclock,
B: Good. See you soon.
(A: 12, 3, 4)
7. A: How about a piece o f cake?
B: Y es, please.
(A: apple-pie, meat)
8. A: How do you like your tea?
B: A little m ilk an d no sugar.
(B: N ot too much milk and two lumps, please. N o milk
and no sugar, please)
* Peter I ['pi:ta 'f9:st]
** , .
212

Exercise 9. Fill in the blanks with missing remarks. Reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.

7.
8.

9.

10.

11.
12.

13.
14.

A: Did you see the film "Young Russia" on TV?


B: ...
A: How did you like the film?
B: ...
A: How did you like his acting?
B: ...
A: T he play is based on documentary material, isn t it?
: ...
A: Would you like to com e to the cinem a tonight?
B'
A: W hats on at our local?
B: ...
A: W hose novel is the film "Blockade" a screen version
of?
B: ...
A: W hos you favourite actor?
B: ...
A: Would you like to come to the show tonight? Ive
booked two seats.
B: ...
A: How did you like the show? Some people say its a
com plete flop.
B: ...
A: Why don t we go for a drive in the country today?
B: ...
A: When could I pick you up?
B: ...
A: Im so glad vou were able to come.
B: ...
A: Id advise you to sit in this armchair. Its near the
fire.
B: ...
A: Do you take milk and sugar in your coffee?
B: ...
A: How do you like your coffee?
B: ...

Exercise 10. Think of the questions and statements to which the following
sentences are the answers.

1.
2.

I enjoyed every minute of it. Its an excellent film.


?

213

I think its one of the best plays about writers V. L


Lenin.
9

played his part brilliantly.

Y es, I ve booked two seats.

Well, everyone says the play is a complete flop.


?
I d love to. Thank you very much.
** ?
That would be very nice. Thank you.
*?
Its very kind of you to invite us.

A little milk and a lump of sugar.
?
N o milk, please. I like black coffee.
*
N o, thank you. I m trying to give up.
?
O nly if its not too much trouble.

Y es, it suits me perfectly.

I stayed there for a week.
* *

3.
4.

5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

11.
12.
13.

Exercise 11. Act as interpreter.

1.

2.
214

P eter (a R u ssian stu d en t):


?
Jam es (a B ritish stu d e n t): Yes. Its the first time Ive
seen a R ussian film.
P eter: ?
J am es: I enjoyed every minute of it. I learned so much
about R ussia.
Peter: ,
I?
Jam es: plays his part brilliantly. I must say I liked
all the actors. Their acting is marvellous.
N ick: He
?

Jam es: Id love to. W hats on?


N ick: " ".
("The Sleeping Beauty" 1'bjutti ]) .
Jam es: Ive never seen this ballet. Id be very glad to
see it. Thank you very much.
3. A: Would you like to see a new American film tonight?
: . ?
A: At eight o clock at the Odeon (['oudi^n ]).

Exercise 12. Translate into English.

1. .
.
.
.
.
?
7.20.
.
2. , ?
. . ,
.
.
3.
?
.
4. .
* .
. ?
, .
, - ?
.
, - ?
.

Exercise 13. Make up dialogues based on these situations.


215

1. Invite a British colleague to the Bolshoi ballet


performance.*
2. Invite a foreign colleague to see a film.
3. Exchange impressions** about a film (play) with a
foreign colleague.

L E S SO N F IF T E E N
1. NEW GRAMMAR STRUCTURES
1. The Sim ple Future T ense ( )

I
We
He
She
(it)
You
They
'Shall

'Will

shall
shall not
shan't
(Ja:nt]
'go

there

will
will not
wont
[wount]

next
S month.

I
we
he
she
(it)
you
they

'Yes, we ~~\shall.
'No, we "^shant
'go

there

'next
month?

'Yes, they ""Vwill.


'NTo, they ""Won't.

1.
(Simple
Future T ense) shall
( 1- )
will ( )
to.
.
will .
I will do it tomorrow. .
We won't go there tonight. .
* performance [pa'formgns]
** exchange impressions [iks'tjeincfe im'prejnz]
216



: Ill, w ell, hell, youll, shant
[{a:nt], w ont [w ount].
Sim ple Future ,
() :
Children will com e to school again [' ].
.
Students will com e to colleges. .

Simple Future.
T he m inister ['m in ists] will open new University
tomorrow.
.

Present Continuous.
Mr Brown said, "The m inister is opening the new
University tomorrow".
Simple Future T en se
: tomorrow , the day
after tom orrow , next M onday (T uesday, etc.)
( . .), next week
, next month , next
year , tom orrow morning (afternoon,
night) ( , ).
shall 1-
3-
, .
D o,
piease; Y es, p lease.
"Shall I read the text?"

Do, please".
Shall he bring the
m agazines here?
Y es, please."
Will
.

?
(
?)
, .

?
, .

217

W ill you close the door, please? , ,


.
W ill you p a ss me the book, please? ,
, .
Exercise 1. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

Ill
Y oull
H ell
S h ell
W ell

leave for London


see a new film
stay at home
hear his lecture
go to see them

I
We

You
He
She

Shall

sh a n t

1
wont

I
we

Will

you
he
she
they

study French
meet them
teach geography to
them
have any classes
tell them about it
go there by bus

introduce him to
Mr Brown?
invite them to my
birthday party?
type these letters
work in the office
return from Paris
stay there long?

next week,
next month,
next Friday,
next Monday,
the day after
tomorrow.

next week.
next year.
in summer.
tomorrow.

next Monday?
tomorrow?
next year?
next month?

Exercise 2. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1. A:
B:
(A:
2. A:
:
(A:
218

Has P eter already left for London?


N o, he h asn t. H ell leave next month.
Jim, Nick, Mr Brown, Mr Volkov)
I think Sm oktunovsky will play this part.
1 think
so, too.
U lyanov, Lavrov)

3.

4.

5.

A:
B:
(B:
A:
B:
(A:

Im sorry to say I sh an t go to see them next week.


Then Ill ask Peter to go with me.
John, Mary)
Shall I read text 51
Y es, please. (Do, please.)
do exercise 4, do my homework now, answer
his
questions)
A: Will you pass me the book, please?
B: Here you are.
(A: bread, butter, salt, apples, cup of tea)

Excrcise 3. Transform these sentences into tag questions and translate them.
Give short answers to them. Pay attention to intonation.

HeTl reread the novel next week.


"Hell reread the novel next week, w ont he?" "Yes, he
will."
I. T h ey ll come to see us next week. 2. Y oull have some
free time tomorrow. 3. H e w ont help them. 4. She
w ont look through the papers before lunch. 5. Ill go
to his lecture next W ednesday. 6. He w on t go for a
walk in the park next Saturday. 7. H ell help them do
their homework next Tuesday.
Exercise 4. Respond to these sentences according to the models.

a) He often leaves home for work at 7.30. (tomorrow)


And will he leave home for work at 7.30 tomorrow?
1. Ann usually gets up at half past six. (on Sunday) 2. He
seldom plays tennis on W ednesday, (next W ednesday) 3. Bob
som etim es plays hockey after classes, (tomorrow) 4. T hey
often go out on Saturdays, (next Saturday) 5. Mr Green often
listens to the latest news in the evening, (tomorrow evening)
6. He is often at home on Saturday, (next Saturday)
b) T he Browns d id n t go out last Saturday.
(next Saturday)
And they w ont go out next Saturday.
1.
T hey d id n t play chess yesterday, (tomorrow) 2. I
d id n t go shopping last Friday, (next Friday) 3. She d idnt go
to see her mother last W ednesday, (next W ednesday) 4. He
stayed in the library yesterday, (tomorrow) 5. He d idnt have
any free time yesterday, (tomorrow) 6. He did not go for a
walk last Sunday, (next Sunday)
Exercise 5. Ask questions to which the italicized words are the answers.
219

1. T hey will go to the new show next week. (1) 2. M y elder


brother will lecture French art next year. (2) 3. The Browns
will com e back next m onth. (2) 4. H e will have som e free time
tom orrow . (2)
Exercise 6. Translate into English.

1. ,
. 2. ,
. . 3.
? 4.
? ,
. 5.
? . 6. , . 7.
, , . 8. ? ,
. 9. ? ,
, 10. .
.
Exercise 7. Make up ten sentences using Simple Future.

2. Equivalents o f M odal Verbs "can" and "must"


in the Sim ple Future and the Sim ple Past T ense
( can m ust
Sim ple Future Sim ple Past)
Present

Past

Future

I must do
it now.

I had to do it yesterday.
Did I have to do it yesterlfay?

V 11 have to do it next
week.

I can do it
now.

I was able to do it yesterday.


I couldn't do it yesterday.
I was not able to do it yesterday.
Could you do it yesterday?

V ll be able to do it
tomorrow.

..

............ - ......

1.

m ust
have to. have to
,
.
have to
do.
220

. have to
Simple Present.
; ,
( have to ).
has to get up at six every morning as it takes him two hours to get to
college. ,
, .
You don't have to do it. . (
)

2.
could [kud, kad ] .
be able to ,
- . be able to
Sim ple Present Simple Past.
W e7/ be able to hear Mr Browns lecture on British art next
T uesday. -
.
. could
;
, ,
- .
could play tennis well when he was a student.
( ), .
could speak French very well when he was at school.
-, .
: was able to play tennis yesterday. .
I was able to get his new book last week. '
.
Exercise 8. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to modal verbs.

1.
"Could you translate the text last Friday?" "No, I
couldnt. I was able to do it only yesterday." 2. He could
speak English very well when he was at school. 3. She could
drive a car very well when she was young. 4. I couldnt book
any seats for the film. There w erent any. 5. "Will you be able
to call me up tonight?" "Yes, I shall." 6. Y oull have to take
them to the airport. 7. T h ey ll have to have a meeting next
week. 8. H e w on t have to drive the car. Peter will do it. 9.
You w ont have to stay there.
221

Exercise 9. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

A:
B:
A:
(A:

I sh an t be able to go fo r a walk tomorrow.


Why?
Ill nave to d o m y homework.
to come to see you, to go out; to drive Peter to the
department store, to answer a few letters)

2.

A: Did you have to receive visitors after lunch?


B; Y es, I did and I couldnt ring you up.
(A: to look through the papers, to speak about the plans
for the summer; B: dictate any letters, translate the
text)

Exercise 10. Transform these sentences into the Simple Future or Simple Past
Tense. Use the adverbial modifiers of time given in brackets.

1. T hey can visit Moscow, (next month) 2. She must study


French, (next year) 3. He cant lecture on French art. (last
year) 4. You must stay in the college library, (the day before
yesterday) 5. Can she bring me a few books? (next Friday)
Exercise 11. Ask questions to which the italicized words are the answers.

1. S ed o v had to stay in Rome fo r a week. (3) 2. John could


play tennis well when he was a student. (2) 3. Youll be able
to book seats fo r the theatre the day after tom orrow . (2) 4.
Y oull have to teach your daughter English. (2)
Exercise 12. Translate into English.

1. ? ,
( ) . 2.
? .

. 3. ,
- .
. (
.) 4. ?
. ,
.
Exercise 13. Make up six sentences using equivalents of the modal verbs can
and must in the Simple Future and Simple Past Tense.
222

3. W ays of Expressing Future A ctions*


( )

Simple Future

They will leave for


London next month.

to be going to

I am going to leave for


London.

Present Continuous

They are leaving for


London tomorrow.

Exercise 14. Read and translate these sentences. Compare the future actions.

1.
A famous British writer is speaking on TV tonight. 2.
Some French actors are arriving in Moscow tomorrow. 3. He
is m eeting Mr Brown tomorrow afternoon. 4. "When are you
having your next lesson?" "Im having it on M onday. 5. "Are
you going to buy any butter?" "No, we have a lot of butter at
home." 6. Are you going to reread that book? When will you
be able to give it to Peter? 7. I hope the Browns will arrive
before dinner. 8. "Toms sister has just come back from
Samarkand." "Good, w ell invite her to our next party." 9.
Will you have time to help me tomorrow? 10. Will you see
them next week?
Exercise 15. Make up twelve sentences expressing future actions.

4. Attributive Clauses**
( )

.
1)

(defining relative*** clau ses),

, .
*

** attributive clauses JVtribiutiv 'kia:ziz]
*** defining relative [di'fainitj 'rebtiv]
223


.
2)
(non
defining relative clau ses),
, ,
.
.
,

who , whom , , w hose
which ; who whom
, which . ,
where,
when that,
,
.
,
whom who.

T he man w h o( ) we m et
yesterd a y is ch ief
engineer of th is factory.
T he boy whose m other you
saw a t the m eetin g is not
ew ell.
T he son who works in the
office is tw enty.
I want to speak to the girl
that typed m y letter.
What is the nam e of the
street where you liv e?

John, who cam e back


yesterd a y, is leaving for
Paris today.
G eorge, whose m other you
m e t, is not well.
His eldest son, who is at
college, is twenty-two.


who, whom that ,

.
. :
T he man you yesterday is my father. Mr Smith,
w h o(m ) you m et y e s t e r d a y is a teacher.

, ,
224

.
,
. :
This is the man (th a t) I spoke to you a b o u t This Is
Mr Roberts, about whom I spoke to you.
Exercise 18. R ead and tran slate these sentences. Pay atten tio n to attribu~
tiv e clauses,

1, The man (that) you want has just left. 2. The engineer
who was here yesterday has gone to London. 3. The m agazine
(that) you gave me is very interesting. 4. The doctor (who)
she visited is very famous. 5. The book (that) my friend
gave me is interesting. 6. The man (that) you spoke to in the
street is my French teacher. 7. I d like to see the. books (that)
you bought yesterday. 8. W h ats the m usic (that) you re lis
tening to? 9. The man (who) you are talk ing about left last
week. 10. The steak (that) we had for lunch was very good.
II. My sister, whom you m et yesterday, wants to speak to
you. 12. Her father, who stayed in London for a m onth, has
just come back. 13. Thursday is the day when we have an
English class. 14. Thank you very much for the present (that)
you bought for Peter.
Exercise 17. Combine these two sentences into one sentence.

I met a man yesterday. This is the man.


This is the man (that) I met yesterday.
1.
These are the books. I spoke about them. 2. Here are
the exercises. You must do them . 3. Where are the papers?
You wanted to show them to me, 4. I d idnt like the house.
He lives in it. 5. W h ats the name of the girl? Y ouve just
spoken to her. 6. W hats the name of the book? John is read
ing it.
5. Adjectives another and other (
another other)
another I,

.
W ill you have another cup of tea? .
I dont like this book. G ive me another book, please.
. ,
.
225

Other , ()
.
How many other brothers have you?
?
There are some other people in the sitting-room .
, ( )
Exercise 18. Translate into English.

( ) .
.
.
.
.

6. The U se of the Definite Article before


the N ouns "sun", "moon", "sky" (

sun, moon, sky)
,
, ,
: the sun , the moon ,
the sky .
II. TEXT
Learn these w ords and word com binations
holiday ['holsdei] n 1. ( pi.)
; What are your plans for
the summer holiday (s)? 2.
, ; Sunday is a
holiday in many countries; 3. p i
; Where is your son
going for his summer holidays?
coming ,
, ; We
shall have a lot to do in the
coming year,
town [taun] n ; the town of
Sochi (Batum i)
(); Are they going to
visit the town of Sochi?
spend (spent) v 1. ,
(); How much did
you spend yesterday? 2.
226

(); They spent a


week in St. Petersburg last month,
again ['] adv , ,
; Say it again, please,
be to (a place) ,
(-.) ( .
Present Perfect): Have you ever
been to Paris?
love [Uv] v -.; He
loves his mother,
sea [si:] n ; the Black Sea

bathe [beid] v ( ,
); Lets go and bathe after
classes.
boat [bout] n ; to go boating
; Will you go
boating tomorrow morning?

swim (swam, swum) v ;


Can you swim? to go swimming
() ; Shall we go
swimming before dinner?
lie [lai] v (lay, Iain {let, lein])
; to lie in the sun
, ; Lets lie in
the sun before breakfast,
beach [bi:ts] n ; on the beach

attend [o'tend] v ,
; to attend a lecture (a
m eeting, a party); Sorry, I
cannot attend the lecture today,
festival ['festivl] n ;
M usic festival
song [sorj] n ; a Festival of
Song
sing (sang, sung) v ; Can you
sing this song?
music ['mju:zik] n
trip , ; to go
on a trip
( ); The Browns
went on a trip to France last year,
taxi ['tseksi] n ; to take a
taxi (a bus, etc.)
( . .); Lets
take a taxi,
plane ; to go by plane,
to take a plane
; Is he going to take a
plane?
show smb. round v
-. (, ,
. .);
you show him round the city
after lunch?
be fam ous for ,
-.; St. Petersburg
is famous for its monuments,
m useum fmju:'zi3m] n
places of in te re st ['m trist]

even ['i:vn] adv ; He never


even said a word.
Opera H ouse [' haus]

in terru p t [inta'rApt] v ,
(); May
I interrupt you?
ticket ['tikit] n ; to book a
plane (boat) ticket
(); to

book a ticket for a plane (a


boat, a train the cinema, the
theatre); Could you book two
boat tickets for us?
in advance [ad'vams] ,
; They booked
tickets for the Opera House in
advance.
settle ['setl] v ,

m atter ['maete] n , ; to
settle the m atter ,
; They want to
settle the matter today,
calm [ka:m] ; The sea
was calm yesterday,
deck n ; on deck ;
There were a lot of people on
deck.
lounge chair [launch tjea]
botanical [ba'tgenikl]

garden ['ga:dn] n ; botanical


gardens
hike [haik] n; to go for a hike
, ; Lets
go for a hike tomorrow,
m ountain ['mauntm] n ; in the
m ountains ( );
They went for a hike in the
mountains yesterday,
warm [w3:m]
w eather ['weda] n ; We had
very warm weather last July.
What is the weather like today?
?
resort [n'ZD:t] n
high [hai] ; These
mountains are very high,
protect [pra'tekt] v ; to
protect from sm th.
-.
north [:0]
wind [wind] n ; The high
Caucasian Mountains protect the
Black Sea coast from the cold
north winds,
sunny ['SAni] ; Its a
very sunny day today,
water j/wota] n
tem perature f'tempritfa] n
: W hats the temperature
now?
thatll do
227

PLANS FOR THE SUMMER HOLIDAYS


'Last k n ig h t 'M ichael 'Pavlov and his 'wife - J H elen J
'talked about their
plans J for the 'coming "^holiday.
"Lets go to
Sochi,
shall we?"1 said Michael. "Its a
'beautiful town. 1 'spent my 'holidays in - J Sochi J when I
was a
student. Id 4 like to go there again."
"Thats
wonderful idea," said Helen. "Ive
never
been to -/S o c h i, J and I 'love the ~^sea. W ell - J bathe, w ell
'go -^boating and "^swimming. W ell 'lie in the 'sun on the
beach."
"And w ell be 'able to at'tend the 'Festival of >Song
that 'takes -/p la c e in Sochi J 'every "^summer, J w ell 'hear
'new - J songs and 'new
music," said Michael. "Our 'trip
may be t very "^interesting. 'H eres what w ell ~ \d o .2 W ell
'take a 'plane to -O dessa J and Ill 'show you 'round the
^city. There are 'beautiful 'm onuments to the 'famous
/ /p eo p le, who 'lived in 0 ,d e s s a , J mu/seu m s and M oth er
places of interest."
"We may 'even 'go to the T famous ^Opera House,"
H elen interrupted him.
'W ell 'never be 'able to 'get to
Sochi, you _^know,"
Michael said. "Well, ""'Ifrom o J )d e s s a , S w ell 'go to /S och i
by ^Iboat." "Well 'have to 'book 'plane and ^ b oat -J tickets
in ad ^ ivance,
sh a n t we?" asked H elen. "Well
certainly have to do that," said Michael. "Ill 'have to 'go to
the T Travel
A gency3 J and ' settle ^that J to'morrow
morning. By the _^w ay, I ve 'got a T guide to
Sochi.
'Lets 'read what it 'says about the ~^town."
Michael started reading, "Sochi is the largest and most
beautiful resort4
in the Caucasus. The high Caucasian
M ountains protect Sochi from the cold north w inds. There are
a lot of sunny days there. T he sea water temperature is b e
tween 24-28 in summer.
About two million people come to Sochi every year."
"Thatll do," H elen interrupted him. "I realize Sochi is the
town we should go to."5

The Pavlovs enjoyed the trip from Odessa to Sochi. The


Black Sea was calm. T hey sat on deck in the lounge chairs
and looked at the sea.
H elen liked Sochi very much. Michael showed her the
famous Botanical G ardens, they w ent to hikes in the
m ountains, they saw the beautiful Augura W aterfalls.6
228

T he sea was nice and warm. The weather was fine.


W hen it was time to go home they were sorry to leave the
beautiful town of Sochi.
N otes
1. Lets go to Sochi ['sstji 3, shall we?
?
2. H eres what w ell do. .
3. the Travel Agency ['traevreid^snsi ]
.
4. the largest ['la:d3is t] and most [m oust] beautiful
resort
5. Sochi is the town we should go to.
, .
6. the Augura W aterfalls [' 'wD:t3fo:lz]

Exercise 1. Read and translate the text.


Exercise 2. Find in the text English equivalents for these word combinations
and sentences.

1. . 2.
3. . 4. . 5.
. 6. . 7.
. 8. . 9.
. 10. . 11.
. 12.
. 1J. . 14. .
Exercise 3. Answer these questions.

1. Why do the Pavlovs want to go to Sochi for their


holiday? 2. How will they get to Sochi? 3. Why will they have
to book plane and boat tickets in advance? 4. T h ey ll see
many interesting places in O dessa, w ont they? 5. Will they
be able to attend the Festival of Song in Sochi? 6. What will
they do in Sochi? 7. Will they go boating and swimming? 8.
Sochi is the most beautiful resort in the Caucasus, isn t it? 9.
What m ountains protect Sochi from the cold north winds? 10.
How many people come to Sochi every year? 11. The Pavlovs
enjoyed their stay in Sochi, d idnt they?
Exercise 4. Respond to these statements according to the models.

a) Do you want me to go there with you?


Yes. Will you go there with me?
1. Do you want me to attend the Festival of Song? 2. Do
you want me to spend m y holiday in Sochi? 3. Do you want
229

me to show them round the city tomorrow? 4. Do you want me


to sit in a lounge chair on deck? 5. Do you want me to book
plane tickets for them? 6. Do you want me to speak English
now?
b) Im sorry I can t finish* the book today, (tomorrow)
Will you be able to finish it tomorrow?
1. Im sorry I cant take you to the Botanical Gardens
today, (tomorrow) 2. Im sorry I can t book train tickets
before lunch, (after lunch) 3. H es sorry he can t go for a hike
after breakfast, (after lunch) 4, S h es sorry she cant attend
his lecture today, (tomorrow) 5. H es sorry he cant go
boating today, (tomorrow) 6. Im sorry I can t go swimming
before breakfast, (before lunch)
c) Did you go shopping yesterday? (Peter)
N o, I d id n t have to. Peter did it.
1. Did you go to the Travel Agency yesterday? (John) 2.
Did you book seats for the Opera House? (Mike) 3. Did Jane
show them round the city? (John) 4. Did you show them
round the college? (Peter) 5. Did Mike settle that matter?
(Jane) 6. Did you take a taxi for them? (John)
d) Will you have to speak to him about that?
Y es, Ill have to. (Yes, Ill have to speak to him about
that.)
1. Will you have to attend Mr Blacks lecture? 2. Will she
have to sing at the party? 3. Will they have to go on tour next
month? 4. Will they have to book boat and plane tickets in
advance? 5. Will he have to settle that matter? 6. Will they
have to take a plane there?
e) Could you go to see them yesterday? (I had a lot of
things to do last night.)
N o, I couldnt. (N o, I couldnt go to see them
yesterday.) I had a lot of things to do last night.
1,
Could you go swimming yesterday? (The weather was
bad.) 2. Could you speak about the plans for the com ing
holiday? (Peter was very busy.) 3. Could you go hoating last
night? (We were very tired.) 4. Could they go on a trip to the
Crimea* last month? (Peter d id n t have a holiday last
m onth.) 5. Could you go swimming yesterday? (The sea was
storm y.**)
* the Crimea [krai'miaj
** stormy ['stD:mi] , ,
230

f) Should I go to the show tomorrow? Id advise you to go.


(Id advise you to go to the show.)
1.
Should we go for a hike in the mountains? 2. Should I
attend his lecture? 3. Should they go on a trip? 4. Should I
book plane tickets in advance? 5. Should we go there again?
Exercise 5. a) Compare the meanings of the verbs to say, to tell, to speak and
to talk.

speak
say
1. to say sm th.
-.
2. to say that... ,
... (,
.)
3. to say sm th. to smb.
-. -.
4. to say,
(
) :
speak
1. to speak ; to
speak English (French,
etc.) -
(-
. .)
2. to speak to smb. about
sm th. ,
-. -.
3. to speak at a m eeting
(
. .)

tell
1. to tell sm b. sm th. (about
sm th.) ,
-. -.
2. to tell smb. to do smth.
()
-. -.

talk
1. to talk to smb. (about
sm th.) ,
,
-. ( -.)

b) Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to the verbs to say, to tell,
to speak and to talk.

1. What did you say? 2. He says (that) it is time to start


work. 3. "Every morning say "hello" to your friends," the
231

young mother sa id to her little son. 4. He to ld m e about his


son. 5. I have a lot to tell yo u . 6. He told m e his name. 7. Tell
me where you live. 8. Did he tell you to translate that article?
9. Will you speak slow ly*, please. 10. Can your sister speak
Germ an? 11. Do you know Mr Brown well? Can you speak to
him about John? 12. He spoke at the m eeting for forty
m inutes. 13. Bill is talking to a friend now. 14. What are they
talking about? 15. T hey talked for two hours.
Exercise 6. Translate into English. Use the verbs to say, to tell, to speak and
to talk.

1. ? 2.
"" ,
. 3. ,
. 4.
. 5. ? 6.
? 7. , ?
8. , , . 9.
- ? 10.
- ? 11*
? 12. (
) .
Exercise 7. Make up twelve sentences using the verbs to say, to tell, to speak
and to tlk.
Exercise 8. Complete these sentences. Use active words and word combinations.

1. Will you attend...? 2. I hope the w eather.... 3. Id like to


spend.... 4. T he sea w as.... 5. T hey went for.,.. 6. The city is
famous for,... 7, Every year a Festival of Song..,. 8, He hopes
hewill be able to..,. 9. T hey d id n t have to.... 10. They even....
11. May I interrupt you? Id like to.... 12. H eres what w ell
do ...
Exercise 9. Insert articles where necessary.

1. T h ey talked to us about their plans for ... coming


holiday. 2. She says that she loves ... sea. 3. T h ey ll go on ...
trip to ... Caspian Sea. 4. W ell take ... plane to Paris. 5.
T h eyll go to London by ... train. 6. Y oull have to go to ...
Travel Agency and book ... train tickets. 7. There are a lot of
lounge chairs on ... deck. You may sit there and enjoy ... sea.
8. I hope ... w eather will be fine on Sunday. Then we shall be
able to go to ... country. 9. T hey lived in ... town of V ilnius.
10. I hope they enjoyed ... holiday that they spent in Sochi
* slowly t'siouli] adv
>32

last month, 11. T hey liked ... places of interest they visited in
St, Petersbourg.
Exercise 10. insert prepositions or adverbs.

1. What is this town famous ... ? 2. I ve never been ... New


York. 3. W ell lie ... the sun ... the beach. 4. 1 speak ... then
... our trip ... the Caucasus. 5. "11 show you ... the city lived
there a few years ago and know it very w e ll/1 said Ann. 6.
There is a monument ... Minin and Pozharsky in Red Square.
7.... O dessa they will go ... Sochi ... boat. 8. Shall we have to
book seats ... advance? 9. She is going to sit ... deck and look
... the sea.
Exercise 11. Make up ten questions based on the text and answer them.
Exercise t2. Give a summary of the text "Plans for the Summer Holiday
Exercise 13. Open the brackets and put the verbs in the proper tenses.

1. "You (to see) Peter and Nick this morning?" "Yes, I (to
meet) them a few minutes ago. T hey (to go) for a hike in the
mountains." "They (to come back) today?" "I (not to know).
They may come back in the evening." 2. "You ever (to be) to
Odessa?" "Yes, I (to spend) my holiday there last year."
"Where you (to go) for your holiday this summer?" 1 (to go)
on a trip to Siberia in August." 3. "That's a beautiful song,
isn t it? Who (to sing) it?" "Some students from Kiev." 4. "You
(to go) to attend the Festival of Song in Sochi, aren t you?
When the Festival (to take) place?" "It (to begin) the day
after tomorrow." 5. "The sea (to be) calm today. Lets go on
deck." "Thats a good idea. We (to sit) in lounge chairs and
enjoy the sun and the sea.
Exercise 14. Ask questions to which the italicized words are the answers.

1. N ick will spend his summer holidays in Riga. (2) 2.


They attended the conference in Paris. (2) 3. H e will show
you som e interestin g places tom orrow. (3) 4. The M usic
Festival will take place in M oscow next year. (3)
Exercise 15. Make up sentences using the following word combinations with the
verbs to go and to come.

to go (by boat, by plane, by train, by b us), to go for a


walk, to go to school (to college), to go to bed, to go out, to
go to see, to go boating (swim m ing), to go on a trip, to go on
lour, to come back, to come home, to come to see, to come
from
E x rm se K>. Translalr info English.

1. ? .
,
. 2.
. ,
. ,
. 3.
? . ? 25-
. 4. ?
. 5. ,
. 6.
() , 7.
.
? . .
( ),
. 8.
. 9. ? ,
, . 10.
? . 11.
? , .
Exercise 17. Ask your colleagues these questions and sum up the answers.

a) 1. What are your plans for the coming holiday? 2.


Where will you go for your holiday? 3. How long are you
going to stay there? 4. What other places are you going to
visit? 5. Will your family go together with you? 6. How will
you go there: by plane or by train?
b) 1. Where is your friend going to spend his holiday? 2.
Has he ever been there before? 3. What places of interest will
he be able to see there? 4. Will he be able to go swimming and
boating? 5. Is he fond of swimming? 6. Will he have to stay in
a hotel?
Exercise 18. Make up situations using the words given below.

a) Plans for H olidays: coming, to talk about, to interrupt,


to go on a trip, to hope, the weather, to book tickets, to
spend, to enjoy, again.
b) On the Beach: to be famous for, fine beaches, in the
sun, to bathe, warm, calm, to be fond of, even, to go boating.
c) A Trip by Boat: to go by boat, on deck, lounge chairs,
in the sun, calm, to listen to music, to sing songs, to play
chess, to enjoy.
Exercise 19. a) Make up stories on these topics, b) Write a story on one of the
topics.
234

1.
Plans for the com ing h olid ay(s). 2. My friends plans
for his h olid ay(s). 3. How I spent my last summer holiday
(my last winter* holiday).

L E S S O N SIX T E E N
Conversations: A. Transport: At a Railway Station. Booking
A irline Tickets. At the Airport. B. An Enjoyable Holiday.
C. It is N ice to See You Again.
Learn these speech pattern s
1. I t s nice to see you again.
.
Exercise 1. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

to see you again.


It is nice
to meet you again,
to talk to you again.
2. You are looking (lo o k ) very well.
.
Exercise 2. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

You

are looking
look

very well,
fine.

He
is looking
tired.
She
looks
wonderful.
3. Were looking forw ard to showing you around.
, .
looking forw ard to the trip.
.
Exercise 3. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

Im looking forward to
Were looking forward to

your visit,
his lecture,
your birthday party,
seeing you.
reading his new novel,
flying home.

*
winter ['winta] n ; winter holiday ; winter holidays

235

Exercise 4. Translate into English

1.
. 2.
, ? 3.
. 4. .
5. ,
.
Exercise 5. Make up nine sentences using patterns 1, 2 and 3.

Learn these words an d w ord com binations


railway station ['reilwei 'steijn]
,
train [trein] n ; to go by
train (
) ; Will you go there by train
or by plane? through [0ru:]
train
platform ['pla3tf3:m] n ;
Which platform does the Rostov
train leave from?
change [t$emd3 ]
, (
,
..); Youll have a change at
Leeds for Hull,
next [nekst] ; When
does the next train for Bristol
leave? Whats the name of the
next stop? B u t : next week
(m onth, year, M onday)
single I'siggl] n (. single
ticket) ,
,
; first (second, etc.) class
single
( . .) ;
Id like three first class singles to
Leeds, please,
retu rn [ri'tan] n (. retu rn
ticket) ,
; Id like one two
month return, to Leeds.


.
flight [flait] ; flight 207
from Moscow to Paris; a non
stop flight
; Is this a non-stop flight?
to book a flight
; Could I book a flight
236

to London?
ju st a m inute ['minit] ()
, ; Just
a minute. Im finishing the letter,
travel ['traevl] n ,
; to travel by ship (air,
train, car) (
, ,
); Did they
travel by train or by air? They
travelled for twenty days,
economy [1'] n (.
economy class)
( )
; to travel economy
()
; Would you like to travel
economy?
coach [kou^] n
; ,
; When
does the next coach leave for the
airport?
announcer [s'naunsa] n
announce [a'nauns] v ,
( ,
. .)
d eparture [di'pcntja] ;
(
. .); Aeroflot announces the
departure of fligth 207 from
Moscow to Paris.
Gate N um ber [ ] 7 (Gate
No. 7) 7
copy ['] n ; H eres a
copy of Pravda.
everything ['evn0itj] pron ;
Everything is ready,
enjoyable ['<11] ;
Her birthday party was really
enjoyable.

scientist ['saiantist] n
carry ['kaeri] v ; Where are
you carrying the books?
bag n , ,
manage ['maenicfe] v ,
; I can manage all
right [rait];
(),
hotel [hou'tel] ,
while [wail] cnj ;
What places of interest would you
like to see while you are here?
certainly ['sartnlij adv ,
; Hes certainly a
very good man. Certainly not!
. ,
. "Will you invite John to your
birthday party?" "Certainly not".

fairly I'feah) adv ,


; The weather was
fairly good.
,
though [dou] cnj ; He went
for a walk in the park though it
was very cold,
rain n ; We had a lot of rain
last month,
shine (shone) [jam, $] v
; The sun is shining brightly
['b ra ith ]. ,
lovely I'IavIi]
, ; It is
lovely day today,
on the whole [houl] ,
; On the whole I
liked the film.

A. TRANSPORT
AT A RAILWAY STATION

1*
A: When does the Kiev train leave, please?
: At 10 o clock, platform 3.
A: What time does it arrive?
B: Five o clock in the evening. It takes about seven
hours to get there.
A: Do I have to change?
B: N o, its a through train.

2.
A:

Is there a through train to Aberdeen*


. ?
: N o, there is n t. You have to change at
Edinburgh**.
A: What time is the next train to Edinburgh, please?
B: At 10.35 in the evening.
BOOKING AIRLINE TICKETS

Passenger: Id like to book a flight to Geneva for Monday


the twelfth.
B ooking clerk: Just a m inute, Ill see what there is.
* Aberdeen [,seba'di:n]
** Edinburgh ['edm bara .]
237

P assen ger: Id like to travel economy class, please.


Booking clerk: Aeroflot Flight 048 leaves at 0 9 2 0 .1
Passenger: What time do I have to be there?
B ooking clerk: Y oull have to be at Air Terminal by 0810.
T he coach leaves for the airport at 0815.
AT THE AIRPORT

Announcer: Aeroflot announces the departure of Flight


N um ber 5022 to Vienna at Gate Number 7.
M r W ilson: Im afraid I must be going.
M r Brown: H eres a copy of tod ays newspaper. You may
find som ething interesting in it. G oodbye and all the
best.
M r W ilson: Goodbye. Thanks for everything.
B. AN ENJOYABLE HOLIDAY
(Mr Brown has just returned from Italy, and is talking to
Petrov.)
P etrov: How did you enjoy your holiday?
M r Brown: Oh, I liked Italy very much.
Petrov: What about the weather?
B:
W ell, it was fairly good, though we had quite a lot of rain.
P:
Oh, what a pity.
B: . W ell, when the sun shone it was really lovely. On the
w hole it was a very enjoyable holiday.
C. IT IS NICE TO SEE YOU AGAIN
(John Masters meets Paul Ivanov, a Russian scientist, at
the airport.)
Joh n : H ello, Paul. i\Tice to see you again.
Paul: H ello, John. Y oure looking very well.
John: H ere,3 let me carry those bags.
Paul: Oh, no, please d on t bother. I can manage all right.
John: W ell, w ere going to the hotel now. By the way,
what would you like to see while you are here? W ere
looking forward to showing you around.
Paul: Thank you. T hats certainly very nice of you.
N otes
1. 0920 = 9.20. ,
.
2. Flight Num ber 502 502
3. ()
238

Exercise 6. Read and translate the dialogues.


Exercise 7. Find in the dialogues English equivalents for these word
combinations and sentences.

1.
? 2.
... 3.
. 4. 502.
5. () . 6.
. 7. . 8. .
9. .
Exercise 8. Quote the sentences in which these words and word combinations
are used in the dialogues.

a through train, to change, single, platform, pleasure, to


book a flight, to travel economy class, coach, gate, to manage
Exercise 9. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1,

2*

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

A: When does the Edinburgh train leave?


B: At 10 o'clock, platform 3.
(B: 9.25, 4; 6.45 in the evening, 6)
A: Do I have to change?
B: No, i f s a through train.
(B: Y es, you have a change at Leeds.)
A: I d like to book a flight to M oscow fo r Sunday the
fifth.
B: Just a m inute, Ill see what there is.
(A: London for Monday the thirteenth, Tbilisi for
Thursday the twenty third)
A: What time do I have to be at the Air Terminal?
B: Y oull have to be there by 0920. The coach leaves
for the airport at 0 9 3 0 .
(B: 0315, 0325; 1140, 1150)
A: What about the weather?
B: Well, it was fairly good.
: we had a lot of rain it was wonderful, the sun shone
all the time)
A: How did you like your holiday?
B: It was a very enjoyable holiday.
( : good, interesting)
J: H ello, Bill. N ice to see you again.
B: H ello, John. Youre looking very well.
: fine, very tired)
A: Let me carry those bags.
B: Oh no, please dont bother. 1 can manage all right.
(A: do it for you, carry those books, take a taxi for
you, book you a hotel)
239

9.

A: Im looking forward to showing you round the town.


: T h ats certainly very nice of you.
(A: showing you our country, taking you to the
Botanical Gardens)

Exercise 10. Fill in the blanks with missing remarks. Reproduce the dialogues.

1.

A: When does the Kiev train leave, please?


D. *
jL-J*

2.

A: Do I have to change?
B: ...
A: How much do I have to pay for two six-day returns
to London?
B: ...
A: Which platform does the London train leave from?
B: ...
A: Could I book a flight to Moscow for Sunday the
nineteenth? Id like to travel first class, please.
B: ...
A: Did the radio announce myflight?
B: ...

3.

4.
5.

6.

Exercise 11. Think of the questions and statements to which the following
sentences are the answers.

2.
3*
4

I f

A9
: At 9.25. Platform 5.
A: ...?
B: N o, its a through train.
Aii
**7

B: You have to change at Kiev.


j.

* ** *

A '

^ 1 *

* 4 *

B: Just a m inute, Ill see what there is


5 A: ..?
B; Y oull have to be at the Air Term inal by 1215. The
coach leaves for the airport at 1225.
6. A: ..?
B: T he radio says "Aeroflot announces the departure of
Flight Num ber 048 to Moscow at Gate Number 3".
1 A'
9
; Oh, I liked Samarkand very much.

8*
U

*
a
At

***9#

B:
all
9 A*
JL*
B:
10. A:
B:
J

240

4-

T he weather was wondertul. The sun shone brightly


the time.
***9
On the whole it was an enjoyable holiday.
...?
H ello, Peter. You look fine.

. : ***?*
-; Oh, no, please d on t bother, I can manage all right.
12. * ****
: Id like to see the city.
13. : ***
: T hats certainly very nice of you.
Exercise 12. Reproduce the dialogues in pairs.
Exercise 13. Act as interpreter.

: ?
: My wife and I are going to R ussia for our summer
holiday.
: - ?
: No, w eve never been there.
: ? ?
: W ed like to see Moscow, St. Petersburg and some
other cities and towns.
A: ?
: W ell go by plane. It w ont take us much time.
A: .
: I think w ell stay there for three weeks.
Exercise 14. Translate into English.

1.

?
8.35 5- .
?
4 . 7 ,
.
2. ?
, .
?
.
3.
(Kaunas
['kauna:s])?
.
(Vilnius I'v iln iss]).
.
.
4. ( )
15 .
, , .
241


. ?
.
5.

?
9.30. 9.40
.

6.

, .
.
?
9.
. .
.
. .

7.

.
.

8.

?
.
.

9.

, .
.
, .
. .
, .
.
.
' \
10.
.
, . .
11. .
.

Exercise 5. Make up dialogues based on these situations.

1. Buying (booking) tickets for a train. 2. At a railway


station asking about the platform the train leaves from. 3.
Booking airline tickets. 4. Talking about plans for the coming
holiday 5. Exchanging impressions about summer holidays.
6. M eeting a foreign colleague at the airport.
242

Exercise 16. Make up dialogues based on this picture.

"Have

good

holyda

L E S S O N SE V E N T E E N
1. NEW GRAMMAR STRUCTURES
1. The Sim ple Present T en se in C lauses o f Tim e and
Condition* (The Sim ple Present T ense
)

, if , when ,
after , , before , as soon as
, until, till ; , (
Simple Present
Simple Future.
If I have my holiday in July, I shall go to Yalta.
, .
If the sea is calm tomorrow, they will go boating.
,
.
I shall phone you as soon as he gives an naswer.
, .
Please wake me up when you get up. ,
.
.
, .
If he calls me up, I shall tell him about it.
H : I shall tell him about it if he calls me up.
* condition [kan'difn]
243

Exercise 1. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to the use of
tenses.

1, "Ill call you up as soon as I buy tickets for the train, "
Peter said. 2. If the weather is fine, we shall be able to go to
the m ountains. 3. Please book a return ticket if you go to
Sochi. 4. If he returns hom e before Friday, he will help us to
do the translation. 5. If you want to see all these places, you
will have to stay here for a week. 6. Please drive us to the
airport if you have time tomorrow morning. 7. As soon as you
return home, call me up. 8. T hey will go for a walk before
they go to bed. 9. Speak to him about it when you see him. 10.
She will not be able to tell him about it till he phones her. 11.
Will you wait until he com es back?
Exercise 2. Join these sentences according to the model.

We shall go out on Friday. We shall not be tired, (if)


We shall go out on Friday if we are not tired.
1. I shall write you a letter. I shall arrive in London, (as
soon as) 2. He will have to speak to the manager. He will
leave for Rome, (before) 3. H e will stay there for another
week. He will not settle the matter, (if) 4. We shall have to
wait for Peter. He will be late, (if) 5. I shall receive visitors.
We shall discuss the plan, (after) 6. She will give you the
book. She will read it. (when) 7. I shall tell him about it. I
shall see him. (when) 8. He will not be able to settle the
matter. The manager will come back from a business trip,
(till)
Exercise 3. Respond to the statements according to the model.

If Tom m eets us at the station, h e ll take its to the hotel.


But w hatll we do if he d oesn t meet us?
1. If they help us, itll take us half an hour to translate the
text. 2. If it is fine tomorrow, w ell go for a walk. 3. If he calls
me up tonight, Ill ask him to book tickets for a plane. 4. Ill
be able to settle the matter if I stay there for another week.
Exercise 4. Complete these sentences.

1. If there are return tickets to T ashkent... 2. After you


return from Sochi... 3. As soon as the festival begins... 4. He
will have to stay there for another week if... 5. I shall bring
you som e other books w hen... 6. They will go on a trip next
summer if...
Exercise 5. Translate into English.
244

1. , . 2.
, , . 3.
" , ? 4.
, . 5.
,
. 6. -
, . 7.
, . 8. ,
, . 9.
,
.
Exercise 6. Make up six sentences using clauses of time and condition.

2. T he Future Continuous T ense


I
We
He
She
You
They

'Shall

'Will

shall
shall 'not
'sh an t

1
|

be "1 seeing
hin tomorrow.

will
will 'not
'wont

^
r

be 'I seeing

'Yes, I ~"\shall.
No, I " Is h a n t.

I
we
he
she
you
they

be - J seeing

him
tomorrow?
'Yes, he
will.
No, he ^wont.

Future Contunuous
to be Simple Future Present
Participle . Future Contunuous
* ,
, .
, ,
, .
"VII be seeing them tomorrow morning, " he sa id ,
, .
"Im afraid 17/ be having a lecture at that tim e on
W ednesday, " she answered. ,
, .
245

:
Will you visit him tomorrow, please?
, . ( .)
Will you be visiting him tommorrow?
? ( .)
: L
Continuous Future Continuous ,

Present

is not coming to the party.


will not be coming to the party.
2. , Future Continuous
.
Exercise 7. Read and translate these sentences.

1. "Hell be leaving next week, " John said. 2. She says


sh e ll be having lunch in a cafe at that time. 3. W ell be
having coffee after dinner. 4. "Hell be lecturing on R ussian
art next year, " she said. 5,"Hurry up! The train will be
leaving in a m inute, " Mary said. 6. Will you be staying here
long? 7. What will they be having for breakfast? 8. Where will
you be spending your holiday? 9. Will you be writing to her
next week? 10. When will you be having your next French
class?
Exercise 8. Transform these sentences accordiag to the model,

a) Are you going to help him?


Will you be helping him?
1. Are you going to stay in Tallinn for a week? 2. Are you
going to have fruit for lunch? 3. When are they going back to
the U niversity? 4. Is he going to visit the Browns again this
week? 5. W hen are you going to have your next lecture on
French art? 6. What are they going to have for lunch?
b) You will call her up tomorrow.
Will you be calling her up tomorrow?
1. You will write to him again. 2. Y oure going to see your
mother next week. 3. S h es going to take the children to the
Zoo. 4. H ell look through the papers. 5. T h ey re going to
have tea.
Exercise 9. Make up seven sentences using the Future Continuous Tense.
246

3. Comparative* Structures ( )
as...as...
j not as (so)...as

..., ; .
.... ; .. ,

This book is as good as that one.


, .
T hese books are as good as those.
, .
Mary has as m any books as Peter (h as).
, .
Nick speaks French as well as John (does).
- , .
T he sea is as calm today as it was yesterday.
, .
T his book is not as good as' that one.
, *
T hese books are not as good as those.
, .
Mary hasn't as m any books as Peter (h as),
, .
Nick doesn 't speak French as well as Peter (does).
nb- , .
won't be able to work as much as he did a few years
ago. ,
.


one.
This book is as good as that one,
H o: T h ese books are as good as those.
(
)
,
.
My holiday is not as long as Peters.
, .


.
* comparative [ksm'paerativ]
247

H e can play chess as well as John can .


, .
cannot play chess as well as John can .
, ,
Exercise 10. Read and translate these sentences.

1, "I dont think these pictures are as good as his, Bill


said. 2. This sweater is as nice as your red one. 3. The film is
not as interesting as the novel. 4. I am as busy today as I was
yesterday. 5. I cannot play tennis as well as Peter can. 6. He
does not speak German as well as Mary does. 7. I do not get
up on Sunday as early as I do on Monday. 8. He did not stay
there as long as you did. 9. This song is as good as the one
we heard yesterday. 10. This film is not as interesting as the
one we saw last Sunday. 11. Ann cannot sing as well as you
can. 12. This lecture is as important as the one we had last
week.
Exercise 11. Respond to these questions according to the models.

a) John is young. And Ben?


Ben is as young as John. Ben isn t as young as Ben,
1. Peter is busy. And Bill? 2. Bill is tired. And Dick? 3.
German is difficult. And French? 4. Lesson 12 is easy. And
lesson 14? 5. Max has many English books. And Tom?
b) Jane can speak French weil. And Mary?
Mary can speak French as well as Jane can. Mary cant
speak French as well as Jane can.
1, Jack plays tennis well. And Ted? 2. Peter saw many
interesting places there. And John? 3, Mary can speak English
w ell. And Helen? 4. The Browns will be able to stay in Rome
long. And the Smiths? 5. My brother often goes to the theatre.
And you?
*
Exercise 12. Join these sentences using the pronoun one. Translate them.

a) This novel is interesting. That novel is interesting, too.


This novel is as interesting as that one.
1.
This m agazine is interesting. That magazine
interesting, too. 2. T he blue coat is nice. The dark brown coat
is nice, too. 3. T he old textbook is good. The new textbook is
good, too. 4. The new sofa is comfortable. The old sofa is
comfortable, too.
b) This novel is interesting. The novel you gave me last
week is interesting, too.
248

is

This novel is as interesting as the one you gave me last


week.
1. This story is long. T he story you told us yesterday was
long, too. 2. This picture is good. The picture you showed me
yesterday was good, too. 3. This film is interesting. The film
we saw last Sunday was interesting, too. 4. This article is
difficult. The article we translated yesterday was difficult,
too.
Exercise 13. Translate into English.

1. () ,
. 2. ,
. 3. ,
. 4. , .
5, , . 6.
, . 7.
, . 8. , . 9.
- , . 10.
,
? 11. , ,
.
4. "It" as Subject (It )
it
,
,
.
It is difficult to answer your question.
.
Excrcise 14. Answer these questions.

1. Is it difficult or easy to learn spoken English? 2. Was it


easy to book seats for the Bolshoi Theatre? 3. Is it easy or
difficult to settle business matters? 4. Was it difficult to learn
French? 5. Is it difficult to listen to lectures on English
literature? 6. Is it easy or difficult for you to get up early?
Exercise 15. Respond to these questions according to the model.

Peter is learning spoken English, (difficult)


Is it difficult to learn spoken English?
1. My younger brother is learning spoken French, (easy)
2. They settled the matter yesterday, (difficult) 3. He booked
seats for the Bolshoi Theatre, (difficult) 4. I usually get up
249

early in the morning, (easy) 5. He bought tickets for the


footbal match, (easy)
Exercise 16. Translate into English.

1.
. 2.
? 3. ,
. 4. ,
* 5. "
", . 6.
. 7.
?

5. The Article with Uncountable Nouns (


)

,
.
Work first, pleasure afterwards*. ,
. = , , (
)
likes tea . .


,
,
.
I like the m usic o f his new opera.
.
Pass me the butter, please. , ,
(, ).
1 have bought som e brown bread. The bread is fresh.
. (
) .

6. The Past Continuous Tense

He
She
We
You
They
*

250

was
was 'not
'wasnt
were
were 'not
'werent

'watching T ^ V

at 7 oclock yesterday.

afterwards ['a:ftgwadz] adv ,

'Was

'Were

'Yes, he "'Iwas.
'No, he
wasnt.

he
she
we
you
they

'watching T^7V

at 7 oclock
yesterday?

'Yes, they *~"\were.


'No, they
werent.

Past Continuous
to be Simple Past Present Participle
( ) .
, ,

Present Continuous (. 5).
Past Continuous

.
:
) .
I was translating an atricle at seven d clock last night.
7 .
) , Simple
Past.
Peter and John were playing chess when I came back from
college. / ,

Past Continuous
,
.
I was doing my homework while he was writing a letter.
,
.
Past Continuous
,
,
.
,
all day (night) long ( ), all the tim e
, the whole [houl] evening (morning, afternoon)
( , ), from five to six
. .
251

John said: "They were discussing * the problem the w hole


morning yesterday." : "
", (
)
She was typing letters from nine to twelve yesterday
morning. 9 12
.
: ,
, Simple Past.
John said: "They discussed the problem the whole morning yesterday."
: " ". (
)

Past Continuous ,
.
T h e brothers were playing chess w hile their sister was
watching TV. ,
.
Exercise 17. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

I
He
She

We
You
T hey

*
252

was
w asnt

were
w erent

having dinner
having an English
class
answ ering a
telephone call
telling John about
her studies

at six o clock
yesterday,
at 11 o clock
yesterday
morning,
when Peter came
into the room,
when the
telephone rang.

discussing the
problem
listening to his
lecture
talking about Mr
Browns lecture

when he came into


the office,
at 10 o clock
yesterday
morning,
when I came up
to them.

discuss fdis'kAs] v ,

Was

Were

(I)
he
she

you
they

doing his
homework
writing a letter
having a French
class

watching TV
driving in a car
having breakfast

at 5 o clock
yesterday?
when you came
home?
at 9 o clock last
T u esd ay?
the whole evening
yesterday?
when you saw
them?
at 7.30 yesterday
morning?

Exercise 18. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.

3.

A \: What were you doing at 12.30 yesterday


afternroon?
: I was having lu n ch And you?
A 2: I was having a lecture.
(: having a French class, taking Peter to the Travel
Agency; A t. looking through the papers, showing Mary
round the city)
A; Was John leaving when you came home?
B: N o, he w asnt. He was just going to.
(A: reading a book, speaking on the phone, watching
television, doing his homework, making a phone call)
A: Did you watch television last night?
B: Y es, I was watching T V the whole evening.
(A: play chess, translate the text, read that novel; B:
playing ch ess, translating it, reading it)

Exercise 19. Transform these sentences according to the models.

a)
Are they having an English class now? (at 11 o clock
yesterday)
N o, they aren t. T hey were having an English class at
11 o clock yesterday.
1. Is Mr Brown looking through the papers now? (at 10
o clock yesterday) 2. Is Ann typing a letter? (at 4 o clock
yesterday) 3. Is she looking for her textbook? (at 6 o clock
last night) 4. Are they playing chess now? (at 11 o clock
253

yesterday morning) 5. Is John reading the new text) (at 2


o clock yesterday afternoon)
b) Is he doing his homework now? (when I came home)
N o, he isn t. He was doing his homework when I came
home.
1. Is Jane writing a letter? (when her son cam e from
college) 2. Is Peter learning the new words? (when his sister
called him up) 3. Is Mary reading a book? (while her husband
was translating an article) 4. Is H elen watching television?
(while her father was looking through the newspapers)
Exercise 20. Translate into English.

1. . 2. , ?
. 3. ,
. 4. ,
. 5.
. 6. ,
. 7.
, ? , ,
. 8.
? ,
.

IL W O RD-BUILDING
A ffixation: noun-form ing suffix "-ion"
ion ( -tion, -ation, -sion)
.
, :
1) : preparation Lpreps'reijn ]
, , cooptation [,'$ ]
, discussion [dis'kAjn] ,
;
2) : attention [a'tenjn j
;
3)

:
tra n sla to r
[traens'leijn ].
Exercise. Find the suffix in these words and translate them.

invitation, delegation, declaration, cooperation, dictation,


station, presentation, transformation
254

III. T E X T

Learn these speech patterns


I. / wonder if Harris is playing today. ,
.
Exercise 1. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

if
I wonder

they enjoyed the concert.


Mary is going there tomorrow,
he has booked tickets for the theatre.
w hen they will come to see us,
how long th ey stayed in London,
who is going to help them.

2. Please tell me how he did it. , ,


.
Exercise 2. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

Please tell me

where Mr Brown is.


who called me up last night,
how much that sweater is.
what time it is.
how long it will take us to get there.

Exercise 3. Translate into English.

,
,
,

,
,

,
.

3.
They are sure to win the match. (, ) .
Exercise 4. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

to help them.

e
is

to show them round the city.

She
sure
They
are
You

to enjoy the performance.


to like him.
255

Exercise 5. Translate into English.

1. . 2.
. 3.
. 4.
.
Learn these words and word com binations
foolball ['futbD:l] n ;
football fan (
); My brother is a football fan;
football ground [graund]
, ; football
player ; Is Peter a
very good football player?
football match
; Are you going to the
football match today? football
team
team n , ; home
team (
,
. .); to play for a team
,
beat (beat, beaten [bi:t, 'bi:tn] v 1.
, ; 2. ,
, ; I wonder if
Spartak beat Tractor yesterday,
crowded ['kraudid]
; Was the football ground
crowded yesterday?
crowd [kraud] n ; There was
a crowd of people in the street,
thats why , ;
Peter was absent yesterday,
thats why I was not able to tell
him about it.
be on b u sin ess ; Are you here on business? to
go on business ( );
When do you plan to go on
business?
bring (brought, brought [bn>:t]) v
, ; Will you
bring your elder daughter to the
party, please?
later on H a te r ) ; We shall
see what will happen later on.
find [faind] (found, found
[faund]) v ,
, I cannot find my English
textbook.

256

park v ,
(, .
.); to park a car (a plane,
etc.); Where did you park your
car? parking-place n

seat n ; to take a seat
; Will you take a seat, please?
, ,
stand n ( ): It
did not take them long to find
their seats in the stand,
scorer ['sko:re] n ,
, "" ; top
scorer ; I
wonder who their top scorer is.
goal [goul] n ; to score a goal
; Who scored the last
goal yesterday?
score [slo:] n ; What
was the score? to open the score
; Which team
opened the score?
goalkeeper n
in one's favour ['feiva] -.
. The score is two to one
(2-1) in Spartak's favour.
- "",
leg ( ),

injury ['] ; to get


leg injury
( )
couple '] 1. , . 2.
. ; I think he has
a couple of English novels; a
couple of weeks (months,
years) - (,
); is going to Kiev for a
couple of weeks,
field [fi:ld] n ,
; to come onto the field
; "Look! The
teams are coming onto the field,'
Peter said.

referee [refo'ri:] n .
blow fblou] (blew, blown [blu:,
bloun]) v
whistle {'wislj n ; to blow a
whistle ; The
referee blew the whistle and the
match started,
shout IJaut] n ; "Come here
and help ," he shouted; to
shout for .
(
)
support [S3f'p3:t] v ,
; What team do you
support?
understand [.Ando'stsend]
(understood [,Anda'stu:d]) v I.
; sotty to say I
dont understand this rule; 2.
,
; Mr Smith has gone on
business, I uderstand.
popular ['popjub] ,

;
Spartak are a very popular team.
Come on! . , !
centre forward ['senta .foiwad]
,

shoot [Ju:t] (shot, shot [Jort]) v


,
(); to shoot at the goal
( ,
); Shoot! . !
lose [lu:z] (lost [lost]) ;
He lost his notebook yesterday;
to lose the game (the match)
() ; They
have lost the game.
.
win (won [wAn]) v ,
, ; to win a
match (
) ; I wonder who won the
last match,
exciting [ik'saitig] ,
,
; It was an exciting match.

Exercise 6. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to active words
and word combinations.

1. "Which team won the game yesterday? "Spartak" did.


They beat Tractor 1 (three to one)." "The football ground
was crow ded, I understand." "Yes. Those are very popular
teams, you know. It was quite an exciting match.
Unfortunately* a Spartak player got a bad leg injury." "Im
sorry to hear that. Does it mean he w ont be able to play for
a couple of weeks now?" "I dont know. It will be very bad if
he is n t able to play in October when they go to Tashkent.
H es one of Spartaks top scorers." 2. The players are coming
onto the field. The game will begin as soon as the referee
blows his w histle. 3. "Our hom e team is not as good as it was
last year. I can t understand why." "11 tell you why. Two
very good players have left the team. T h ats why they arent
playing as w ell as they did last year." 4. If we win this game
we shall play in Luzhniki next week. 5. The referee will speak
to the players before the match begins.
A FOOTBALL MATCH
Mr Green is very fond of football. He is a football fan. He
thinks that the Blackpool team 1 are very good. But he knows
* unfortunately [An'fxljnitli] adv

257
')

that they are not as good as the M anchester City team.


M anchester City beat Blackpool three to one in the last match.
When the M anchester City players come to Blackpool next
Saturday the Football Ground will be crowded.
If the day is fine it will be very difficult to get tickets.
Thats why Mr Green has booked tickets in advance.
N ext Friday Mr Green is going to have a Russian guest:
Sedov is coming to Blackpool on busin ess. Mr Green will meet
him at the station and bring him to the hotel in his car. On
Saturday they will go to the Blackpool Football Ground.
*

'H ere they ~ \c o m e ,2 Mr 'Green and Se~^dov. T hey are a


'little Nearly, but it is
always good to 'come Nearly for a
'football
match.
Later on J there will be "'icrowds J and
it 'may be
difficult to 'find a
place to 'park the ""'Icar.
T hey "take their 'seats in the /sta n d and 'wait for the
'match to b e ^ g i n .3
"I 'wonder if "^Harris is playing," says Mr Green. "'Who
does he ""'Iplay for?" ,asks Sedov. "~M anchester City. H es
their top
scorer. He 'got a 'leg
injury a couple of weeks
ago. If he 'plays to / day the
M anchester City _^team
are 'sure to ^win."
"Oh, ""ihere they _^come," says Sedov. The 'players
'come 'onto the "Afield. The 'referee 'blows his -/w h is tle and
the 'match be~^gins.
"'Black ~\ 'Black ~\" shout Blackpool fans.
Manchester]" shout M anchester City fans.
"A 'lot of "^people are shouting for 'M anchester -J C ity, I
understand," says Sedov. Well, th e y re a "Wery popular
- /t e a m , says Mr Green. "'Come ", -JJackson, 'come
\on," he shouts. -/J a ck so n , the 'Blackpool 'centre
.^forw ard is 'going to score; 'If he -^ scores ^ it will 'give
'Blackpool a "M ead.4
Shoot,
shoot!" the crowd shouts.
" ^ W ell, th eres the 'first ~Jgoal. 'Jackson has
^ op en ed the /score," says Mr G reen. "If 'Blackpool dont
'lose t h e _/spirit5 \ the 'match may be T very ex~Sciting."
He 'hopes that his Thorne _^team will 'win the
match.

Notes
1.

258

the B lackpool
['blaekpu:lj team, the M anchseter
['m sentjists] C ity team. no
.

,
() ,

they. team ( )

, ,
.
2. H ere th ey come! ! he comes!
!
3. they wait for the match to begin
4. will give Blackpool a lead

5. if they don t lose the spirit ['sp irit]



lixercise 7. Read and translate the text.
Exercise 8. Find in the text English equivalents for these word combinations
and sentences.

1. . 2. . 3.
. 4.
. 5. . 6.
. 7. , .
8. . 9. . 10.
, 11. . 12.
.
Exercise 9. Quote the sentences in which the following words and word
combinations are used in the text.

last match, crowded, thats why, guest, early, stand,


couple, field, to shout for, to score, to open the score
Exercise 10. Answer these questions.

1. What is Mr Green fond of? 2. What team does he


support? 3. Are the Blackpool team as good as the M anchester
City team? 4. Will the football ground be crowded when the
Manchester City team com e to Blackpool for a match? 5. Will
it be easy or difficult to get tickets? 6. Has Mr Green booked
lickets in advance? 7. Who is coming to Blackpool next
Friday? 8. Where is Mr Green going to take Sedov on
Saturday? 9. Why did Mr Green and Sedov come early to the
football ground? 10. Was it easy or difficult to park the car?
! 1. Did it take them long to find their seats? 12. Who does
Harris play for? 13. What happened to him a couple of weeks
259

ago? 14. Is the match going to be exciting? 15. Who is sure to


win the game?
Exercise 11. Transform these sentences according to the model.

a) Is Mr Green fond of football?


I wonder if Mr Green is fond of football.
1. Are the M anchester City team very good? 2. Did
Spartak beat D ynam o I'dainsm ou] in the last match? 3. Was
the Sokolniki Football Ground crowded last Saturday? 4. Did
Mr Brown go there on business? 5. Have you told them about
S p a r ta k s new centre forward? 6. Shall we be able to find a
place to park the car?
b) Where is he going to take Sedov next Saturday?
I wonder where he is going to take Sedov next Saturday.
1. Where are you going to park the car? 2. When will the
match begin? 3. How many goals have the Spartak players
scored already? 4. How long did it take them to get to the
Football Ground? 5. What are the football fans shouting?
c) Who is waiting for the match to begin?
I wonder who is waiting for the match to begin.
1. Who is going to have a Russian guest? 2, Whose team
will win the match? 3. Which of the teams won the match
yesterday? 4. Which of the M anchester City players got a leg
injury? 5. Who opened the score?
d) He is going to help them.
He is sure to help them.
1. The B lackpool team is going to win the match. 2. Mr
Green is going to book tickets for the match. 3. Mr Green is
going to bring Sedov to the hotel. 4. Mr Green is going to take
Sedov to the Blackpool Football Ground. 5. T hey are going to
find a place to park the car, 6. A lot of people are going to
shout for M anchester C ity.
Exercise 12. Join these sentences using the conjunctions given in brackets.

1. The football players will come onto the field. The time
will come, (when) 2. The day will be fine. The football
ground will be crowded, (if) 3. The referee will blow his
w histle. T he match will begin, (as soon as) 4. T he home team
will give a warm welcom e to the visitors team. T he match will
begin, (before) 5. Dick will play chess with Jack. He will beat
Jack, (if)
260

Exercise 13. Join these sentences using the conjunctions as ... as, not as (so)
... as.
1. T he Blackpool team are good. The Bishopton
[' ) ] team are good, too. 2. The Sokolniki Football
Ground is good. T he D ynam o Football Ground is good, too. 3.
Dick Harris has scored many goals this summer. Roy Smith
has scored many goals this summer, too. 4. It is difficult to
find a place to park the car today. It was difficult to find a
place to park the car yesterday. 5. The M anchester City team
is popular. The Blackpool team is not so popular. 6. My elder
brother plays football w ell. M arys younger brother does not
play football so w ell. 7. T od ays match* is exciting.
Y esterd ays match was not so exciting.
Exercise 14. Insert articles where necessary.
1. "I wonder w hy Jenkins is not playing today." "He got a
leg injury in ....last match." 2. T hey will stay in O dessa for ...
couple of w eeks when they go to ... Black Sea for their
holiday. 3. It was not easy to find ... place to park ... car. 4.
If ... day is fine it will be very difficult to get ... tickets for ...
match. 5. My sons are fond of ... football. T hey are ... football
fans. T hey support ... sam e team. 6. I have come here an ...
business. I shall go hom e as soon as I settle som e business
m atters. 7. "Dixon has opened ... score," John shouted. 8. Has
he gone to Sochi for ... pleasure or on ... business? 9. ... music
we heard last night was beautiful.
Exercise 15. Insert prepositions or adverbs.
1. The players are coming ... the field. 2. "We beat
Canada six ... three a couple ... days ago," said Peter. 3. I
shall m eet you ... the station and bring you hom e ... m y car.
4. Who does John play ... ? 5. Dick has told me ... the match.
6. "Come ..., N ike, shoot!" shouted the crowd. 7. "I wonder
where Olga is. I called her ... but there was no answer." "She
has gone ... Tashkent ... business." 8 ."Its time to leave ... the
airport. Y oull have to take a taxi if you dont want to be
late," said Jane. 9. "What are you doing tonight?" "Were
going ... . John has invited us ... his birthday party. W ell go
as soon as Tom com es home ... work." 10. When Jane calls ...,
please ask her to m eet me ... the station the day ... tomorrow.
11. "I did not see you ... the Football Ground yesterday." "I
was very tired, thats w hy I did not go ... the match." 12. I
* todays (yesterdays) match ()
261

wonder if we shall be able to get ... the Football Ground ...


the match begins.
Exercise 16. Fill in the blanks with the verbs to tell, to say, to speak, to talk.

1. "141 ... you about it as soon as you do your homework,"


Jane ... to her younger brother. 2. "What are you... about?"
"John is ... us about the football, match he watched on
television a couple of days ago." 3. When did she ...? 1 d id n t
quite understand her. 4. "When you ... about your plans to
Peter, please ... him that I d like to ... to him too, later on."
"All right, I ll be seeing him tomorrow and Il l ... him." 5, The
lecturer ... for half an hour. 6. T hey ... French, thats w hy I
d id n t understand them. 7. When they score the first goal, I
shall ... you which team is sure to win. 8. "I hope th ey ll be
watching our game tonight," he ... .
Exercise 17. Give a summary of the text "A Football match".
Exercise 18. Ask twelve questions based on the text and answer them.
Exercise 19. Make up sentences using as ... as, not as (so) ... as and the words
given below.

1. team, good; 2. fond of, football (tennis, etc.); 3. the


new referee, not so good; 4. tbe football ground, crowded; 5.
match, exciting; 6. football (tennis, etc.) player, popular; 7.
centre forward, good; 8. to watch football matches on TV,
often
Exercise 20. Ask questions to which the italicized words are the answers.

1. Our team has won the match. (1) 2. The centre forw ard
is our top scorer. (1) 3. He parked his car near the Football
Ground. (1) 4. The cafe was crowded thats why he went to a
restaurant. (1)
Exercise 21. Think of statements or questions to which these sentences may be
responses.

1. The hom e team is sure to win. 2. Well, a lot of people


are shouting for Spartak. 3. If they d ont lose the spirit they
may win the match. 4. Ill be seeing them tonight.
Exercise 22. Translate into English.

1. ? , .
. 2.
3 : 2. 3. ?
. 4. ,
262

. , ,
. 5.
, .
. 6. ? ,
.
, . 7. ,
.
. 8. ,
. ,
. 9.
, ,
. 10. .
? ! 11.
,
-. 12.
, , . 13.
,
. 14. , ,
, , . 15 .
, .
Exercise 23. Make up situations using the words given below.

a) My Friend Watches a Football Match on Television: a


match, the football ground, to find seats, later on, to shout
for, not as good as, to get a leg injury, to stop the game, a
doctor, to leave the field, th ats w hy, did not enjoy.
b) An Exciting Match: let me tell you, exciting, a couple of
minutes after, to open the score, fans, popular, a top scorer,
a centre forward, to shoot at the goal, to beat, the score was
in favour of.
Exercise 24. Read the story filling in the missing active words and discuss it.

A. few m inutes after the ... began, a girl about seventeen


and a young man came to t h e ........ ..
"Whats the ... ?" the girl asked the young man.
"Nil nil,"* he answered.
"Oh, then we are not really late."
"Well, we are a little," the young man said and looked at
the ... . He thought he could watch the ... now.
"... .... !" he shouted.
"Look," she said. "May 1 have a cigarette, please?"
* nilnil ['nil 'nil]

263

"Now, where did I put them? Excuse me a moment." He


started searching for* cigarettes in his pockets. At last he
found the cigarettes. It took the young man some time to light
the cigarette. T he girl started smoking. Now the young man
was able to watch the match.
"Look," he ... . "Were going to ... ! Shoot, shoot!"
"Jake," the girl said "I can sm ell som ething burning."** It
was the neighbours coat burning from the girls cigarette.
A few m inutes later she said she was hungry.*** "Well,
can t you wait till the break?" the young man asked.
"I think I can, but Im awfully hungry," said the girl.
A mom ent later she said: "Jake, look at that little boy. He
bothers his father every minute. Why do fathers bring
children here? The b oys father can t watch the match."
"No, he ca n t," said the young man and sighed.
score, to score, players, to shout, football ground, match (2),
come on

L E S S O N E IG H T E E N
C onversations: A. A Football Match. B. Wales v **** England.
C. C ant Accept Your Invitation.
Learn this speech pattern
1. I d id n t hear the telephone ring. ,
.
. ,
hear to.

.
Exercise 1. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

I heard

him speak on the radio,


the crowd shout, "come on".
her ask Mary to help them.
the referee blow his whistle,
them talk about the coming holiday.

Exercise 2. Translate into English.


* search [sa:t$] for smth. -.
** I can smell something burning. , - (
) .
*** she was hungry ['hAggn] () ( )
**** V.- versus I/v9:s9s] prep .
264

1. , . 2.
, . 3. ,
. 4. ,
.
Exercise 3. Make up four sentences using pattern 1.

Learn these words an d word com binations


Cup Final ['fainl])
; sem i-final
( );
to win (to lose) the Cup Final
()
; I hope that
Spartak will win the Cup Final,
game n , ; football
game ; a game
of ch ess ; a
game of tennis (
); gam es ;
the Olympii [o'limpik] Games

programme ['prougraem] n
(-, -,
. .); souvenir
i,su:va'ni9] programme
-
photo ['foutou] n (pi.
photos) (. photograph
['foutsgrcuf])
look v , ; to look at
smth. -.; Look
at this photo, please,
footballer ['futbDilaJ
on form (
); All the
footballers are on form now,
arent lhey? Ant. off form
(
); afraid their
goalkeeper is off form today,
im pression [im'prejn] n
; I have the impression their
team is off form today; to make
an im pression on smb.
-.;
The match made a great
impression on everyone.
kick n ; free kick ,
; penalty ['penslti]
kick ; Thatll be

a penalty kick; goal-kick

score [sko:] v <- to score a goal)


; Look, Adams is going
to score.
top n , ; The ball
went over the top.
,
shot [jat] n ; Good shot! (
, )
!
v., vs (. versus ['vgisss])
prep . ; France v.
Finland ['f intend]
-
rugby ['] n , ;
Can you play rugby?
International [.inta'naejnl]
; Will it be an
international match?
still adv ; I still play tennis,
keen , ;
H es still a keen footballer.

, (
.) to be keen on smth.;
-.; H es keen on
chess.
cricketer ['krikitg] n
; Is he still a keen cricketer?
end v ,
, ; How did the
game end? to end in a draw
[dro:] ; Did
the game end in a draw? to end
with a score 1 - 0 (one to nil),
3 - 2 (three to two), etc.
1 - 0 (3 - 2)
..; The game ended with a
score 6 - 3 (six to three),
invitation n ; to
accept ['sept] an invitation
; Did they
accept the Browns invitation?
265

event [1'vent] n ,
; swimming events
; What
events are you going to attend?
join [cfcpin] v ;
May I join you?
?

engagem ent [in'geKfemant] n


( ),
; I have another engagement,
(
; ). I
have no engagements till
Saturday.
.

A.

A FOOTBALL MATCH

Jane and Peter came to the football ground to watch the


Cup Final".
a) Before the gam e started
Program m e Seller: Souvenir programmes! Read all about
your favourite team! Photos of all the players.
Jane: Id like to get one.
Program m e Seller: Programme, Miss!
Peter: Look and see if Adams is playing.
Jane: Who does he play for?
Peter: Oh really, Jane, h e s Peruvale's* top scorer. He got
a leg injury two weeks ago.
Jane: Y es, h es playing today. Look at this. There are
photographs of all the players here.
Peter: T hats Harry Creed. He plays for Liverpool. One of
the best footballers1 Ive ever seen when h e s on
form. If he is the Liverpool team are sure to win;
Jane: Oh, good, th ey re coming out onto the field now.
b) The match
Crowd: L iverpool! Liverpool!
Jane: I have the impression that half Liverpools here.
Peter: Well, th ey re a very popular team. What a kick!
Jane: A dam sli never get to it. Come on, Adams, come on!
Peter: Adams is there. H es going to score.
Jane: Its over the top.
Peter: Its a goal-kick. Creed has got the ball.
Crowd: Shoot! Shoot!
Jane: Its a goal. What a shot!
*

News Announcer: Here is the ten o clock news. Liverpool


won the Cup Final. The final score was Liverpool 4,
Peruvale 0.
* Peruvale [pa'ru:vl] ( )

266

. WALES V. ENGLAND
(After a rugby match)
David: Its the best match Ive ever watched.
John : It certainly is.
David: Rugby can be wonderful when its an international
match.
John: Oh yes. By the way, are you still a very keen
cricketer?
David: Yes. Its e very good game. Im always sorry when
the summer ends.
John: What were yoy doing at 8 o clock last night? 1 called
you up but there was no answer.
David: I was watching a rugby match on TV. Im afraid I
d id n t hear the telephone ring.
John: How did the match end?
David: It ended with a score 6 3 (six to three).
. I C A N T ACCEPT YOUR INVITATION
John: H ello, Michael.
Michael: Hello. How are you?
John: Im fine, thank you. And what about you?
Michael: Im. O.K. John, Id like to invite you and Helen
to attend the swimm ing events next Thursday.
John: Thanks a lot. W ed be happy to join you but we
have another engagem ent. Im really sorry.
Michael: Im sorry, too. My best regards to H elen.
John: And give my regards to Susan. G oodbye.
Michael: Goodbye.
N otes
1.
one of the best footballers
; the best match
Exercise 4. Read and translate the dialogues.
Exercise 5. Find in the dialogues English equivalents for these word
combinations and sentences.

1.
. 2.
. 3. . 4.
! 5. . 6.
; 4 0. 7.
. 8. ? 9.
.
267

Exercise 6. Quote the sentences in which these words ;ind word combinations
are used in the dialogues.

programme, photos, to play for, im pression, to score, goal,


shot, rugby, international, engagem ent
Exercise 7. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

A: Who does Adams play for?


B: For Peruvale. H es their top scorer
(A: Newman ['nju:m onl, Thomson ['tam san])
A: Are you going to watch the "Cup Final' on TV
tonight?
B: No. Im going to the Football Ground. I managed to
book a ticket.
(A: the sem i-final, Oxford v. Coventry, Watford f'wotfsd 1
v. Brighton ['b raith])
A: I wonder if M ichael Davies ['d eiv is] is on form
today?
B: Im afraid he is off form. I dont think their team ll
win the game.
(A: Peter N ewm an, Harry Thom son)
A: Newman is there. H es going to score.
B: I t s over the top.
(A: Thom son, Adams; : Its a goal. What a kick! Shoot!
Shoot!)
A: Are you still keen on hockey?
S: Oh yes. Its my favourite sport.
(A: football, tennis, cricket, chess)
A: What w ere you doing at seven o clock last night? I
phoned you but you did n t answer.
B: Im afraid I d id n t hear the phone ring. I was
watching D ynam o ['dainam ou] v. Spartak.
(B: D ynam o v. Yenisei
[J e n i'se i];
Youthl
[ju:0]
( ) v. Yenisei)
A: How did the game end?
B: It ended in a draw.
(B: with score 4 0, with a score 64)
A: Would you like to see the swimming events?
: Im sorry, I have another engagem ent.
04: the match, the sem i-final)

Exercise 8. Reproduce the dialogues in pairs.


Exercise 9. Fill in the blanks with missing remarks. Reproduce the dialogues.

1.

A:
B'
A:
B:

2.
268

Would you like a souvenir programme, sir?


4

Who is D ynam o's top scorer?


...

3.

A: When did Adams score the first goal?


*' *
A: Are you going to watch D ynam o v. Spartak on TV
tonight?
B: ..
A: Is their goalkeeper on form?
B: ..
A: What a pity! The ball went over the top. Willthere
be a goal-kick?

A Was the game exciting?
**
A Who scored the goals?
*
A Who was playing last night?

A How did you like the game?

A How did the game end?

A Are you still keen on chess?

A Is your brother still a keen footballer?

A Were you watching TV at seven o clock last night?


*
A Did you hear the phone ring?
4
A Did the last hockey game make a great impression
on 7 1 ?
B:
A:
T uesday?
B: ..
A: Can you join us?
B: ..
A: Did they accept her invitation?
B: ..
i - j

4.

5.
6.

7.

8.

9.
10.
11.
12.
13.

14.

15.

16.
17.

Exercise 10. Think of the questions and statements to which the following
sentences are the answers.

II A'
^ 1* *
?
B: Adams is. H es the best footballer Ive ever seen.
2. A: .?
B: He scored it a few minutes before the end of the
game,
269

3.
4

5.
6.
7
f

8.
9

10

11.

12.

: ...?
: Oh yes. All their players are on form today.
A
A*
9
B: J m afraid D ynam o's goalkeeper is off form today.
A: ...?
B: It ended with a score 3 1 in Liverpool's favour.
A: ...?
B: D ynam o is sure to win the game.
*
9
B: Thomson scored two goals and Adams scored one.
A: ...?
B: It was exciting.
A
++**7
: Oh yes. Im still very keen on cricket. Im always
sorry when the summer ends.
A: ...?
: I was reading an a rticle about hockey. Ive always
been keen on hockey.
A* ...?
B: Y es, it made a great im pression on me. The game
was really exciting.
A: ...
B: I ll be happy to jotn you but I have another
engagem ent.

i f

Exercise 11. Open the brackets and put the verbs in the Present and Past
Continuous Tenses.

1.
"What John (to do) now?" "He (to watch) television.
T h eres a hockey match on." 2. "What you (to do) at eight
o clock last night? "I (to read) a very interesting article
about Olympic Games." 3, John and Bill (to play) a game of
chess when I returned home yesterday. 4. "What they (to
talk) about?" "They (to discuss) the football semi-finals." 5.
"What your brother (to do) from seven to nine last night?"
"He (to play) basketball. H es a very good basketball player."
6. "Who (to swim) now?" "Two swimmers from France and
Great Britain.
Exercise 12. Act as interpreter.

Peter Volkov: - ,

?
M r Sm ith: With pleasure. I havent been to Luzhniki yet.
And I havent seen any of your hockey teams.
270

V:
S:
V:
S:

V:
S:
V:

,

Thank you very much. Are you a hockey fan? Which
of the teams do you support?
.
, .
And I played for the college football team. My son is
a very good football player too. All our family supports
his team. By the way, when does the game begin?
7 . .
Thank you. See you later.
.

Exercise 13. Translate into English.

2.

3.

5.
6.

?
.
, ?
. (Brighton)
.
?
6 : 2 .
.
! ! !
,
.
.
.
. .
! !
?
4 : 2. !
.
.
?
. ,
. (skiing ['sknrj]).
?
.
?
, .
, , .
.
?
,
- .
271

7,

?
6 0 .

?
,
( ).

Exercise 14. Make up dialogues based on these situations.

1. Exchange im pressions about a football (hockey, etc.)


game. 2. You are inviting a foreign colleague to see the
swimming events but he can t accept your invitation as he has
another engagem ent. 3. Invite a foreign colleague to a hockey
(football, etc.) game. Tell him about the teams.

L E SSO N N IN E T E E N
I. NEW GRAMMAR STRUCTURES
. Impersonal "it" ( it)

It is

.
, ?
.
() .
.
.
10 .

cold today.
very early, isnt it?
early morning.
a fine evening.
summer.
Thursday today.
10 p.m. now.

I t seldom rains* here.


I t is snowing** now.
It may rain tomorrow.

.
.
, , .

it
-
, ,
. .
.
.
* rain [rein] v: It rains. .
** snow [snou] v: It snows. .
272

It is cold, ( -
) , ( )
I t is raining, (- it)
, ( )
Exercise 1, Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.

3.

4.

A: It was hot* yesterday, w asn t it?


B: Y es, it was very h o t.
(A, B: cold, warm)
A: Its a fin e day today, isn t it?
B: Y es, I like it.
(A: cold, warm; B: don't like, like)
A: It often rains in October here, d oestt it?
B: Yes. Its very bad, isn t it?
04: November, April, September)
A t: Its Friday today, istt it?
B: Y es. By the way, what time is it?
: Its three o clock now.
(Aj: Thursday, W ednesday, Tuesday; . half past four,
four, half past three)

Exercise 2. Transform these sentences according to the models.

a) It seldom rains in October here.


It seldom snows in October here.
1. It is raining now* 2. It often rained last month. 3. It
may rain tomorrow. 4. If it rains we shall stay at home.
b) It often snows in Omsk in March?
Does it often snow in Omsk in March?
1. It seldom rains in November there. 2. It often snowed
last month. 3. It is snowing now. 4. It will rain a lot in
October.
c) Does it often rain there in October?
N o, it d oesn t. It d oesn t often rain there in October.
1. Does it often snow in Moscow in March? 2. Did it often
snow last January? 3. Is it raining now? 4. Is it snowing now?
5. Will it often rain next month?
Exercise 3. Translale into English.

1.
. 2. ,
? 3. . 4.
. 5. ? . 6.
, . 7. . 8.
* hot [hot]
273

, ? . 11 (). 9.
?
2.
A bsolute Form of P ossessive Pronouns
)
This is
This is
This is
This is
This is
This is
Whose
Whose

my book.
your book.
her book.
his book.
our book.
their book.
book is this?
books are these?

It is mine.
It is yours.
It is hers.
It is his.
It is ours.
It is theirs.
It is mine.
They are ours.


,
:
1)
This is Johns pencil. M ine is on the desk.
. .
2)
I havent got a pencil. Will you give me yours, please.
. , , .
3)
That textbook is hers. .
4) of
is a friend o f mine. . (
.)
Exercise 4. Translate these sentences according to the model.

a) This book is mine. And that one? (she)


That one is hers.
L This room is mine. And that one? (she) 2, This book is
yours. And that one? (he) 3. This ticket is his. And that one?
(you) 4. T hese pencils are hers. And those? (they) 5. Those
textbooks are ours. And those? (I)
b) My notebook is (not) thick, (as ... as, your)
My notebook is as thick as yours.
My notebook is n t as thick as yours.
1. His letter is long, (as ... as, my) 2. Their team is not
good, (as ... as, our) 3, Their football ground was crowded.
274

(as ... as, our) 4. His story is interesting, (as ... as, her) 5.
My brother is not busy, (as ... as, your) 6. Their lootball
ground is not large, (as ... as, your)
Exercise 5. Translate into English.

1.
. ? . 2. , .- ,
, . 3.
? . . 4. ?
, . 5.
, . 6.
, . 7. .
3. D egrees o f Com parison of Adjectives and Adverbs
( )

Positive (
)

Comparative
(
)

Superlative (

)

-e

-est [ist]

thick
large
thin
near
late , adv
early , adv

thicker
larger
thinner
nearer
later
earlier

thickest
largest
thinnest
nearest
latest
earliest

more [:]

most [moiistj

difficult
exciting
easily adv
slowly adv

more
more
more
more

most
most
most
most

good a
well adv
bad a
badlv adv
much <2, adv
many a
little a, adv
old a

better
better
worse
worse
more
more
less
older
elder

"

difficult
exciting
easily
siowlv

difficult
exciting
easilv
slowly

best
best
worst
worst
most
most
least
oldest
eldest
275

1. ,
, -, -,
-ow , -ble,
-
-est:
large larger largest
( )
2.
,

: thinthinner
thinnest, hot h o tte r -h o tte st.
3. ,
- ,
i: ea sy e a s ie r -e a s ie s t,
early earlier earliest.
4. ,
m ore, m ost,

.
That text is more difficult. .
This is the m o st difficult text. (
) .
N ext time you will be able to find it most easily.
.
5.

( , )
. :
good better best
bad worse worst
6. old
: older, oldest elder, eld
est ( ).
(, ).
Nick is P eters eldest brother, isn t he?
?
John, his elder brother, is a journalist. , 276

(, ),
.
7. ,
, ,
.
,
.
has the largest f la t.
M arys flat is the largest.
8.
of ( ).
This is the m ost interesting o f the texts.
.
Ted is the best o f my friends.
( ).
9. ,
,
one of ( ).
Mrs Clark is one o f our best teachers.
.
Lesson 17 is one of the m ost difficult lessons. 17-
.
Exercise 6. Give the degrees of comparison of these adjectives and adverbs.

a) calm, fresh, happy, near, short, fast, thick, thin, few,


busy, long, small, slow, hot, warm, cold, easy, young, late,
nice, early;
b) beautiful, charming, exciting, popular, favourite,
wonderful, brightly, difficult, easily, slow ly, happily;
c) good, w ell, m any, much, old, little, badly, bad
Exercise 7. Read and translate these sentences.

a) 1. That room is larger, isn t it? 2. I think lesson 12 is


the easiest. 3. Mary is the youngest girl in her class. 4. He
says he is the happiest man now. 5. Have you got fresher
bread? 6. "Come n e a r e r the teacher said. 7. Dick came an
hour later. 8. I got up earlier that day.
b) 9. Her birthday party was more enjoyable. 10. His last
story is more exciting. 11. I think exercise 8 is the m ost
difficult. 12. Mary says this is the m ost interesting film she
has seen lately. 13. Jack London is one of the m ost popular
American [ ' ] writers in this country. 14. N ext time
you will be able fo find it m ost easily.
277

)
15, A friend of mine is one of the best doctors here. 16.
Jane has more English books. 17. Think m ore, say less.
Exercise 8. Transform these sentences according to the model.

I have a thin notebook. And what about Peter and Nick?


Peter has a thinner notebook and Nick has the thinnest
(notebook).
1. John is a small boy. And what about Peter and Max? 2.
Peter has a large flat. And what about his brother and sister?
3. My sister is young. And what ahout Johns and Peter's? 4.
Mary has a small room. And what about Jane and Ann?
Exercise 9. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

A: Are you doing exercise 10?


B: Y es. And I think this is the most difficult exercise.
(A: reading text 19, learning the new grammar rule; B:
text, rule)
A: What do you think of the film ?
B: it s one of the most interesting film s.
(A: book, lecture, novel; B: books, lectures, novels)
A: This lesson is difficult. And what about lesson 16?
: I think its more difficult.
(A , B: interesting)
: hear your brother is ill. Is he better today?
B: I m afraid he*s worse.
(A: sister, wife, husband; B: sh e, she, he)
A: Mike has little time today. And Ben?
B: Im afraid he has less time.
(A: Bill, Peter, George)
A; Is there a bookshop nearby?
: Y es, its round the corner. You can find it most
easily.
(A: a department store, a library)

Exercise 10. Translate into English.

1. ,
. 2. . 3.
. 4. ,
() .
. 5. ?
? , . 6.
? . . 7.
,
. 8. -?
. 9. ,
( ).
278

4.
Comparative Structures
( )
This novel is better
These exercises are easier
His elder brother is two years older
1 usually get up earlier

than

that one.
those.
he (is).
my sister does.


than [ ] .
Your father is older than mine. .


,
:
My flat is larger than P eters.
.


, , , .
I woke up earlier than my brother ( d id ) .
.
Exercise 11. Transform these sentences according to the models.

a) Nick is nice. And John?


John is nicer than Nick.
1. Ben is young. And Dick? 2. His brother is short. And
Bens brother? 3. Lesson 14 is easy. And lesson 13? 4. Our
team is good. And their team? 5. My father is old. And T ed s
father? 6. Peter has m any English books. And Max? 7. Ann
has few friends at college. And Mary?
b) Does John get up as early as Ben does?
I think he gets up earlier than Ben does.
1.
Did John come home as late as Dick did? 2. Does John
speak French as well as Bill does? 3. Can he play hockey as
well as football? 4. Can she speak French as well as English?
5. I don t like oranges as much as apples.
c) This novel isn t as interesting as that one.
That novel is more interesting than this one.
279

1. This exercise isn t as difficult as that one. 2. This film


isn t as exciting as that one. 3. M arys father is n t as old as
Johns. 4. It ist as hot today as it was yesterday. 5, It isn t as
cold today as it was last Sunday. 6. He h a sn t as much free
time as John (has).
Exercise 12. Translate into English.

1. , .
, . 2. -
-, - , ?
, - - -
. . 3. ?
. ( .)
. 4. , . ,
. 5. , .
. 6.
, , ? .
. 7. , (Chekhov)

. , . 8.
, - .
5. The U se o f the Article with N ouns "morning", "day",
"evening", "night" (
morning, day, evening, night)
1. morning, day, evening, night
:
) ,
.
The morning is wonderful. ( ) .
The day was warm. ( ) .
) morning, evening
in.
Lets go for a walk in the evening.
.
2. :
) .
It was evening. .
I like early morning. .
) at (at night ), by
(by day ), from ... to (till) (from morning to /till night
).
280

He came back at night. .


He read the book from morning till night.
.
3.

,
( early).
It was a wonderful black night.
.
: It was early morning. .
6. " get", "to becom e", "to grow", "to turn", "to look",
"to feel" as Hnk-verbs ( to get, to becom e, to grow,
to turn, to look, to feel )
to get, to becom e, to grow, to turn
, to look , to feel
.
felt very tired yesterday.
.
You look quite ill. .
It is getting cold. .
It is growing hotter. .
My father is growing o ld * .
Your daughter has becom e a very good teacher.
.
turned re d . .
Exercise 13. Read and translate these sentenses.

1. Your brother has become a very good hockey player. 2.


Moscow is becoming more and more beautiful. 3. She turned
red when she heard the news. 4. The trees in your garden
have grown quite tall. 5. T hese flowers look beautiful, dont
they? 6. It*s getting dark, isn t it? 1. I hope you fe e l guite
comfortable in this armchair. 8. I feel very tired today.
II W ORD-BUILDINIG
1. A djective-form ing su ffixes "-al", "-ful", "-y"
-al, -ful, - ,
, -al
:
281

national ['naejnl] . -ful


,
(
) , : beautiful
, , awful ['o:fl] , wonderful
. ~

, : rainy , sunny
.
Exercise 1. Point out the suffixes in these adjectives and translate them.

fruitful
l'fru:tfl], happy, frosty,
[pa'litikl ], wonderful, busy, easy

musical,

political

Exercise 2. Form adjectives from these nouns and translate them.

a) -ful: use, help, thank;


b) -y: cloud, fog, snow, luck, glass, ice, flower, wind;
c) -al: continent, m usic, industry
2. Adverb-form ing suffix "-ly"
-ly .
,
: usually
, easily , badly .
Exercise 3. Form adverbs from these adjectives and translate them.

occasional, real, bad, fruitful, happy, useful, helpful,


beautiful, bright, slow, nice
m

rfijY T

J.

J.

Learn these words and word com binations


climate ['klaimit] n ; What
is the climate like in the Crimea?
?
western ['westanj ;
blow (blew, blown ) [blou, blu:,
bloun] v ; Western winds
often blow in summer,
influence ['influsns] v
() (. -.); ,
; His words influenced me
greatly.
()
282

. Western winds influence


the climate of Great Britain,
mild [maild] ; The climate
of G reat Britain is mild,
strong [strDr)] ; A strong
wind is blowing,
frost [frost] n ; The frost is
strong today,
rare [] ; Strong frosts
are rare in the Crimea,
average ['aev9rid3] ;
Whats the average temperature
in Woscow in May?

low [lou] ; Whats the


lowest average summer
temperature in London?
part n ; What is the coldest
part of the country?
Frosty ['frosti] ; Is it as
frosty in St. Petersburg, as it is in
Moscow?
snow [snou] n ; There was a lot
of snow last winter,
long adv : long ago ; I
read that novel long ago; for
long
; Snow never lies for long in
the Crimea,
alm ost ['o:lmoust] adv ,
, ; has almost done
his homework,
from day to day ;
Its getting colder from day to
day. .

day
,
hard [ha:d] adv ; It rained
(snowed) hard yesterday.
().
They are working hard.
,
world [w3 :ldj; the world n ,
; This is a map of the world,
land [laend] n ,
per cent [pa'sent]
tem perate ['temparot]
; a tem perate zone [zoun]
; a tem perate
climate ; The
country has a temperate climate,
subtropical [,SAb'tr3pikl]
; a subtropical climate
(zone)
(- )
great [greitj , ;
The greater part of Russia is in
the temperate zone,
mass [maes] n
air ] n ; vast [va:st]
m asses of cold air
; fresh
air ; 1 must get
some fresh air.
.
flow [flou] , ,

over ['ouvaj prep ; Vast masses


of cold air are flowing-over the
land.
lower ['1| v ,
; to lower the temperature

central ['sentrgl] ;
Is your house in the central part
of the city?
region ['] n , ,
(
)
continental [,konti'nentl]
; In most regions of
fhe Russia the climate is
continental. Siberia has a more
continental climate.
hot ; Summers are very
hot in here,
short ; Summer is very
short in the north of the country,
long , ;
It was a very long winter,
extreme [iks'trirmj ,
; in the extreme
north
bare [] , ,
(-.)
tundra ['u n d ra] ; The
tundra is a cold bare region, it
occupies the extreme north of the
country.
around fo'round] prep ,
; She is around forty.
( ,
).
zero ['ziarou] ; above
['] zero ; below
[bi'lou] zero 'The
temperature is around 15
above (below) zero.
15 ()
.
cool [ku:l] ; Nights
are rather cool in Central Asia in
summer.
coast [koust] , ;
The Black Sea coast
; Their town is
on the south coast.
.
283

Exercise I. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to active words
and word combinations.

1.
T h e clim ate of Scotland is not as mild as the climate
of England. 2. T he warm w inds of the Atlantic and Pacific
O ceans do not influence the clim ate of the greater part of
his country. 3. T he July average temperature in London is
lower than in Paris. 4. Strong frosts are rare in this part of
the country. 5. "Its as frosty today as it was yesterd ay,
is n t it?" "I think the frost was even worse yesterday." 6. It
snow s more in February than in March in Moscow 7. In
Great Britain the w eather changes from day to day. 8. It
rained hard all day yesterd ay. 9. About 80 per cent of
R ussia is in the tem perate zone. 10. W inters in the south
are not as cold as they are in the central part o f the
country. 11. Siberia has a more continental clim ate,
sum m ers are hotter and shorter, w inters are colder and
longer. 12. T he tundra occupies the extrem e north of the
country. 13. W inters are m ilder and summers are hotter on
the Black Sea coast. 14. It is rather cool here in early
spring. 15. T he tem perature is around 40 above zero.

CLIMATE OF GREAT BRITAINE


A N D OUR CO UNTRY
W estern winds that blow from the Atlantic Ocean
influence the clim ate of Great Britain. T he climate is m ild and
strong frosts are rare. T he January average temperature is
higher and the July temperature is lower than in most
European countries.
T he coldest part of the country is the H ighlands of
Scotland. It is as frosty in Scotland as it is in St. Peterburg.
In January south-w estern England (Devon and Cornwall) is
the warmest part in Great Britain. There snow is rare and it
never lies for long. In summer the south-eastern part of
England is the warmest.
Britain has rain alm ost in every month of the year. In
Great Britain the w eather changes from day to day or even
during the day. It may be sunny in the morning and it may
start raining hard1 in the afternoon.
284

About 80 per cent of Russia is in the temperate zone, 18


per cent in the Arctic and 2 per cent is subtropical.
T he greater part of the country is not influenced by the
warm w inds2 of the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans. There are no
mountains in the north to protect the country from the cold
north w inds. Vast m asses of cold air from the Arctic flow over
the land and lower the temperature in the northern and
reatral regions of the European and Asian parts of the
country. In most regions the clim ate is continental with hot,
short summers and cold, long winters.
T he tundra is a cold bare region, it occupies the extrem e
north of the country.
The lowest average winter temperature in the tundra is
around 30C below zero.3
In the European part of the country the coldest months
are January and February and the hottest m onths are July
and August. There is often a lot of rain in autumn.
In St.Petersburg the clim ate is less continental, summers
are cooler and winters are warmer than in the central regions
of the European part of the country.
Siberia has a more continental climate than the European
part of the country, winters are colder and longer, summers
are hotter and shorter.
The Black Sea coast have a subtropical clim ate. Winters
are mild and summers are hot there.

N am es
ihe Atlantic Ocean [at'laentik 'oujn 1
European Ljusra'pian ]
the H ighlands of Scotland

[ hailandz sv 'skattond 1

Devon f'devsn 1
Cornwall rkD:nwD:ll -
The Arctic l'a:ktik]
The Arctic Ocean
the Pacific [pa'sifik ] Ocean
Siberia [s a i'b io m ]
285

N otes
1. it may start raining hard
2. is not influenced by the warm winds
()
3.

is around 30 (thirty degrees [di'gri:z] centigrade


['sentigreid ]) below zero 30 ()


.
,

. +32,
+212.
Exercise 2. Read and translate the text.
Exercise 3. Find in Ihe text English equivalents for these word combinations
and sentences.

1. . 2.
. 3. ,
- . 4.
. 5. 80%
. 6.
. 7.
(). 8. .
9. -
30 , 10. . 11.
.
Exercise 4. Quote the sentences in which these words and word combinations
are used in the text,

mild, everage, part, snow, from day to day, to start


raining, to occupy, the Atlantic Ocean, vast masses of cold
air, continental, rain, cool, the European part of the country,
the Black Sea coast
Exercise 5. Answer these questions.

1. How do western winds that blow from th Atlantic


Ocean influence the climate of Great Britain? 2. What part of
Great Britain is the coldest? 3. Is it as frosty in Scotland as
it is in St.Petersburg?. 4. What part of England is the warmest
in summer?
5.
What is the weather like in Britain? 6.
286

What climatic* zones are there in Russia? 7. Why do northern


winds that blow from the Arctic Ocean influence the clim ate
of Russia? 8. What is the clim ate like in most regions? 9.
What part of the country does the tundra occupy? 10. What is
the lowest average winter temperature in the tundra? 11.
What are the coldest and the hottest months in the European
part of the country? 12. Are summers in the European part of
the country as hot as (they are) in Siberia? 13. What part of
the country has a subtropical climate?

Exercise 6. Give the degrees of comparison of these adjectives and adverbs.

mild, strong, high, low, cold, warm, frosty, sunny, large,


great, bad, brilliant, good, little, long, short, much, m any,
badly, w ell, exciting, thick, thin, hot, cool, continental,
temperate, difficult, early, easy, easily

Exercise 7. Transform these sentences according to the models. Translate them,

a) It is not as cold in February as it is in January.


It is colder in January than in February.
1. It is not as hot in August as it is in July in Moscow 2.
It is not as cool in the morning as it is in the evening here. 3.
Winters in Moscow are not as frosty as they are in Siberia. 4.
Cold northern winds in the central regions of the country are
not as strong as they are in the tundra. 5. Summers in the
Highlands of Scotland are not as warm as they are in the
south-eastern part of England.
b) I do not like autumn as much as (I like) spring.
I like spring more than autumn.
1. She does not like winter as much as summer. 2. It does
not rain as much on summer as (it does) in autumn. 3. It does
not snow as moch in Decem ber as (it does) in January. 4 . 1 do
not like rain as much as snow. 5. I do not like the continental
climate as much as I like the subtropical climate.
Exercise 8. Insert appropriate form of the adjectives and adverbs giver in
brackets.
* climatic [klai'msetik]
287

1, T he January average temperature in Great Britain is


(high) than in some European countries. 2. Wbere are winters
(long): in Moscow or in Paris? 3, It rained (hard) yesterday
than it is raining today. 4. Today it is (cool) than it was
yesterday. 5. There snow lies (long) than in the south of the
country. 6. If the clim ate is subtropical, then sammers are
(long), 7. February is (short) month of the year. 8. T he
clim ate of Ireland ['a is b n d l is (mild) than the clim ate of
som e European countries. 9. Finland has a (coatinental)
clim ate than Norway ['no:w ei].
Exercise 9. Ask questions to which the italicized words are the answers.

1. Siberia has a more continental clim ate. 2. T he winter


average temperature in the tundra is around 30C below zero.
3. The greater part of Australia [o:s'treiljo ] has a subtropical
clim ate. 4. In the south winters are m ilder than in the central
regions of the country. 5. There are fou r seasons in the year.
6. Spring is the best season of the year in England.
Exercise 10. Insert articles where necessary.

1. ... greater part of Australia has ... subtropical clim ate.


Some regions have ... tropical clim ate. In ... south of ...
country ... January everage temperature is 20C above zero
and ... July average temperature is 9C above zero. It rains
hard in ... tropical north in summer. 2. Canada I'ksensda] is
one of ... largest countries in ... world. It occupies ... northern
part of ... continent ['kontm snt] of North America
[ ' ]. ... northern winds that blow from ... Arctic Ocean
influence ... clim ate o f Canada. Canada has ... continental
clim ate with cold winters and hot summers. 3. It was ... frosty
morning. 4. ... morning was warm and sunny and they went
for ... hike in ... m ountains. 5. July is... warmest month in...
central regions of ... country. 6. Did they come back at ...
night? 7. ... winter is coming. It is getting colder and colder.
8. It was ... very cold winter. ... average temperature was
around 22C below zero. 9. It was ... Friday before he left for
.;. south.
Exercise 11. Insert prepositions or adverbs.

1. Northern winds that blow ... Arctic Ocean influence the


climate ... Finland. ... the south-western part... the country
288

the clim ate is milder. The lowest average February


temperature is ... 15C ... zero ... the north-western part ...
Finland. Snow lies ... 250 days ... the extrem e north-west. 2.
... 70 per cent ... Australia is ... the subtropical zone. 3. Snow
does not lie ... long ... the Black Sea coast. 4. The weather
changes ... day ... day or even ... the day in N ew York
I'njui'jork] ... autumn. 5. Vast m asses ... cold air ... the Arctic
flow ... the land and lower the temperature. 6. It rained hard
... night. 7. They are going ... a drive ... the country ... the
afternoon. 8. They left the town ... a sunny W ednesday...
May.
Exercise 12. Open the brackets and put the verbs in the proper tenses.

1. "Where you (to spend) your holidays last summer?"


"We (to go) to Riga. I (to have) my holidays in July. The
weather (to be) wonderful there. It (to be) as hot there as it
(to be) in Yalta. I (to enjoy) my holidays." 2. "You (to have
got) any plans for the week-end?" "Well, if the weather (to
be) fine and it (not to rain) we (to go) for a walk. Would you
like to come with us?" 3. It (to rain) hard now. We (not to be
able) to go for a hike in the m ountains. 4. "You (to be) ever
to London?" "Yes, 1 (to be) there last summer." "How you (to
like) the weather there?" "Well, the weather (to be) wonderful
when I (to be) there. It never (to rain)." 5. I wonder if they
(to arrive) at the station before the train (to leave). 6. It (to
be) very cold lately. 7. Summer (to com e). It (to grow)
warmer and wanner. 8. The cold northern wind (to blow) all
day long yesterday. 9. Snow (to lie) for about 200 days that
winter. 10. It (to be) the best holiday I ever (to have).
Exercise 13. Give a summary of the text "Climate of G reat Britain and our
country."
Exercise 14. Translate into English.

1. ?
, .
, -
. ,
- . ,
. 2.
. ,
. 3. 80%
.
, , 289
U \ ' ,-

l . <,

. <

- / c u a t i t f ' i

.
.
.
,
, . 4'.
,
, . 5;,
?
. 6.
? 23 .
, , ? 7, ,
. 8.
. , (
) . 9.
?
, . 10.
? . 11.
12. ( ).
Exercise 15. a) Speak on these topics, b) Write a story on one of the topics.

1. Climate of Great Britain. 2. C lim ate of our country. 3.


Climate of Canada (Australia, Finland, etc,). 4. My favourite
season.

LESSO N TW ENTY
Conversations: A. W eather. B. It's Too Wet to Go for a Walk.
C. A Visit to an Exhibition,
Learn these speech p attern s
1. a) I like it when it is warm. , ,
b) I hate it when it rains. ( ),
.
Exercise 1. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

T hey
We

when it snows,
when it rains,
when it is hot.

like
dont like
hate
it

He
She
Peter
290

likes
d oesn t like
hates

w hen you are late.


when my team loses the game.'
when the game is exciting.

Exercise 2. Translate into English.

() ,

.

,
,
.

,
,

,
.

2. a) "I like it when it is warm," "So d o I." ,


. .
b)
"I do not like it when it is cold." "Neither ['naida] do
I." , . .
. :
.
Exercise 3. Read these statements and responses to them. Translate them into
Russian.

a) 1. "John is fond of French." "So am I." 2. "They are


football fans." "So are we." 3. "I go to the football-ground
every Saturday." "So does Bill." 4. "We attended the sem i
finals last Saturday." "So did they." 5. "I was watching a
football match on TV at that time." "So was John." 6. "I have
read this book." "So has Jane." 7. "He can play chess very
well." "So can Jim."
b) 8. "Peter is not a student." "Neither am I." 9. "He
doesnt like it when its hot." "Neither does my father." 10.
"Spartak d idnt win the game yesterday." "Neither did
Vractor." 11. "I d id n t have to go there yesterday." "Neither
did he." 12. "He h asn t had a holiday yet." "Neither have I."
Exercise 4. Give responses according to the model.

Peter lost a game of chess yesterday. (John)


So did John.
1. Spartak won the game last Saturday. (D ynam o) 2. John
Henley scored two goals in the last match. (Peter Brooke) 3.
1 was translating the new text at that time. (Ben) 4. Their
goalkeeper is excellent. (Ours) 5. He enjoyed every minute of
it. (I) 6. I havent seen this film yet. (They) 7. John d oesnt
speak French. (I) 8. She cannot write French. (He) 9. T hey
didnt have an English class yesterday. (We)
291

Exercise 5. Translate into English.

1.
.
. 2. . . 3.
. . 4.
, . . 5.
. . 6.
. . 7. "
" . " . 8.
. . 9.
7
. .
3.
I t s too wet to go for a walk. ,
.
Exercise 6. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

Its too cool


It was too cold
He was too busy
It was too hot
It was too frosty

to
to
to
to
to

go swimming today,
go for a drive,
listen to her.
go for a hike in the m ountains,
go for a walk.

bright [brait] ; ; The


sky was bright. .
brighUy adv ; The air was
fresh and the sun was shining
brightly.
cloud [klaud] over
(); The sky was
clouded over.
.
cloudy ['klaudi] ; The
sky was cloudy and it was
growing cooler,
last [la:st] v ,
. I wonder how long the fine
weather will last.
(w eather) forecast ['fD:ka:stj n
; Do you know
the weather forecast for the
weekend?
foggy ['fogij ; The
morning was foggy and cool,
rainy ['reini] ;
Autumn is a rainy season in that
part of the country,
windy ['wmdi] ; It was
a very windy day.
stop v , ,
; The clock has
292

stopped. -Has it stopped raining?


( ) ?
at last adv ; At last it
stopped raining,
wet ; , ;
October is the wettest month in
Moscow.
hope [houp] v ;
; I hope (that) youU come
to see us next week. We hope to
see you soon,
take off v ; Take off your
raincoat, please,
coat [kout] n ; Will you take
off your coat, please. Its warm
here.
too adv ; Its too wet
today. T hats too bad.
( ).
go out v ; He went out of
the room,
enough [rnAf]
(
); Have we enough
time for a game of chess?
(
),

(, ),
; Help yourself to
some ice-cream,
go swimming () ;
They went swimming every day
last month,
unusual U n'ju: 3l] ,
; He is an
unusual man.
; It is unusual for
him to be late.
. Ant. u su al ['ju: 3l]
,
let in ; Let him in.
. Ant. to let out
exhibition [eksi'bijnj n ,
, ; art
exhibition ,

entrance ['entrans] n ; ,
; at the entrance to
; Lets meet at the entrance to
the university,
autom obile [':1:1] n

be interested ['m tristid] in sm th.


-.; Are you
interested in art?
? (
?)

? 1 have enough chalk.


,
room ; Is there enough
room in your car for us?

? There is enough
room for everything here,
ail pron ; Ail of us are here.
,
decide [drsaid] v , ;
He could not decide what to do.
They decided not to go for a
holiday to Scotland,
wait [weitj v , ; Wait
a minute. ;
to wait for (-., .); Whom are you waiting for?
get (got, got) v , ,
; Get me a pencil, please.
,
. get you a cup of
coffee now.
black coffee ; I like
black coffee,
white coffee ; Do
you like your coffee black or
white?
without [wi'daut] prep ; Id like
black coffce without sugar,
help yourself [jo:'self] to sm th.

Exercise 7. Make up four sentences using pattern 2.

Learn these words an d word com binations

A. WEATHER
1
A: N ice and bright this m orning.1
: Yes. Much better than yesterday.2 I like it when its
warm.
A: So do I. Im afraid it may cloud over this afternoon.
: I dont think itll last.

2
A:
B:

Whats the weather like today?


Its a lovely day. Lets go for a drive to the country.
293


A: Fairly mild for the tim e of year.3
B: Yes. Quite different from the forecast.
A: They say w ere in for snow .4
B: What a pity! I sh an t be able to go for a hike in the
m ountains.
4
A: Cold this morning, isn t it?
B: Yes. And Im afraid its going to get even colder.
5
A:
B:
A:
;
the

I think the w in d s getting stronger.


Y es, its much stronger now that in the morning.
Do you know the forecast for tomorrow?
Cold and foggy in the morning, rainy and windy in
afternoon.

6
A; Is it still raining?
: N o, its stopped at last. I think its going to be a
beautiful day.
B. IT S TOO WET TO GO FOR A WALK
A: Oh, there you are. Im glad y o u ve come. Is John
with you?
B; N o, he isn t. I d on t know where he is,
A: Oh well, h ell be here in a few m inutes, I hope.
Come in and take your coat off.
: Thanks.
A: Y oure very wet. Is it raining?
: Y es, its raining hard. Its too wet to go for a walk.
I m afraid.
A: Oh well, we can go out in the car. T heres enough
room in the car for all of us. W ell decide when John
com es. Would you like som e coffee w hile w ere waiting
for him?
B: Y es, please.
A: I ll go and get you some. Do you like it black or
white?
B: W hite, please, but without too much milk.
A: Here you are. And heres the sugar. Help yourself.
: Thanks.
294

A: What did you do yesterday? Did you go swimming?


; N o, it was too cold to swim.
A: I wonder when Johns coming. Its unusual for him
to be so late.
B: There he is.
A: Oh good. Ill go and let him in.
C. A VISIT TO AN EXHIBITION
Bobrov, a Russian businessm an, meets Mr Chandler, a
British businessm an, at the entrance to the Automobile
Exhibition in London.
Bobrov: H ello, Mr Chandler.
Mr Chandler: Hello, Mr Bobrov. Its a lovely morning,
isn t it?
B:
Y es, its a wonderful morning. Its so warm and
sunny. Going to see the exhibition?5
Ch: Y es, I heard so much about it. Im fond of cars, you
know. Youre going in, too, aren t you?
B:
Y es, I havent seen it yet. Lets go in.
(T hey go into the hall.)
Ch:

Why, its crowded! I must say a lot of people seem to


be interested in cars.6
B:
T h ats nice to know.
N otes

1. N ice and bright this morning, (.) Its nice and bright
this morning.
2. Much better than yesterday, (.) = It is much better
than yesterday. () ,
.
3. for the time of year ()
4. T hey say w ere in for snow. ,
.
5. Going to see the exhibition? (.) - Are you going to see
the exhibition?
6. a lot of people seem to be interested in cars ,
.
Exercise 8. Read and translate the dialogues.
Exercise 9. Find in the dialogues English equivalents for these word
combinations and sentences.

1.
, . 2. ,
. 3. ( )
. 4. . 5.
295

. 6. . 7. ,
. 8. . 9.
(), . 10. . 11.
, ?
Exercise 0. Quote the sentences in which these words and word combinations
are used. Translate them.

bright, to last, forecast, to get, foggy, te stop, to hope, to


take off, too wet, without, unusual, sunny, to go in
Exercise 11. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

Nice an d bright this morning.


Yes. Much better than yesterday.
cold and foggy, rainy and windy; : worse, worse)
2.
I like it when its nice and bright.
So d o L
does Peter, does Jane, do they)
3.
I dont like it when its rainy and windy.
N either does he.
does she, does Aan, do we, do I)
4.
Im afraid it may cloud over this afternoon.
I hope it w ont last.
rain, get w indy, turn foggy)
5.
Fairly m ild for the time of year.
Yes, Quite different from the forecast.
rather cold, fairly warm, very hot)
6.
Do you know the weather forecast for the weekend?
T hey say w ere in for snow.
rain, fog, a snowstorm)
7.
The wind is rather strong this morning, isn t it?
Y es, and its going to get even stgonger.
frost)
8:
Is it still snowing?
N o, the snow has stopped at last.
it raining; B: the rain)
9.
W hats the weather forecast for tomorrow?
Sunny an d warm.
cold and foggy, rainy and windy, frosty and w indy,
sunny and hot)
10. A; W hats the w eather like this morning?
B: Its a beautiful morning. The sun is shining brightly
and its fairly warm.
(A: afternoon; B: afternoon)
296

A:
B:
(A:
A:
B:
(B:
A:
B:
(B:
A:
:
(A:
A:
B:
(A:
A:
B:
(B:
A:
B;
04:
A:
B:
(A:
A:
B:
(B:

11. A:
' B:
(A:
12. A:
B:
(A:
13. A:
B:
(A:
14. A:
B:
(A:

T he weather is a w fu t today, is n t It?


Y es. Much worse than yesterday.
nice, bad; : better, worse)
Is there enough room for all of us in your carl
Oh, yes.
boat, sitting-room )
Help yourself to some apple-pie.
Thank you,
ice-cream , roastbeef, apples, oranges)
Why didnt you swim yesterday?
It was too cold to sw im .
go for a walk, bathe, go for a drive, go out,go boating;
B: to go for a walk, to bathe, to go for a drive, to go
Ncmt, to go boating).
15. A: Michael hasnt come yet, has he?
B: N o, he h asn t. Its unusual for him to be late.
(A: John, Peter, Ben)

Exercise 12. Fill in the blanks with missing remarks. Reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2. A

3. A

4. A

5. A

6. A

7. A

8. A

9. A

10. A

11. A

12. A

N ice and bright this morning.


Sunny and warm this morning.
Cold and rainy this afternoon.
* * *

I d ont like it when its rainy and w indy.

I like it when its sunny and warm.


#

Im afraid it may cloud over this afternoon.


#*

I hope it w ont rain tomorrow.


**

Fairly hot for the time of year.


Do you know the weather forecast for tomorrow?

T hey say w ere in for a snowstorm.


* *

The wind is getting stronger.


*

T he morning is frosty. Do you like it when its frosty?

* awful :]

13. A:
B:
14. A:
B:
15. A:
:
16. A:
B:
17. A:
B:
18. A:
B:
18. A:
B:
20. A:
B:
21. A:
:
A:

Is it still snowing?

W hats the weather forecast for tomorrow?

I hope the fog w ont get thicker.


*
I hope it ll get warmer next week.
**
W hats the weather like today?

Is there enough room in your boat for all of us?


*t
Why d id n t you go boating yesterday?
*
Mary h asn t come yet, has she?
*
I know you re interested in art.

Lets m eet at the entrance to the exhibition.

Exercise 13. Think of the questions or statements to which the following


sentences are the answers.

1.

A: ...?
B; Y es. Much warmer than yesterday.
2. A: ...?
B: Its sunny and warm.
3. A: ...
B: So do I.
4. A: ...
: N either does George.
5. A: ...
: I hope the wind w ont last long.
6. A: ...?
B: T hey say w ere in for rain.
7. A; ...?
: Y es, the wind is much stronger now than it was in
the morning.
8. A: ...
: Its a pity. I shan t be able to go boating.
9 A*
7
; N o, its stopped at last. Its going to be sunny and
warm.
10. A; ...?
B; R ainy and w indy in the morning, cold and foggy in
the evening.
/

298

. .+

11 *
*

1 *

12

A* *

13.
14
j.

15.
16.

17.

at *

: Oh yes. Quite different from the forecast. Its warm


and sunny.
A'
?
B: Y es, I hate it when its cold and foggy.
A: ...?
B: T hey say itll rain all day tomorrow.
A*
i*
+*7
; Y es, theres enough room in the boat for all of us.
A: ...?
B: It was too cold and windy to go boating.
A: ...
: Its unusual for him to be late. I hope h ell be here
in a few m inutes.
A: ...
: See you at the entrance to the exhibition tomorrow
morning.
a

1 *

+ * *

Exercise 14. Reproduce dialogues in pairs.

Exercise 15. Translate into English.

1. , , ?
. , .
. ,
.
.
2.
, ?
, . ,
.
?
. ,
.
, .
3. .
. () .
?
.
, .
4. (awful) . ,
( )..
, .
6 ,
,
5. ?
. , .
, .
299

6.

?
20.
.
.
?
, . ,
.
7. ?
, (snowstorm ).
8. ?
. . ,
.
9. , .
.
10. .
, .
.
11.

12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.

300

! ?
, .
.
, , .
, .
.
.
?
, .
, , . , ,
.
.
?
, .
?
, .
, ?
.
?
, . .
.
.
.
. .
.

Exercise 16. Make up dialogues based on these situations.

1. Speak to your colleague (friend) about the weather. 2.


Ask your colleague (friend) about the w eather forecast for the
weekend and discuss your plans for the weekend.
3.
Speak about the clim ate in R ussia (Great Britain,
Australia, Canada, etc.).
Exercise 17. Make up dialogues based on this picture.

L E S S O N T W E N T Y -O N E
1. NEW GRAMMAR STRUCTURES
1. The Present Perfect T ense
Present Perfect :
1)
sin ce ( -
) for , .
We have had rainy w eather since Thursday.
.
You have lived in Moscow for five years now, havent you?
, ?
has been very busy for the last two days.
.
Since when have you known them?
.
301

2) since .
T hey left for Tomsk two years ago and I have not seen them
since.
.
3) ,
since , .
Sim ple Past.
T hey have been good friends since they met in St. Petersburg
in 1978. 1978 ., ,
() -.
Exercise 1. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to the Present
Perfect Tense.

1. I hqye been a student for a year and a half now. 2. Mr


N elson has been m y doctor for a long time. 3. Mr Jenkins has
been in Moscow for two weeks now. 4. We have h ad rainy
w eather since W ednesday. 5. It has been very hot since June,
h a sn t it? 6. I have not gone boating since last W ednesday. 7,
You have lived in London far two years now, h aven t you? 8.
"Since when have you had that car, Bill?" "Since 1978." 9. We
met in 1979 and have been good friends since.
Exercise 2. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.

A: How long have you known the G reens, John?


J; About five years. Ive known them since they came
to live here in 1981.
(A: the Browns, the Johnsons)
A; Have you seen John lately?
: N o, I havent seen him since he left for his holiday.
04: Peter, Bill, Ben)

Exercise 3. Transform these sentences according to the models.

a) Do you know the Smiths? (for five years)


Y es, Ive known them for five years.
1. Does Mr Brooks work in this office? (for two years) 2.
Do they live in St. Petersburg (since 1975) 3. Is it cold here?
(for three weeks) 4. Is that film on at our local? (since last
Sunday) 5. Is your son at Moscow University? (for a year
now)
b) Did it snow last week? (for two weeks)
No, It hasnt snowed for two weeks.
1.
Did it rain last Tuesday? (for a week now) 2. Did you
see John yesterday? (since last Thursday) 3. Was the sky
302

cloudy yesterday? (for a couple of days) 4. Did they score a


goal? (since the match began)
Exercise 4. Complete these sentences.

I have
clo u d ^ sin ce
hot for ... 5.
five m atches

been awfully busy since ... 2. T he sky has been


... 3. It has been very cold for... 4. It has been
The film has been on since ... 6. T hey have lost
since ... 7. It has not rained since ...

Exercise 5. Translate into English.

1. ? ,
. 2.
. 3.
, .
4. , , ?
, (
). , .
5. , , ? .
( ). 6.
. 7. ,
. 8. ()
.
Exercise 6. Make up ten sentences using Present Perfect.

2.
The Present Perfect Continuous Tense
( )
I
You
We
They
He
She

have

been
writing
letters

since nine o clock in the morning.


for an hour now.
since Peter went out for a walk.

has

have

you
they

has

he
she

How
long

been
writing
letters?

Since 9 oclock in the morning.


For an hour.
f

'
'

Present Perfect Continuous


to be Present Perfect
Present Participle .

Present Perfect Continuous


,


.
, for (for
a long tim e, for a week, for a month .) since (since
early morning, since two o clock .).

, since.
Present Perfect Continuous
,
.
It has been raining hard since early morning.
.
T he north wind has been blowing for three days now.
.
John is very tired as he has been translating an article for four
hours. ,
( ) .
to live, to learn, to
work . Present Perfect Present Perfect
Continuous . :
has lived here for six years. He has been living here for
six years.
How long have you learnt English? How long have you been
learning English?
, ,
Present Perfect Continuous. ,
: to see, to hear, to feel,
to watch .; : to hate, to love,
to want, to like, to dislike .; : to
think, to understand, to know .
Present Perfect.
I have not seen my brother for a long time.
.
They have known our fam ily since we came to live here.
, ( ...) ,
.
I have always liked his music.
.
304

: 1. , ,
Present Perfect Continuous ,
.
I have been thinking about it all day long, .
2. Present Perfect Continuous
Present Perfect.
It has not rained since last Tuesday.
.
Exercise 7. Respond to these sentences according to the models.

a) Have you been staying here long? (for a month)


Ive (I have) been staying here for a month.
1. Have you been learning English long? (for a year and a
half) 2. Has it been ra-ining long? (since early morning) 3.
Has it been snowing long? (since yesterday) 4. Has he been
collecting stamps long? (for five years)
b) She is teaching at Moscow U niversity.
How long has she been teaching at the university?
1. Peter is waiting for them. 2. They are playing football
now. 3. He is watching a rugby match on TV. 4. Shes reading
an article. 5. Vast m asses of cold air are flowing over the land.
6. They are working hard.
Exercise 8. Put the verbs in brackets in Present Perfect Continuous or Present
Perfect.

1. He (to be) very busy lately. 2. I (to wait) for you since
one o clock in the afternoon. 3. How long you (to know) Jane?
4. I (not to m eet) the Marchands since last year. 5. It (to
snow) since early morning. 6. We (to work) hard for two
hours. 7. "How long your mother (to teach) at college?" "For
fifteen years." 8. The north wind (to blow) since early
morning.
Exercise 9. Translate into English.

1.
? . .
, . 2. .
. ( ...) 3.
? . 4.
?
. 5.
? . 6.
.
Exercise 10. Make up ten sentences using Present Perfect Continuous and
Present Perfect.
305

3. Com pounds o f "some", "any, "no", "every"


( )

one
body

+?

+?-

some

any

-f.9_

every

someone

anyone

one

everyone

somebody
-
-
-

anybody
-
-
-

nobody

everybody
,

thing

something
-
-
-

anything
-
-

nothing

everything

where

somewhere
-
-
-

anywhere
-
-

nowhere

everywhere^

som e, any, no, every


one, body, think
, where
.
,
som e, any (. 6).
1.
.
,
.
Everyone has come. .
Has anyone read this book? -
?
Can you hear anything? -?
brought nothing yesterday.
.
2. ,
no one, nobody, nothing, -
306

,
.
N o one knows how to get there. ,
,
3.
no one, nobody, nothing
- anyone,
anybody, anything -
.
:
I fo u n d one there yesterday. I d id n ot fin d anyone
there yesterday.
H e could see nothing. He could not see anything.
4. ,
one, body thing (som eone, som ebody, anyone, anybody
. .), .

som e, any, one, none, each ().
S om e o f us will be able to go swimming.
.
O ne o f us will have to go to the airport.
.
Each o f us is ready to help him.
.
I want none o f these books.
.
5.
,
,

.
N on e o f them is ( are) here. .
6. anyone, anybody, anything
,
.
A nybody can do that. () .
You may take anything. ( ),
.
307

7. ,
if, -, -
anyone, anybody, an y
thing*
If anyone rings me up, tell him I shall be back at 2 p.m.
- , , 2
().
8. , ,
- , som eone,
som ebody, som ething.
W hy d idnt you ask som eone to help you?
- ?
Will you take som ething to read? -
?
9.
else , .
Did you see anybody else there? - ?
10. som eone, som ebody,
anyone, anybody, nobody, everybody
.
I saw so m e b o d y s textbook there. Is it Mikes?
- . ?
: That must be som ebody else's book.
11.

.
There was nothing new in his lecture.
.
I have got som ething to tell you.
.
12. som ewhere nowhere
.
T he bookshop must be som ewhere near here.
, , - .
I can see him nowhere. .
We went nowhere else. .
308

Exercise 11. Make up sentences using ihe table and translate them.

Someone
Somebody

Nobody
N o one

Has

Will

anyone
anybody

anyone
anybody

told him about


it.
called you up
this morning,
has already
translated this
article.

went swimming
yesterday,
came to see us
last Sunday,
has seen the
play.
will go shopping
tomorrow.
read the text?
translated the
article?

go there?

Y es, som eone


(som ebody) has.
N o, no one
(nobody) has.
Yes, som eone
(som ebody) will.
No, no one
(nobody) will.

Exercise 12. Read and translate these sentences.

1.
He put som ething on the desk and went out. 2. No one
scored a goal during the match yesterday. 3. I have never
seen him and I know nothing about him. 4. Can you tell me
som ething about the matter? 5. "Did Peter tell you anything
about his trip?" "Yes, he did." 6. When I saw him he was
talkihg to som ebody. 7. Is there a department store anywhere
near here? 8. You will find the book som ewhere in that
bookcase. 9 "Did any of them come to the library yesterday?"
"No, none did." 10. In a sm all town everyone knows everyone
else. 11. Have you got anything to tell me? 12. Did you find
anything new in the novel? 13. Shall we take som ething to
read? 14. If anyone comes to see me ask him to wait for me.
309

Exercise 1*3. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.

3.

A: Is there anything else to do?


: Yes. You can help P eter d o his hom ework.
(B: translate this article, look through the papers, dictate
som e letters)
A: Will anyone else come?
: I hear M ary and Peter w ere going to come.
(B: Ben and Jack, Jane and Bill)
A: Is it difficult to learn to sw im ?
B: Certainly not. Anyone can learn to swim.
(A, B: to type, spoken French, to drive a car)

Exercise 14. Translate into English.

1. - no . 2.
-
. 3. . 4.
- ? 5*
. 6.
. 7. . 8.
. . 9.
- ? 10.
- ? . 11.
. 12.
.

4. Present Participle in the Function of an Attribute *


(
)
Present Participle**
:
) :
She is a loving little girl.
.
) (

):
T he actress playing the part of Eliza [' ] is brilliant.
, , .
T he nan sitting over there is our new Freanch teacher.
( ) ,
.
* attribute ['aetnbjurt]
** . . 4.
310

Exercise 15. Form present participles from these verbs.

to write, to blow, to do, to give, to leave, to put, to read,


to speak, to wait, to stand, to shout, to flow
Exercise 16. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to present
participles.

1.
The Student sitting next to me is a friend of mine. 2.
The northern winds blowing from the Arctic influence the
climate of the country. 3. Vast m asses of cold air flowing over
the land lower the temperature. 4. T he tundra occupying the
extrem e north of the country is a cold bare region. 5. T he boy
writing on the blackboard is A nns brother. 6. "Im afraid the
boy waiting for his father has got wet. Its raining hard," he
said. 7. T he girl standing next to Ann is one of the best
pupils.
Exercise 17. Mahe up three sentences using present participles.

5.
Article with an Apposition *
( )
1. ,
, .
Michael Petrov, a teacher of English, is coming to see
them tonight.
2. ,
,
.
Moscow, the capital of R ussia, is a beautiful city.

II. W O RD-BUILDING
N oun-form ing suffix "-ing"
-ing
, :
) : swimming , teaching
;
) : writing
.
* apposition [,aep3'zijn]
** capital ['ksepitl] n
311

Exercise. Form nouns from these verbs using the suffix -ing and translate them
into Russian.

to shop, to act, to greet, to begin, to live, to hear

III. TEXT
Learn these w ords and word com binations
postgraduate ['poust'grasdjuit] n
; exchange postgraduate
- (
)
dialect ['daislekt]
a great deal of () ;
spent a jjre a t deal of money last
month.
make (made) friends
, ; She has
made a lot of friends since she
came to Moscow,
quite a few ; I know
quite a few workers from that
factory.
H ouses of P arliam ent [' :1 ]
(
)
look round v ; Will you
look round the town?
. P. . M em ber of
Parliam ent
(
)
S trangers G allery ['streinctesz
'] (

)
first adv , ; First we
had lunch and then looked round
the new school.
H ouse of Lords
( ,
, "
" " )
throne [Broun]
queen [kwi:n]
session ['sejn] ,
; session of P arliam ent
; to open
session of Parliam ent
(

312

,
)
Lord C hancellor ['1$:81] (
)
H ouse of Commons ['komanz]
(
;

)
Speaker (
,

)
Speakers chair (
)
front [frAnt] ; front
seats (
)

( )
" " (
)
bench , ; front
bench (


)
right [rait] ; to
sit on the Speakers right (on
the right of the Speaker)
( )

Prime M inister ['praim 'minista]


-
leading ['li:dirj] ,
; ,
governm ent [' ]

left ; to sit on the


Speakers left (on the left of
the Speaker) (
)

leader ['li:da] n ,
,
opposition [,'$] ;
The O pposition
{.
); Leader
of the Opposition

shadow cabinet ['Jsedou 'kaebimt]


" " (

)
face [feis] , ,
; The school
faces the cinema.
.
window faces the south.
.
cross-bench ['krosbentJJ
(
)
,
-

belong [bi'brjJ v (to)
; Who does this book belong
to? What party do you belong to?
eith er ['5] pron ;
You can take either of the books.
.
Either of them is good,
main [mem] , ;
the main street
political [pa'litikl]

; There are two main


political parties in the USA.
sit (sat) v ; The House of
Commons will sit tomorrow,
foot [fut] n (pi. feet) ,
; Its wet under feet.
. Is it good to sit with
your feet on the table?
in front of prep ; There is a
nice garden in front of our house,
next to prep ; He is sitting
next to Professor Ivanov,
bow tt>au] v ,
; W hats the name of the man
whos just bowed to you?
debate [di'beit] n ,
,
late adv ; Better late than
never. ,
. We arrived too late to see
him.
take u p v , ; We
wont take up more of your time.

,
as cnj , , ; As
we were leaving home, it started
snowing.
along [a'brj] prep (no), no;
They walked along Ostozhenka
(Street).
em bankm ent [lm'ba&rjkmgnt] n

Exercise 1. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to active words
and word combinations.

1,
Most postgraduates spend a great deal of time in
libraries. 2. He is sure to make quite a few friends there.
3.Would you like to look round the H ouses of Parliament? 4.
I wonder if her brother is an M.P.? 6. First we shall go to the
House of Lords and then to the H ouse of Commons. 6. Mr
Brown took them to the House of Lords. 7. The queen never
comes into the H ouse of Commons. 8. Do you know who
opens a session of Parliam ent in Great Britain? 9. The PrimB
Minister sits on the front bench on the right of the Speaker.
10. The Leader of the Opposition walked to the front bench
on the left of the Speaker and sat down. 11. I wonder how
often the Shadow Cabinet meets. 12. He does not belong to
either of the two main political parties of the USA. 13. When
is the cabinet going to sit again? 14. D oes your window face
313

the north? 15. Do the cross-benches face the Speaker? 16.


The debate lasted till late at night. 17. Im sorry, I ve taken
up too much of your time.
A VISIT TO THE HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT
Mary Frolova, an exchange postgraduate from Moscow is
studying English dialects at Oxford U niversity. Mary has
been staying at Oxford for three months now. She has spent
a great deal of her tim e in the U niversity library. Mary has
made quite a few friends since she came to England.
Last week Mary visited the H ouses of Parliament. One of
her English friends, Alice Bromhead, asked Mary if she
would like to look round the H ouses of Parliament. A lices
brother is an M.P. and he got two tickets for the Strangers
G allery.
Alice and Mary arrived at W estm inster at half past eleven
and went to the entrance to the Victoria Tower. A lices
brother met them there. He took them first to the House of
Lords. There they saw the Throne on which the Queen sits
when she opens a session of Parliament and the w oolsack1 on
which the Lord Chancellor sits.
T hen Mr Bromhead took them to the H ouse of Commons.
T hey saw the speakers Chair where the Speaker usually sits.
T he front bench on the Speakers right is for the Prime
M inister and the leading members of his government. The
front bench on the Speakers left is for the Leader of the
Oppositon and members of his Shadow cabinet. T here are
some cross-benches facing the Speaker for members who do
not belong to either of the two main political parties.
After lunch Mr Bromhead took the girls to the Strangers
G allery. Then he went to the House of Commons which was
going to sit in a few m inutes.
Mary was am used to see2 members in the front seats
sitting with their feet on the table in front of them. Some
members were talking to those sitting next to them. Members
were coming in and out all the time, everyone bowed to the
Speaker as he cam e in or out.
If the members liked what a Speaker was saying, they
shouhed, "Hear, hear!3" If they did not like som ething they
shouted, "No!
Alice and Mary listened to the debate until late in the
afternoon. When the debate was over, Mr Bromhead found
them. Mary said to him , "Thank you very much for en
314

joyable visit and for the excellent lunch. I hope we havent


taken up too much of your time."
Mr Bromhead answ ered, "Its som etim es nice to put
pleasure before work4. I m glad you enjoyed the visit.
Goodbye."
Mary and Alice decided to take a walk. As they walked
along the embankment, Alice asked Mary, "I wonder how you
managed to learn English so well. How long have you been
learning it?" "For five years at the Teacher Training College.
There are quite a few very good teachers of English at our
college."
N am es
Alice Bromhead ['aelis 'bromhed ]
W estminster ['w estm m sts] (.
)
Victoria Tower [vik't3:ri9 ] (
)
N otes
1. woodsack ['wulsaek] (
, )
2. Mary was am used [s'm juizd] to see
,
3. "Hear, hear!" "! !" (
).
4. pleasure before work "Work
before pleasure." , .
Exercise 2. Read und translate the text.
Exercise 3. Find in the text English equivalents for these word combinations
and sentences.

1. . 2.
. 3. - . 4. ,

. 5. () .
6. ,
. 7. ( )?
Exercise 4. Quote the sentences tn which these words and word combinations
are used in the text.
315

postgraduate, the Houses of Parliament, the Strangers


G allery, session, his Shadow cabinet, to sit, in front of, next
to, to be over, to walk along, quite a few
Exercise 5. Answer these questions.

1.
What is Mary Frolova? 2. Has Mary made quite a few
friends since she cam e to England? 3. Who invited Mary to
look round the H ouses of Parliament? 4. Where did Mr
Bromhead take Mary and Alice first? 5. What did they see in
the H ouse of Lords? 6. What did they see in the House of
Commons? 7. Where do the leading menbers of the
governm ent sit? 8. Where do the members of the Opposition
sit? 9. Where did Mr Bromhead take the girls after lunch? 10.
What was Mary am used to see? 11. What did members of
Parliament do during the debate? 12. The House of Lords is
less important than the House of Commons, isn t it? 13. Mary
thanked Mr Bromhead for an enjoyable visit, did n t she? 14.
What did Mary and Alice speak about as they walked along
the embankment?
Exercise 6. Give the three forms of the following verbs.

to make, to stay, to spend, to look, to be, to get, to go, to


take, to sit, to m eet, to see, to belong, to come, to bow, to
say, to find, to enjoy, to decide, to learn
Exercise 7. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.

3.

A:
B:

I wonder how M a ry s getting on?


S h es all right. S h es made quite a few friends since
she came to O xford.
(A: Jane, Alice, Ann; B: London j Leeds, Moscow)
A: How long has the H ouse o f C om m ons been sitting
today?
B: For over three hours.
(A: the House of Lords, the cabinet, the Shadow cabinet)
A: Y oure still looking round.
B; Yes, w eve been looking round the H ouses o f
Parliam ent since 11 o clock in the morning.
<: the town, the University)

Exercise 8. Give the degrees of comparison of these adjectives and adverbs.

great, few, long, leading, late, much, many, enjoyable,


excellent, well, good
316

Exercise 9. Insert articles where necessary.


1.
John Din, ... British exchange postgraduate, is studying
... R ussian dialects. He has been staying at ... Moscow
U niversity for over six m onths. John has spent ... great deal
of his tim e in ... library. He has made quite... few friends
since he came to Moscow. 2. Mr Brown invited Viktorov, to
v is it ... Houses of Parliament. Mr Brown is ... M. P. for Leeds.
3. There are over 900 peers* in .. H ouse of Lords. 4. There
are 630 members in ... H ouse of Commons. 5. N o... King or...
Queen of England can come into... House of Commons. 6.
T hey saw ... front bench on ... Speakers right. This bench is
for ... Prime M inister and ... leading members of ...
governm ent. 7.... debate lasted until late in ... afternoon. 8. I
wonder what .. members of Parliament shout when they like
what ... speaker is saying. 9. Thank you for... most enjoyable
evening," she said. 10. T hey decided to take ... walk along ...
embankment after lunch.
Exercise 10. Insert prepositions or adverbs.
1.
W ould you like to look ... the University? 2. Who is
sitting ... the left ... the Leader ... the Opposition? 3. "The
Queen sits ... this throne when she opens a session ...
Parliament," he said. 4. "Did you see the woolsack ... which
the Lord Chancellor usually sits?" she asked. 5. What political
party do you belong... ! 6. There was a beautiful garden ...
front ... the house. 7. Who is sitting next ... the Prime
Minister? 8. I hope I havent taken ... too much .. your time.
Thank you very much.
Exercise 11. Make up ten questions based on the text "A Visit to the Houses of
Parliament" and answer them.
Exercise 12. Open the brackets and use the proper tenses.
1.
The Leader of the Oppositions (to leave) just. His
Shadow cabinet (to sit) at twelve. 2. I (to be interested) in
British political parties. 3. He (to spend) a great deal of tim e
in the British.Library since he (to come) to London. 4. I hope
I (to make) quite a few friends there. 5. 1 d on t think he (to
belong) to either of the two main political parties. 6. "The
debate (to last) for three hours already. Do you know when it
(to be over)?" he asked. 7. They (to walk) along the
embankment for an hour already. 8. 1 hope (not to take) too
much of your time. 9. He (to go) to Sochi for quite a few days.
* peer [] n
317

Exercise 13. Open the brackets and use present participles. Translate the
sentences.

1. The man (to sit) over there is an M. P. for Liverpool. 2.


Please, speak to the man (to read) a book near the window, 3.
T he windows (to face) the north are too large, I think. 4. The
girl (to study) English dialects is a exchange postgraduate. 5.
T he cross-benches (to face) the Speaker are for members of
Parliament who do not belong to either of the two main
political parties. 6. T hey saw som e members (to sit) with their
feet on the table in front of them. 7. Members (to talk) to
(hose (to sit) next to them were not listening to the speaker.
8. The girls (to walk) along the embankment are Alice and
Mary.
Exercise 14. Fill in the blanks with somebody, everybody, som ething, some,
any, etc.

1. I cannot say ... is interested in English dialects but


som e people are. 2. We were unable to see ... in the H ouses of
Parliament during one visit. 3. Please ask ... of the students
to take you to the U niversity Library. 4. Did you hear ... the
speaker said? 5. If the members lik ed..., they shouted, "Hear!
Hear!" 6. If the members did not like ..., they shouted, "No!"
7. Did ... of your colleagues take part in the debate? 8. ...
could answer that question.
Exercise 15. Give a summary of the text "A Visit to the Houses of Parliament."
Exercise 16. Ask questions to which the italicized words are the answers.

1. If the members liked som ething, they shouted, "Hear!


H ear 2. T hey have been looking round the British Library
fo r two hours already. 3. The windows facin g the south are too
small. 4. She has bought quite a few English books since she
began to study English. 5. T he main thing^ is to work hard.
Exercise 17. Translate into English.

1.
. ,
.
. 2. 900 (peers),
630 . 3.
, . 4.
, . 5.
,
-. , 318

, . 6. , ,
. (Labour
[' . 7.
. , . 8.
.
,
. 9.
. 10.
- ? 11.
. 12.
- , :
! ! - ,
: . 13.
,
. 14. ,
? 15. ,
. . ,
.
Exercise 18. a) Make up stories on these topics, b) Write a story on one of the
topics.

1.
A Visit to the Houses of Parliament. 2. A visit to the
Palace of C ongresses. 3. A visit to the Grand Kremlin Palace.

LESSO N TW ENTY-TW O
Conversations: A. Telephone Conversations. B. You should
spend a Holiday in the H ighlands.
Learn this speech pattern
You should spen d a holiday in the H ighlands.
() .
Exercise 1. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

You
He
should
She

wait for them a little longer.


go for a drive in the country. T he weather
is wonderful.
have a cup of hot tea. Y oure wet.
visit the exhibition. Its really interesting,
stay here for three more days.

Exercise 2. Make up sentences using the pattern.


319

Learn these words and word com binations


speaking; Speaking; (
). (This
is) Ann speaking. ,
special I'spejl] ;
nothing special
; Its a special day for me.
,
as far as I know ;
Me is a very good teacher as far
as I know,
[] v ,
; Would you care to go for a
drive? He
?
look ( . . )
! (
); Look,
would you care to come to the
football game with me?
w hether ['weds] cnj (
); I wonder
whether he is leaving London
tonight.
engaged Un'geidbd) ; Mr
Brown is engaged. -
. This seat is engaged.
,
all right 1. predic.
, ; Are you all
right in this room? 2. predic.
,
; Would 11.30 be all
right? 11.30 ? T hats
all right. (
. .). (
),
place ; at ones place -. ; They were at my
place when John came,
sound [saund] v ,
, ; That
sounds very exciting,
sure [Ju9] ; I m sure
youll like the film. She says
shell do it but Im not so sure.
, ,
. Im pretty
I'priti] sure. ,
call [:1] (up) v ; Did he
call you from Kiev yesterday? to
call back (
); Ill call you back
later.
320

I h ear . (); 1 hear


youve been to Edinburgh lately,
have a good time
; I hope you had a good
time in Scotland. Did you have a
good time yesterday?
expect liks'pekt] v ,
, ; I expect hes
engaged now.
so int , ; So what. ?
!
be in , ,
. Is he in? Ant. be out
, ,
; H es out; to be away

m essage ['mesicb] n ; to
give a m essage to smb.
(-.) -.; Will you give a
message to Mr Smith, please?
wrong num ber ['rorj ']
; Youve got the wrong
number. ,
spell [spel]
,
be born [:] v ; Charles
Dickens was born in 1812.
abroad [9'brD:d] adv ,
; lived abroad for
many years; to go abroad

mistake [mis'teik] n ; to
make a mistake
; Shes made a few mistakes in
her translation. H es making a
big mistake.
,
sunshine ['SAnjain] n

loch [bk] n . ; Loch


N ess JIox-Hecc
late , (-.
. .); in late
sum m er (winter)
(); in late autum n
(spring) ( ); They returned home in late
autumn. Ant. early ,
(-. .
.); in early w inter (summer)
(); in early
spring (autum n)
()

A. TELEPHONE CONVERSATIONS
1. INVITATION TO VISIT THE HOUSES OF PARLIAMENT

M ary:
Alice:
M ary:
Alice:
M ary:
Alice:
M ary:
Alice:

8752161.
Is that you, Mary? Alice speaking.
H ello, Alice. How are you?
Im well, thanks. And you?
Im fine, too, thank you.
By the way, what are you doing tomorrow?
N othing special as far as I know.
Would you care to look round the H ouses of
Parliament? My elder brother is an M.P. and h es got
two tickets for the Strangers Gallery.
M ary: Id love to. Thank you very much.
Alice: We must be at the entrance to the Victoria Tower at
ten to eleven. G eorge will be waiting for us there. I
can come and pick you up at 9 tomorrow morning.
W ell have enough time to get there. D oes it suit you?
M ary: Y es, it suits me perfectly. Thank you very much.
Alice: See you tomorrow.
M ary: B ye-bye.
2. MAKING AN APPOINTMENT

Petrov: Petrov speaking.


M r Snyder: H ello. T his is John Snyder. How are you?
Petrov: Fine. Thank you. And what about you?
M r Snyder: Im fine, thank you. Look, I wanted to ask you
I wonder w hether you could come out to lunch
with me som e day?
Petrov: Y es, Id like to very much.
M r Snyder: How about tomorrow?
Petrov: Thank you, but Im alfraid Im engaged tomorrow.
M r Snyder: What about Thursday then?
Petrov: Just a m inute. Let me see. Yes, Thursday would be
fine. What time?
M r Snyder: Would twelve thirty be all right?
Petrov: Y es, th atll be fine.
3. AN INVITATION TO A PARTY

Volkov: Volkov speaking.


M r Brown: Good morning. Robert Brown here. Were
having a little party at our place next Friday. I
wonder if you and your wife would care to come.
321

Volkov: That sounds very nice. What time would that be?
M r Brown: About half past seven, if that suits you.
Volkov: Well, Ill have to check with my w ife,2 though Im
pretty sure w ere free then. Shall I call you back?
M r Brown: T h atll be fine. By the w ay, I hear you ve been
over to Moscow lately. I hope you had a good time,
Volkov: Very nice, thank you.
M r Brown: W ell, I expect youre busy, so goodbye for now
Volkov: Goodbye.
4. NOT AT HOME

Voice: 434 6729.


P etrov: I wonder if I could speak to Mr Hart, please.
Voice: Im .afraid he isn t in just now.
Petrov: Would you give him a m essage, please? Would you
tell him that Michael Petrov called, and that Im very
sorry but I ca n t come to his dinner party tomorrow.
Voice: Ill tell him . What was the nam e, please?
P etrov: Michael Petrov.
Voice: Would you please spell it?
Petrov: Petrov P -E -T -R -O -V .3
Voice: All right, Mr Petrov.
Petrov: Thank you. Goodbye.
5. WRONG NUNBER

A:
B:
A:
B:
A:

384 5629.
Can I speak to Mr Smith, please?
Im afraid y o u ve got the wrong number.
Oh, Im sorry.
T hats all right.
B. YOU SHOULD SPEN D A HOLIDAY IN THE
HIGHLAND

John Black: Have you lived in Edinburgh all your life?


Jan M acdon ald: N o. I was born in the H ighlands, not far
from A berdeen. Have you been to the Highlands?
John Black: N o. We usually go abroad for our holidays.
Jan M acdon ald: That is som etim es a mistake. There are
many beautiful parts of Britain that you should see.
You should certainly spend a holiday in the
H ighlands one year.
John Black: But you get a lot of rain there, d on t you?
Jan M acdon ald: Not as much as people think. We have
more hours of sunshine than many other places in
Britain. T he mountains and lochs are very beautiful
322

in late summer and early autumn. You should


certainly go to the H ighlands and see the places
Robert Burns wrote about.
N am es
Snyder ['sn a id s]
Robert ['1] Brown
Hart [ha:t ]
Jan Macdonald m sk'donald]
Aberdeen Lsebs'diin] .
Robert Burns [' ': (
, 1759 1796)
N otes
1. ' 8 ' 7 ^ 5 '2' 1 \ 6. -
- : 'eigh t-'seven -)fiv e -'tw o - 'o n e -^ s ix .
, double
I'dAbl] : 223 'double 'two- three.
[ou ].
.
2. 11 have to chcck with my wife.
() .
3. P -E -T -R -0-V . ,
, .
: for Paul [:1 ], for
Ernest ['s:m st3, for T ony, R for Robert, for Oscar
['oska], V for Victor Petrov.
,
.
Exercise 3. Read and translate the dialogues.
Exercise 4. Find in the dialogues English equivalents for these word
combinations and sentences.

1.
. 2. , . 3
, . 4. . 5.
( ). 6.
? 7. , , . 8.
. 9.
. 10. . .
, .
Exercise 5. Quote the sentences in which these words and word combinations
are used in the dialogues.

special, whether, speaking, all right, place, to sound, to


323

check, to have a good time, to expect, to be in, to call, to get


the wrong number, to be born, m istake, late summer
Exercise 6. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

A: 341-6625
: Is that you, Peter? John speaking.
04: 738 2246, 231 407, 272 0238; B: Michael,
Robert, Oscar).
A j: What are you doing tomorrow afternoon?
: N othing special as far as I know.
A 2: Would you care to go fo r a drive inthe country?
B: Id love to. Thank you very much.
(A 2 : to look round the H ouses of Parliament, to go
boating, to go for a walk, to play tennis)
A: I wonder w hether you could come out to lunch with
me tomorrow?
B: Y es, V d like to very m uch.
(B: Im afraid, Im engaged tomorrow. Im sorry, Im
leaving on business tomorrow.)
A: Would 72.30 be all right?
B: Y es, th atll be fine.
(A: 10.30, 11.45, 1.45, 2.30)
A: W ere having a little party at our place next
Thursday. I wonder w hether you and your wife would
care to com e.
: Ill have to check with my wife though Im sure
w ere free then.
(A: next Friday, next Saturday, next Tuesday)
A: Could I speak to M r S n yder, please?
B: Im afraid he isn t in juts now.
A* Would you give him a message?
B: Y es, certainly. W hats the message?
(A: Mr Merriman, Pavlov, Bobrov)
A: Can I speak to Mr Pavlov, please?
; Speaking.
( : Im afraid you ve got the wrong number. Im afraid he
isn t in just now. H es out and h ell be back after lunch.)
: Have you ever been to the H ighlands?
B: No. We usually go abroad for our holiday.
: You should certainly spend a holiday in the
H ighlands one year.
0 4 1 , A% Siberia, the Baltic; B: to Sochi, to tne Crimea)

Exercise 7. Fill in the blanks with missing remarks. Reproduce the dialogues.

1.
324

A: 364 5512.
T: ..

A;
T
'*
A:

74
.
i

3.

4.

D.

6.

7.

By the way, what are you doing next Saturday?


*

J L -J

5.

* *

A: Would you care to go for a drive in the country?


T* **
A: I can come and pick you up at 10. Does it suit you?
: ...
A: I wonder if you could came out to lunch with me on
W ednesday.
JS* ...
A: What about Friday then?
B: ...
A: Would 12 be all right?
: ...
A: W ere having a dinner-party next Friday. I wonder
w hether you and your wife would care to come.
.

2.

H ello, Tom. How are you?

A:

I hear youve been to Kiev lately. I hope you had a


good time.
B: ...
A: I wonder if I could speak to Mr Sm ith, please?
Secretary; ...
A: Would you give him a m essage, please?
S: ...
A: Would you tell him that Victor Volkov called and
that Im very sorry but I can t come to the exhibition
with him tomorrow.
S: ...
A: Can I speak to Mr Black, please?
B: ...
A: Oh, Im sorry.
D. *
}

8.

A: Did anyone leave a m essage for me?


B; ...
9. A: Have you lived in Central Asia all your life?
B: ...
A: No. We usually go to the Crimea for our holidays.
B: ...
10. A: You should certainly spend a holiday in Central Asia
on e year.
B: ...
A: It is n t very hot in early spring though there* a lot of
su nsh in e.
11. A: When were you born?
325

...

Exercise 8. Think of the questions and statements to which the following


sentences are the answers.

I.
2

M *

G.* ...
P: Is that you, John? Peter speaking.
A'
7
B: N othing special as far as I know.

4 JL*

i t *

*4

* * 4

5 : Id love to. I like boating.


P*
# : H ello, Mr Pavlov. Hart speaking. How are you?
P
H : Look, I wonder whether you could come out to
lunch with me next Tuesday.
p . t

A?
B: Y es, 11.30 will be fine. It suits me perfectly.
4

J,*

t f

* **

B:

That sounds very nice, I havent been to the theatre


for a month. W hats on?
A
B: Thank you. See you tomorrow.
6. A: ...?
: I spent my holiday in the Baltic last summer. There
was a lot of sunshine. I had a very good time there.
A: ...
B: You should certainly spend a holiday in the Baltic
one year.
7. A: ...
B: Would you give him a m essage, please?
A; ...
8. A .*
B: Can I speak to Mr Volkov, please?
A: ...
B: Oh, Im sorry.
A: ...
9 Ai' 9
B: Im afraid she is n t in just now.
A*
9
B: S h ell be back at four o clock.
10. A: ...?
B: C ertainly, w hats the message?
A: ...
B: Y es, Ill give him the m essage. Goodbye.
II. A: ...
4

326

* *

:
A:
B:
12. A:
B:

Youve got the wrong number.


...

T hats all right.


..?

George Byron was born in 1788.

Exercise 9. Reproduce the dialogues in pairs.


Exercise 10. Translate into English.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

448 6601.
, ? .
, . ?
. ?
, .
, "
"? *?
.
.
.
.
?
, . .
.
?
, .
?
.
12.30. ?
, .
, . .
.
.
?
. ,
, ,
. ?
.
?
, .
- ,
. .
. - .
, , .
.

* Palace of Congresses.
327

6.

7.

8.

9.

.
.
, , .
.
?
, .
?
.
?
. .
?
.
.
.
. ,
. .
.
- .
(James Aldridge)
['Dldricfe])?
1918 .

Exercise 11. Make up telephone conversations. Think of situations.

Exercise 12. Make up dialogues based on this picture.

328

L E S S O N T W E N T Y -T H R E E

I. NEW GRAMMAR STRUCTURES


1. The Past Perfect T ense
I
You

Had

, she

had

We
They

had not

I
you
he, she
they
we

written an

by last
Friday

article

(hadnt)
written an
article

by last
Friday?

Yes, she
had.
No, she
hadnt.

Past Perfect
to have Simple Past Past Participle (
) .
Past Perfect
,
. :
) by (by the
end o f the month, by 5 o clock yesterday, by that time .)
T he SpartaK players h ad scored three goals by the end of
the first period.
.
By that time he h ad already signed the letters.
.
) ( )
, Simple Past.
knew that A rsen al had won the game. ,
.
thought that they had com pleted the work. ,
.
Past Perfect ,
, ,
, .
329

My friend left for Divnogorsk yesterday. He had never


been there before. .
.
: 1.
when.
:
) : Simple Past Simple Past.
When he came into the room, he heard the phone ring.
, , .
) , ,
: Simple Past Past Continuous.
When he left home, it was raining. , .
) , : Simple
Past Past Perfect.
When he got to the station, the train had already left.
, .
) , :
Past Perfect Simple Past; when
after.
When (after) they had looked round the Houses of Parliament, they had lunch.
2. after Simple Past,
.
After she returned home she called him back.
, .
Exercise I. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to the Past
Perfect Tense.

1. By that time they had settled the matter. 2. N o one had


scored a goal by the end of the first period. 3. She had
fin ish ed the book by last W ednesday and gave it back to Jane.
4. Peter Lobov had known Mr W ilson for many years. 5. After
he h ad walked round the city for two hours, he feft awfully
tired. 6. T hey had atten ded the Festival of Song before they
left for O dessa. 7. He went for a walk after he had fin ish ed
the translation. 8. After the manager h ad received all the
visitors, he dictated a few letters. 9. He knew that the Browns
had gone to Scotland by car. 10. I hoped that Peter had not
gone out. I wanted him to help me.
Exercise 2. Transform these sentences according to the models.

a) John saw the new film. (I knew)


I knew (that) John had seen the new film.
1. She did her homework. (I knew) 2. Mr Brown, a British
330

businessm an, has already arrived. (H e knew) 3. T hey did


everything, (I was sure) 4. T hey have already called the
doctor. (I hoped) 5. Jane m ade an appointm ent. (I was sure)
6. T he rain has stopped. (I hoped)
b) We had lunch at two o clock.
We had had lunch by two o clock.
1. They had dinner at seven o clock. 2. They left
Edinburgh in October. 3. We finished work at six. 4. We
attended the art exhibition. 5. He gave the secretary the
m essage. 6. He called them back at five o clock.
c) He looked through the papers. He dictated som e letters.
(after)
After he had looked through the papers, he dictated
som e letters.
1. We arrived. The concert started, (when) 2. He came to
the station. The train left, (after) 3. I received a letter from
him. I went to see him. (after) 4, Peter came to see us. We left
for London, (before) 5. I talked to him. I phoned you.
(before)
Exercise 3. Translate into English.

1. , . 2.
, -
. 3. ,
. 4. , .
5. . 6.
- ,
. 7.
. 8. ,
.
2.
R eflexive and Emphatic Pronouns
( )
I m yself [m ai'self]
you yourself [jo:'self]
he him self [h im 'self]
she herself [h st'self]
it itself fit'self]

we ourselves [au s'selvzl


you yourselves [jo:'selvz]
they them selves [dsm 'selvz]


.
331

one
on eself [wAn'self ].
:
) (

- ): to w ash on eself , to shave on eself ,
to dress on eself .
Peter washed h im self. .
Ann d ressed herself. .
.
.
usually washes in the morning with cold water.
.

) (,
)
, , .
bought h im self a pair of gloves. .
She never talked about herself.
( ) .


, ,
, .

, .

.
John h im se lf told me about it. 1
John told me about it h im self. J .
Mr G reen h im self signed the
paper.
Mr G reen signed the paper
him self.
Exercise 4. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to the use of
reflexive and emphatic pronouns.

1.
H as Ann ever told you anything about herselp. 2. Did
John buy h im self a new pair of shoes? 3. They never talk
about them selves. 4. "Who received visitors yesterday?" "Mr
Brook him self received them." 5. Excuse me, will you find the
332

book or shall I look for it m yself! 6. I hear you are going to


Yalta. I hope you will enjoy yourselves there. 7. He will do
everything h im self. 8. Are you going to buy yourself a new
hat?
Exercise 5. Insert reflexive or emphatic pronouns.

I. I hope you will buy ... the new textbook. 2. Soon he


found... before a big department store. 3. Go to the show next
Sunday and I am sure you will enjoy ... . 4: If he com es to see
us tonight, I shall speak to him about it ... t 5. He wanted to
show her round the city ... . 6. Id like to see him . . . . I have
got som ething to tell him.
Exercise 6. Translate into English.

1.
?
. 2. .
. 3.
, . 4.
? 5. ?
. 6. .
Exercise 7. Make up eight sentences using reflexive and emphatic pronouns.

3.
Substantivized A djectives
( )

().
,
- . ,
.
young the young ,
old the old ,
poor the poor ,
unem ployed
[Amm'phid ]
the
unem ployed
II. W O RD-BUILDING
Prefix "un-"
un-
, , , ,
:

)
un :
unpleasant , unlucky , unpublished
1'1{11 ;
)

: unmake ,
().
Exercise. Form new adjectives, participles and verbs by adding the prefix un-.
Translate them into Russian.

friendly, fruitful, musical, happy, real, true, known, published, paid, written, to think, to make
III. TEXT
Learn these words and m ord com bin ation s
outstanding [aut'staendirj]
, ; Lomonosov
was an outstanding Russian
scientist.
dram atist ['draematrst] n
drunkard ['dnvgkad] n
poor [] ,
gifted ['giftid] ,
,
musician [mju:'zijn] n
leave [lu:v] (left) v ,
; to leave school
; I hear John left school
last year,
age [eictj] n ; at the age of
ten (twenty, etc.)
( . .) ; At
what age did your brother leave
school?
hate v ; ,
;
; I hate it when it rains,
join [ctpin] v 1. ;
; will
join us later; 2.
(, ., .);
Dreiser joined the American
Communist Party in 1945.
for a long time
, ; has not
seen his brother for a long time.
334

make a living (as smb.; by doing


sm th.)
( -.; .); Shaw had to make a living as
a cashier in a land agency,
publish ['$] v ,
; to be published
; When
was Shaws first novel published?
success [sak'sesj n ; to be a
success ,
; Their plan was a
great success,
profession [pra'fejn] n ,

as cnj , (
.
) ; to work as teacher
(journalist, etc.).
.
, work as
( , )

: At
the age of twenty he began to
work as teacher,
critic ['kritik] n
interested f'm tristid]
, ; to
be (to become) interested in
sm th.

() -.;
is interested in art, isnt he?
work n ,
im press [im'pres] v
( -.),
(-.); Did his last
novel impress you?
fail to do smib. ,
,
-.;
failed to understand them.

.
realize ['rialaiz] v 1. ,
; Does she realize that
her father is very ill? 2.
, ,
(, ); They failed to
realize their plan,
necessity [ni'sesiti] n

revolutionary [,rev3'lu:jnan]

reconstruction ['riikgns'trAkJn] n
, ;

pam phlet ['paemflit] n


creator [kri'eitaj n ,

publicist t'pAblisistj

title ['taitl] n ,
criticize ['kritisaiz] v
bourgeois ['bu33wa:]
society [sa'saisti] n ; In
his works Gorky criticized
Russian bourgeois society,
attack [a'taekl v ,

landlord ['laendb:d] n
, ; slum
landlord -, ,

rob [] v
period ['piariadj n ,

war [ w d : ] n ; W orld W ar I
(O ne), the F irst World W ar

criticism [ kritisizmj n ;
drastic [ draestik] criticism
()

im perialist [im'piariahst]

policy ['polisi] n
existence [ig'zistsns] n

true [tru:] , : a
tru e friend
several ['sevrl] ;
several days (boys, books,
etc.); I have read his letter
several times,
describe [di'skraib] v ,
; In his book the
writer describes the life of college
students.
achievem ent [' :\] n

devote [di'vout] v ;
() ;
devoted his life to art; to be
devoted to
-.; His new book is devoted
to the life of a famous actor,
be out ,
; His book is out, isnt it?
stage v (, .
.); to be staged
( , . .);
Where was his last play staged?
perform ance ( :5] n
, ; The
performance begins at 7 o'clock
tonight.
7 ,
the public ['] .
; the reading public
, ; the
theatre-going public
tour [tua] n , ; to
make a tour of
no; When did you make a
tour of Scotland?
award la'waid] v ; to be
aw arded ;
Shaw was awarded the Nobel
Prize for Literature in 1925.
1925 .

,
die [dai] v ; Byron died at
the age of 36.
death [de0] n

335

GEORGE BERNARD SHAW


'George 'Bernard\ - J Shaw, an 'outstanding 'British
-^dram atist, was 'born in "^Dublin, 'Ireland, on '26 Ju_Jly.
"185 \ 6. His 'father was
drunkard and the 'fam ily was
n p o o r . 'Shaw s
mother, a 'gifted m u_^sician, ^left her
^husband and 'went to
London where she 'started to
'work as music teacher.
'As the 'fam ily was 'very _^poor 'Shaw had to "Cleave
.J sc h o o l at the 'age of f i f t e e n . He be'cam e shier in a
'D ublin 'land ^ a g e n c y .1 He hated his _^job and after he had
'worked for 'five _^years he 'gave it -J up and 'left for
"^London. 'T here he 'joined his S m o th e r whom he had 'not
'seen for a 'long time.
'Shaw 'tried to 'make a 'living by "Writing. He wrote
'four
novels which were 'published in 'm a g a ^ z in e s but
they were 'not a suc~^cess. The "\best of .J th e m is "'Cashel
'B yrons P ro~V ession".2 In '1 8 8 -^ 5 'Shaw be'came a
music critic. From '18_^85 to '18_J98 he 'wrote a ""Mot as
critic of -J a rt, - J music, 'literature and drama and was 'very
popular with the readers.
After ,Shaw had .joined the .Fabian S o -J ciety 3 he 'took
'part in d eAbates and 'wrote many "^pamphlets.
In the -^ n in eties4 'Shaw be'gan to 'write for the
"^theatre. He was the cre'ator of a 'new 'publicist "^drama.
In '1892 . J 93 'three 'plays 'grouped under the 'title
"'Plays Un~\pleasan t" 5 were .published. In 'these Splays
'Shaw
'criticized
'British
'bourgeois
s o b r ie ty :
in
""^Widowers -J Houses"6 he at'tacked ~"\slum -^landlords
who 'robbed he . 'During the 'period of '1894 _^97
'Shaw 'published 'three s p l a y s 'grouped under the 'title
"'Plays~S Pleasant".
'When 'World 'War"'} I ^started 'Shaw 'published
"'Comm onsense about the "^War"7 (1914), a
drastic
-^criticism of the 'British 'governm ents ""l policy.
From the 'very 'first 'days of the e'xisten ce of the Soviet
-J Union 'Shaw be'cam e a 'true
friend of the 'first 'socialist
"Estate. In '1 9 -^ 2 8 'Shaw
visited the Soviet Union, 'After
he had re'turned to .JE n glan d he 'published 'several
Particles in which he des'cribed a chievem ents of the
U SS ^ lR .
Shaw wrote over twenty plays. One of his most popular
plays is "Saint Joan"8 (1923). The play is devoted to Joan of
Arc (the Maid of O rleans). The play had not been out a few
336

m onths when som e theatres staged it. Since its first


performance the play has alw ays been a great success with the
public everywhere. Shaw him self liked this play very much. In
1931 he made a world tour visiting India, C hina, Africa and
America.
In 1925 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature
and in 1934 the medal of the Irish Academy of Letters.9
Shaw died at the age of 94 in 1950.

N am es
D ublin t'dAblin] *
Ireland ['a isb n d ]
Joan t>f Arc ['(feoun av'aik]
the Maid of Orleans [:':]
China ['tjains]
Africa ['aefriks]

N otes
1. Dublin land agency ['eid33nsi]

2. "Cashel Byrons ['kaejl 'bairanz] Profession" "
"
3. the Fabian ['feib ia n ] Society
,
; 1884 .
4. in the nineties ['nam tirz]
5. grouped [gru:pt] under the title "Plays Unpleasant"
" "
6. "Widowers ['w idousz ] Houses" " "
7. "Commonsense ['kom snsans ] about the War" "
"
8. "Saint Joan" [sem t 'd30u n ] " ", ,

9. the m edal ['m ed l] of the Irish ['a in j] Academy
[s'kaedami ] of Letters

Exercise 1. Read and translate the text.


337

E xercise 2. Find in the text English equivalents for these vord combinations.

1. . 2.
. 3.
. 4. . 5.
. 6.
(). 7. . 8.
. 9. . 10.
. 11. .
Exercise 3. Quote the sentences in which these words and word combinations
are used in the text.

to be born, at the age of, to give up, to make a living, to


be published, to become a music critic, to be popular with, to
make an impression on sm b., to fail, bourgeois society,
achievem ents, to be devoted to, to be out, to be a success
w ith, him self, to be awarded, to die
Exercise 4. Answer these questions.

1. When was Shaw born? 2. Why did he have to start to


make a living at the age of fifteen? 3. How long did he work
as cashier in a Dublin land agency? 4. Why did he leave for
London? 5. Were his first four novels a success? 6. What did
he do from 1885 to 1898? 7. Under what title were his first
three plays published? 8. What did Shaw describe in those
plays? 9. What pamphlet did Shaw publish when World War
started? 10. When did Shaw visit the Soviet Union? 11. What
did he write about his visit to the first socialist state? 12.
What prizes was Shaw awarded? 13. Which of his plays have
you seen?
Exercise 5. Substitute the active words from the vocabulary' for the italicized
parts of these sentences. The words are given below the exercise.

1. I think he does not understan d how important this plan


is. 2. Not long before he d ied Dreiser ['draizaj joined the
American communist partv. 3. In manv of his books Dickens
I'd ik in z] wrote about the life of poor and unhappy people. 4.
In 1835 Dickens becam e a reporter of the "Morning Chronicle"
['kronikl], 5.Conan D oyle [' dail ] began to write at the
age of twenty.

338

to becom e, to start to work as reporter, death, to start, to


describe, to realize

Exercise 6, Insert articles where necessary.

1. John Galsworthy ['gorlzwstdi 1, ... outstanding English


novelist and dramatist, was born in 1867. He was awarded ...
Nobel Prize for... Literature in 1932. 2. First* Dickens worked
as ... reporter for "... True Sun". 3. After "Oliver ['olivo]
Twist" had been out, all D ickenss works were ... great
success with ... readers. 4. In 1841 Dickens made ... tour of ...
United States. ... tour made ... great impression on him. After
he had returned to England he published "American Notes" in
which he criticized ... American bourgeois society. 5. Conan
Doyle became famous when ... collection of short stories
under ... title "Adventures of Sherlock H olm es** was pub
lished in 1892.
Exercise 7. Insert prepositions or adverbs where necessary.

1.
Jerome K. Jerome ' kei d33'roumJ, a British
novelist and dram atist, was born ... 1859. He had to leave ...
school ... an early age and start to make a living ... him self.
He had worked ... clerk, actor and teacher before he became
a writer. His book "Three Men in a Boat" has been popular ...
the readers since it was ... in 1889. 2. In 1932 Priestley
[pri:stli ] began to w rite... the theatre and published his first
play "Dangerous Corner"***. 3. Graham [' ] G reenes
"Quiet American"**** is devoted ... the war in Vietnam
[viat'nsem ]. 4. Sean O C asey was born ... a poor workers
family ... 1880 ... Dublin. In his youth he became interested
... socialist literature. ... 1913 he took an active part ... the
strike ... the Dublin transport workers. ... the tw enties he
began to make a living ... writing. Sean O C asey wrote plays.
* first adv ,
** "Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" [sd'ventjoz av '$:1 'houms] "
"
*** Dangerous ['deindjarasj Corner " "
**** Quiet f'kwaigt] American" " "

339

... the thirties he joined the British com munist party. His best
play is "Juno and the Peacock"* ... which he was awarded
Hawthornden Prize**.
Exercise 8. Respond to these statements according to the model.

a) His mother has been ill for a month.


By that time his mother had been ill for a month.
1. He has worked as art critic for the "Times" for a year.
2. H e gave up studying English literature. 3. He made a tour
of the Soviet U nion. 4. T hey have already realized their plan.
5. T hey have published two of his novels.
b) T he new performance was a success, (to hope)
I hoped that the new performance had been a success.
1. H e failed to realize the new plan, (to know) 2. Shaws
play "Saint Joan" made a great im pression on him. (to be
sure) 3. H e was awarded the Nobel Prize, (to know) 4. They
have staged his new play, (to think) 5. He has always been
their true friend, (to be sure) 6. He tried to make a living by
writing, (to know)
Exercise 9. Make up ten sentences using Past Perfect and the active words given
below.

an outstanding dram atist, to leave school, to try, to


become interested in, to take part in, to describe, several, t6
be out, to be devoted to, to make an im pression on
Exercise 10. Open the brackets using the proper tenses.

1. A. Cronin (to be born) in 1896. After he (to finish)


school he (to go) to Glasgow ['gla:sgou] University. From
1921 to 1930 he (to work) as doctor first in South Wales***
and then in London. In 1930 Cronin (to fall ill). When he (to
leave) hospital he (to go) to the country. While he (to stay) in
the country he (to write) a novel. After the novel ("Hatters
Castle****) (to be out), it (to be) a great success with the
reading public. It (to be translated) into five languages.
Cronin (to give up) m edicine and (to begin) to make a living
by writing. Several of his novels (to be translated) into
R ussian. 2. I knew that Chekhov and Tolstoy (to be popular)
always with the British reading public. 3. She was sure that
John (to fail) to understand them. 4. I am sure they (can)
realize, their plan next month. 5. He thought that Jill and Ben
(to take part) in the debate.
* Juno I'd 3 u:nouJ and the Peacock" " "
** Hawthornden f'hD:0:>:nd3n] Prize

, 40 .
*** South Wales
**** H atters Castle" "
340

Exercise 11. Make up twelve questions based on the text "George Bernar Shaw"
and answer them.
Exercise 12. Give a summary of the text "George Bernard Shaw".
Exercise 13. Make up situations, using the words given below.

a) T he Life Story* of a Famous Man: to be born, to make


a living, to give up, to devote to, to take part in, to become
famous.
b) My Life Story: to be born, to go to school, to leave (to
finish) school, to go to college, to have true friends, to enjoy
on e's work, to realize, to be a success.
Exercise 14. Translate into English.

1. ,
, 31 1892 . .
(to move [mu:v] to) ,
. ,
,
.
,
("Flares").
,
,
. 1916 .
. ,
.

. 2.
, ,
,
.
(tsarist ['zarrist]) . 3.
(James Aldrige ['D:ldrid3 ]),
, 1918 .
1938 . .
1949 .
.
.
,
,
(fighting against fascism ['faitirj a'geinst 'faejizm ]).
* life story
341

Exercise 15. a) Make up stories on these topics, b) Write a story on one of the
topics.

1.
The life story of my favourite R ussian (English,
American, etc.) writer. 2. The life story of a friend of mine. 3.
My life story.

L E S S O N T W E N T Y -F O U R
Conversations: A. Can you Tell me about R ussian Writers? B.
Tell me about British Writers, Please. C. Could you
Advise me an English Novel to Read? D. I am Fond of
Music.
L tarn these words and word com bin ation s
nam e v ; Will you name
the most popular actors? to name
only a tew
( )

modern ['mDdan] ;
Whos your favourite modern
writer?
be translated v
; Last year his novel was
translated into English,
unfortunately [An'fo:iJnith] adv
; Unfortunately, h es
late.
at present ['prezant]
; I dont need any more
books at present,
fiction ['fikjn] n .
,
; a book of fiction

in translation
especially [i'spe$li] adv ;
He likes the country, especially
in spring,
republish [ri'pAbhf] v
; to be republished
; When was his
novel republished?
classic f'klaesik] n
surprise [sa'praiz] v ; to
be surp rised at smb., smth.
-., -.;
We are surprised at you.
.
342

stand the test of time


; Leo
Tolstoys novels have stood the
test of time,
subject-m atter ['SAbd3ik,tmaet9] n
; What is
the subject-matter of Bondarevs
"Bank"?
problem ['] n ,

conscience {'ksnjgns] n
duty l'dju:ti] n ; ;
Youll have to do your duty.

.
responsibility [riS,pDnS9 'bllltl]

action ['sekjn] ,
( ,
. .)
take place ,
, ; Where does the
action of the novel take place?

?
bomb [] ; atomic
[a'tDmik] bomb
village ['vilicfe]
test v , ;
The USA tested its first atomic
bomb in 1945.
Japanese [,d3sepa'ni:z]
sign ('sain] v ; Did
the manager sign all the papers?

protest ['proutest] n ; .
,


event [ vent J ; These are
the main events of this year,
m essage ['m e s ia l n
(, , .
.); W hats the message of the
novel?
attention [a'tenjn] n ; to
draw am b.s attention to sm th.
-.
-.; The writer draws the
attention of the readers to the
duties and responsibilities of
scientists,
danger ['deind33] n
to my mind [mamd] -,
; my mind the
play is sure to be a success.
(the) social value J'soujl 'vaelju:]
of the novel (
) (
)
undoubted [An'dautid]

opinion [a'pinjan] ;
W hats your opinion of the
novel? to form an opinion
; Read this novel
and form your own [oun] (
) opinion,
finish ('finij] v ,
; When did you finish work
yesterday? Has he finished the
picture yet?
lend (lent) v ,
; Can you lend me that
book?
?
concert ['kansat)
pianist i'pjaenist]
splendid ['splendidI
; The performance was
splendid,
have a look at smth.
-; Will you have a look at
the books Ive just bought?
tour n ; to be on tour
; The Bolshoi ballet
is on tour in France now.

A. CAN YOU TELL ME ABOUT RUSSIAN WRITERS?


(A talk between Bill Anderson, a lecturer at London
U niversity, and Peter Sedov, a Russian feacher, who is
teaching Russian at London University.)
Bill A nderson: Peter, could vou do me a favour?1
Peter S edov: Y oure welcome.
Bill:
Could you name most popular modern Russian
writters?
Peter: W ell, you know, tastes differ. My favourite modern
writers are Solzhenitsyn, Bondarev, Rasputin, Lipatov
to name only a few.
Bill:
Were any of their works tran slated into English?
Peter: I think so. I have Bondarevs "Bank"2 in English.
Bill:
May I borrow it?
Peter: Y es, certainly. Ill bring it tomorrow.
Bill:
Thank you very much. Unfortunately I dont know
any of your modern writers.
Peter: I hope youll enjoy these novels.
343

. TELL ME ABOUT BRITISH WRITERS, PLEASE


A:
B:

A:

A:
B:

Who are the most popular writers in Great Britain


at present?
Its a diffucult question. Tastes differ, you know.
Id say the most popular fiction writers are Graham
G reene, Iris Murdoch, Agatha C hristie, to name only
a few.
As to Graham G reene, Iris Murdoch
and Agatha
Christie Ive read som e of their books in translation.
They im pressed me greatly. I especially liked Graham
G reenes novels "The Comedians" and "The
Honorary Consul".3 I wonder whether John
Galsworthy, Bernard Shaw, Som erset Maugham and
Arnold Bennett are as popular as they used to b e.4
I d ont think so though many of their books are
republished. Galsworthy is my favourite writer. H es
a classic. I hear most of G alsw orthys novels were
translated into R ussian.
Oh, yes. I think Ive read all the books that were
translated.
Im surprised at you, R ussians. You seem to know
English literature better than we do.5

C. COULD YOU ADVISE ME AN ENGLISH


NOVEL TO READ?
P eter R ostov: Could you advise me an English novel to
read?
John Brown: Id advise you to read C.P Snow s novel "The
N ew Men". Though C.P. Snow wrote it over thirty
years ago, the book has stood the test of time.
R ostov: W hats the subject-m atter of the book?
Brown: As far as I understand its the problem of
conscience, duties and responsibilities of scientists.
R ostov: Who are the main characters?
Brown: To my mind the two brothers Lewis and Martin
Eliot.
R ostov: When and where does the action take place?
Brown : During the Second World War and a year after. A
group of British scientists worked on the atomic bomb
344

in a small village, a few m iles from Stratford-onAvon*. Late in July 1945 they learned that the USA
had tested an atomic bomb and that the American
military were planning to drop an atomic bomb on a
Japanese town.
Rostov: Excuse my interrupting you. Did the scientists try
to do something?
Brown: Yes, they did. They signed a protest and took it to
W ashington.
Rostov: But the American military d id n t listen to the
scientists as the events showed.
Brown: U nfortunately, they d id n t.
Rostov: What do you think the m essage of the novel is?
Brown: I think the writer wanted to draw the attention of
the people to the danger of atomic bombs. To my
mind the social value of the novel is undoubted. Look,
I advise you to read the novel yourself and form your
own opinion. When you finish it w ell be able to
discuss it, I could lend you the book, by the way.
Rostov: Thank you.

D. I AM FOND OF MUSIC
(Jane, an English student has just returned from a
concert. She meets Mary, a Russian exchange postgraduate.)
Mary: Hello, How are you?
Jane: Fine, thanks. Ive just been to Richters concert.
Mary: Did you enjoy the concert?
Jane: It was splendid.
Mary: What did he play?
Jane: Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninov and ... Here, have a
look at the programme. I believe Richter is one of the
most brilliant pianists of today.
Mary: Y es, he certainly is. By the way, the Chamber
Orchestra "Moscow Virtuosos"** is on tour in Great
Britain now. Would you care to attend their concert
next Friday? Ive got two tickets.
Jane: Id love to. Thank you very much. Ive read a
review about the concert. It says th eyre marvellous.
Im fond of music.
*
Stratford-on-Avon ['strastfad ' eivsn] . --
** the Chamber Orchestra ['tjeimba 'Dikistraf "Moscow Virtuosos"
[ ,v3:tju'ouzouz| () " "
345

N am es
Graham Greene ['greiam 'gri:n]
Iris Murdoch ['aiaris ' ^ ]
John Galsworthy [^ 'gD:lzw36i ]
Som erset Maugham ['sDmasat ' : ]
Arnold Bennett ['a:nld 'benat]
. P. Snow ['si: 'pi: 'snou]
N otes
1. Could you do me a favour ['feivs]? He
?
2. "Bank" "
3. "The Comedians" [k3'mi:di3nz ] and "The Honorary
Consul" [' 'konsl ] "" "
"
4. as they used [ju:st ] to be (
)
5. You seem to know English literature better than we do.
,
.
Exercise 1. Read and translate the dialogues.
Exercise 2. Find in the dialogues English equivalents for the word combinations
and sentences.

1.
He
? 2.
? 3. . 4. .
5. . 6. ,
. 7.
. . " ". 8.
? 9. , . 10.
... 11. . 12.
.
Exercise 3. Quote the sentences in which these words and word combinations
are used in the dialogues and translate them.

tastes differ, fiction, to republish, to surprise, to stand the


test of time, conscience, to take place, protest, attention,
social value, to be on tour
Exercise 4. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1. A:
346

Could you name most popular m odem Russian


w riters?

2.

3.

4.

5.

My favourite modern writers are B ondarev,


R asputin, Nagibin, Shukshin an d Solzhenitzin, to
nam e only a few.
(A: poets ['pouits ]; B: R ozhdestvensky, V oznesensky,
A bashidse, Evtushenko and Gamsatov)
A: Is L eo T olstoy as popular as he used to be?
B: Oh, yes, His works have stood the test of time.
(A: Gogol, Pushkin, Chekhov),
A: Where does the action take place?
B; In a small village, a few m iles from Stratford-onAvon an d in L on don .
(: in London, in Moscow, in a small town)
A: W hats the m essage of the novel?
B: T he writer wants to draw the attention o f the
readers to the danger o f atom ic bombs.
(B: to show that moral standards* are important)
A: I hear the Bolshoi ballet is on tour in France.
: Y es. And its a great success.
(A: the Moscow Art Theatre, the Chamber Orchestra
"Moscow Virtuosos")

Exercise 5. Fill in the blanks with missing remarks. Reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.

A: M ichael, could you do me a favour?


M : ...
A: Could you name m ost popular modern Russian
writers?
M : ...
A: Could you lend me Bondarevs novel "Choice"?
* *

A: Thank you very much. Unfortunately, I know only


a few of your modern writers.
:
A: Could you name most popular modern British
writers?
*
A: Which of them are your favourite writers?
*
A; Are Dickens and Thackeray** as popular as they
used to be?
B'
A: W hich of D ickenss novels do you like best?

...

3.

4.

4 **

* moral standards {'1 'stsendadz]


** Thackeray [']
347

:
A:

...
I hear most of D ickenss novels were translated into
R ussian.
B: ...

5.

6.

A: Could you advise me an English novel to read?


B: ...
A: Y ouve read Graham G reenes novel "The Come
dians", havent you?
/ *
**
*

7.

A:
B:
A:
B:
A:
B:

Where does the action of the novel take place?


...
Who are the main characters?
...
W hats the m essage of the book?
...

8.

A:

So you ve finished Bondarevs novel "Choice".


W hats the subject-m atter of the novel?

B'
A:
B:
9.

W hats your impression of the book?


...

A:

Can you say that Chekhovs works have stood the


test of time?
10. A: Did you enjoy the concert?
B: ...
A: What did he play?
B: ...
11. A: Who are the main characters of Shaw s play
"Widowers Houses" ?
B: ...
A: Was she play staged at any of the Moscow theatres?
B: ...
12. A:

Would you like to see the Bolshoi ballet? Its on


tour in Great Britain now.

9
A: S hedrins ballet "Anna Karenina".
B: ...

13. A:
B:
A:
B:
*
348

Have you read any English novels in the original?*


...
Was it easy or difficult for you?
...
in the original ['{1]

Exercise 6. Think of the questions or statements to which the following


sentences are the answers.

1*
X

A
I X*'
B;

*7

J. A *

4 4

1*

4 4 4 4

J. .

4 4 4 4

. 1 *

4 4 4 4

X A*

4 4 4 4

. .+

4 4 4 *

T astes differ, you know. My favourite modern


writers are Aitmatov, Bondarev, Abramov, Granin
and Lipatov to name only a few.
1 A7
B: Y es, theres a magazine. Its called "Soviet Litera
ture". Its published in English, French, German and
Spanish. The magazine publishes works of writers,
poets and critics.
3 A'
9
B: My favourite poets are Pushkin, Lermontov,
M ayakovski, Block and Esenin, to name only a few.
*
7
B: Y es, they are. Their works have stood the test of
tim e.
4at A '*
7
B: Ive just finished Graham G reen es novel "The Co
medians".
A: ...?
B: It im pressed me greatly.
5 A'
7
B: T he writer wants to draw the attention of the
readers to problems of peace* and war.
6. A: ...?
B: T he main character is David Copperfield.**
1 A*
7
: I havent finished the novel and I havent formed
an opinion yet.
8 A*
7
B: Y es, I have. I could lend it to you.
9 A*
7
B: T he concert was splendid.
10. A: ...?
B: T he Bolshoi Ballet is on tour in Great Britain now.
v

Exercise 7. Reproduce the dialogues.


Exercise 8. Act as interpreter.

G erald N elson : Hello.


: . ?
Gerald: Fine, thank you. And what about you?
* peace Tpiis] n
** David Copperfield ['deivid 'kop9fi:ldI
349

: , *
Gerald: Could you do me a favour?
: , .
Gerald: Could you tell me about most popular modern
writers?
: ,
. .
, ,
, .
Gerald: Were any of their works translated into English?
: , . "
" ("Choice") .
G erald: May I borrow it?
: .
Gerald: Thank you very much. Could you name most
popular modern poets?
: ,
, , ,
. , "
"
.
Gerald: What does it publish?
: ,
,
.
Gerald: Its very interesting. Ive never heard about it.
Exercise 9. Translate into English.

1. He ?
, ,
, , , ,
.
.
2.
?
, ,
.
?
.
3.
?
,
, (Priestley ['priistli ]),
(Aldridge [yD:ldrid3 ]) .
350


original)?
.

(in the

4.


("An Inspector [in'spekta] Calls") ?
,
.
?
-,
(social injustice).

5.

. .
?
- .
?
,
.

6.

7.

, ?
("The
Picture of Dorian ['d oirisn] Gray", a novel by Oscar
Wilde ['w aild])
?
: (Basil ['baezl]),
.
?
.
?
,
.

?
.
?

, (to the fact th at),
.

Exercise 10. Make up conversations based on these situations.

1. Speak about modern Russian writers (poets). 2. Speak


about R ussian writers, 3. Speak about British writers. 4.
D iscuss the novel you have read. Exchange your im pressions.
351

18 .
. I ,
.
*
. -
.
II (

), ,
, -
.
, (
), .
: 1. , 2.
, 3.
, 4.
.
; ,
,
, .

.
,

.

.
, ,
, .
- ( ,
, , ..
). , ,
-
.
1-16- ,
. .
.
17 18- , -

354

. ,
,
; -
.
3- :
III 2-
() . ,
.

: B.C. -
, (
, , ..), 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18- , I
5, 7, 9, 11, 13- ; .. II 5, 7, 9,
11 13- .

*
- . ., . .
("English for Everyone"). ., . .., 1983. 4.2.

355

CONTENTS
(354)
LESSON ONE
I. New Grammar Structures: 1. Sequence of Tense (358) 2.
Reportted Speech (359). 3. Reported Questions (363). 4.
Reported Commands and Requests (366). 5. The Defenite
Article before the Names of Rivers (367).
II. Text: A Visit to London (368)
LESSON TWO
Conversations A. Asking the Way. , On a Bus. C. Taking a
T a x i D. Telephone Conversation (377).
LESSON THREE
I. New Grammar Structures: 1. The Passive Voice (390). 2.
Passive Infinitive (395). 3. Use of the Article with
Geographical Names (396). 4. Nouns advice, information,
news, knowledge, money and progress (396). 5. Fractions
(397).
II. Text: The United Kingdom o f Great Britain and Nortern
Ireland (398)
LESSON FOUR
Conversations: A. Suggestions about What a Person Should See.
B. Impressions o f a Visit
LESSON FIVE
I. New Grammar Structures: 1. Ways Of Expressing Necessity
(419). 2. The Past Perfect Continuous Tense (426). 3. The
Future Perfect Tense (427).
II. Text: I am his Brother (after B.B. Fowler) (428).
LESSON SIX
Conversations: A. A Visit to the "Spartak" Stadium. B. Sport in
British Schools. C. A t the Doctor's.
LESSON SEVEN
I. New Grammar Structures: 1. The Participle (454) 2. The
Nominative Absolute Construction (459)
II. Text: No Accommodation fo r You (after A.Hailey) (460)
LESSON EIGHT
Conversation: A. A t the Passport Control. B. Passing through
the Customs. C. A t a Hotel. D. In a Restaurant E. In a
Pub. F. A t the Dentists. (473)
356

LESSON NINE
I. New Grammar Structures: 1. Modal Verbs with Perfect
Infinitive (485). Correlative conjunctions both ... and,
either ... or, neith er ... nor (489)
II. Text: Mendoza Sells H im sself (after William Caine) (490)
LESSON TEN
Conversation: Exchange o f Impressions (504)
LESSON ELEVEN
I. New Grammar Structures: 1. Conditional Sentences (514) 2.
Subjunctive Mood in Object Clauses after I wish (519) 3.
Subjunctive Mood in Object Clauses after suggest, insist,
dem and (521)
II Text: Nothing Succeeds Like Success (after Shirley
MacLaine) (522)
LESSON TWELVE
Conversations: A. Booking Seats fo r the Theatre. B. Talk about
Theatre. C. The British Theatre is Dying.(after J. B.
Priestley) (535)
LESSON THIRTEEN
I. New Grammar Structures: 1. The Infinitive (546). 2. The
Complex Object (549). The Complex Subject (551). 4.
For-phrase as Subject (553)
II Text: Sensation is News (after A.J. Cronin) (556)
LESSON FOURTEEN
Conversations: A. Television.
Conference. (569)

B.

Newspapers.

C.

Press

LESSON FIFTEEN
I. New Grammar Structures: 1. The Gerund (538). 2. The
Gerund and the Verbal Noun (590).
II Text: A Poor o f Brain (after Agatha Christie) (591).
LESSON SIXTEEN
Conversations: A. An Invitation to a Conference. B. A t the
Office Equipment Exhibition. C. Scientists Should
Protest. (604)
LESSON SEVENTEEN
I. New Grammar Structures: The Complex Sentence (613)
II Text: Senator fo r Sale (after Gore Vidal) (618)
LESSON EIGHTEEN
Conversations: A. Elections in Great Britain. B. Presidential
Elections in the t/S A (634)
lis t Of Abbreviations (647).
List Of Words (648).
357

LESSON ONE
1* NEW GRAMMAR STRUCTURES
1. Sequence* of T enses
( )
,
.

.

,
( )
.

Simple Past

Simple Past
Past Continuous
Past Perfect
Future in the Past

I knew that they had a French class every Tuesday. ,



. ( )
I knew that they were having a French class then. ,
.
I knew that they h ad already had a French class. ,
.
I knew that they w ould have a French class the next day.
,
.
* sequence t'si:kwans]
358

Future in the Past


should [Jud, jad ] (1-
) would [wud, wad ] (
)
to.
We hoped we would devote his life to art. ,
.
knew that I should tell him about my world tour. ,
.
.
would .
hoped I would do the translation. , .

Future in the Past


,
, .

2. Reported Speech ( )


:
)
that, , , .
says, "They will achieve success". He says (th a t)
they will achieve success.
)
:
says, " /ve just seen your elder brother." He says
(that) he has just seen m y elder brother.
) to say
, , ,
to tell.
She has said to me, "Im awfully tired." She has told
me that she is awfully tired.
Simple
Past, Past Continuous Past Perfect,

.
359

Direct* Speech

Reported Speech

Simple Present
Present Continuous
Simple Past
Present Perfect
Simple Future

Simple Past
Past Continuous
Past Perfect
Past Perfect
Future in the Past


,
:
Direct Speech

this these
now
today
yesterday
the day before yesterday
tomorrow
the day after tomorrow
next week (month, year)
last week (year)

Reported Speech

that those; the


then
that day
the day before
two days before
the next day; the following day
in two days* time
the following (the next) week (month, year)
the previous** week (year), a year (a week)
before

Direct Speech

He said,

He said to me,

"Peter is
looking through
the paper now."
"1 went to see
them the day
before
yesterday."
"V11 go thete
tomorrow."
"My father died
a year ago."

Reported Speech

He said (that)

he had gone to
see them two
days before.

He told me
(that) .

* direct [di'rekt]
** previous rpri:vi9s] ,
360

Peter was looking


through the
paper then.

he would go there
the following day.
his father had
died year before.

: Simple
Past Past Continuous ,
.
said, "Bernard Shaw visited the Soviet Union in 1928". He said that
Bernard Shaw visited the Soviet Union in 1928.
She said, "I met my schoolteacher when I was getting out of the train at Victoria
Station". She said she met her schoolteacher when she was getting out
of the train at Victoria Station.
2. Past Perfect
.
said to me, "The book had been out by last June". He told me <that) the
book had been out by the previous June.
3. ) ,
.
At breakfast this morning he said, "Pll be very busy today", At breakfast this
morning he said that he would be very busy today.
)
, .
On Monday John says to Tom, "Im leaving the day after tomorrow." On
Tuesday Tom sees Bill and says to him, "John said he was leaving
tomorrow." On Wednesday Tom may say to Ben, "John said he was leaving
today".

Exercise i. Give the three forms of the following verbs.

to be, to say, to tell, to speak, to talk, to hear, to have, to


see, to take, to give, to attend, to phone, to go, to enjoy, to
become, to get, to write, to leave, to buy, to remember
Exercise 2. Read and translate these sentences.

1. H e said he had not heard anything about it. 2. H e said


that Peter has booked tickets fot the theatre the previous
week. 3. Mr Stone told me that the m eeting would take place
the following month. 4. He said the secretary had already
phoned Mr Brown. 5. Peter said that the Spartak players had
scored three goals before the end of the first half. 6. He told
them he would speak to Mr Smith about it if he saw him the
next day. 7. Jane said she would join us the next day. 8. Ann
said she was going out that night. 9. She said she had
attended Professor D avys lecture the previous day. 10. Miss
Brooks said that Mr Dodd was speaking on the phone then.
11. She said her husband was manager in a big factory. 12.
He said that Byron was born on January 22, 1788. 13. He
said that he met Ann when he was going to the supermarket.
361

Exercise 3. Choose the proper adverb or the adverbial phrase.

1. Mr Brown said the manager would be back in London


(tomorrow, the following day). 2. He says he enjoyed the film
(yesterday, the previous day). 3. The secretary told Mr Black
that Mr Brown had called him up (two hours ago, two hours
before). 4. T he secretary said Mr Brown was engaged (now,
then). 5. Mary sa y s she will book tickets for the cinema
(tomorrow, the next day). 6. T he journalist said that
Bondarevs new novel would be out (next month, the next
m onth). 7. He said that he had finished his new collection of
stories (last month, the previous m onth).
Exercise 4. Choose the proper tense-form of the verb.

1. He said the novel (is, was) very interesting. 2. Mary


said the weather forecast for the next day (is, was) bad. 3. He
told her that m any of the students (will go, would go) to the
football ground the next day. 4. T he boys say they always
(have suppoted, had supported) Spartak. 5. Peter said he
(will attend, would attend) the Music Festival if it (takes
place, took place) the following June 6. Miss Hornby says that
there (is, was) a m essage for Mr Brown. 7. He said he (will
finish, would finish) his new collection of poems the following
May.
Exercise 5. Make up conversations according to the model.

A; The film im pressed me greatly.


: What did he sa?
C; He said (that) the film had im pressed him greatly.
1. Jack Londons northern stories made a great im pression
on me. 2. John has just gone on a trip. 3. B ills brother has
given up college. 4. T he weather is wonderful today. 5. T hey
are interested in art. 6. She is making a living as a clerk.
Exercise 6. Transform direct speech into reported speech. Make the necessary
changes.

1.
She said to me, "Well go boating tomorrow". 2. He
said, "Well stage this play if you help us". 3. T he secretary
said, "Ive got a m essage from Mr Green". 4. Mr N elson said,
"Shaw was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1925."
5. The old man said to m e, "I met her many years ago". 6. Mr
Smith said, "They had lunch on the train two hours ago". 7.
She said, "Im leaving for London tomorrow".
Exercise 7. Make up ten sentences using reported speech.
362

Exercise 8. Translate into English.

) ,

)
,

,

,
,
2:1 "",

,

.
,
,
,

.

3. Reported Q uestions ( )
1.
.

-
.
.
2. -
,
.
3.

if whether,
.
John asked the secretary whether Mr Brown had com e back.
, - .
:
yes .

answ ered, "Yes, I can." ("No. I cant .") He


answered that he could (he couldn't).
4.
.
asked Jane, "Who won the last swimming event?" He
asked Jane who had won the previous swimming event.
She asked Bill, "How o ld is Johns father?" She asked Bill
how o ld Johns father was.
363

Reported Questions

Direct Questions

General Questions
"Is

Mr Smith a
doctor?"
"Is it raining now?"

He
asked
me,

"Have you finished


the poem?"

He
asked
me

if

Mr Smith was a
doctor,
it was raining
then.

whether
I'weda]

I had finished the


poem.

"Did they enjoy the


film?"
" Will she join us?"
"May I speak to you
after lunch?"

they had enjoyed


the film,
she would join us.
he might speak to
me after lunch.
Special Questions

"What are you doing


now?"
" What
foreign
languages does
Peter knowV

He
asked
me,

"Whose team lost


the
game
yesterday?"
When will you go to
see
your
mother?"
" Where are they
now?"

He asked me

what was doing


then.
what
foreign
languages
Peter knew,
whose team had
lost the game
the
day
before.
when I would go
to
see
my
mother.
where they were
then.

5. to say,
to ask, to wonder, to
want to know.
She said "John, when are you leaving?" She asked
John (she wondered she wanted to know) when he was
leaving.
Exercise 9. Transform direct questions into reported. Pay attention to the
sequence of tenses. Translate the reported sentences.

1. "Is the Music Festival taking place in Edinburgh now?


Mary asked him. 2. "Whats the weather like in Moscow
now?" Mr Smith asked him. 3. "Was it a cup game?" she asked
her brother. 4. "Are you tired?" she asked Jane. "Yes, I am,"
364

Jane answered. 5. "Can you help me translate this article


today?" John asked Bill. 6. "How long did you stay there?"
John asked him. 7. "When shall we meet?" he asked Bill. 8.
"Whats the title of the book you are reading?" Mary asked
Jane. 9. "Where shall we go for the week-end?" Jane asked
her husband.
iV.

Exercise 10. Make up dialogues according to the model.

A: John asked me, "Are they com ing to see us tonight?"


: What did John ask you?
A: He asked me if they were coming to see them that
night.
1. How long did it take him to write the novel? 2. When
will the next match take place? 3. May I have breakfast now?
4. Will you be able to come to the party? 5. When did he make
a world tour? 6. W hats the score? 7. What hotel are they
going to stay at? 8. Who is the m essage from?
Exercise 11. Complete these sentences.

1. H e asked me if... 2. She wondered how long... 3, John


asked Peter w hat... 4. Mr Blackwood asked the secretary how
m any... 5. She asked him what tim e... 6. She wondered how
much... 7. He asked me w hether...
Exercise 12. Put these jokes into reported speech.

1
Wife: Do you want to see the beautiful present I
bought for your birthday?
H usband: What is it?
Wife: Ill put it on in a minute.

2
A schoolboy said to his father: "We gave a wonderful
performance at school. A lot of parents came and they
enjoyed it."
"How do you know?" asked the father.
"They laughed all through the play," the boy answered.
"And what was the-play?"
"Hamlet," said the boy.
Exercise 13. Translate into English.
365

1.
,
. 2. - ,
. 3. ,
. 4.
, . 5.
, - ,
. 6. ,
. 7. - ,
. 8.
, -

4. Reported Com mands and R equests* (


)
Direct Speech

Reported Speech
to

"Tell
him
everything
tomorrow."
She said
to me,

"Dont go to the
cinema today."
"Please help him."

She

asked me
told me
ordered me

tell
him
everything
the following
day.
not to go to the
cinema
that
day.
to help him.

1.

to ask ( ) , to tell , , to
order .
, to tell, to ask, to
order ,
. ,
, ,
,
.
She s a id , "Dont book tickets for the theatre for next Friday."
She asked m e not to book tickets for the theatre for the
following Friday.
: to order ,
.
*
III
.
366

2.
.
not (to go not to go).
3. ,

.
Exercise 14. Transform direct speech into reported speech.

1. "Please show them round the city," Peter said to him.


2. "Please dont call me up before W ednesday," Mr Dobson
said to him. 3. "Please phone Mr Petrov," Mr Dodd said to the
secretary. 4. "Please ask Mr Mitchell to wait for a little
while," Mr Smith said to the secretary. 5. "Dont send the
papers yet," he said to the secretary. 6. "Please show me
another pair of shoes," the customer said to the shopassistant. 7. "Dont buy any bread today," Mary said to her
son. 8. "Please d on t com e back very late," Peter said to his
daughter. 9. "Please try on these shoes," the shop-assistant
said to the customer.
.Exercise 15. Make up dialogues according to the model.

John ( to A nn):
Please show me your new English
textbook.
Peter ( to M a x ): What did John say to Ann?
Max:
H e asked her to show him her new English textbook.
1.
Take a seat, please. 2. Have a cup of tea, please. 3.
D ont buy any oranges today. 4. Please d ont go out tonight.
5. Please show me round the city tomorrow. 6. Please book
two train tickets. 7. D ont be late for the theatre, please.

Exercise 16. Translate into English.

.
,
7.30.
,
,
,
- ,
,
, ,
.
367

5. The Definite Article before the N am es of Rivers


(
)

: the Thames [temz ] (the River Tham es
), the Volga ['volga] (the Volga River
), the Don Idon] , the Hudson ['lu d sn ] .

II. TEXT
Learn these words an d word com binations
farewell [fea'wel] ( . .
)
; farewell speech (dinner,
etc.) (
); to give
farewell (dinner) party
();
Is Peter going to give a farewell
dinner party?
complete [':!] v ,
; I know they have
completed the school building,
work on smth. v .; I wonder whether hes
working on his novel,
take a train (a plane, a bus, etc.)
( ,
. .); Are you going
to take a train?
while n: for a (short) while
( ,
); said he would stay in
Kiev for a while, in a little while
; it will take quite a while

.
sight-seeing ['saitsi:iij]
; to go
sight-seeing
; When are
they going sight-seeing?
couple ['] n . ;
in (tor) a couple of days
(
); will be back
368

in a couple of days,
guidebook ['gaidbuk] n
; a guidebook to London
(Moscow, the British M useum ,
etc.)
(,
. .); Syn, a guide to London
(Moscow, etc.)
list n ; to make a list (of)
; The teacher
asked me to make a list of
students who wanted to see the
film.
capital ['ka&pitl] n
lie [lai] (lay, lain [lei], [lem]) v 1.
; 2.
; Scotland lies to the north
of England.
()
( )
valley ['vseh]
stretch v ,
mile [mail] ; square
[skweQ] mile ;
Hyde Park stretches for many
miles.
population [,popju'leiJn] n
; The population of Canada
is over 26 million,
industrial [in'dAstnsl]

cultural ['^]
centre ['sentgj n
building ['btldigj n
Norman [':]

century ['senijgri] n , ;
in the twentieth (20th) century
()
hundred ('hAndrad] n ;
Hundreds of people came to see
the match,
use tju:z] v ,
; ,
; May I use your pencil,
please? to be used
; What was the Tower used for?
fortress t'b :tris] n
residence f'rezidns] n
prison ['prizn] n
sight [sait] n ( pi.)
; Come and see
the sights of Moscow,
nowadays ['nauadeiz] adv
, ; In many
countries children start school at
the age of six nowadays,
display [di'splei] rt: to be on
display ;
There were a lot of cars on
display,
cathedral [ka'8i:drl] n
striking ['straikjr)]
,
design [di'zain] v ;
; Who will have
to design the new factory?
architect ['cukitekt] n
architecture ['cukitektja] n

part [pa:t] n , ; The


novel is in six parts,
whole [houl] n
area [' ] n ,
, ; Hyde Park is
several square miles in area,
im portant [im'p3:t3nt] ,
; London is one of
the most important industrial and
cultural cities in Great Britain,
king n
bank n
banking
com mercial [':$1]
, ; New York is the
most important commercial centre
of the USA.
white-collar worker
westwards ['westwadz] adv

, ,

reach v , ,
, ; When will the
train reach Edinburgh?
new s-agency l'eid33nsi]

site n ,

flag n
fly (flew, flown [flu:, flounj) v

by day
light [laitl n , ;
burn (burnt) v
by night
opposite [']
;
nearly ['mail] adv , ;
It is nearly four oclock,
bury ['beri] ; to be
buried
memorial [ :1] n ;
a memorial to smb.
-.; war memorial

attraction [a'trsekjnj n
,
historical [his'tDrikl]
; historical associations
[3,sousi'eijnz]

skyscraper ['skaiskreipa] n

make (m ade) v , ;
to be made of smth.
-.; Most
skyscrapers are made of glass
and steel,
build [bild] (built [bilt])
; to be built
; St Pauls Cathedral was
built in 1675-1710.
recently l'ri:s3ntli] adv ;
tie has completed his last novel
recently.
traditionally [trs'dijnh] adv
,
storey ['st3:ri] n ; two(three- ) storey house
(building) - () ; said that the new
block of flats would be a twelvestorey building.
369

district ['distrikt] n ,
change [tjeind3 ] v (), (); ;
Nothing has changed since I last
visited the town.

stili adv , () no
; She is still busy,

Exercise 1. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to active words
and word combinations.

1.
How did you like his farewell speech? 2. Michael said
he would stay there for a short w hile. 3. I know they are
returning in a couple of days. 4. T he British Isles lie to the
west of Europe. 5. May I use your textbook, please? 6. There
were quite a few interesting books on display. 7. Amundsen
reached the South Pole in 1911. 8. He said they would travel
by day and stay at hotels every night. 9. T he guide told them
about the historical events that had taken place many years
before, 10. He told me he had seen som e of the sights at
night. 11. N early a hundred new houses were built in the old
part of the city recently. 12. The skyscraper made of glass
and steel looked beautiful. 13. "Has anything changed since
you last saw the town?" she asked him. 14. "Is Mr Brown still
engaged?" "Yes, I think so." 15. There was a striking contrast
between the two sisters.
A VISIT TO LONDON
On Septem ber 25, 1984 Peter Fedorov, a lecturer at
Moscow U niversity, was giving a farewell dinner party to his
friends as he was leaving for Great Britain the next day.
Peter told his friends that he would teach spoken Russian to
English students at Leads University for a year. He also said
he would try to com plete the English textbook he was working
on.
His friends asked Peter whether he was going by air or by
train. Peter said that he was going by air. George Lunin, one
of his colleagues, who had been to England before, advised
him to take the train. George said if Peter went by train he
would be able to see Poland, Germany and the N etherlands
on his way to England. George said it had taken him about
two days to get to London.
P eters friends asked him whether he would be able to
stay in London for a while and go sight-seein g. Peter hoped
he would stay in London for a couple of days. He said he had
already read the guidebook to London and had made a list of
places he wanted to see.
T his is what Peter read about London.
370

London, the capital of Great Britain, lies in the valley of


the Tham es. (Greater London"1 stretches for over thirty miles
from north to^south2 and for over thirty miles from east to
west. Its population is about seven million. London is the
biggest industrial and cultural centre of Great Britain.
One of the oldest buildings in London is the Tower.
William the Conqueror,3 the first Norman king, built it in the
eleventh century. For hundreds of years the Tower was used
as a fortress, a residence of kings and a prison. The most
popular sight in the Tower nowadays is the Jewel House in
which the Crown jew els4 are on display.
St 'Patils Cathedral is not very far from the Tower. The
cathedral the most striking building in the C ity,5 was
designed by Sir Christopher Wren, an outstanding British
architect.
Tftfc City of London is a very small part of the whole, it is
only one square mile in area but it is the most important
banking and commercial centre of the country. Every day over
a milliorf^white-colltfr workers come to the City offices and
banks.
If you walk westwards from St P auls you reach Fleet
Street. Here the most important newspapers and newsagencies have their offices.
Walking along the Strand you can reach the Houses of
Parliament. The new building for the H ouses of Parliament
was built in 1840 on the site of the old Palace of Westminster.
When Parliament sits a flag flies from the Victoria Tower by
day and a light in the Clock Tower above the famous Big Ben6
burns by night.
Opposite the H ouses of Parliament stands Westminster
Abbey, famous for its architecture and historical associations.
Nearly all kings and queens have been crowned7 in the Abbey
since the tim e of the C onquest.8 Chaucer, Spencer Tennyson,
Oickens and many other famous men and writers were buried
there. In the P oets Corner9 there are memorials to
Shakespeare, Milton, Burns, Byron and many other poets and
writers.
One of Londons attractions is its parks, Hyde Park the
most famous of them.
There are many other historical buildings and museums
in London. Some skyscrapers made of glass and steel10 were
built in London recently but they are not popular with
English people who traditionally like to live in small twostorey houses.
371

N am es

Leeds [li:dz ] .
Poland ['poutand]
Germany : 1
the N etherlands ['n ed sb n d zj
the Jewel ['<3:1 ] House
St Pauls Cathedral [seint 'po:lz ka'6i:drl 1
.
Sir Christopher Wren ['kristsfa 'ren ]
Fleet Street -
the Strand [straend ] ()
the Palace ['paehs] of W estm inster ['w estm insta]

( )
W estminster Abbey ['sebi ]
Chaucer ['tjoiss]
Spencer f'sp en ss]
Tennyson l'te n isn ]
Shakespeare ['Jekspia]
Milton ['m iltn ]

Notes
1. Greater London (
, , , ,
; 32 )
2. from north to south. from...
to , , .
3. William the Conqueror I'wiljsm ']
, I (1027 1087),

4. the Crown [kraun] jewels (
)
372

5. The City ( ,
;
)
6. Big Ben " ", " " ( ,
)
7. have been crowned ( Perfect
)
8. the Conquest ['kogkwestj (

1066 .)
9. the Poets ['p o(u )its ] Corner (
,
)
10. m ade of glass [gla:s] and steel
(m ade
).
Exercise 2. Read and translate the text.
Exercise 3. Find in the text English equivalents for these word combinations
and sentences.

1. ,
. 2.
, . 3. , ,
,
. 4. ,
. 5. ,
. 6.
. 7. .
8. . 9.
-. 10. 1840 . 11.

.
Exercise 4. Quote the sentences in which these words and word combinations
are used in the text.

farew ell, while, sightseeing, couple, list, to lie, mile,


building, to build, hundreds of, to be used, striking, whole, in
area, nearly, recently, district
373

Exercise 5. Study the text and answer these questions.

I. Why was Peter Fedorov giving a farewell party to his


friends? 2. What did Peter tell his friends about his job*? 3.
Why did George Lunin advise Peter to go to London by train?
4. What did P eters friends ask him about? 5. For how long
did Peter hope to stay in London? 6. Where is London
situated? 7. What is the oldest building in London? 8. Who
was St Pauls Cathedral designed by? 9. What is the city
famous for? 10. What do you know about Fleet Street? 11.
When was the new building for the H ouses of Parliament
built? 12. What is W estminster Abbey famous for?
Exercise 6. Insert prepositions or adverbs.
I. Lenin visited London several tim es. In 1902 he came ...
London to prepare everything ... the publication** ... "Iskra".
He stayed ... London ... a short while. ... his stay he studied
the life ... the British workers and attended their m eetings.
He liked to walk ... London streets. H e knew London very
well and called it a city ... great contrasts. 2. Karl Marx came
... England ... the summer ... 1849 ... the age ... thirty-one,
and spent there the rest of his days.*** Marx was buried...
Highgate Cem etery.**** 3. Glasgow, one ... Britains
industrial centres, is famous ... its historical associations. ...
Daniel Defoe ['daenial 'di:fou] said that Glasgow was "one ...
the cleanliest, most beautiful and best-built cities in Great
Britain". Modern Glasgow is a very large city that stretches ...
many m iles... north ... south and ... east ... west. 4. The
teacher asked Ann to make a list ... students who wanted to
go ... the Television Tower. 5. Johns sister bought a guide
book ... Kiev yesterday. 6. George is going to give a farewell
dinner ... his friends as he is leaving ... Siberia ... a couple of
days. 7. How many cars are there ... display? 8. How many
memorials ... Pushkin are there in Moscow?
Exercise 7. Insert articles where necessary.
1. Londoners are fond of ... beautiful parks of their city.
At weekends hundreds of people come to ... parks. 2. Most of
*
job
** publication [,1$]
*** the rest of his days
**** Highgate Cemetery' ['haigit 'sematri]
374

... London streets are narrow.... Oxford Street is ... busiest


street: there are ... lot of department stores, shops and offices
there. 3. St.Petersburg is one of ... most beautiful cities in ...
world. 4. Tallinn is ... ancient city... old part of ... city with its
narrow streets and tw o-storey buildings is like an open-air
museum. Estonia [estouniQ] is famous for its festivals of ...
song. Festivals of ... song take place all over .. the country in
spring and in summer.

Exercise 8. Make up fifteen questions based on the text and answer them.

Exercise 9. Give a summary of the text "A Visit to London".

Exercise 10. Open the brackets and put the verbs in the proper tenses.

1. John told me he (to give) a farewell dinner party the


following Friday. 2. She said Jane Morton (to teach) spoken
English at Moscow U niversity then. 3. Mr Chandlers said that
Kiev (to change) greatly for the last ten years. "It (to be) one
of the most beautiful cities in the Ukraine", he added. 4. He
said that Mr Barton (to stay) in Tallinn for a couple of weeks.
5. The guide said that the sightseeing tour (may) take them
from four to six hours. 6. I wondered whether the train (to
reach) already Leeds. 7. T he teacher told Mrs Jones that
there (to be) a striking contrast between her two children. 8
He said that they (to visit) the Tower the day before. 9. The
guide said that nearly all English kings and queens (to be
crowned) in W estm inster Abbey. 10. Jane asked her friend to
make a list of things they (to need) for the trip. 11. The bus
iiriver said that Suzdal (to be) only a few m iles away. 12. I
wondered whether he (to buy) a guide-book to St. Petersburg.
13. He said they (to walk) along Arbat when he (to meet)
Ihem. 14. Did he say that he (to stay) there for a short while?
15. She said she (to com plete) the textbook she (to work on)
the following month.
i;xercise II. Make up ten sentences using reported speech and the following
active words.
375

to reach, to design, to go sightseeing, nearly, change,


district, a couple of, to make a list of, to build, commercial

Lxercise 12. Translate into English.

1.
. ,
(sports facilities
[fa'silitiz 1). 1980 . XXII
. (tourist ['tu srist])

, ,
. 2. ,
, (the Potomac
IpD'toumak]) River).
. ,
1 . .
. 3. ,
. 4. - (Burton)
, .
,
, . 5. ,
. 6.
,
(Rastrelli)
. 7. ,
, 1970 .

Exercise 13. a) Prepare a talk* on these topics, b). Write an essay** on one of
the topics.

1. The town (the city) I like best. 2. A capital city. 3.


Im pressions of a visit to a town (a city).
* prepare a talk
** essay I'eseil ,
376

L E SSO N TWO

Conversations: A. Asking the Way. B. On a Bus. C. Taking a


Taxi. D. Telephone Conversation.

Learn these speech patterns


1.

You'd (You h a d ) better ask the policeman.


. (
.)

Exercise 1. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

Y oud better
H ed better

speak to the teacher about it.


leave for the airport now.
read the guidebook,
ask them to help you.
phone him now.

f-Zxercise 2. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

A:

I don t understand what he meant by that.

B:

Y oud better ask him .

(B: speak to him; tell him what you want to do; tell him
everything).
'L Is this the right bus for the Town Hall?
? (
?)
Exercise 3. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

377

the station?
bus
Is this the
right

trolley
bus*

Moscow University?
for

tram**

London University?
the airport?
the National Gallery
Tgaebri 1?

Exercise 4. Make up sentences using the pattern "Is this the right bus (tram,
etc.) for ..?"

Learn these words an d word com binations

left n ; on the left


, ; on
your left ; Youll
see a supermarket on your left.
to tu rn (to the) left
; Turn left at the school
and youll see the bus-stop.
right [rait] n ; on
the right ,
; on your right
; to turn (to the) right

straight [streit] on adv ;
Turn left at the supermarket and
then go straight on.

way [wei] n 1. , ; Ill


ask the way. .
Could you tell me the way to the
nearest underground station? He
,

? 2. : "No
T h rough Way" (
) ; "Way Up"
; "Way Down"
tu rn round v
traffic-lights ['traefik.laitsj n
.
distance ['distans] n ;
What distance is it to Kiev? Its
no distance at all.
.

far (farther, farthest) adv ,


; Is it
far? far from ; Is Red
Square far from here?

stran g er ['streindsal n ,
,

car-driver n (
)

policem an [po'lr.smsnj n
,

passer-by ['pa:sabai] n (pi.


passers-by)

conductor [kan'dAkta] n
( )

* trolley-bus ['trolibAs]
** tram
378

put down v ; to put


smb. down at a stop
-. ,
-., ;
Did you ask the conductor to put
you down at the department
store?
get off v ( ,
.); to get off at
the next stop; You'll have to get
off at the next stop.
wrong [)] ,
, , (
); Im afraid youre
wrong. ,
. His answer is wrong, to go
the wrong way
, ; They
went the wrong way.
change v ,
; to change (for a
train) at a station; Youll have
to change at Trafalgar
[trg'fa&lgaj Square for a 11 or a
12 bus.

11 12.

appointment with Mr Britton for


ten oclock? to keep (to break)
an appointm ent (
) ; Im
afraid Ill have to break the
appointment with Mr Smith.
possible ] ;
Im sure he'll do everything
possible to help you. ,
,
. as soon as
possible ;
Please come back as soon as
possible.
urgent ['3:d3ant] ,
, ;
The matter is urgent.
(,
) .
perhaps [pg'haeps] adv
, ; ;
Perhaps hell lend you the book.
perfect ['paifikt] ,
, ,
; The weather was
perfect. Its perfect. .
(.)

post-office ['poust,afis]
,

the M inistry of Foreign Trade


taxi ['taeksi] ; to take a taxi


() ; You are
going to take a taxi, arent you?
Its a long distance.

hold the line


( )

prom ise ['promis] v ; I


promised to call him back.
do ones b est
; , ;
They are doing their best.
, .

available [s'veilabl] a: Is Mr Brown


available just now?
- (
-
)?
put smb. through [6ru:] to smb. v
-. -. (
)

in time ; Youre just in


time. ()
.

believe [bi'li:v] v ,
; I believe h es already
completed the novel.

keep (kept) v . ,
. You can keep
the book. I do not need it.

show n ; the International


Agricultural [,'1$1]
Show

appointm ent [ ' ] n (


) , ()
; to make (to have) an
appointm ent
; Did you make an

official [s'fifl] ; Is
the news official?
?
379

opening ['())] n ;
Would you like to attend the
official opening of the exhibition?

send (sent) v ,
; When did you send the
letter?

mind [mamd] v: if you dont mind


(
)

com plim entary [ ' ]


ticket ,

A. Asking the Way

1
A:
:
A*
B:
A:
B:

Excuse me. Can you tell me where South Street is,


please?
Take the secon d 1 on the left and go straight on.
Is it far?
No, its only about five m inutes walk.
Thank you.
Not at all.

2
A ( car-driver to a passer-by): Excuse m e, please. Could you
tell me the way to the station?
B:
Turn round and turn left at the traffic-lights.
A:
Will it take me long?
B:
No, its no distance at all.
A:
Thank you.
B:
T hats OK.
3
Excuse me, can you tell me where the nearest
underground station is?
Im a stranger here. Youd better ask the policeman.
B:
A (to the policem an ): Excuse me, officer,2 could you tell
me the way to the nearest underground station?
Youre going the wrong way. Go straight on and
B:
take the second on the right. Youll see it on your left.
A:

B. On a Bus
1
A ( a t the b u s-sto p ): Is there a bus from here to the
National G allery3?
380

:
A:
B:

Y es, take a 124 and ask the conductor to put


down at Trafalgar Square.
Thank you.
T h ats OK.

you

2
A:
B:
A:
B:

D oes this bus go to the station?


N o, youll have to get off at the bank and take a 12.
Can you tell me where to get off?
Its the next stop but one.5
3

A:
B:
A:
B:

Is this the right bus for the Town Hall?


N o, youre going the wrong way. Y oull have
change at the post-office and take a 192.
Thank you.
Not at all.

to

C. Taking a Taxi
A:
Piccadilly,6 please. I have to be there by 10.30.
Taxi-driver: I cantprom ise, but Ill do my best ... Y oure
just in time. 70 p ,7 please.
A:
Thanks a lot. H eres 80 p. You can keep the
change. (H eres a pound. Give me 20 p change,
please.)
D . T elephone Conversation
1
Secretary: Good morning. Mr Brownings office.
Victorov: Good morning. Can I speak to Mr Browning,
please? This is Victorov speaking.
Secretary: Mr Browning is out. Can I help you, Mr
Victorov?
Victorov: Id like to have an appointment with Mr
Browning.
Secretary: When would you like to come?
Victorov: As soon as possible.
Secretary: Im afraid th eres nothing tomorrow. Mr
Browning is very busy just now. If it is urgent,
perhaps we could find time tomorrow.
Victorov: N o, it isn t as urgent as that. It can wait until
the day after tomorrow.
381

Secretary:
Victorov:
Secretary:
Victorov:
Secretary:

What time could you come on W ednesday?


As late as possible in the afternoon.
Would 4.30 be all right?
Yes, thats perfect. Thank you. Goodbye.
Goodbye, Mr Victorov.

2
Secretary: Good morning. British Em bassy.
Petrov: Good morning. Id like to speak to Mr W eston,
please.
Secretary: Whos calling, please?
Petrov: This is George Petrov from the Russian Ministry of
Foreign Trade.
Secretary: Will you hold the line, please? Ill see if Mr
Weston is available ... Im putting you through.
M r Weston: H ello, Mr Petrov.
Petrov: H ello. I believe you know that the International
Agricultural Show is to open next W ednesday,
September 8 th in Sokolniki Park. I wonder whether
you would like to attend the official opening.
M r W eston: Thank you very much for the invitation.
Unfortunately I cant accept it. I have another
engagem ent. I think Mr Morton will be able to attend
the opening if you don t mind.
Petrov: W ell be glad to see Mr Morton. W ere sending a
Complimentary Ticket for him. G oodbye.
M r Weston: Goodbye.

Notes
1. Take the second (. . the second turning
). .
2. Excuse me, officer ['o fiss].
, officer ().
3. the National G allery (
,
- )
4. take 12 (twelve) (. . take a number 12).
,
100 : take
22 (twenty tw o), 97 (ninety seven); 100 take 22
382

: take 182 (one-eight-tw o).


5. Its the next stop but one.
( ).
6. Piccadilly (Circus) [,pik3'dili ,s9:kas] , (
)
7* 70 () 70
Exercise 5. Read and translate the dialogues.
Exercise 6. Find in the dialogues English equivalents for these word
combinations and sentences.

1. . 2.
? 3. . 4.
. (- ) 5. . 6.
12- . 7. . 8.
. 9. . 10. 20
. 11. ....
12. . 13. ,
. 14. .
Exercise 7. Quote the sentences in which the following words and word
combinations are used in the dialogues.

to try, quite all right, to tell the way to, to turn round,
stranger, you d better, to put smb. down, to get off, the right
bus, to do o n es best, in time, possible, available, to put smb.
through to sm b., show, official
Exercise 8. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

().

A:
:
(A:
A:
B:
(B:
A:
B:
(A:
A:
B:
(A:
A:
B:
(B:
A:

Do I take the secon d on the leftl


N o, you want the first on the right.
third, right; second, right; B: fourth, left; third, left)
Is it far? Should I take a bus?
No. Its only a fiv e m inutes walk.
seven, four, ten)
Could you tell me the way to the p o st-o fficel
Turn left at the traffic-lights.
the University; B: right)
Does the 68 go to the university?
Im a stranger here. Youd better ask the policeman.
72, the technical college; 152, the Town Hall)
Can you tell me where to get off?
Its the next stop but one.
the next stop, the third stop, the fifth stop)
Is this the right bus for the bank?
383

N o, youre going the wrong way. You want a 132


from the station.
04: the post-office, the university, the Town Hall; B: an
18, a 254, a 98)
7. A: Does this train go to Piccadilly Circus?
B: N o, youll have to change at O xford Circus.
(A: Moscow U niversity, Trafalgar Square; B: Teatralnaya
Square, Baker Street)
8. A: What should I see next?
B; Have you been to the N ational Gallery?
(B: the Tate G allery, the Town Hall, the British Museum)
9. A: Will three o clock be all right?
B: Y es, thats perfect.
(A: ten, two, four, five)
10. A: Id like to make an appointment with Mr Smith.
B: When would you like to come?
A: A s soon as possible.
(A: Tomorrow if possible. N ext Monday morning. As late
as possible tomorrow afternoon.)
11. A: Good morning. This is Peter Vetrov. I d like to
speak to Mr R eston, please.
B: Will you hold the line, please? 141 see if M r Reston
is available.
(A: Michael Lomov, Jane Kozlova; : Mr W ilson, Mr
W heeler)

Exercise 9. What would you say if you took part in these dialogues? Dramatize t
them.

1.

2.

3.

A (sta n d in g near the m onum ent to Lerm ontov): Excuse


me, can you tell me where Basmannaya Street is?
B: ...
A: Is it far?
B: ...
A: Thanks a lot.
A (sta n d in g near fh e Politechnical M useum ): Excuse
me, but Im trying to find the Bolshoi Theatre.
B: ...
A: Should I take a bus?
B: ...
A: Thank you very much.
A ( standing near the m onum ent to Prince Yuri

Dolgoruky): E xcuse me, can you tell me where the


nearest underground station is?
B: ...
A: Thank you very much.
A (in a car in Neglinnaya S treet): Excuse me, please.
Could you tell me the way to Tverskaya Street?
B: ...
A: Will it take me long?
B: ...
A: Thank you.
B: ...

4.

5.

A (o n the platform o f U niversity underground station):


Does this train go to Kiev railway station?
B: ...
A: Thank you.
B: ...

6.

A:

7.

Secretary: Good morning. Mr W heelers office.


K ozlov: ...
S: Nr W heeler is out. Can I help you, Mr Kozlov?
K: ...
S: When would you like to come?
K: ...
S: Would 3.30 tomorrow afternoon be all right?
K: ...

8.

Secretary: Good morning. R ussian Em bassy.


M r Wilson: ...
Secretary: Will you hold the line, please? Ill see if Mr
Rostov is available ... Im putting you through.
M r Wilson: ...
R ostov: Thank you very much for the invitation. Id be
glad to come and see the exhibition.
M r Wilson: ...
R ostov: Thank you. Goodbye.
M r Wilson: ...

Taxi! Trafalgar Square, please. 1 have an


appointm ent at 11.30.
T-d: ...
A: Thanks very much indeed. H eres the fare* and this
is for you.

fare [fea]
385

13

Exercise 10* Think of the questions to which the following sentences are the
answers.

2.

3.
4.

5.

6.
7.
8.

**?

Take the third on the left and go straight on.


**?*
N o, its only a few m inutes walk.
* ?
t
Turn right at the traffic-lights.
**?*
N o, its no distance at all. Itll take you about six
m inutes.
**
Im a stranger here. Y oud better ask the policeman
** 9*
N o, youre going the wrong way. You want a 192
from the bank.
?

Im going to the Tretyakov Art Gallery.


* *?
*
Nothing special.
*?
Thanks. Id love to.
?

1 * 4

Y es, it suits me fine.


9 *

Id like to make an appointm ent with Mr Brown for


tomorrow afternoon.
s .- *
. T h ats perfect.
9. A: *
B. Im afraid h e s broken the appointment.
10. A. ** 1
B. Thank you very much for the invitation.
U nfortunately I cant accept it. I have another
engagem ent. I think Mr Sokolov will be able to attend
the opening if you don t mind.
A. *
B. G oodbye.

Exercise 11. Reproduce dialogues , , C, D in pairs.


Exercise 12. Replace direct speech with reported speech.
386

1. John asked the passer-by, "Is it far ?" 2. Peter asked


Bill, "Should I take a bus?" 3. A young man asked him,
"Could you tell me the way to the station?" 4. He asked Bill,
"Will it take me long?" 5. Jane asked a passer-by, "Is there a
bus from here to the National Gallery?" 6. Peter asked, "Does
this bus go to the station?" 7. John asked an old man, "Can
you tell me where to get off" 8. Ann asked one of the
passengers, "Is this the right bus for the Town Hall?" 9. Peter
asked m e, "What are your plans for tomorrow morning?" 10.
He asked me, "What are you doing in the afternoon?" 11. He
asked John, "What Art galleries have you been to?" 12. "Did
you find the shortest way to the underground station
yesterday?" Bill asked him. 13. "What bus goes to Kazan
Station?" an old man asked him. 14. "How long will it take me
to get there?" he asked the taxi-driver. 15. The young man
said to him, "Take the first on the left and go straight on." 16.
The policeman said to him, "Turn round and turn left at the
traffic-lights." 17. The boy said to her, "Go straight on and
take the second on the right." 18. She said to him, "Take a 12
and ask the conductor to put you down at Trafalgar Square."
Exercise 13. Give a summary of dialogues A (1, 3), (2), D (1) in reported
speech.
Exercise 14. Translate these dialogues.

1. , ?
.
.
.
2. ?
?
.
.
?
.
.
3. ,
?
. .
12-
(Marble Arch).
387

4.

5.

.
,
?
,
.
.
.
.
. , ,
?
, .
.

6.

, ,
?
.
?
, .
.
.

7.

-?

-.

8.

, ?
.

9.

! .
11.00.
, . ...
. 1 20 ,
.
. , ,
.
10. -
.
?
.
, -
. ?
, .
2 ?
, . . .
11. . .

388

.
- .
, . ,
- .... .
, - . ?
, . - ,

(motor exh ib ition ).
?
. .
.
Exercise 15. Make up dialogues based on this picture.
Exercise 16. Dramatize these situations.

1. You are staying in London. Ask a British colleague how

to get to the H ouses of Parliament.


2. You are in a street (in a foreign city). You do
how to get to. Ask a passer-by to tell you the way.
3. You are on a bus. Ask a passenger if this is
bus.
4. You are in a taxi. You have an appointment at
he taxi-driver to hurry.
5. At the airport you meet a friend of yours. On
I'rom the airport you discuss plans for sightseeing.

not know
the right
9.30. Ask
your way

389

LESSON THREE
1. NEW GRAMMAR STRUCTURES
1. The P assive Voice ( )
Simple

Present

Continuous

Many new films are


shown at our
local every
month.

Past

A new film was


shown at our
local last week.

Future

Several new films


will be shown at
our local next
month.

Perfect

A new film is being


shown at our
local now.

The new film has


already been
shown at our
local.

The new film was


being shown
when we came
in.

Mr Brown said that


a new Russian
film had been
shown at their
local the
previous
Saturday.
By the end of next
year the new
hospital building
will have been
completed*.

1. Passive Voice
to be ,
Past Participle** ( )
.
:
Continuous.

Passive

Voice

Future

2. Passive Voice ,
, . , ,
.
:
That school was built last year.
.
* Future Perfect Passive 5.
** Past Participle . 1, 13.
390

: , ,
, , ,
, by, with, of.
The play "Three Sisters" was written by Chekhov, the great Russian writer.
" " ,
.
Her letter was written with, a pencil. .
Many modern buildings are made o f steel and glass.
.

3.

, .
, Passive Voice
,

(, , ),

, .
: 1. ,
,
.
Everyone listened to him with great attention. He was 'listened 'to with
'great a- ^ttention. .
2. ( to give),
,
.
gave Ann interesting book. A nn was given an interesting book. An
interesting book was given to Ann.
He told me the news this morning. I was told the news this morning. The
news was told to me this morning.
3. to report (), to say, to believe [bi'li:v] (
), to expect [ik'spelt] (, ), to know
Passive Voice it: It is
reported that ... (), ..., It is said that ...
, ..., It is believed that ... , ..., It is expected that ...
, ..., It is known that ... , . . . .

, . .
It is expected that many foreign guests will come to Moscow for the Great
October Revolution celebration. ,

.

4.
:
)
- (
, ,
).
His new collection of poems has just been published. .
391

) , -.
T he letters are being typed now.
.
)
.
When was this college opened?
?
Exercise I. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to the Passive
Voice.

a) 1. Sochi Festivals of Song are attended by a lot of


people. 2. I hear the game was lost by the Dynamo team
yesterday. 3. "Were the letters signed yesterday?" "No, they
w ere n ot. 4. "Will the translation be com pleted tomorrow?" "I
hope, it will."
b) 5. I believe the hockey match is being shown on TV
now. 6. T he new sky-scraper is being m ade of glass and steel,
7. T he factory was still being built when we came to live there.
c) 8. His last book has just been published. 9. T he plan has
been changed, hasn't it? 10. "Nothing has been done to help
him," sh e said. 11. All the passengers have been p u t down at
the post-office. 12. H e hasnt been pu t through, has he? 13.
H a s the list of students who want to see the war memorials
been typed yet?
d) 14. His new novel is much talked about, isn it? 15. 1
w onder w hy he is alw ays laughed a t * 16. T hose papers
havent been looked through yet.
e) 17. It is expected that they will do everything possible
to help him . 18. It is believed that the M inister will attend the
official opening.
Exfercise 2. Respond to these questions according to the models.

a) Do people speak English in many countries?


Y es, English is spoken in many countries.
1.
Do people buy a lot of newspapers every day? 2. Do
they translate a lot of foreign books into Russian every year?
3. Do m ost people often spend summer holidays in the south?
4. Do the Caucasian m ountains protect the Black Sea coast
from the cold northern winds?
b) Did they ask a lot of questions after the lecture?
Y es, a lot of questions were asked after the lecture.
* to faugh [la:f] at smb. -.
392

1. Did they complete the plan yesterday? 2. Did they show


the film yesterday? 3. Did they publish his article last week?
4. Did he make a list of books last Monday? 5. Did they make
the sky-scraper of glass and steel?
c) Shall I help you translate the article?
N o, thank you. Its been translated.
1. Shall I help you type the letters? 2. Shall I tell him
about it? 3. Shall I book train tickets? 4. Shall I invite them to
the party? 5. Shall I make a list of students who want to see
the film?
d) When will they complete the plan? Tomorrow?
Y es, itll be completed tomorrow.
1. W hen will they settle the problem? N ext W ednesday? 2.
When will he complete the novel? N ext month? 3. When will
they publish his new textbook? N ext October? 4. When will
they stage the play? N ext April? 5. When will they change the
plan? N ext week?
e) Have they settled the problem yet?
N o, it s still being settled.
1. Have they built the school yet? 2. Has he written the
article yet? 3. Has he translated the novel yet? 4. Has she
made a list of new textbooks yet?
f) T hey met the Browns yesterday. Did you know?
Y es, I knew the Browns had been met.
1. We took them round the city yesterday. Did you know?
2. T hey com pleted the school building last veeek. Did you
know? 3. T hey invited the Smiths to the farewell dinner
party. Did you know? 4. John bought a guide-book to St.
Petersburg. Did you know?
g) Will you sign the letters? (Mr Brown)
N o, th e y ll be signed by Mr Brown.
1.
Will you translate this article? (a friend of mine) 2. Did
you m eet the delegation yesterday? (my school colleagues) 3.
Have you com pleted the plan? (Peter Gromov) 4. Has he
made a list of students? (Mary)
Exercise 3, Respond to the statements according to the models.

a) T h e y ve looked through the papers.


So the papers have been looked through,
393

1. T hey talk a lot about his last play. 2. They will wait for
John. 3. T hey are laughing at him. 4. He has not looked
through his article yet.
b) Their plan will be a great success, (to expect)
It is expected that their plan will be a great success.
1. Her acting made a great im pression on everyone, (to
believe) 2. Chekhov is very popular with British readers, (to
know) 3. They are going to change their plan, (to say) 4.
T hey failed to realize their plan, (to report) 5. They will stay
in Tallinn for a couple of weeks, (to expect)
Exercise 4. Use the verbs in brackets in the proper tense of the Passive Voice.

1. Six Olympic com plexes (to build) in Moscow for the


22nd Olympic Gam es. 2. Thousands of foreign guests (to
invite) to attend the W inter Music Festival in Moscow. 3.
Young people from many foreign countries (to teach) at
Moscow university. 4. N othing (to hear) of him since he left
N ew York. 5. How m any goals (to score) by the teams before
the end of the first period? 6. When America (to discover)? 7.
Do you know if the last match (to win) by Spartak? 8. I hate
it when people (to laugh at). 9. It (to expect) that his new
play will be a great success. 10. It (to know) that Aitmatovs
last novel made a great impression on everyone. 11. It (to
believe) that they went the wrong way. 12. It (to report) that
his new novel is popular with the readers.
Exercise 5. Translate into English.

1. , .
2.
. 3.
- XXII
? 4. .
. 5.
, . 6. ,
, . 7.
, . 8.
,
. 9. , . 10.
? . 11'.
, ? 12. ()
. , . ,
.
Exercise 6. Make up ten sentences using the Passive Voice.
394

2. P assive Infinitive ( )
Passive Infinitive

Active Infinitive
to
to
to
to
to

build
write
sign
attend
publish

to be

built
written
signed
attended
published


to be Past
Participle .

.
Som ething m u st be done to help them com plete the job.
- ,
.
We are sure the problem can be easily settled .
, .
The article m ay be translaled today. ,
.
Exercise 7. Give the Passive Infinitive form of the following verbs.

to book, to build, to finish, to take, to sign, to publish, to


borrow, to teach, to see
Exercise 8. Transform these sentences according to the model and translate
them.

He must com plete the novel next month.


T he novel must be com pleted next month.
1. He can finish this translation tonight. 2. You may buy
a guide-book St. Petersburg in Moscow. 3. T hey should settle
the problem. 4. He may sign the letter after lunch. 5. You
should open the window. 6. They may publish his new book
next January. 7. You should teach foreign languages to
children. 8. You can borrow books from the library.
Exercise 9. Translate into English.

1. , .
2. . 3.
, . 4.
, . 5.
395

. 6.

. 7.
.
3.
U se o f the Article with G eographical* N am es
( )
1. :
) , ,
: the Gulf of Finland I'fin b n d ] , the
English Channel ['tjaenl] (
- ), the North Sea
, the Irish ['airif ] Sea , the
Caspian ['kaespisn] Sea , the Atlantic
Ocean [stTsentik oujnj , the Arctic
l'a:ktik] Ocean , the Pacific
[pa'sifik] Ocean , the Indian ['in d ian ] Ocean
;
) : the Caucasus
I'k3:k3s3s] , the Ural ['juarl] Mountains
, the P ennines ['p en in zl , the
Cheviots ['tjevists ] (the Cheviot H ills) -,
the Cambrian ['kaembrian] Mountains .
:
: Elbrus [el'bru:z] , Ben Nevis [ben 'nevis]
-, Mount Everest ['maunt 'evarest] .

) :
the N etherlands ['n ecb b n d z] , the Ukraine
[ju'kreinl , the Crimea fk rai'm is] , the Hague
[h eig] .
2. :
Loch N ess [b k 'nes ] - ( , loch .
), Lake Baikal [leik bai'ka:l] .
4. N ouns "advice", "information", "news", "knowledge",
"money" and "progress"
1.
advice [sd 'v a is] , ,
information , , , knowledge
riDlid3 1 , progress , ; m oney
[ ]
.
* geographical ['!}
396

They gave us some good advice.


.
There was very little information on the subject.
.
His knowledge of German is poor.
.
is making progress in his studies.
.
: news , ,
,
.
What is the news? ?

2.
a piece [pi:s] of: a piece of advice ()
, a piece of information ( ) , , a
piece of news ( ) .
3. advice, inform ation .
.
som e, any
,
.
The advice he gave me is very good. ( ),
(-) , (-).
5. Fractions ( )

,
: 1 /3 one third, 1 /8 one eighth, 1 /9 one
ninth.
,
-s: 2 /3 two thirds, 3 /5 three fifths,
5 /7 five sevenths.
,
, : 3 /4 m ile
(: three fourths of a m ile).
,
, : 2 1 /3
m iles (: tmo and a third miles two miles
and a third).
Exercise 10. Read these fractional numerals.

a) 1 /4 , 1 /2 , 1 /5 , 2 / 5 , 5 /9 , 7 /1 2 , 3 /8 , 1/25;
b) 1 /4 m ile, 2 /5 km, 4 /7 mile, 5 /8 km, 3 /2 8 km;
c) 2 2 /3 m iles, 3 1 /2 km (kilom etres), 4 3 /5 miles.
397

II. TEXT
Learn these words and word com binations
situated ['si^jueitid]
, -.
, ; Great
Britain is situated on the British
Isles [ailz].

,
island ['ailand]
total [ 'toutl] , ;
The total area of the country is
over 200,000 square miles,
kilom etre ['kii9,mi:t3] n ;
sq u are kilom etre (sq km) .
. ( k m 2 ) ; France has an area of
554 thousand sq km.
separate ['separeit] v ,
; England is
separated from France by the
Channel,
wash ( ); In the
north Canada is washed by the
seas of the Arctic Ocean,
middle
middle n
mountainous ['mauntinasj

peninsula [pi'ninsjub] n
occupy I'okjupai] v 1. ; to
occupy a house (a room, etc.);
Their ofiice occupies two floors.
2. , ;
to occupy a country (a town,
etc.)
tall ; "How tall is he?"
"Hes 2 metres tall." Ben Nevis is
the tallest peak of the Highlands,
peak n ,
m - m etre ['mi:tal n ; This
street is only six metres wide,
flat ,
except [ik'sept] prep ,
, ; Everyone
has come except Peter,
deep ; That lake is very
deep,
port n
estuary ['estjuari] n ()\
,
398

mineral resources ['minarl


ri's3:siz] ;
The Siberia is rich in mineral
resources,
vast [va:st] ,
deposit [drpDzit] n ,
; There are vast
deposits of gas in Siberia,
coal n
oil n
gas n
discover [dis'kAvs] v ;
; When was oil
discovered in Siberia?
current ['] n ,
severely [si'viali] adv ,
; Winters are not
severely cold here.
,
rarely ['] adv
nationality [^'] n
; The Canada is a
country of many nationalities.
Scottish ['skoti:J]
W elsh [welj] ,

Irish ['airij]
immigrant [Emigrant] n
coloured ['kAlad] n (
, . .)
form er ['fo:nm] ,
, ; Mr
Bailey is the former manager of
the company,
colony ['1] n
industrialized [in'dAstrolaizd] a
,
; highly industrialized
; Syn.
industrial
industry [indAstri]

develop [di'vetop] v ;
to develop economy []
industry, etc.
, . .;
Many new industries have been
developed in the country.

decade ['dekeidj n
position [pa'zifn] n ,

am ong [' ] prep ,


, ; Their village is
situated among the hills. The old
mother was sitting among her
children.
recognition [.rekag'm jnj n
; ; to change
beyond [bi'jond] recognition
;
Your sister has changed beyond
recognition,
no longer
leading ,
im perialist [im'piarislist]

state n

politically [pa'litikali] adv


;

financially [fai'naenfah] adv
,

dependent [di'pendant] 1. on
(upon) ; The
success of the tour is dependent
on the weather. 2.
, ,
; a dependent country
; A n t inde*
pendent [jndi'pendant]
, ,

parliamentary monarchy
[,:1' '
()

Names of co n tin en ts an d som e European and A sian countries

Name of the continent/country

Adjective

Africa ['aefrika]
America [' ]
Asia ['eifa]
Australia [3:s'treilja]
Europe ['juargp]

Afghanistan
[aef'gaenistaen]
Austria ['xstrra]
Belgium ['belcfeam]
Bulgaria []
Canada E'kaenada]
China 1 '^ ]
Cuba t'kju;ba]

Afghan ['aefgaen]

Czechoslovakia
['iJeko(u)slo(u)'va:kia]

Austrian [':>:stmn3
Belgian ['belcfoan]
Bulgarian []
Canadian [ka'neidjgn]
Chinese ['tjai'ni:z]
Cuban f'kju:b 3 n]
Czechoslovakian

Denmark l'denma:k]
Finland ['fintend]
Germany [<:1

African t'aefrikan]
American [' ]
Asian ['eifanj
Australian [Dts'treiljsn]
European [,]' 1]

{'$eko (u) slo (u)' vaekian]


Danish ['dem ij]
Finnish ['finifj
German [(]
399

Name of the continent/country

France [fra:ns]
Hungary ['hArjgariJ
Iceland ['aisland]
India I'm dja]
Iran [i'rQinJ
(the Republic of)
Ireland E'aigbndJ
Italy [#iteh]
Japan [']
Korea {()':]
Mongolia [mDg'goulja]
the Netherlands
['nefobndz]
Norway ['nD:wei]
Poland ['poubndj
Rumania [ru:'meinj9]
Sweden ['swi:dn]
Turkey ['ta:ki]
the United Kingdom
['kirjdsm] of Great
Britain and Northern
Ireland
the United States of
America

Adjective

Italian [rtaeljsn]
Japanese [,d3aep3'ni:z]
Korean [']
Mongolian ['^]

Dutch [dAtJ]

French IfrentJ]
Hungarian [']
Icelandic [ais'laendik]
Indian ['indjan]
Iranian [ai'rem jsn]
Irish ['am rijj

Norwegian [no:'wi:d3(9)n]
Polish ['poulij]
Rumanian [ru:'meinj3n]
Swedish ['swi:dij]
Turkish ['tsikijj
British, English

American [' ]

Exercise 1. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to active words
and word combinations.

1. T he USA consists of fifty states. 2. The total area of


Finland is over 3 37,000 sq km. 3. T he Urals separate Europe
from Asia. 4. Canada is washed by the seas of the Arctic
Ocean in the north. 5. In the South Mongolia borders on
China. 6. T he Irish Republic occupies two thirds of the island
of Ireland. 7. Most of the Siberian rivers flow into Arctic
Ocean. 8. T he USA is rich in mineral resources. 9. There are
vast deposits of oil and gas there. 10. T he population of the
USA is over 237 mln. 11. Czechoslovakia is a highly
industrialized state. 12. In the past three decades Mongolia
has changed beyond recognition, many new industries have
been developed, new industrial centres have been built. 13.
400

Israel has always politically and financialy been dependent on


the USA.
THE U N ITED KINGDOM OF GREAT BRITAIN AND
N O R TH ER N IRELAND
T he U nited Kingdom is situated on the British Isles. The
British Isles consist of two large islan d s, Great Britain and
Ireland, and a great number of small islands. Their total area
is over 244,000 sq km.
T he British Isles are separated from the European
continent by the North Sea and the English Channel. The
w estern coast of Great Britain is w ashed by the Atlantic
Ocean and the Irish Sea.
Northern Ireland occupies one third of the island of
Ireland. It borders on the Irish Republic in the south.
T
T he island of Great Britain consists of three''main parts:
England (the southern and middle part of the islan d), Wales
(a m ountainous peninsula in the w est) and Scotland (the
northern part of the isla n d ).
There are no high m ountains in Great Britain. In the
north the Cheviots (the Cheviot H ills) separate England from
Scotland, the Pennines stretch down N orth England almost
along its m iddle, the Cambrian m ountains/occupy the greater
part of W ales and the H ighlands of Scotland lire the tallest of
the British m ountains Ben N evis, the tallest peak of the
H ighlands, is only 1,343 m high.
T here is very little flat country except in the region known
as East Anglia.
Most of the rivers flow into the North Sea. The Thames is
the deepest and the longest of the British rivers, it is over 300
km long. Some of the British greatest ports are situated in the
estuaries of the T ham es, M ersey, T yn e, C lyde and Bristol
Avon.
Great Britain _is_jipt very rich in mineral resources, it has
some deposits of coal and iron ore and vast deposits of oil and
gas that w ere discovered ir%Jthe North Sea.
T he warm currents J n the. Atlantic Ocean influence the
clim ate of Great Britain. Winters are not severely cold and
summers are rarely ho4.
T he population of the U nited Kingdom is over 55 mln
people. T he main nationalities are: English, Scottish, W elsh
and Irish. In Great Britain there are a lot of immigrants
(black and coloured) from former British Asian and African
colonies.
401

Great Britain is a highly industrialized country. New


industries have been developed in the last three decades. The
main industrial centres are London (Greater London),
Birmingham, M anchester, Leeds, Liverpool, Glasgow and
Bristol. The capital of the country is London.

"Names
East Anglia [']
the M ersey [ ' : ] p.
the T yne [tain ] p.
* the C ly d e , [klaid ] p.
the Bristol Avon ['bristl 'e iv n ] p. ,
p. , .
Birmingham [' : ] .
M anchester rm aentjists] .
Liverpool ['hv3pu:lj .
Glasgow ['glarsgou] .
Exercise 2. Read and translate the text.
Exercise 3. Find in the text Engiish equivalents for these word combinations.

1. . 2.
- . 3. . 4.
. . 5. 300 . 6.
. 7. . 8.
.
Exercise 4. Give Russian equivalents for these sentences.

1.
Their total area is over 2 4 4,000 square km. 2. The
island of Great Britain consists of three main parts. 3. There
is very little flat country except in the region known as East
Anglia. 4. It has vast deposits of oil and gas. 5. Summers are
rarely hot. 6. N ew industries have been developed.
Exercise 5. Write out from the text all the sentences containing verbs in the
Passive Voice and translate them.
402

Exercise 6, Study the text and answer these questions.

1. What islands do the British Isles consist of? 2. What


oceans are the British Isles washed by? 3. How many parts
does the island of Great Britain consist of and what are they
called? 4. What country does Northern Ireland border on? 5.
Where are the main mountain ranges situated in Great
Britain? 6. What sea do most of the rivers flow into? 7. What
mineral resources is Great Britain rich in? 8. What is the
clim ate like in Great Britain? What currents influence the
clim ate of Great Britain? 9. What is the population of Great
Britain? 10. What nationalities live in Great Britain? 11. What
are the nam es of the main industrial centres? 12. What kind
of state is Great Britain?
Exercise 7. Say if these statements are true or false.

1. Northern Ireland is part of the Irish Republic. 2. The


total area of the British Isles is over 300,000 sq km, 3.
Scotland is situated in the southern part of Great Britain. 4.
Ben N evis, the tallest peak of the H ighlands, is only 1,343 m
high. 5. Most of the British rivers flow into the Irish Sea. 6.
No deposits of oil and gas were discovered in the North Sea.
7. There are a lot of immigrants from former British colonies
in Great Britain. 8. Great Britain is still the leading
imperialist state.
Exercise 8. Make up ten questions based on the text and answer them.
Exercise 9. Make the necessary substitutions and translate the dialogues.

1.

2.

3.

A: W heres M angolia situated?


: Its situated in A sia .
(A: France, the USA, Angola [serj'goub ]; B: Europe,
North America, Africa)
A: What is M ongolia rich in?
B: In tin an d copper*.
(A: Cuba, Norway, Great Britain; B: iron ore, copper and
nickel; iron ore, copper and nickel; oil, gas and coal)
A: Do you know w hats the area of France?
B: It has an area of over 551,000 sq km.
(A: Hungary, Norway; B: 93,000 sq km, 324,000 sq km)

Exercise 10. Give a summary of the text "The United Kingdom of Great Britain
and Northern Ireland".
* tin , copper
403

Exercise 11. a) Insert articles wherever necessary, b) Give a summary of the


texts.

1. ... USA occupies ... southern part of ... North America


and stretches for ... thousands of kilom etres from ... Pacific
Ocean in ... west to ... Atlantic Ocean in ... east. It has ... area
of over 9.8 mln sq km.
In ... north ... USA borders on ... Canada and in ... south
it borders on ... Mexico ['m eksikou].
... Rocky Mountains* in ... w est have many high ranges. ...
high at peak is ... Mount W hitney ['w itn i], 14,495 feet.
Among ... longest rivers is ... M ississippi
which flows into ... Gulf of Mexico**.

['m isi'sip i]

... population of ... USA is over 237.2 mln.


... USA is ... highly industrialized country. It is ... leading
capitalist state.
2. ... N etherlands is situated in ... north-western Europe.
... country has ... area of over 41,000 sq km.
... N etherlands borders on ... FRG in ... east and on ...
Belgium in ... south. It is washed by ... North Sea in ... w est.
... population of ... country is over 14 mln.
.. N etherlands Is not very rich in ... mineral resources. It
is a highly industrialized capitalist state.
Exercise 12. Use the verbs in brackets in the proper tense end voice form.

1.
The island of Sakhalin [sahA'ljim] (to wash) by the Sea
of Okhotsk U 'hoitsk] in the east and by the Gulf of Tatary
t'tartari] in the w est. 2. Kamchatka [kAm'tJaitks] (to
separate) from Alaska la'lsesks] by Bering Strait ['berirj
'streit] 3. T he clim ate of Murmansk (to influence) by the
warm currents of G ulf-stream . 4. Many new industries (to
develop) in Siberia in the last two decades. 5. Vast deposits of
oil and gas (to discover) there. 6. Most of the Siberian
industrial centres (to situate) along the Transsiberian
[xtraenssai'bisrisn] railway line. 7. Tw o-thirds of the island
of Ireland (to occupy) by the Irish Republic. 8. Many new
factories (to build) in the country in the last decade.
* Rocky Mountains
** Gulf of Mexico
404

Exercise 13. a) Give English equivalents for these words and word
combinations, b) Make up sentences with these words and word
combinations using forms of the Passive Voice where possible.

, , ,
, , (
), , , ,
, , ,
,
Exercise 14. a) Translate these texts, b) Give summaries of the text.

1. (Azerbaijan [:':'1: j
. 86 . . .
.

(Armenia
[cr.'mirnjan ]), (Georgia ['d3D:d3js ]
.
: ,
.

,
.
, ,
.
,
.
2. .
93 . . . 10 .
. (Budapest ['bu:da.pest]), ,
.
4 /5 .
(T he Carpathians
[ka:'pei9i3nz]).
(Balaton ['baeb'ton ]), (Hungarians)
" ". .
.

(The Danube ['daenju:b]).
- .
3. .
405

324 . . .
4 . ,
,

.
,
.
1 /2 5 ,
5 ,0 0 0 . . .
, ,
.
Exercise 16. Read the text, give a summary of it and discuss it.

Canada
Canada is the w orlds second largest country. It has an
area of 3.8 million square m iles (about 10 mln square km ).
Canada occupies the whole of the northern part of the
N orth American C ontinent. It is washed by the Pacific Ocean
in the w est, by the Arctic Ocean in the north, and by the
Atlantic Ocean in the east. In the south Canada borders on
the U nited States of America.
Canada has six main divisions: the Appalachian Region*,
the Great Lakes St Lawrence Lowlands**, the Canadian
Shield***, the Interior Plains,**** the W estern Cordilleras
Lko:d200'jeira: ], the Arctic Islands.
T he Appalachian R egion, which borders on the Atlantic
Ocean, is a series of uplands and of several mountain ranges.
The region is covered with forests.
T he Great Lakes
St Lawence Lowlands is the
C ountrys sm allest region. It stretches from Quebec City
[kwi'bek siti 1 to Lake Huron ['hju:rsn ], along the US border.
*
the Appalachian [,'1] Region
** St Lawrence Lowlands [seint 'birans 'loubndzj .

*** the Canadian Shield Lka'neidian 'Ji:ld] ()


**** the Interior ['] Plains
406

The Canadian Shield borders on the Hudson Bay. The ln~


terior Plains stretch from the province of Manitoba
[,m aeni'toub3] to the Arctic Ocean. The Plains rise 3,000 feet
(about 1,000 m) in three steps. The southern part is
grassland, but north of the region is covered with forests.
T he W estern Cordilleras is a m ountainous region, which
is washed by the Pacific Ocean. T he central section is a plain
with hills. The eastern section includes three high mountain
ranges. T he coast of the Pacific is covered with C anadas
tallest forests.
Canada has nearly 15 per cent of the w orlds fresh water
surface. There are so many lakes in Canada that they have
never been counted. C anadas major fresh water resource is
the Great Lakes system . Lakes Superior [sju 'p ia m ],
Michigan [ ' ] , Huron, St Clair [seint ' ] , Erie
' 1 and Ontario [on'tesriou ] are the largest group of lakes
in the world with an area of 95,000 square m iles.
The main rivers are the St Lawrence, the Mackenzie
[m s'kenzi ] and the Fraser.
T he Niagara Falls* is one of the w orlds largest falls on
the Niagara River which connects two lakes Lake Erie and
Lake Ontario. It is about 1,000 feet wide and 162 feet high.
Nearly a m illion tons of water passes over the Falls every five
minutes.
The clim ate of the eastern and central parts of Canada
varies considerably, but in the north-western and southern
parts of the country the clim ate is milder.
Canada is very rich in mineral resources. The most
important minerals are nickel, copper, iron ore, zinc, lead,
gold, silver, oil, natural gas and coal.
C anadas forests are among her greatest resources.
Productive forests cover nearly one million square miles. T he
waters of C anadas coastal regions and inland lakes are rich
in fish.

* the Niagara Falls [ 'fo:IzJ


407

Canada, is. a highly industrialized and agricultural


country. The main industrial centres are Montreal
[,mDntri'o:l ],
Toronto [te'ronto(u) ]
and
Vancouver
[v^n'kurva]. T he capital of Canada is Ottawa ['stsw o] .
Exercise 17. Speak on these topics.

R ussia, Great Britain, Canada, Australia, the USA.

L E S S O N FO U R

Conversations: A. Suggestions about What a Person Should


See. B. Im pressions of a Visit .

Learn this speech pattern


D id you happen to visit any other places in the Far East?
-
?
happened to buy a very interesting book about the Far
East. (, )
.
Exercise 1* Change these sentences according to the models and translate them.

a) He knew Mr Browns phone number.


H e happened to know Mr Browns phone number.
1. He bought two tickets for the final match. 2. John had
a guide-book to Oxford. 3. He went the wrong way. 4. He was
in when George called.
b) Do you know M arys phone number?
Do you happen to know Marys phone number?
1.
Do you know the Smiths? 2. Did you meet John in
London when you stayed there? 3. Do you know what film is
on at the local? 4. Did you see Nick yesterday?
408

Learn these words an d word com bin ation s


suggestion [se'd 3estjn] n
,
several ['sevrl] ; I
visited the British Museum
several times,
be away [o'weil v (
); ;
How long will Mr Smith be away?
advice bd'v ais] n , ; a
piece of advice ; to
ask sm b.s advice
-. . Youd better ask
P eters advice; to give smb. (a
piece of) advice -.
() ; gave me
piece of good advice.
:


: to advise
[ad'vaiz] - advice [ad'vais]
historian [hi'stoirian] n
architectural [,a:ki'tektj3rl]

fascinating ['fsesmeitir)]
, ,
; Your new poem is
fascinating,
call v ; She is called Jane.
. What do you
call this? ?
Arab f'gerab]
get to know ; When you get
to know them youll like them,
recom m end [,reka'mend] v
, ; Can you
recommend me a good novel? I
would strongly recommend you to
go there by air.

,
way , ; on ones way
; On my way to college I
met John, o u t of the way
( );
Unfortunately this tittle town is
out of the way.
journey ['d39:ni] n ; Have
a good journey!
!
expect [iks'pekt] v ,
; We expected you

yesterday,
at least ,
; You should also visit
Pskov at least for a few hours,
birthplace ('ba:0pleisj n

find [faindj {found [faund]) out


, ; Please
find out when he train starts,
appreciate l3'pri:Jieit] v ,
( .); I appreciate your kindness,
feel (felt, felt) v ,
; How are you feeling
today? to feel cold (happy,
com tortable)
( ,
(
); I feel very cold.
,
conference ['konfaransl

the F ar E ast
geologist [d5i'ol3d3rst]
sponsor ['spsnss] v ,
;
,
branch ,
full , ,
; You must be full
of impressions. ,
, ,
prospect ['prospekt] (. p i )
, ,
; What are your
prospects?
?
development [di'vetepmsnt]
, ,
dicussion [dis'kAjn]
, ; to have
discussion about sm th.
, -.;
They had a discussion about the
prospects for the development of
Siberia.
lively ['laivli] ; a
lively discussion

fruitful ['fru:tflj ;
Their discussion was lively and
fruitful.
409

; to be friendly with
smb,
-.; Is John friendly
with Peter?
hospitable ['hDSpitabl]
,
including [m'klu:dig] prep
,
the present state of affairs [a'fesz]

find [faind] (found [faund])
, ; How do you
find him? ?
peace [pi:s] n
discuss [dis'kAs] v ;
Lets discuss the question,
forum [' : ] n

happen ['hsepn] v 1. ,
; to happen to smb.
-.; What
happened to him? 2.
; He happened to be
there.
.
participant [pai'tisipont] n
; a participant in a
conference (a m eeting, etc.)
(
..)
taiga ['taiga:]
hydroelectric l'haidro(u) riektrik]
station
friendly ['frendti] ,
;

A.

Suggestions about What a Person Should See


1

At a reception in the Russian Em bassy Mr M itchell, a


British journalist, m eets George Danilov, a R ussian
journalist. T h ey have met several tim es before;
M r M itchell: H ello, George.
George Danilov: Good evening. How are you?
M:
Im fine, thank you. And what about you?
D:
Fine, thanks.
M:
H avent seen you for a g e s.1 Have you been away?
D:
Yes. Ive just returned from my holiday.
M:
Where did you go for your holiday?
D:
Yes. My w ife and I made a tour of Central Asia.
M:
How very interesting! I was just going to ask your advice
about a visit there. You s e e ,2 my wife is a historian. For
many years s h e s been planning a trip to Samarkand and
Bukhara. Have you ever been to th ese cities?
D:
Y es, certainly. T he architectural monuments of
these two cities are fascinating. In the past Arab poets
called Samarkand "the Eden of the ancient E a s tV I
think your w ife should try to see these cities.
M:
I wonder how long the trip will take her.
D:
If she wants to really get to know Samarkand and
Bukhara itll take her about a couple of w eeks. I
would strongly recommend your wife to see som e
modern cities, too.
M:
That sounds interesting. Ill speak to her about it.
Thanks a lot. Your advice was most helpful.4
D:
Its a pleasure.
410

Nicholai Stepanov, a teacher of R ussian, has beea staying


in London for a few m onths. Next Saturday morning he is
leaving for Edinburgh. Last T uesday Nicholai saw Bernard
Law, a London U niversity lecturer and asked his advice.
N icholai Stepanov: Bernard, could you do me a favour?5
Bernard Law: Ill be glad to if I can.
S:
N ext Saturday morning Im going to Edinburgh by
car. What would you advise me to see on my way
there?
L:
Well, its going to be a long journey. When are you
expected in Edinburgh?
S:
N ext M onday afternoon.
L:
You should try to see Oxford though its a little out
of the way. I suggest you should also spend at least a
few hours in Coventry and see the Cathedral.
S:
Is Robert Burnss birthplace far from Edinburgh?
L:
Im sorry to say Ive never been there. You see
Burns is n t as popular in England as (he is) in
Scotland and abroad. Im sure y o u ll easily find it out
in Edinburgh.
S:
I really appreciate your help. Thank you very much.
L:
Its a pleasure.

B. Im pressions of a Visit
Jim Brown: H ello, H enry.
Henry Sloan: H ello. How are you feeling?
Jim:
Im OK, thank you. And what about you?
Henry: Im w ell, thanks. Have you been away? I phoned
you several tim es but there was no answer.
Jim :
Y es, Ive just returned from a conference in
Khabarovsk.
Henry: W heres that? In Africa?
Jim:
Oh, no. Its in the Far East.
Henry: How very interesting! What were you doing there?
Jim:
I attended the UNESC O 6 conference of geologists.
It was sponsored by our branch.
Henry: You must be full of im pressions.
Jim:
Y es, indeed. That was a very interesting
conference. R ussian colleagues told us about the
411

prospects for the developm ent of the Far East. The


discussion was lively and fruitful.
Henry: Did you happen to visit any other places in the Far
East?
Jim:
Yes. T he participants made a fantastic tour of the
Far East. We visited the Kolyma, taiga, a
hydroelectric station. Yakutsk, Chukotka and
Sakhalin.
Henry: Did you meet m any Russian people?
Jim :
Quite a few! Among them scientists, workers and
students. I must say the people were friendly and
hospitable.
Henry: What did you talk with them about?
Jim:
A lot of things including the present state of affairs
in the world. I have the impression that all the
Russian people want peace. I found that peace is
discussed everywhere nowadays, at international
forums and over a cup of tea7 at home.

N am es
Samarkand ['saemsrkaend] .
Bukhara [bu'kcurs] .
Coventry ['kDvsntri ] .
Khabarovsk [hA'barrsfsk] .
Kolyma [ ] p.
Yakutsk [je'ku:tsk] .
Chukotka [tju'kDitka] -

N otes
1. H avent (I havent) seen you for ages. He
. ( .)
2. You see ... ... ( ...)
3. the Eden of the ancient East ()
4. Your advice was most helpful.
. ( .)
5. Could you do me a favour ['feivs]? He
?
6. the UNESCO
[ju:'neskou] = the United Nations
Educational [,ed ju 'k ei$n l], Scientific [,sai3n 'tifik ] and
412

Cultural Organization [,:$ ] ,



,
7. over a cup of tea
Exercise 2. Read and translate the dialogues.
Exercise 3. Find in the dialogues English equivalents for these word
combinations and sentences.

1.
H e . 2. 3.
. 4.
? 5. . 6.
, . 7. . 8.
. 9. .
10. .
Exercise 4. Quote the sentences in which these words and word combinations
are used in the dialogues.

to make a tour of, fascinating, to get to know, to sound


interesting, advice, to advise, w ay, at least, popular, to find
out, to be full of, developm ent, situation, peace
Exercise 5. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

A: M r Brown, could you do me a favour?


: 11 be glad to if I can.
(A: Ben, Bill; B: Y es, certainly. You are welcom e.)
2. A: H avent seen you for ages. Have you been away?
: Y es, I ve just returned from my holiday.
t : a business trip, Kiev, London)
3. A: We made a tour of Central Asia last month.
; How very interesting! I was just going to ask your
advice about a trip to Sam arkan d.
(A B: Siberia, Scotland, W ales, Armenia)
4. A: What towns would you advise me to see on my way
there?
B: You should try to see Coventry and Birm ingham .
(B: Vladimir and Suzdal, Bradford and Leeds)
5. A: Ive just a tten ded a conference of geologists,
B: You must be full of impressions.
(A: attended a conference of physicists, returned from the
tour of Central Asia)
(>. A: How did you find the new teacher?
: I think h e s very good.
(A: student, manager)
413

Exercise 6. What would you say if you took part in these dialogues? Dramatize
them.

1.

Fedorov: Good morning, Mt Berners.


B: ...
F: Im all right, thank you. And how are you?
B: ...
F: Yes, the morning is wonderful. Spring has corne at
last. Now its time to plan o n es holiday. I hear
you re going on a tour of the Caucasus.
R*

JLJ *

F:

My w ife and I made a tour of the Caucasus last


year. It was fascinating. Id recommend you to go
there.
B: ...
F: If you go by air, it may take you about three weeks.
There are a lot of ancient monuments in Georgia and
Armenia. Im sure youll enjoy the trip.

2.

3.

4.

JL-J

R*

F;

Its a pleasure.

Ben M orris: Could you do me a favour, Peter?


P eter Volgin: ...
Ben: Id like to take my family on a car tour to your
country.
Peter: ...
Ben: W ed like to make a tour of the "Golden Ring".
Peter: ...
Ben: How long will it take us?
Peter: ...
Ben: Thank you very much.
Peter: ...
N in a Andreeva: Could you do me a favour, Bill?
Bill Brown: ...
N ina: Im going to Edinburgh by car next Friday.
What would you advise me to see on my way there?
Bill: ...
N ina: Thank you very much.
Bill: ...
Christopher A dam s: Hello, John.
John R eeves: ...
Chris: Im fine, thank you. And how are you?
John: ...
Chris: Y es, Ive been away for a week. Ive just
returned from St.Petersburg.

John: ...
Chris: I attended the International Forum of physicists
that was held there.
John: ...
Chris: One of the main problems that was discussed by
the scieatists was the prospects for the peaceful use of
nuclear energy.*
John: ...
Exercise 7, Think of situations in which these sentences can be used. Dramatize
them.

1. We are planning a tour of the "Golden Ring" towns, 2.


It was a fascinating tour. 3. I would strongly recommend you
to go there in early autumn. 4. Your advice was most helpful.
5. Could you find out his phone number? 6. Do you happen to
know when the show starts? 7. You must be full of
im pressions. 8. What are the prospects for the development of
the gas deposits? 9. After all San Francisco isn t so far across
the Pacific. 10. I found that everyone is interested in the
problem of peace. 11. What are the prospects for the
development of oil deposits in the Arctic regions? 12. I
appreciate your help. 13. Do you really want to get to know
them?
Exercise 8. Reproduce the dialogues "Suggestions about What a Person Should
See and Impressions of a Visit" in pairs.
Exercise 9. Insert articles or some, any where necessary. Translate the
sentences.

1.
I hear you have collected ... important information. 2.
"This is ... very important piece of ... information," he said. 3.
1 do not think ... information they collected is interesting. 4.
Could you give me ... piece of ... advice? 5. What do you think
of ... advice Mary gave them? 6. "Do you expect him to make
.... progress in English?" "I hope h ell make ... good progress."
7. "Did he listen to ... latest news last night?" "I dont think
he did." 8. H ere are ... interesting pieces of news, 9. I wonder
if we have ... enough information.
Exercise 10. Act as interpreter.

I.

M r Jacobs: Good morning, Mr Pavlov.


: . ?
J: Im fin e, thank you. And how are you?

*
peaceful ['pi:sf9lj use of. nuclear ['nju:klia) energy [']

415

, . , ?

J:

Y es, the morning is wonderful. By the way, is this


your first visit to this country?

P:

. .
.
, - ?

J:

11 be glad to if I can.

P:

J:

Well, yours will be rather a long journey. There are


a lot of interesting places on the way. I advise you to
spend at least a few hours in Coventry and see the
Cathedral. I also advise you to see Birmingham,
Sheffield and Leeds, the oldest industrial centres in
this country.

P:

. .

J:

Its a pleasure.

George O sborne ( correspondent o f the "D aily World"):


Hallo, H elen.
( "
"): .
George: H avent seen you for ages. Have you been
away?
: , .
George: Did you spend your holiday there?
: .
.
George: How very interesting! What was the subject of
the conference?
:

.
George: T he subject is very interesting. You must be
full of im pressions.
: , .
,
, ,
.
, , , .

f xcrcise 11. Translate into English.

1. .
. . -?
. .
, .
?

.
?
. ,
. ,
. ,
?
, ().
,
, ,
. .

.
?
, ,
.
? ,
.
, . 45
( ).
, .
. .
.
2. ,
, - .
,
.
.
?
. , ,
.
Exercise 12. Make up dialogues based on the pictures (see p. 67).
: \ercise 13. Dramatize these situations.

1.
Your foreign co llea g u e asks your advice about what he
' hould s e e in Russia. A sk him what he and his wife are
interested in, what their h obb ies are a n d recom m end them
places to see.
417

2. Ask your English colleagues advice about what you


should see on your way to Liverpool (to Glasgow, etc.).
3. You were a participant in an international forum that
discussed problems of the development of the deposits of oil
and gas in the next two decades. Speak about your
im pressions with a friend of yours.

British Teacher: What should I see in your country?


The Uzbek: Samarkand.
The Georgian: T bilisi.

Mary: G oodbye, Nick, and all the best.


Nick: G oodbye, and thanks for everything.
418

L E S S O N FIVE
1. NEW GRAMMAR STRUCTURES
1. W ays o f Expressing N ecessity ( )


,
, ;,


,
, ,

m ust, have to, have got


should, ought to
be to
have to, have got to, need
to, need
should
see
the
He must stay in the college He does not have to stay in the The conference is to begin You
library today. ( college library every day. next Tuesday. ( swimming events. They
( will be very intesting.
() (
.)
.)

)
.
.)
has to stay in the college has not got to stay in the Tell John he is to prepare You ought to read more in
for
the English, then you will
library every day. ( college library today. ( everything
( know the language better.
meeting.
, (
.)
.)
-,
.)

.)
has got to stay in the needn't stay in the college
You ought to tell her
college library today. ( library every day (today).
about it. (
(
.)


.)
(.)
Need he stay in the college
library every day (today)?

420


,
, ,


,
, ,

(

(
) ?
have to

V
R

have to

be to

had to stay in the college did not have to stay in the The conference was to
library
after
classes college library yesterday (last begin
last
Tuesday.
yesterday. ( Monday). ( (

( .)
.)
.)

have to
have to
will have to stay in the will not have to stay in the
college library after classes college library tomorrow. (
tomorrow. (

.)
.)

Future.

should, ought
to+Perfect Infinitive
You should have visited the
exhibition. It was very
interesting, (

.
.)
You ought to have told her
about it, (
.)

, (
)
m ust,* should, ought to
have to, have got to, be to,
need.
1. have to have got to ,
,
(
-). Have to Simple Present, Simple
Past Simple Future. Have got to
Simple Present.
2. be to :
) Simple Present ,

.
.
T he President is to leave for London next W ednesday.
()
, (
)
) Simple Present ,
, ( ,
)
"You are to stay here for another week," Mr Brown said to
him. ,
- , ( ,
)
says we are to wait till he comes back. ,
, , (
)
) Simple Past ,

. , ,
, .
T hey were to return yesterday.
, ( ,
)
3. should ought to
.

* . 1, 10.
421

, , .
,
,
.
should u ought to ,

,
.
should u ought to
, should .
:
to have Past Participle .
Non-Perfect Infinitive

Perfect Infinitive

to do
to translate
to tell

to have done
to have translated
to have told

You should have helped him translate the article. He had so little time.
.
.
You ought to have advised her to join them.
.

4.
need
neednt + to
,
.
You needn't go shopping today. I have bought everything.
( )
. .
5.
.
Question

Affirmative answer

Negative answer

Shall I have to go there?

Yes, you will.

No, you wont.

Does he have to go
there?

Yes, he does.

No, he doesnt.
No, he neednt.

422

Question

Affirmative answer

Negative answer

Have I got to go there?

Yes, you have.

No, you havent.

Need I go there?

Yes, you must.

No, you neednt.

Must I go there?

Yes, you must.

No, you neednt.

Is he to go there?

Yes, he is.

No, he isnt.

Should he go there?

Yes, he should.

No, he shouldnt.

: Yes
No.
Exercise 1. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to modal verbs.

1.
"Sorry, you ll have to wait for a short w hile, Mr
Smith is engaged," said the secretary. 2. "Did he have to
ask G eorges advice?" "I think, he did." 3. "Who had to take
the letters to the post-office?" "Mr Hopkins did." 4. T hey
have got to com plete the plan. 5. John has got to go to the
Travel A gency today. 6. "You don t have to find out when
the train starts. Ive already done that," said Peter. 7. "Did
you have to tell him everything?" "No, I d id n t." 8. "You
are to make a list of students who want to see the film," the
teacher said to John. 9. The conference is to start next
month. 10. T he bus was to arrive in the morning. 11. Tell
Mr Smith he is to m eet the delegation at the airport
tomorrow morning. 12. Did you tell I John he was to book
rooms in the hotel? 13. "You should see Lake Baikal, it is
one of the w orlds deepest lakes," Peter Vertov said to him.
14. You n eed n t come yourself. You may send som ebody
else. 15. You ought not to have told him that his brother
was ill. 16. T h ey should have taken part in the discussion.
17. You should not have advised him to join them.
Exercise 2. Made the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

A: D oes he have to go there to d a y?


: N o, he n eednt.
(A: to collect stamps; to take part in the trip; to find out
when the train starts)

2.

A:
B:

D oes Peter have to finish the article today?


I m afraid he does.
423

3.

4.

5.

(A: to start as early as 5 a.m.; to stay there for another


week; to leave on business today)
A: Did the Sm iths com e back yesterday?
B: They were to return yesterday but I d on t know if
they did.
(A: leave; go to the reception; meet the Browns; B: to
leave; to go; to meet them)
A: Did she tell John he was to call up M r Brown?
B: Y es, she did.
(A: to write a letter to Mr Brooks; to prepare everything
for the conference)
A: He h asn t taken us to the exhibition yet,
B: T h ats a pity. He shouldve done so.
(A: shown them round the city, bought a guide-book)

Exercise 3. Respond to these questions and statements according to the models.

a) Can they come next Friday?


No, Im afraid they have to come this Friday.
1. Can he sign the letters next W ednesday? 2. Can I make
an appointment with Mr Brown for next Thursday? 3. Can he
book seats for the theatre for next Saturday? 4. Can he go to
see them next Monday?
b) Must I really help John?
No, you n eed n t but h e ll be very glad if you do.
1. Must he really go to see them tonight? 2. Must she
really help him with the translation? 3. Must he really give
her a piece of advice? 4. Must Jim really recommend them the
route?
c) What time does your plane leave? (4 p.m., at the
airport)
At 4 p.m. but Im to be at the airport half an hour before.
1. What time does your train start? (2 p.m ., at the station)
2, When does the m eeting begin? (3 p.m., there) 3. What time
do your classes start? (9 a.m ., at college) 4. What time does
the exhibition open? (10 a.m ., there)
d) We d id n t tell him about it.
I think you sh ou ld ve told him.
1. I d id n t leave a m essage for him. 2. Bill didnt keep the
appointment. 3. He d id n t take the children to the Zoo last
Saturday. 4. She d id n t give him any advice.
424

Exercise 4. Read this short story and ^ive a summary of it. Use modal verbs.

Once Mark Twain arrived at a small town. He was to give


a lecture there. Before dinner he went to a barbers shop,*
"Youre a stranger in this town, arent you?" the barber
asked him.
"Yes," said Mark Twain. "Ive just arrived here."
"Youre lucky. Mark Twain is giving a lecture tonight.
Youll go, w ont you ?
"Certainly," answered Mark Twain.
"Have you booked a ticket yet?" the barber asked him.
"No, I havent."
"Im afraid, youll have to stand then. T he theatre is sold
out."**
"Thats a pity," said Mark Twain. "I always have to stand
when that man gives a lecture."
Exercise 5. Read the dialogue and reproduce it. Use modal verbs.

Harry: Were you able to write that letter yesterday, Nora?


Nora: Which letter do you mean?
Harry: T he letter to the headmaster of P eters school. You
said you would write a letter and say we wanted to
take Peter away on holiday a week before the end of
the term.
Nora: Oh, no. I must write it tonight.
Harry: Im afraid it may be too late. You should have
written it yesterday.
Nora: D on t you think you ought to write the letter as
P eters father?
Harry: But you can write that kind of letter better than I
can.
Nora: I think you should do it you know I hate letterwriting.
Exercise 6. Translate into English.

1.
?
, . 2.
. - , . 3.
- ,
. 4. - ,
. 5.
? ,
* barbers shop
** The theatre is sold out .
425

, . 6.
? 4 , . 7.
,
. 8.
. 9. ?
( )
.

2. The Past Perfect Continuous T en se


I was very tired as I had been
translating articles since early
morning.

,
.

The teams had been playing for


fifteen minutes before the first goal
was scored.

15 ,
.

Past Perfect Continuous


,
-

,
.
for (for two years,
etc.), by (by that time, by the first of June, etc.),
. Past Perfect Continuous

,
: Past Perfect
Continuous Past Perfect.
hqd not worked for ten months before he became manager.
, .
Exercise 7. Read these sentences and translate them into Russian. Pay attention
to the Past Perfect Continuous Tense.

1. John told Nick he had been waiting for him for half an
hour. 2. T hey were very tired as they had been walking since
early morning. , I wondered what he had been doing since I
saw him last January. 4. She had been sitting for about half an
hour when the doctor came in. 5 . At that moment the young
man who had been writing in his notebook got up and ran out
of the room, 6. T he N elson s had been living in London for ten
years before they left for New York. 7. George said he had
been boating since four in the afternoon.
426

Exercise 8. Put the verbs in brackets in the Past Perfect or the Past Perfect
Continuous Tense.

1. We (to drive) for three hours before we came to


Coventry. 2. By the tim e the train arrived they (to wait)
already for an hour and a half. 3. He knew where the Browns
lived but he never (to be) there. 4. When I first met him he
(to lecture) at Cambridge U niversity for ten years. 5. It was
in Bristol that I first met Peter Black. I was fifteen and I just
(to come) back from school for the summer holidays. 6.
Before Ann came to college she (to study) French for quite a
while. 7. She realized that it was now com pletely dark and
that she (to walk) for a long while. 8. She (to look) at him
since they sat down; and he wondered what she (to think)
about all the time. 9. It (to snow) all day when I left home.
10. At lunch Peter told them about New York and what he (to
do) there.
3. The Future Perfect T ense
By the end of the year I shall have
worked in the office for ten years.
Ill be back in two hours. I hope you
will have finished the translation
by then.


10 ,
.
2 .
,

.

Future Perfect ,
.
: .
Simple Future.
Exercise 9. Read these sentences and translate them into Russian. Pay attention
to the Future Perfect Tense.

1. He will have sta rted on his way back by the time you
return. 2. You will have returned the book to the library by
this time tomorrow. 3. I suppose by then they will have settled
all the problems. 4. T hey will have gone for a walk by the time
I have finished the job. 5. "Dont be late," he said. "He won't
have gone when you come back." 6. When my thoughts are
written down I shall have fin ish ed with them and I shall have
time to think of other things.
477

II. T E X T

Learn this speech pattern


a) He had no idea that the train slowed down.
( ) , .
b) H ave you any idea when he is coming back?
( ) ,
?
E xercise 1. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

I have no idea
Have you any
idea

how vast the deposits of ore are here?


why he has changed beyond recognition?
how m any chapters this book consists
of. (?)
what mineral resources the country
is rich in. (?)
what is the shortest way to the
museum. (?)

Exercise 2, Translate into English.

(

),
(

),


. (?)

. (?)

, (?)

. (?)

Learn these words an d word com binations


be m issing ,
, ; papers
(books, studeats, children) are
m issing; I am sorry to say that
a few pages are missing from
(in) the book. C f : Peter is
absent today.
( ). "Is
everyone here?" "No, Peter is
m issin g . (
; ,
)
worry ['WAri] (about) v 1.
(), ();
Dont worry about him, every
thing will be al! right. 2.
428

, , ; Do not
let little things worry you.
completely [kam'plirth] adv
,
disappear [-disa'pia] v ,
; A few minutes later
the plane disappeared in the
clouds,
panic ['paenik] n
dressing-room ['dresirjrum] n
,
upset [Ap'set] (upset) v 1.
, ; the situation
(the news, the words, etc.) may
upset smb. (,
..
-.); His letter upset me

greatly. 2. ,
(, . .);
His arrival upset our plans,
probably [ ] adv ;
He is probably at home now.
hand v , ; to
hand money (a letter, a doc
um ent, papers, etc.) to smb.
, (,
..) -; Your
letter was handed to the manager,
deal [di:l] (dealt fdelt]) v (with)
-., -.,
-.; .; This novel deals with the life
of an actor.
. The man is hard
(impossible) to deal with.
(
) . (
.)
deal ,
rival E'rivl]
sm art 1. , ;
; sm art deal (practice,
etc.) (
. .) 2. ,
; , ;
sm art person (
, ,
) ; Johnny was
smart boy. 3. ,
; ; a sm art
answ er ()
; 4. ; ,
; a sm art woman
; She
looks smart in this dress,
go crazy
reach for v ,
( -, -. ) ; Can you
reach for the book?
fail v ,
; Unfortunately, she
failed us at the last minute,
ju st adv , ; It is just
wonderful that you are going to
join us.
angry paeggri] ; to be
(to get) angry with sm b.
() .; I got very angry with him
because he had failed us.
as cnj 1. , ; As
he was not ready we had to wait

for him. 2. ;
; ; As he
was getting off the bus he saw
Peter.
badly adv , ;
to w ant (to need) sm th. badly
-. (
-.); She needs
your advice badty.
jure rin d ja ] v ,
, ; to in ju re ones
leg (hand, etc.) with smth.
, (, )
( .. ) -.;
Unfortunately she injured her
hand with a knife, to injure
oneself ,
ice n
manage v ,
( -., -. ) ; to
manage smb. (sm th.); I believe
the young teacher will be able to
manage his students,
gloomy f'glu:mi] ,
, , ;
is gloomy today. What has
happened?
suddenly ['sAdnli] adv ,
,
double-crosser ['dAbl .krosa] n

shout [|aut] v
appear ['] v ,
; He said he would be
back at four oclock but he
appeared only at six.
welcome ['welkam] v 1.
() ;
; to welcome smb. at ones
home . ( ); When
Johnny appeared on the field the
people welcomed him. Welcome
home!
. . 2.
, ; to
welcome an idea (a plan, etc.)
,
( ..); I hope you
will welcome my plan,
mouth ['mau8] n
sick a 1. Am. predic. ; to
be (feel, look) sick; Syn. ill Br.;
2. Br. predic.
; He is (feels) sick. 429

(); to be seasick
(airsick)
, (
) , b u t: a sick man (boy,
girl, etc.) Br. and Am.
(,
..)
sound [saund] v ,

hit (hit) v ; was badly


hit during the game.
miss v 1. ,
, ;
wanted to hit the ball but
missed. 2. ,
; to miss (classes, a
lecture, a match, etc.)
, ,
..); I wonder why he missed so
many classes.
to miss an opportunity
[,Dpstju:niti]

smash v ,

roar [:] v , ,
throw [6rou] (threw , thrown [0ru:,
9roun]) v , ,

smile v

hurt [ha:t] (hurt) v


, , ; His
words hurt me. 2.
; It hurts the eyes to look at
the sun My hand (leg, tooth,
etc.) hurts me.
(, ..); 3.
, , ,
; has hurt his leg.
pocket-book ['pakit ,buk] n

jump off tdjAmp'of] v ,

hospital ['hospitl] n ,
; to take smb. to
hospital () . ; I didnt know he
had been taken to hospital the
week before.; to be (to stay) in
hospital
bill n ; Can I have the bill,
please? to pay the bill
; a hotel (a restau ran t,
etc.) bill
( ..);
Have you paid the hotel bill yet?
kid n . , ,
pay back v . ,

Exercise 3. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to active words
and word combinations.

1.
"I can t understand the sentence. I think som e words
are m issing here," said John. 2. The news has probably upset
him, he looks so gloom y. 3. You should not be angry with the
coach, he did not want to hurt you. 4. You neednt worry
about him. He is very smart and always manages to deal with
anything and anybody. 5. I am not going to ask him for help.
He failed me last time. 6. The cajTtain was badly hurt just as
he was trying to hit the ball. 7. You should not miss the
opportunity to see the match, 8. U nfortunately she has
injured her hand with the knife. 9. "You are still very ill,"
said the doctor. "You should be taken to hospital." 10. I have
no idea why he disappeared so suddenly. 11. When German
students delegation came to Moscow they were warmly
welcomed by U niversity students. 12. Have you any idea
whether they have handed the documents to the director?
430

AM HIS BROTHER
The hockey match between the Wolves and the Eskim os1
was to take place at 7 p.m. By late afternoon when Johnny
was still m issing, we all began to worry. We wondered where
he had disappeared to. By five o clock we were all in a panic.
When we were in the dressing-room we heard som ething
that upset us com pletely. Som eone had seen Johnny at the
railway station. He had gone down to the train with two of
Abe Gravots boys, who stayed with him till the train left.
Gravot, the E skim os coach, had probably handed Johnny a
good sum of m oney to get him out of the game. We knew that
he had dealt with some of his rivals before in that way,
It was a smart deal. T he next station was forty miles away
so Johnny could not get back before the next morning.
I was afraid Matt, our coach, would go crazy. He even
tried to reach Johnny but failed. He was not just angry it
was a knife in his heart, as he had built all his hopes on the
boy since last year when Bucko was badly injured. What
could we do? We had to go on the ice. Oh, we played tough
hockey2 and m anaged to score a goal in the second period.
But by the end of the period the Eskimos shot two pucks past
our goalkeeper. In the dressing-room the boys sat gloomy.
Suddenly the door opened and Johnny ran in.
N obody said a word as Matt walked across the room.
"You, double-crosser, where have you been?" he shouted.
"What difference does it make3 where Ive been? Im back
and you n eed n t worry. T he score is only two to one, Ill show
them how to play hockey!"
And he really did. I know that I will never see hockey as
we played it that last period. When we appeared on the ice I
thought the roof would go up with shouts4 as the crowd
welcomed Johnny. I looked at Abe. His mouth was open, the
cigarette fell from it and he looked sick.
The w histle sounded and the game started again. It was a
quick gam e, both teams played tough hockey but the Eskimos
could do nothing against Johnny. We were beginning to win
when I saw Guff H ibbing ready for his gang-up act5. Johnny
was going along the boards just as Bucko had been going that
night a year before when Guff and another Eskimo player hit
him. But Johnny saw in time what was coming. He stopped
short. Guff m issed him and sm ashed against the boards. With
a bad injury he was carried away from the field.
Johnny scored two more goals before the referees final
signal sounded. The crowd roared when their favourite was
leaving the field.
431

In the hotel Gravot came up to Johnny and said angrily,


"You, dirty double-crosser! You should be thrown out of
hockey!"
"Double-crosser? I took the train as we agreed, d idnt I?"
Johnny sm iled. And then he hit Abe with his open hand
across the m outh.6 "That," he said, "is for Bucko."
In the room we heard his story. "I wanted to hit Abe
where it hurt the m ost7. So I hit him in the pocket-book. He
paid me two thousand to take that train out of town tonight.
He had no idea that the train slowed down at Crocket
Junction8. So I jumped off and ran back. I knew Id be in time
for the last period to help you win the game."
After a while Johnny added, "Bucko Mackey needs money.
You, boys, paid his hospital bills. Im sending him A bes two
thousand in the morning."
Old Matt was happy, "I knew you would take Bucko's
place when I first saw you on the ice, kid."
Johnny gave us a real smile then and his face looked
boyish and friendly. "Take his place, Matt? I came here to
take his place. And I also wanted to pay back for Buckos
injury. Im Buckos brother."
(After

"Double

for Trouble"

by

B.

Fowler)

N am es
Abe Gravot feib :':]
Guff [ Hibbing
Bucko Mackey [' m s'k eil
N otes
1. the Wolves [wulvz 1 the Eskimos feskim ouz]

2. Oh, we played tough hockey. Am. .
(
.) Br. It was a tough game.
3. What difference ['difrans] does it make...
...
4. the roof would go up with shouts

5. a gang-up act ;

6. then he hit Abe with his open hand across the mouth
.
432

,

,

.
7. I wanted to hit Abe where it hurt the most.
.
8. the train siowed down at Crocket Junction
()
Exercise 4. Read and translate the text.
Exercise 5. Find in the text English equivalents for these word combinations
and sentences.

1. ( ). 2.
. 3. ,
, . 4,
. 5. . 6.
. 7. . 8.
. 9.
.
Exercise 6. Give Russian equivalents for these sentences.

1. We wondered where he had disappeared. 2. We heard


som ething that upset us. 3. He had dealt with some of his
rivals in that way. 4. He tried to reach Johnny but failed. 5.
He was not just angry it was a knife in his heart. 6. We
m anaged to score a goal in the second period. 7. What
difference does it make? 8. With a bad injury he was carried
away from the field. 9. You should be thrown out of hockey.
10. I wanted to hit Abe where it hurt the most.
Exercise 7. Study the text and answer these questions.

1. Why did the Wolves worry before the beginning of the


match? 2. Why was Johnny missing? 3. How did the Wolves
play in the first two periods? 4. Did Johnny explain to his
coach where he had been? Why? 5. Why did the Eskimos
decide to injure Johnny? 6. Why did Abe, the Eskim os coach,
call Johnny "dirty double-crosser"? 7. How did Johnny decide
to use the m oney he got from Abe? Why?
Exercise S. Explain or comment on these statements.

1.
The E skim os coach had probably handed Johnny a
good sum of m oney. 2. It was a smart deal. 3. Matt had built
all his hopes on Johnny. 4. We (the Wolves) played tough
hockey. 5. "I wanted to hit Abe where it hurt the most," said
Johnny.
433

Exercise 9, Say if these statements are true or false. Give your reasons.

1* By late afternoon when Johnny was still m issing the


Wolves did not worry. T hey hoped Johnny would be back in
time. 2. Matt, the W olves coach, was very angry with Johnny.
3. The Wolves were w inning the game when Johnny appeared
on the ice. 4. T he Eskimos m anaged to injure Johnny and he
was taken to hospital. 5. Johnny took the money from the
Eskimos as he really wanted to go away. 6. Johnny wanted to
give the money to Bucko.
Exercise 10. Make up twelve questions based on the text and answer them.
Exercise 11. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

A:
B:

Sorry, I ve upset your p la n s.


Its all right, you n eed n t worry. I can manage as it
is.
(A: your preparations, everything here)
A: What difference does it make how he m anaged it?
B: Youre quite right. Now it makes no difference at all.
(A: who handed the letter, who injured him)
A: I wonder why he m issed the gam e.
B: U nfortunately he was taken to hospital.
(A: the final, the English class)
A: You should call Mr Browns office. They dealt with
such problems last month as far as I know.
B: Did they? be glad if they help me.
(A* last week, som e months ago, last year)

2.

3.

4.

Exercise 12. Insert the words given below.

1.
Everyone is here except Johnny. He is still ... . 2. The
Wolves were ... with Johnny as they thought he ... them. 3. I
wonder why he ... the opportunity to see the match last
Saturday. 4. D ont ... . Everything is all right. 5. She could
n o t ... for the book. 6. You have got to apologize* to the
coach. Your words ... him as far as I could see. 7. T hey ... the
idea to see the match. 8. He ... his leg during the last footbalf
match. 9. Will you please ... the documents to the director?
10. Have you paid the hotel ... ? 11. What does this book ...
with?
angry, to m iss, bill, m issing, to hurt, to deal, to reach, to
injure, to fail, to hand, to welcom e, to worry.
Exercise 13. a) Insert prepositions or adverbs, b) Give a summary of the story
and discuss it.

434

apologize lypDlacfeaizJ ,

This is our fam ily ... all grown-ups. Father is the oldest.
Mother does not consider herself old. My wife Jane is quite
young.
For the weekends Father usually gets his ideas. Last
Saturday when he was reading the newspaper he noticed an
article which dealt ... skiing contests. "Just think how much
attention is given ... sports now," he said, "and we havent put
... skis or skates ... ages. Shall we go skiing or skating
tomorrow?"
Everybody welcomed the idea.
"Good," Father concluded. "So tomorrow we can go ... the
park to skate there."
T h ats how it began. We started to look ... proper clothes
to put ...-.^Mother took Fathers old trousers* and started to
change them . Jane was worried ... her sweater which she
thought was m issing. I was sent to buy skating caps. When I
was ... about half an hour later and handed the caps ...
Mother she got very angry ... me. "Why," she exclaim ed,
"what did you think about when you were buying the caps?
They are all the sam e colour! W ell have to keep away from
each other if we are ... the ice!"
... two o clock ... the morning we went ... bed.
When woke .......... the morning the weather was bad.
"Wake ... everybody!" I shouted. "Are you crazy?" my wife
said angrily still half asleep. "Oh, he always jokes in a silly**
way," my mother remarked ... her bedroom. "Its eleven
o clock," I said. "Its time to go ... the park to skate, dont you
think so?" Father appeared ... the bathroom. He looked tired,
almost sick. ... breakfast Father reached ... his newspaper and
took it up. "Look,"
he suddenly exclaim ed, "they say
swimming is the best way of losing weight.*** Dont you
think we should g o ........ swimming?" We all agreed with him.
Exercise 14. Make up ten sentences using these word combinations.

to worry about sm th. (sm b.), to hand smth. to sm b., to


deal with sm b., to be (to get) angry with sm b., to reach for
sm th., to be in hospital, to take smb. to hospital, to injure
smb. with sm th.

*
trousers ['trauziz]
** silly ['sill]
*** to lose weight
435

Exercise 15. Give Russian equivalents for these word combinations.

a) to manage to do sm th., to manage a child;


b) to want sm th. badly, to hurt smb. badly, badly injured;
c) to be (to come) back, to bring back, to take back, to
send back, to give back, to row back, to pay back;
d) a smart deal, a smart answer, a smart person, a smart
dress;
e) to m iss the train, to miss the opportunity, to miss
classes, to miss the ball; to be m issing
Exercise 16. Translate these sentences into English using words and word
combinations given in exercise 15.

a) 1. , .
2. , , .
3. , .
b) 1. ,
(). 2.
, .
c) 1. , . 2.
? 3. ,
. 4.
, , . 5.
, .
d) 1. . 2.
. 3. () . 4.
.
e) 1. , . 2. ,
. 3. ,
-.
.
Exercise 17. Give responses according to the model. Use modal verbs.

T hey d id n t m anage to reach the station in time,


a)
T hey should have started earlier, b) They needn't hurry
now they will have to wait for another train, c) They had
to help their friends, th ats why they d idnt manage to reach
the station in tim e, d) T hey were to be taken to the station by
a taxi but the taxi did not come.
1. He m issed the football match yesterday. 2. The captain
hurt his leg when he was hitting the ball. 3. I see she is
worried about som ething. 4. The team lost the game and it
upset the coach very much.
Exercise 18. Give e summary of the text 1 Am His Brother".
436

Exercise 19. Translate into English.

1. , , ,
. 2. , .
. 3.
, . 4.
.
. 5.
. 6.
, . 7.
,
. 8. , ?
9. . ,
. , ? 10.
? 11.
. 12.
, .
Exercise 20. Read these texts, give summaries and discuss them.

1. Olympic Games
The Olympic Gam es have a very long history. They began
in 776 B.C.* and took place every four years for nearly 1,200
years, at Olympia, in G reece. They included many different
kinds of sports, among them running, boxing and wrestling.
All the cities in Greece sent their best athletes to the city of
Olympia to compete in the games. Thousands of people from
all parts of Greece came to see the games.
In 394 A.D.** the Games stopped and the temple at
Olympia was destroyed. Fifteen hundred years later, in 1894,
a Frenchman, Baron Pierre de Coubertin, addressed a
circular to all the governing bodies of sport in which he
pointed out the educational value of sport to modern peoples.
The first of the modern series of Games took place in
Athens two years later, in 1896, on the site where the ancient
festivals had been held 1,500 years before.
In 1896 the International Olympic Committee was set up.
It is the central policy-m aking body of the Olympic
movement. All nations, which take part in the Olympic
Gam es, are represented in this Committee. The Committee
decides where next Olympic Games will take place. They ask
a city (not a country) to be the host one city for the Winter
* B.C. (before Christ [kraist])
** A.D. (anno Domini)
437

Olympics and one for the summer Olympic Games. N early


150 countries are represented on the International Olympic
Com mittee now.
In 1952 the Soviet Union sent athletes to the Olympic
G am es for the first time. Then four years later, in Australia,
the Soviet Union won more m edals than the other countries.
Soviet athletes won thirty-seven gold medals and tw enty-nine
silver medals.
2. Sports in Great Britain
The English are great lovers of sports and when they are
neither playing nor watching games* they like to talk about
them.
The game especially associated with England is cricket.
Organized amateur cricket is played between club team s. But
for the great mass of the British public the eight months of
the tootball season are more important than the four months
of cricket. There are plenty of amateur football (or "soccer")
clubs, but professional football is big business. Every large
town has at least one professional football club. The players
have not necessarily any personal connections with the town
for w hose teams they play. They are bought and sold between
the clubs, and the "transfer fees" ** can be much more than
30,000. The Cup Final, played in May each year in London,
is the culminating event of the season.
Rugby football (or "rugger") is played with the eggshaped ball, which may be carried and thrown. Rugby is
m ostly played by amateurs. It is also the game played at the
great majority of "public schools"*** though more and more
grammar schools are adopting it. International m atches,
involving England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland and France, are
played in capital cities.
Most secondary schools have playing fields, and boys
normally play rugger or soccer in winter and cricket in
summer; schoolgirls play tennis and rounders (a sort of
baseball) in summer and netball and hockey in winter though
hockey is now becom ing more and more popular also at b o y s
schools, and there are many m ens amateur hockey clubs.
*
when they are neither playing nor watching games

** transfer jtraens'fa:] fees ,
*** public schools *

438

G olf and tennis are played by great numbers of people.


There are plenty of tennis clubs in Great Britain.
N ext to football, the chief spectator sport in English life is
horse racing.*
Athletic sports and gym nastics are practised at schools,
but not many towns have running tracks for public use.
Rowing occupies a leading place in the sporting life of schools
and universities which have suitable water nearby.
Exercise 21. Speak at these topics.

1. Moscow, the city of the 22nd Olympic Games. 2, The


role of Olympic Games in the development of sports and
friendship. 3. Sport in Great Britain. 4. My favourite sport.

L E S S O N SIX
Conversations: A. A Visit to the "Young Pioneers" Stadium.
B. Sport in British Schools. C. At the Doctors.
Learn these speech patterns
)

. W ell see a Lot o f children training** there. ,


( ) .
T hey watch boys play a game of basketball.
, .
T h ey watch children com pete in track and field events.
,
() .
Exercise 1. Make up sentences using the tab e and translate them,

see
T hey

saw
will see

the boys
Jane

watch

her

watched

Nick

cross (crossing) the


street.
play (playing) tennis,
play (playing) football,
walk (walking) to the
bus stop,
get on the bus.

Exercise 2. Translate these sentences using the pattern to see (to watch) smb.
do (doing) smth.

1.
,
. 2. ,
*
Next to football, the chief spectator sport in English life is horse racing. Ha
.
**

to, (Present Participle)
439

. 3. -,
? 4. ,
.
2. It does look a bit sore. ()
. ( .) D o
. I do believe
you. , . did say that.
.
Exercise 3. Read and translate these sentences.

1.
He did give her a piece of good advice. 2. She did
recommend them to go there. 3. T hey did appreciate your
help. 4. He does feel tired. 5. T hey did settle that problem.
Exercise 4. Make up five sentences using pattern 2.

3. How long do you think I ll have to stay here?


, ?
What problems do you think th eyll discuss tomorrow?
, ?
Exercise 5. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

What
Where
When
Who

do you
think

h ell do next?
the nearest underground station is?
the next bus will arrive?
will take them round the fortress?

Exercise 6. Translate these sentences.

()
?

?
?

?

Learn these words and word com binations


pioneer [,'9] n
stadium ['staidiam] n ;
Spartak Stadium "
"
lounge [laundj] n ,
( . .)
sleep ; I had a good night
sleep
sleep (slept) v ; I dont want
to sleep now.
start v: to start with doing smth.
440

Lets start with visiting the


British Museum; to start smth.
with smth.; He often starts his
lesson with questions,
teenager I'ti:neid59] n ;

objection [ab'dsekjn] n
train v () ; My
brother trains quite a time every
day.
sports events [l'ventsl

sports club
( )
function ['fArjkJn] v
, ; .
;idmit [ad'mit] v ;
; ; to admit to
school (college, club)
( , );
I wonder who is admitted to
colleges in this country.
.support fsa'pcKt] n (
), ;
Schools are supported by the
state in our country,
trade union
n ; club fee

free ot charge
coach v , (),
() ;
Coaching is free of charge here,
only [/ounli] ; Is
this the only sports club for
teenagers?
basketball |'bci:skitb3:l] n
pretty f'priti] adv . ,
;
; George plays tennis
pretty well,
relaxation f.ri:lsek'sei$n] n ;
; ;
Playing tennis is the best kind of
relaxation for me.
stop v ();
stopped near the entrance to the
exhibition, to stop to talk (to
read, ete.) ,
( ..);
stopped to watch the boys
play basketball,
volleyball ['vDliborll n
*ompete [kam'pkt] v ,
,

irack and field events



kmd , , ; .
What kind of person is he?
? What kinds of
sports do you have in your
schools?
?
various I'veam s] ,
; It can be done in

various ways.
-,
offer I'ofa] v ( ,
-.): offered me his help.
He offered to help me.
opportunity [,Dp9'tju:niti] n
, () ; I
didnt get the opportunity to
speak to him.
( )
.
team games
cricket ['krikit]
rugger [') . rugby

soccer I'sDka]
rounders f'raundoz]

baseball ['&:1]
athletics ItcB'letiks]

athletic IseB'letik] ;
athletic sports
facility [fg'silm] ( p i)
; There are excellent
facilities for athletics here,
attention n: to pay attention to
smth.
-.; We pay a great deal of
attention to the development of
sport.
training n
body ['badi] n
character ['kserokts] n
record ['reko:dj n ; to estab
lish [is'tseblij] a record for
smth. .; established the record for
the 100 m run.
100 ,
sportsman ['spo:tsmon]
nation ['neijnj 1. ; 2.
.
physician [fi'zifn] (
) ; at the physicians
form
Whats the trouble []?
?
feverish ['fi:v3ri$]
; The child feels feverish.
(
).
throat [Brout] , ,
441

; ; sore [ss:] throat


, ; I
have a sore throat.
,
slip off v
blouse [blauz]
chest , ; to
listen to ones chest
( )
breathe [bri:d v ; to
breathe in ; "Please
breathe in," said the doctor, to
breathe out
cough [kof] v ; Have you
been coughing much?
take ones temperature
() ; Will
you take your temperature,
please?
thermometer [0' ] n

tongue [tAQ] n
a bit n ,
, -
sn eeze [sni:z] v ; "Ive been
coughing and sneezing a lot
these two days," said Jane,
exam ine [ig'zgemm] v .
, ;
; " have to examine you,"
said the doctor,
mouth [mau0] n
wide adv ; Open your
mouth wide.
.
/
cold n , ; to have
(to have got) a cold
,
course [:] . ; to give
course of antibiotics
f'sentibai'ruiks] (
)

capsule ['kgepsju:l) ;

prescription Ipris'kripfn] ;
Did the doctor give him a
prescription?
surgeon ['so:d5n] n ; at the
surgeons ; to go to
the surgeons
surgery ['S9:d3ari] n

Whats wrong with you?
( )?
fracture pfraekt^a] ;
;
run (ran, run) v , ;
ran as hard as he could,
ball n
slip v
fall down (fell, fallen) v
pain n ; to have (to feel) a
pain ; I have a
pain in my left hand,
get up v ,
careful ['k&afl] ,
; You should be
careful when you cross the street.
One cannot be too careful.
,
examination [ig,zaemi'neijn] n
, ,
; X-ray ['eksrei]
examination

X-ray room
X-ray picture

X-ray v

drive (drove, driven f'drivn]) v


, -., -.; Will you drive me homo,
please?

A. A Visit to the Spartak Stadium


(In the hotel lounge)
G rom ov: H ello, Mr Adams.
M r A dam s: H ello. Its a beautiful morning, isn t it?
G: Y es, its warm and sunny. How are you today? You
had a very busy day yesterday, d id n t you?
442

A:

Oh, yes. But I had a good night sleep and Im OK


now. What shall we start with?
G: What about visiting the "Spartak" Stadium? Its a
stadium for children and teenagers.
A: N o objection. Is it far from here?
G: No, itll take us about fifteen minutes to get there.
Its Sunday today and w ell see a lot of children
training there. There are some sports events, too, Im
sure.
(In the car)
A:

How do your childrens sports clubs function? Who


is adm itted to them?
G: All sports clubs in this country are supported by the
state and trade unions. Any child can be admitted to
the club.
A: W hats the fee?
G: N o fee at all, its free of charge.
A: Do you mean to say parents dont have to pay for
coaching at all?
G: T hats right.
A: Is this the only stadium for children in Moscow?
G: N o, there are childrens sports clubs in every
stadium . Here we are. Lets get out and walk round
the stadium.
(In the stadium)
Mr Adams and Gromov watch boys playing a game of
basketball.
A: I wonder what the score is.
G :(asks boys watching the gam e): 35 : 33.
A: Both teams are pretty good and the boys are on
form. One can see th ey re enjoying the game.
G: Yes. Playing a gam e is the best kind of relaxation
for children, I believe.
A: It certainly is. 1 think sport is the best kind of
relaxation for any age.
Gromov and Mr Adams walk round the stadium stopping
here and there to watch children play football, volleyball,
tennis, etc. Then they watch children compete in track and
field events.
A:

Thank you very much. That was a most enjoyable


visit.
443

. Sport in British Schools


(Talk between Michael Kovrov, a R ussian coach, and
George Smith, a British coach)
Michael: What kinds of sports do you have in British
schools?
George: Oh, various kinds. Most secondary schools offer
some opportunity for playing chief team games.
Football is usually played in winter at b oys schools
and cricket in summer. Some schools play only rugger
and som e only soccer. Girls play tennis and rounders
(a sort of baseball) in summer ang hockey in winter,
though hockey is becoming more and more popular
also at b o y s schools.
Michael: And what about athletics? Are there any facilities
for athletic sports?
George: Y es, there are also facilities for som e athletic
sports.
Michael: I have the im pression that most British schools
pay a great deal of attention to sport.
George: Oh yes. British teachers think that sport plays a
large part in the training not only of the body but of
the character, too.
Michael: T h ats what R ussian teachers think, too.
George: I know sport is very popular in this country. A lot
of world records were established by our sportsmen.
Michael: Id say w ere a sports-loving nation.
C. At the D octors 1
1) At the Physicians
Doctor: Good morning.
Ann:
Good m orning, Doctor.2
Doctor: Ah, h eres your form. Petrova, isn t it?
Ann:
T hats right, Doctor, Ann Petrova.
Doctor: Well, w hats the trouble?
Ann:
I feel hot and feverish and Ive got a sore throat.
Doctor: Now, le ts have a look at you. Slip off your coat
and blouse. Id like to listen to your chest. Breathe in
then cough. T h ats it. Now again. Thank you. Now
Ill take your temperature. Put it (the thermometer)
under your tongue. Well, it is a bit high. W ell have
to do som ething about it, w ont we? Have you been
coughing much?
444

A nn: Yes, quite a lot, and sneezing.


Doctor: I want to exam ine your throat. wide. Say "Ah".
Ann:
Aaaaahh.
Doctor: Yes, it does look a bit sore. Y ouve got a cold but
not a very bad one. Y oud better have a couple of
days in bed.3
Ann:
What a^out the throat, Doctor?
Doctor: Im giving you a course of antibiotics. Take one
capsule every four hours.4 H eres the prescription.
Ann:
Thank you, Doctor. Goodbye.
2 ) A t the Surgeon's
Tw o.friends help Peter Belov walk into the surgery.
Doctor: "Whats wrong with your leg, Belov?
Belov: Im afraid its a fracture, Doctor,
Doctor: How did it happen?
Belov: I was playing a game of tennis. Running to get the
ball I slipped and fell down on my leg. I felt an awful
pain when I tried to get up. My friends had to help
me get here.
Doctor: T hats too bad. You should have been careful.
Well, w ell start with the X-ray exam ination. Now sit
down in this chair and the nurse will take you to the
X -ray room.
(A few minutes later the nurse drives Peter Belov back
into the surgery. She passes the X-ray pictures to the doctor.)
Doctor (after exam ining the pictures): Unfortunately, it is a
fracture. Y oull have to stay in hospital, Belov.
Belov: How long do you think Ill have to stay here?
Doctor: I think not less than a couple of weeks.

Notes
1. at the doctors ( ).
doctor,
surgeon, physician, etc.
: to be at the doctors (at the surgeons, etc.), to
go to the doctors (to the surgeons), etc,
2. Doctor ,
.
3. bed
: to go to bed , to stay in
bed ( ) .
4. every four hours
445

Exercise 7. Read and translate the dialogues.


Exercise 8. Find in the dialogues English equivalents for these word
combinations and sentences.

1.
? 2. ,
. 3. ?
4. . 5. . 6.
. 7. . 8.
... 9.
. 10. . 11.

, . 12.
. 13. . 14. ,
. 15.
. 16. ? 17.
. 18. . 19.
.
Exercise 9. Quote the sentences in which these words and word combinations
are used in the dialogues and translate them.

objection, to train, to adm it, to support, relaxation,


various, opportunity, facility, record, nation, trouble, a sore
throat, breathe in, to give a course of, wrong, to fall down,
X -ray exam ination, hospital
Exercise 10. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

2.

3.

4.

5.

446

A: What about visiting the Luzhniki S tadiu m ?


B: N o objection, I d be glad to.
(A: attending Dr Browns lecture, p layin g a game of
chess)
A: Playing tennis is the best kind of relaxation for
children, I believe.
: Y es, it certainly is.
(A: football, basketball, volleyball)
A: Shall we see children training?
B: Yes, I think so.
(B: Y es, I d on t think so.)
A: How long do you think itll take
us?
B: N ot more than an hour.
( : About three quarters of an hour. An hour and a half.)
A: What kinds of sports do you have in Russian
schools?
B: Various kinds. Most schools offer some opportunity
for playing basketball, volleyball and table tennis.
B: football, volleyball and hockey)

6.

A: What games are popular at g irls schools in Britain?


B: Tennis and rou nders.
(B: Hockey and ten n is).
7. D octor: W hats the trouble?
P atien t:* I feel feverish *
(Patient: I have a sore throat. Ive been sneezing and
coughing a lot these two days. Im afraid I have a high
temperature now.)
Exercise 11. What would you say if you took part in these dialogues?
Dramatize them.

1.

A: How are you today? You had a very busy day


yesterday.
B: ...
A: What about visiting the childrens sports club in
Sokolniki?
B: ...

2.

A: I wonder how your childrens clubs function. Who


supports them?
B'
A: Are there any fees?
B: ...

3.

A: Do you have to pay for coaching your children?


B: ...
A: T h ats very good.

4.

A: What do you think of the teams?


B: ...
A: Y es, they are. think playing a gam e is the best
kind of relaxation for children.
B: ...

5.

A:
B:
A:
B:

6.

A: Are there any facilities for athletics at Russian


schools?
B: ...
A: What athletic sports are popular with schoolchildren?
B: ...
*

What kinds of sports are popular at British schools?


...
Do boys and girls play the sam e team games?
...

patient ['p eijn t] ,

447

7.

A: I have the im pression that British teachers pay a


great deal of attention to sports.
B: ...

8.

Doctor: H ere's your form. Peter Bobrov, is n t it?


B: ...
D: W hats the trouble?
B: ...

9.

Doctor: Y ou d better have a couple of days in bed.

D: I m giving you a course of antibiotics. H eres the


prescription.
B: ...
D: You should take one capsule every six hours.
A -J *

* * *

10. Doctor: W hats wrong with your arm*?


D: T hats too bad. You should have been careful. W ell
have to start with the X-ray exam ination.
11. D (a fter exam ining the pictures): U nfortunately, it is a
fracture. Y ou ll have to stay in hospital.
B: ...
D: I think not less than a week.
Exercise 12. Think of situations in which these sentences can be used.
Dramatize them.

1. What shall we start with? 2. W ell be able to see a lot


of children training there. 3. W hos adm itted to childrens
sports clubs? 4. W hats the fee? 5. N o objection. 6. I think
both teams are on form. 7. How many children will compete
in track and field events? 8 Most secondary schools offer
some opportunity for playing chief team gam es. 9. Hockey is
becoming more and more popular at b o y s schools. 10.
British teachers think that sport plays a large part in the
training not only of the body but of the character too. 11.
W hats the trouble? 12. Well, the temperature is a bit high.
13. Yes, Ive been coughing quite a lot, and sneezing, too.
14. It does look a bit sore. 15. Y oud better have a few days
in bed. 16. I slipped and fell down. I can t walk and th eres
* arm ( )

448

an awful pain in my leg, 17, U nfortunately, it is a fracture.


18. You should have been carcful, 19. How long do you think
Ill have to siav in hospital? 20. Ive slept well and Im OK
now. 21. He should be taken to hospital.
Exercise 13. Give responses according to the model. Use modal verbs.

He has been feeling ill for the last four days,


a) He should go to the doctors now. b) He should have
gone to the doctors four days ago. c) He was to be taken
to hospital yesterday but he refused, d) He has had a
lot of work to do these four days and thats why he was
not able to go to the doctor's, e) He needn't go to the
doctors. There is nothing serious with him.
L He ran to get the ball and injured his leg. 2. Their
team were on form and they won the game. 3. John has been
awfully coughing for the last five days. 4. He has been
staying in hospital for a week now.
Exercise 14. Reproduce the dialogues A Visit (o the Spartak Stadium,
Sport in British Schools and At the Doctors in pairs.
Exercise 15. Act as interpreter.

Mr Sallis: Could you tell me if sport is popular with


children in this country?
: .
.
S: How do childrens sports clubs function? Who
supports them?
:
,
.
S: Do you mean to say that parents d o n t have to pay
any fees?
: , .

(sport equipment [I'kwipmsnt ]).
S: Are there any special stadium s for children?
: , .
.
S: Who coaches children?
: ,
, (to educate)
.
449

' 2.

3.

M r Candlirt: What sports are popular with your children?


: , ,

.
?
: Football, both soccer and rugby, cricket, golf and
tennis.
M:
?
: There are quite a few football, cricket and golf
professional team s. w onder if there are any
professionals am ong your sportsmen?
M: .
(amateur ['semata ]) .
Surgeon: W hats wrong with your arm, Mr Fedorov?
: ,
. ,
. ,
.
S: You sh ou ld ve been careful. Now, let me exam ine
your arm. D oes it hurt here?
: , .
S: I think w ed better have it X -rayed. Miss M iles will
take you to the X -ray room.

(Some minutes later)


M iss M iles: Here are the pictures, Doctor.
S:
( to Fedorov): Be seated, please. ( A fter exam ining the
pictu res.) U nfortunately, it is a fracture. You will have to
stay in hospital for a couple of days.
: . ,
.
S: I m afraid so.
Exercise 16. Translate into English.

1.

450

: , -
(Barrow)?
: , . ,

.

. ?
: (physical I'fizik l]
education [,ed3u'kei{n ])
. -
(figure

:
:

;
:

:
:
;
.

['figa] skating).

.

.
?
, .
(to grow healthy ]).

.
, .

,
?
,
.
. ?
10 ?
.

: , !
: . ?
: .
: . ?
: , - ,
. ,
.
.
: ,
. ( .)
.
: -.
: A- -.
: . ,
. ,
. . .
?
: .
: (typical ['tipikJ ]) .

(m edicine f'm ed sn ]).
.
: ?
: .
.
451

Advantages and Disadvantages

Doctor: Now, Peter. A cold, is it?

452

,
?
:
-. ,
*
:
, . .
:
.
3.

( ,
(to bandage ['baendid3 ]).

:
?
:
.
. .
,
.
.
:
, , , .
?
: , .
:
, .

.
(
. .)
( ): .
(strain ), .
.
.
: , . .
:
. .
Exercise 17. Make up dialogues based on the pictures (see p. 101).
Exercise 18. Dramatize these situations.

1. You m eet Miss B entley. She is a British figure skater.*


She is interested in the developm ent of sport in R ussia.
D iscuss it with her.
2. You are on a tour in Great Britain. One of the tourists
has a very bad cold. A doctor is called and you have to act as
interpreter.
3. You are on a tour in Great Britain. One of the tourists
breaks an arm. You take him to the surgeons and act as
interpreter.
* figure ['figa] skater
453

L E S S O N SEVEN
I, NEW GRAMMAR STRUCTURES

1. The Participle

1) Form s o f the Participle.


Voice
Active

Passive

Tense
Intransitive
()

Transitive ()

Present
Participle
(Participle I)

coming

writing

being written

Past Participle
(Participle )

come

written

Perfect
Participle

having come

having written

having been
written

1. Passive
Voice.
2. Past Participle Active
(, com e)
Perfect (he has com e).
3. Present Participle Active Passive ,
, , ,
- .
stood looking out of the window.
() .
The problem being d iscu ssed now is very important.
.
4. Present Participle to arrive, to com e, to
cross, to enter (['e n ta ] ) .
, ,
-.
454

Arriving at the hotel he went to his room.


( ),
.
5.

not,
.
N ot knowing his new phone number I was unable to tell him
the news. ,
.
2) Functions o f Participles in the Sentence.

:
1.
) :
Will you take away the broken cup? , ,
.
Look at the sleeping child. .
) (

):
The actor playing the part of Bernard Shaw is wonderful.
, , .
wonder what Peter thinks of the problem being discussed
now. ,
( , ).
2.

) :
Having fin ish ed the novel the writer asked his brother to
read it. ,
,
) :
Having never seen Johns father I cannot tell you what kind
of man he is.
, ,
.
) :
went out of the room laughing. ,
.
455

: 1. Present Participle
when, whiie as,
.
While travelling Bernard Shaw visited India. (
), .
2. Present Participle to be
.
While in London ( - while being in London) he attended lectures on modern
English literature. { ),
.
3. (
) ,
.
. :

Hearing this and learning that Mr
Brooks was in London he went
there.


When he heard this and learned
that Mr Brooks was in London
he went there.

3) Translation o f Participles into R ussian.


1. Present Participle

, - , ,
- ,- .
T he young mother sat and looked at the sleeping child.
.
Coming to the window he opened it and listened.
, .
2. Past Participle
,
-,-,
, - , .
heard the sound of the radio through the closed door.
.
T he novel written by the young physicist is very interesting.
, (
), ,
3. Perfect Participle Active
, -<,
.

Having done his homework John played a game of chess with


his brother. ( ,
),
.
456

4,
Perfect Participle Passive
.
Having been written long ago the letter was difficult to read
because of a great many Old English forms.
,
-
.
:
(Past Participle Active)
,

.
, ,
The participants of the conference that arrived yesterday
are staying at the National.
, , . The man who wrote this
letter is a friend of mine.
Exercise I. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to the use of
participles. Say in what functions the participles are used.

a) 1. He looked at the sm iling children. 2. Novy^Arbat is


a broad avenue with tall modern buildings housing offices,
stores, bars, cafes and restaurants. 3. When playing tennis he
slipped and broke his leg. 4. Entering the room he saw a
letter on his desk, 5, John looked out of the window while
waiting for her answer. 6. He did not say a word, again
looking at his hands. 7. N o t being able to read or think she
phoned her brother and asked him to come,
b) 8. T he teacher asked the students to
read the
sentences written on the blackboard. 9. T he problem
discu ssed at the m eeting yesterday is very important. 10.
The girl stopped before the closed door.
c) 11. T hey were old friends having been at school
together. 12, H aving closed the sitting-room door, she sat
down in the armchair. 13. Having never been to Canada
m yself I listened to hirn with great interest.
d) 14. As a girl she was fond of tennis. 15, While at
college he played for the University hockey team. 16. When
walking hom e he met an old friend of his.
Exercise 2. Transform these sentences according to the models and translate
them into Russian.

;0 The man who is standing near the captain is their new


coach.
* to house
457

T he man standing near the captain is their new coach.


1. Do you know the name of the man who is talking to Mr
Brown? 2. The sea which w ashes Norway in the south-w est
is called the North Sea. 3. T he new stadium that houses forty
five thousand people is a wonderful building. 4. She looked at
the plane which was disappearing in the clouds.
b) I have just read his article that was published in the
Morning Star.
I have just read his article published in the Morning
Star.
_
/
1. T he new school that was built last year is one of the
finest buildings in our street. 2. Did you see the letter that
was signed last Thursday? 3. Did you hear the
an
nouncem ent that was m ade on the radio? 4. Did you see the
article that was translated by him?
c) When I heard the news, I phoned Peter.
Hearing the new s I phoned Peter.
1. When I saw him , I felt happy. 2. When he w atched the
gam e, he enjoyed it. 3. When she spoke to Peter, she asked
his advice. 4. When they drove hom e, they saw Mr B entley.
5. When they arrived at the airport, they saw their friends
there.
d) As she said so she went out of the room.
Saying so she w ent out of the room.
1. As he looked out of the window he saw his father. 2. As
she felt tired she sat down in the armchair. 3. As he did not
know what to do he asked his brothers advice. 4. As he
failed to hit the ball he got angry.
e) While they were travelling in Europe they visited Spain.
While travelling in Europe they visited Spain.
1. W hile the W olves w ere sitting in the dressing-room ,
they did not say a word. 2. While he was looking through the
newspaper, he saw a picture of his friend. 3. While he was
speaking to John, he invited him to his birthday party. 4.
W hile he was walking along the street, he met his old friend.
f)

After he had done his homework he went for a walk.


Having done his homework he went for a walk.
1.
After the W olves had played the first two periods they
felt tired. 2. After he had had a holiday he felt better. 3.
After he had made an appointm ent with Mr Brown he told
the director about it. 4. After they had settled all the
458

questions they had lunch. 5. After he had taken Ben to


hospital he phoned his mother.
Exercise 3. Translate these sentences using participles.

1. ,
. 2. ,
. 3.
, . 4. ,
(),
. 5. , ?
6 . ,
? 7. ,
. 8. ( )
, .
9. ,
.
Exercise 4. Make up six sentences using participles.

2. T he N om inative A bsolute C onstruction


( )*
,
,
, this, it there ( there is ),
.
The weather being fin e, they went for a walk.
, .
It being very la te, they stayed at home.
, .
There being little tim e left, they had to hurry.
, .

.

:
)

, ,
, , , .
*

.
459

This being s o , w e shall have to return.


, .
Weather p erm ittin g, they will leave tomorrow.

, .
It being difficult to settle the m atter, we decided to m eet
again on the following day.
,
.
)

, , .
T he old man tried to get up, the young man helping him .
, .
:
, with ().
The participants came from ten countries, with Britain being represented by
Professor Arthur Thornton. ,
.


- -
.
.
Exercise 5. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to the use of the
Nominative Absolute Construction.

1. There being a strong wind that day, it was im possible to


go boating. 2. It being Saturday, everyone went out of town.
3. The novel com p leted , I was able to take a m onths holiday.
4. T im e perm ittin g, they will discuss the matter tomorrow. 5.
This being so, I should like to as him to return next week. 6.
He stood asid e, with his h ands in his p o c k e ts , watching her.
7. Dinner over, th ey went to the father's study. 8. This being
don e, they left for hom e. 9. The conference over, he returned
to the office.
II. TEXT

Learn this speech pattern


1.
It has som ething to d o with my colour.
- . ( -
).
* permit [pa'mit] ,
460

2. It has nothing to do with your plan.


.
3, It has a lot to d o with their work.
.
Exercise 1. Make up sentences using the table and translate them into
Russian.

it

They
I

has
have

som ething
nothing
a lot

to do with

ballet,
his answer,
the paper he
handed to you.

Exercise 2. Translate into English.

1. ,
. 2.
, . 3. ,

(decision [d i'sisn ]) .
Learn these words an d word com binations
accomm odation
[xkoma'deifn]
n
, ;
; ; hotel
accomm odation
; It was difficult to get hotel
accommodation during the Olympic
Games.
!ine n A n t ; to stand in line
; We must stand
in line to get tickets. Syn. queue
Br.
reception counter (desk) [ri'sep$n
'kaunts] ()
(
)
middle-aged ('midl'esdsd]

room-clerk ['rumk!a:kl

reservation [,rez3'vei$nj
(
, ),
; to make (to book)
a reservation ,
,
( ,

,
..)', T d like to make a
reservation, please, said Mr
Brown.
reserve [ri'zaiv] v ,
; to reserve a seat at
the theatre (a room at a hotel, a
table at a restau ran t, etc.)
(
,
..); Have you reserved
table at the restaurant yet?
register ['redjists] v
, ,
; All visitors are to
register in the visitors book.
expression [iks'prejn] n
(, m n .)
withdraw
[wid'dro:]
(withdrew,
withdrawn [wid'dru:, wid'drDin])
v 1. ,
; 1 hope you will not withdraw
your promise.
2. ,
,
;
,
;
to
withdraw from business
461

; to withdraw troops
; Israel must withdraw
is troops from Arab territories,
push [puf] v ; Push! (
) . Pull
[pul]! ,
firmly adv , ,

undisturbed ['Andis't9:bd]
, ,

smile v ; to smile at smb.

-.;
Keep
smiling! He !
in a friendly way , -
, ; The old
professor spoke with the student in
a friendly way.
confirm [ksn'foim] v ;
to confirm ones report (ones
m essage, etc.); Please, confirm
your telephone message by letter,
confirm ation [,k3nf3'meijn] n
,
;
confirm ation of a prom ise (a
report, etc.)
( ..); There
has been no confirmation of his
report.
produce ipr3'dju:s] v ,

hardly pha:dh] adv , ,


; His English was so poor
that I could hardly understand
him.
glance [gla:nsl v
place v , ,
in front of prep ,
convention [kan'venjn] n ,
,
nod v
shake [Jeik] (shook, shaken [juk,
'jeikn]) v ; to shake ones
head (
, ,
, ..)\ In answer
to my question he just shook his
head, to shake han d s (with
sm b.), to shake sm b.s hand
-. ,
-.
;
They
shook hands and walked towards
the reception desk,
put away v ,
462

in this (that) case ()


; In that case we shall send
you a confirmation, in any case
; In any case you
will have to fill in a form,
assistant
manager
[a'sistant
'&]

duty ['dju:ti] n ,

apologize ['] v
;

;
to
apologize to smb. for smth
(doing sm th.)
-. -.; apologized
for coming late,
m isunderstanding
^miSAnda'stsendirj] n
,
;
Its
just
a
misunderstanding, theres nothing
serious about it.
receiver [ri'sirva] n
; to lift (to take up) the
receiver
; to put down the receiver
; Will
you put down the receiver, please,
voice [V3is] n
check in v () (
); Have you
checked in yet?
check out v
; When are
you going to check out?
checking out time

cheerful f'tfiafsl] ,
greeting ['gri:tig] n ;
friendly greeting

;
to answ er sm b.s
greeting -.
; She answered our
greeting with a smile, greetingcard
greet [gri:t] v ,
; ; to g reet smb.
(with a smile)
-. ()
grey-haired ['greihesd]
hair [hea] n . (.
. )\
Her hair is beautiful.

mouth disease [ mau0 di'zi:z]



cause [ko:z] v ,
,
report [ri'port] ,
drink [drirjk] ; to have
drink -.; Would you
like to have a drink?
- ? soft drinks
; strong
drinks
clear up v , ; to
clear up a question (a situation)
(
)
apology ['1<&1]
guarantee [.gaeran'ti:] v
, , ; to
guarantee smth., to do smth.,
that sm th. will be done; We
guarantee success, you neednt
worry.

walk out v
( ..)
fault [fo:lt] ; Whose fault is it?
pain [pem] n , ,

turn v ()
pretend [pri'tend] V ,
; pretended to be
asleep.
fight [fait] (fought [fo:t]) v
,
prefer [pri'fa:] (preferred) v
,
; to p refer smth. (smb.) to
smth (sm b.); to prefer doing
sm th. to doing smth;
-. (-.) -.
(-.); prefers walking to
driving.
research [ri'sartj] n -

Exercise 3. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to active words
and word combinations.

1.
Im checking out, can I have the bill, p lease? said
Mr Brooks. 2. At the reception desk I saw a line of people
waiting to check in. 3. T he receptionist handed me a form to
fill it in. 4. A m iddle-aged woman greeted me with a sm ile, I
answered her greeting. 5. I hope we shall m anage to get hotel
accomm odation as soon as we come there. 6. The room-clerk
asked me to register my nam e in the visitors book. 7. In
this case y o u ll have to apologize to your colleagues. T his
was your fa u lt, the old doctor said. 8. Would you have a
cup of coffee? N o, thanks, 1 prefer tea . 9. You should
have m ade a reservation in advance. 10. We can hardly
expect him today. 11. H is hair is grey. 12. I could not find
the book I needed so badly. 13. I am afraid he will not be
able to clear up the matter as he has withdrawn from
business. 14. He pretended that he did not see the young
Negro. 15 When he heard the news the expression of his face
changed. 16. D on t worry, it was just a m isunderstanding,
he d id n t want to upset your p lan s, said the manager. 17.
The convention of the Democratic party will take place next
w eek, he said.

463

NO ACCOMMODATION FOR YOU


T he lounge was becom ing busy. A small line had formed
at the reception counter.
A m iddle-aged w ell-d ressed Negro entered the hotel and
came towards R eception . At the counter he put down his
bag and stood w aiting, third in line.
Good m orning he said to the room-clerk. Im Dr
N icholas, you have a reservation for m e.
Y es, sir, if y o u ll register, p lea se. 1 The words were
spoken before the clerk looked up. As he did so the
expression of his face changed. His hand went out2
withdrawing the registration form he had pushed forward a
moment earlier.
T m 'sorry, he said firm ly, the hotel is fu ll.
U ndisturbed, the Negro sm iled in a friendly w ay. 1 have
a reservation. The hotel sent a letter confirm ing it. He
produced the letter.
There was probably a m istake, Im sorry. T he clerk
hardly glanced at the paper placed in front of him. We have
a convention h e r e .
I know , the N egro nodded, his sm ile disappearing.
Its a convention of dentists. I happen to be o n e .3
The room-clerk shook his head, T h eres nothing I can
do for y o u .
T he Negro put away his papers. In that case Id like to
speak to som eone e ls e . You can talk to the assistant
m anager. T he room -clerk called, Mr Bailey! Will you come
here, p lease!
T he assistant m anager looked up from his desk and got
up with a tired look. As he walked across the room his tired
face assum ed a professional greeters sm ile.4 It was his duty
to handle matters of this kind.5 W ell/' he said, w ell just
have to see what we can d o . He led Dr N icholas towards his
desk and gestured him to a chair,6 Well, D octor, he said,
I apologize for the m isunderstanding, but Im sure we can
find you other accom m odation in the c ity . With one hand he
lifted the receiver.
Just a m om en t. For the first time the visitors voice
sounded angry. You tell me the hotel is full, but your clerks
are checking people in. Do they have some special kind of
reservation?
I think you could say that. T he professional sm ile had
disappeared.
Jim N ich olas! A cheerful greeting sounded across the
464

lounge. A small grey-haired man hurried towards the desk.


The Negro stood up. Dr Ingram, how good to see you !
T hey shook hands. I can see, Jim, you're doing fin e ,7 Dr
in gram said, that paper of yours on mouth d iseases has
caused a lot of discussion and w ere all looking forward to a
brilliant report. A few of us will be having drinks later on
and Id like you to join us. Give me your room number, Jim .
U n fortu n ately, Dr N icholas said, Ive just been told I
w ont be getting a room. It seem s it has som ething to do with
my colour.
There was a silence in which Dr Ingram became very red.
Jim , I ll deal with this. Ill clear up the matter. I promise
you therell be an apology and a room. If there is n t
guarantee every other d en tist8 will walk out of this h otel!
Dr Ingram walked to the m anagers office.
Im as sorry as vou, Dr Ingram , the manager said, but
there is a house rule9... We should have made it clear,10 when
your convention was booked. Its our fault we d id n t.
There was pain in Dr Ingram s voice as he turned to
speak to Jim. Im not going to leave it as it is ! he said.
The Negro shook his head. I w ont pretend it d oesn t
hurt, and I am sure my colleagues think I should fight. I
prefer research. T h eres an afternoon flight north. Ill try to
get on it .
(After H otel by A. Hailey)

N am es
Jim N icholas I 'n ik b s ]
Bailey ['belli ]
Ingram ['lrjgrom]
N otes
1. Yes, sir, if youll register, please. , ,
, .
2. His hand went out. .
3. I happen to be one. , .
4. his tired face assum ed lD'sju:md j a professional
greeters sm ile
,
5. to handle matters of this kind

6. gestured I'd3estj3d] him to a chair


7. you re doing fine
465

8. every other dentist


9. there is a house rule
10. We should have made it clear.
.
E xercise 4. Read and translate the text.
E xercise 5. Find in the text English equivalents for these sentences.

1.
. 2.
. 3.
. 4. . 5.
. 6.
. 7. . 8.
. 9.
, .
10. , 11. - .
E xercise 6. Give Russian equivalents for these sentences.

1. N o accom m odation for you. 2. T he expression of his


face changed. 3. His hand went out withdrawing the
registration form. 4. T he hotel sent a letter confirm ing it. 5.
T he clerk hardly glanced at the paper. 6. In that case Id like
to speak to som eone else. 7. With one hand he lifted the
receiver. 8. A cheerful greeting sounded across the lounge. 9.
T h ey shook hands. 10. Its our fault. 11. I w ont pretend it
d o esn t hurt.
Exercise 7. Study the text and answer these questions.

1. Why did Dr N icholas sm ile in a friendly way when he


produced the letter of confirm ation? 2. Why did the room clerk hardly glance at the paper placed in front of him? 3.
Was the assistan t m anager w illing to help Dr Nicholas? 4.
W hy did Dr Ingram becom e angry when he heard that the
hotel had refused to check in his colleague? 5. Why was there
pain in Dr Ingram s voice when he spoke to Dr N icholas after
he had talked to the assistan t manager?
Exercise 8. Explain or comment on these statements.

1.
T he lounge was becom ing busy. 2. Its a convention of
d entists. I happen to be one. 3. It was his duty to handle
matters of this kind. 4. We can find you other
accom m odation in the city. 5. I think you could say that. 6.
It seem s it has som ething to do with my colour. 7. Jim, Ill
deal with this. 8. T here is a house rule. 9. I prefer research.
466

Exercise .9. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.

3.

4.

A: Is Mr Brown still checking in i


: think h es done that.
(A: checking out filling in the registration form)
A: Do you think I should apologize for the
m is understanding?
B: You ought to. It was all your fault.
(A: what has happened)
A: Im afraid he w ont come.
B: Its a pity. In this case w e11 have to change our
p la n s.
(B: fail to make a reservation, fail to register in
time)
A: I w ouldnt like to sta n d in line fo r the tickets.
B: You n eed n t. 1 do it m yself.
(A* to clear up this matter, to try to get hotel
accom m odation)

Exercise 10. Insert the words given below.

1. T he inform ation I have got only ... what I know. 2. Can


y o u ........ of two seats for flight 201? I ... to go by plane. 3. Why
arc you ... the door? D on t you see the sign ...? 4. Are you
sure that the ... time in this hotel is 1 p.m.? 5. Who is Peter
speaking w it h ........ ? Oh, its an old friend of h is . 6. There
was a long ... at the theatre as everybody wanted to see the
new play. 7. When speaking with the visitor the m a n a g er........
and dialled the number. 8. I hope 1 shall manage ... the
question tomorrow. 9. When I invited him to go to the country
next Sunday he only .......... U nfortunately, Im b u sy , he
said. 10. Have you got any ... in the city? 11. Shall we have a
...? said my friend at the reception. 12. In his letter he ... for
the m isunderstanding we had the day before. 13. I looked
round the restaurant hall, all the tables were occupied or ... .
checking out, to confirm , line, in a friendly w ay, to lift
the receiver, to prefer, to clear up, to push, to shake o n es
head, to pull, accom m odation, to apologize, reserved, a
drink, to make a reservation
Exercise 11. Make up twelve questions based on the text No Accommodation
for You and answer them.
Exercise 12. Insert prepositions or adverbs.

1. T he receptionist handed me a form and asked me to


fill it .... 2. Id like to check ... as soon as possible as my
* sign (sain]
467

train leaves in 40 m i n u t e s , s h e said. 3. T h e visitor had a


reservation ... the hotel so it took him o n ly ten m in u tes to
ch ec k .... 4. Have you got the con firm a tio n ... the n ew s that
we were told? 5. After the clerk fin ish e d sp eak in g ... the
p h o n e h e put ... th e receiver. 6. ... th e lou nge a friend of
m in e g r e e te d m e ... a sm ile and said that he had a lr e a d y
clea red ... w h e th e r a cc o m m o d a tio n w a s reserved ... me. 7. Dr
N ic h o la s had to sta n d ... line before h e could speak ... the
receptionist. 8. S h e is a w fu lly u p se t as your words hurt
h e r . O h , I d i d n t m e a n to, ... this c a s e I think I sh o u ld
ap olog ize ... her ... w h at Ive s a i d , 9. i ll try to reserve a
sea t ... th e theatre ... to m o r r o w , he p ro m ised sm iling ... me.
10. T h e m a n a g e r s h o o k h a n d s ... th e visitor and said ... a
fr ie n d ly w a y , W e ve got a reservation ... y o u . 11. It h a s a
lot to do ... the problem we d i s c u s s e d y e s t e r d a y , sa id the
director. 12. W h en re gisterin g the visitor said that he would
prefer a te n -flo o r room ... a four-floor room.
Exercise 13. Make up eighteen sentences using these word combinations.

to have sm th. to do with sm th., to make a reservation of


sm th., to stand in line, to fill in a form, in a friendly w ay, a
confirm ation of sm th., to shake hands with sm b., in this
(that) case, in any case, to apologize to smb. for sm th., to
take up the receiver, to put down the receiver, to check in, to
check out, to greet smb. with a sm ile, to clear up, to prefer
sm th. to sm th., to sm ile at smb.
Exercise 14. Transform these sentences into reported speech.

1. Dr N icholas said, I have a reservation. The hotel sent


a letter confirm ing it . 2. The clerk answ ered, The hotel is
full as we have a convention h ere. 3. The room-clerk said to
Dr N icholas, T h eres nothing I can do for you . 4. T he
room-clerk called, Mr Bailey! Will you com e here, p lea se.
5. Mr Bailey said, W ell just have to see what we can d o .
6. Dr N icholas asked, Do they have som e special kind of
reservation? 7. Dr Ingram asked, W hats your room
number, Jim ?
Exercise 15. Give Russian equivalents for these word combinations.

a) to withdraw a prom ise (on es w ord), to withdraw from


b u sin ess, to withdraw troops from sm b .s territory;
b) to shake o n e s head, to shake hands with sm b., to
shake sm b .s hand;
c) to check in, to check out, checking out time
468

Exercise 16. Give sentences of your own using word combinations given in
exercise 15.
Exercise 17%a) Insert articles wherever necessary, b) Give a summary of the
column and discuss it.

A Man with N o Juice


*

Like Ive alw ays said it seem s my main job in Paris is


to book people at ... hotels, to make ... reservations for them
at ... restaurants and to act as ... guide.
... other day I received ... call from ... two Hollywood
song-w riters Sammy Cahn and Jimmy Van H ansen. Look,
Art, we are com ing to Paris for the w eek-en d. Can you help
us w ith ... reservation?
... only hotel I could name was G eorge V . I had made
... reservations at m ost of ... Paris hotels for ... Americans
who never checked in and their m anagers did not speak to
me.
O k e y , Mr Cahn said. Get us two bedroom s and ...
sittin g-room .
That may be difficult, because ... hotels are full n o w , I
said.
W ell, use som e juice, will you? Mr Cahn asked.
Juice is ... H ollyw ood expression which m eans
in flu en ce .
I did m anage to get ... accommodation and on Friday
morning I went to ... hotel not to m iss the celebrities.***. By
nine in the evening they had not arrived. When I was leaving
... lounge ... room -clerk did not even look at me.
On M onday ... sam e cheerful voices phoned me. Their
colleague had made ... reservation for them in another hotel
and they w ere happy there. Cahn did not offer ... apology
and I thought it would be rude to remind them
of the
Hotel G eorge V .
At lunch Mr Cahn asked: Do you have any juice at the
E xcelsior H o tel in R om e?
N o , I said in ... firm voice. N one at a ll.
(After Art Buchwald)
*
column ['1] Am.
** like Ive always said
*** celebrity [siiebrgti]
**** it would, be rude to remind fri'mamd] them
469

Exercise 18. Say if these statements are true or false. Give your reasons.

1. Dr N icholas had no reservation therefore the


receptionist told him that the hotel was full. 2. The assistant
manager promised Dr N icholas to settle the matter. 3. Dr
Ingram was glad to see his colleague and invited him to have
a drink. 4. The m anager apologized to Dr N icholas and told
the receptionist to give him a room. 5. Dr N icholas made up
his mind to leave by the afternoon flight.
Exercise 19. Give a summary of the text No Accommodation for You.
Exercise 20. Translate into English.

1. - ,
. 2. ,
. 3. ,
, . 4.
.
5. , ,
, ,
. 6.
,
, . 7.
,
. 8. ,
. ,
(in fu ll). 9. , . ,
. 10.
, - , .
,
, . 11.
, :
, , . 12. ,
( ).
Exercise 21. Think of situations in which these sentences can be used.
Dramatize them.

1.
Our checking out time is 12 o clock. 2. W hy, Ive made
a reservation at your hotel. 3. A table is reserved for me. 4,
Will you please fill in the form? 5. You should apologize to
him in any case. 6. Im sorry, it s my fault. 7. Why, the
w eather has changed. 8. Oh, its just a m isunderstanding!
Exercise 22. Make up situations using the words given below.

a)
M eeting an Old Friend: to walk along the street, to
push, to apologize, su dd en ly, to recognize, to greet, to shake
hands with, in a friendly way.
470

b) Going on a Trip for a Holiday: to prefer, to make a


reservation, to confirm, m isunderstanding, to m iss the train.
c) Arriving in a City: to come on b u sin ess, to have a
reservation, accom m odation, to check in, to register, to fill in
the form, checking out time.
Exercise 23. Read this excerpt, give a summary and discuss it.

W hy Did She D ecide to P ass for a White*?


T he main character of the novel The M an by Irwing
W allace, Douglas Dilm an, a N egro, overnight becomes
President of the U nited States, the first N egro to get the
countrys highest office.
Surrounded by hostile Cabinet members Dilm an grows up
to face his new role, acquiring qualities necessary for
President.
T he P resid en ts personal difficulties are making his
position even more com plicated. His daughter M indy escapes
her fam ily and lives in New York under an assum ed name as
she wants to pass for a w hite. A journalist from a racist
newspaper finds it out and publishes a sensational article
about the girl, revealing her real identity.
When Mindy
sees the newspaper she tries to commit suicide.
T he scandal is becom ing nationw ide. So the President
decides to hold a press conference and explain his fam ily
tragedy.
* * *
Dilman came forward and for a moment looked at the
familiar faces of eager and impatient correspondents. T h ey
were waiting.
H e opened the new spaper in his hand and said.
You all read this this new s, Im sure. It is quite true,
every word of it. I have a daughter, she is tw enty four, and
her legal name is Mindy Dilman. have not seen her since
she was eighteen. With my w ifes encouragem ent Mindy left
for the W est, to seek a career.
M indy was fair-skinned,
and had delicate fea tu res.
* to pass for a white
** revealing [n'viilirj] her real identity [ai'dentiti]

*** to commit suicide [' 'sjunsaid]
**** to seek a career
471

Dilman hesitated. I m ight add, this is not unusual. There


has always been racial m ixing in the U nited States. And
because of this m ixing, at least 20 per cent of w hites in the
U nited States have som e degree of so-called Negro blood in
their veins, w hether they know it or not. And there are today
about 70 per cent of American N egroes who have some degree
of so-called w hite blood or, more accurately, white genes.
In our fam ily of four there were two of us who were blac
kskinned like m yself and two, w ho were fair-skinned: Mindy
and my wife.
N ow , it is a regrettable fact that among American N egroes
them selves, most of them , the lighter-skinned on es, often feel
superior. Why is this? I think the reasons are obvious. T hey
consider the lighter on es of their com m unities more attractive.
But b esides pure esth etics, there is a more serious reason.
T h ese lighter N egroes get closer to the majority of the white
population, are more acceptable to the white com m unity, it is
easier for them to escape discrim ination and persecution. And
often these alm ost w hite N egroes, seeing how much easier and
b elter life is for them when they arc taken for w hite becom e
tem pted to cross the color line, and to live perm anently in the
w hite world as w hites.
I can tell you that every year at least three thousand
American N egroes with light-colored skin take advantage of
their appearance, slip away from their N egro hom es,
com m unities, fam ily, friend s, and cross over and join the
w hite race.
For the m ost part, N egro parents do not like it when their
fairer-colored children quit their race and join the white
w orld, pretending to be white when th ey are not. T hese faircolored N egroes resign entirely from their race, pretend to
be w hite in school, in work, and in their social life.
Now you have the background explaining my daughters
defection. She was brought up as a Negro, and around her
sh e could see the terrible injustices that were to be her lot.
When she realized that she need not endure the suffering she
escaped it, she ran to the white world of N ew York city,
w here there was no reason for anyone to suspect that sh e was
not white. I will not say that I approved of Mindy O ilm ans
action, but I did not try to stop her.
I
understand Mindy and all like her who passed as w hite,
because I understand what it is to rid yourself of secondclass citizenship, of poverty, of contem pt, of inferior social
status, and to take on in their place the advantages and joys
472

of equality under the law, a respectable job, new friendships


based on o n e s personality rather than color.
My daughter M indy com m itted no crime. She committed
a deception, yes but whom it could harm but herself?
Can you picture my g irls life these years? Her life was not
easy. Mindy deprived herself of mother, father, brother, and
every other relative.
Now this morning for the sake of boosting a newspapers
circulation,** M indys secret is out. Now the cam ouflage of
this harm less young girl had been stripped off, so that she is
naked and alone and black. And for this my heart is heavy.
But more, far more, I grieve for the situation in this country
that drove Mindy to pass for a w h ite.
'Thank you for your attention, gen tlem en .
(After The Man by Irwing Wallace)

L E S S O N EIG H T
Conversation: A. At the Passport Control. B. Passing
through the Custom s. C. At a Hotel. D. In a Restaurant. E.
In a Pub. F, At the D en tists.
Learn these words an d word com binations
passport i'pa:spo:t]
n ,
passport control [kan'troul]

;
passport
control officer

custom house I'kAstemhaus] n

luggage ['] n

custom s ['kAStamzl n pi.


; to pass (to get)
through the custom s
; wonder how
long it will take us to pass through
the customs, custom s declaration
[dekh'retjn]

declare [di'kfca] v
, (
)', Have you got any
thing to declare?
,
?
duty ['dju:ti[ , ,
; custom s duties
; duty-free
-

*
Whom it could harm but herself? ,
?
** for the sake of boosting a newspapers circulation [.so:kju'leiJn]
,
473

; Are cigarettes duty-free?


liable ['laiadl] to duty

;
W hat goods are liable to duty?
key [ki:] n ; key to the door
(the room, etc.); Where is the key
to room 25?
exam ine [ig'zaemin] v ,
; , ;
Will you examine these papers?
contents ['kontants] n p i

Have a pleasant stay.


,
single 1. ;
a sin g ly room ()
; Id like
single room, please, a single bed
; 2.
, ; Johns sister is
single, isnt she?
double ['dAblj ,
; a double room (
) ; a double
bed
private bath ['praivit ':0]
(
)
porter ( )
fill in v , ; Please
fill in this form. ,
, ,
hand v , ; Please
hand me that notebook,
delightful [di'laitfl]
, ; It was a
delightful holiday,
m enu ['menju:] n ; H eres the
menu, sir.
personally ['parsnh] adv ,
simple ['sjtnpl] ,
, ,
,
cooking ['kukir)]

chips p i ,

soup [su:pl ; vegetable soup
; chicken ['tjikin]
soup (
)
order ; May I take your order,
sir?
474

o rder v ; IjcI me order


lunch this time,
food [fu:d] n ; ;
in spite of prep
pub n (. public house)
,
for a change ;
Lets have lunch in a pub for a
change.
idea [ai'dia] n , ; T hats a
good. idea. (
) !
m ention ['menjn] v ,
; He mentioned to me that
he had seen you the day before
yesterday,
b itter n ()
drink (drank, drunk) v ; Will
you drink some milk?
beer [bo] n ; ginger ['cfemcfeg]
b eer
waiter n ; head waiter

pint [paint] n (
:
0,57 ., .= 0,47 .)
snack ; to have
snack ; Just a snack.
- ,
offer ['ofa] v ; What can
you offer us?
cheese [t$i:z] n
sausage ['sosids] n ;
pickles ['piklz] n p i ;

meat pie ;

filling ; I have a filling in


my tooth.
loose [lu:s] ,
; One of my teeth is
loose, said the child,
awful [':] , ;
The weather is awful today,
pain n ; to have a pain
; 1 have an awful pain in
my tooth,
lower
upper ; One of my upper
teeth is loose,
drop out v , ,
; One of my teeth is
about to drop out.

sensitive ['sensitiv]
; sensitive to heat (cold)
(); Is
this tooth sensitive to heat or cold?
checkup ['tJekAp] n . ,
; You should go for a
checkup to the doctors next
Tuesday.

pull out v ,
()\ I had a tooth pulled out
yesterday.
m ean lmi:n] (m eant [ment]) v
, ; What do you
mean by this?
? What does this word
mean? ?

A. At the Passport Control


P assport control officer: Your passport, please.
Bobrov: H ere you are.
P. o.;
W here are you going?
B:
To London.
P, o.:
How long are you going to stay in this country?
B:
About two m onths.
P. o.:
H eres your passport, Mr Bobrov. Thank you.
B. P assing through the C ustom s
C u stom s officer: Is this your luggage, sir?
Bobrov: T h ats right.
. o.:
Have you got anything to declare?
B:
No. Ive got nothing liable to duty,
. ..*
Will you please open your grey suitcase?
B:
Just a m inute. (H e takes out the key a n d opens the
su itcase.)
C, o. (ex a m in es the contents): All right, Mr Bobrov. Every
thing is OK. Have a pleasant stay in this country.
B:
Thank you.
C. At a H otel
9

Bobrov:
Clerk:
Bobrov:
Clerk:
Bobrov:
Clerk:

Have you a single room for two nights?


You can have Room 22 on the first floor.
How much is it?
45.25 with a private bath and a TV set.
Can I see it, please?
Y es, of course. The porter will take you there.
Y oud better fill in this form, please.
Bobrov: Y es, certainly. (H e fills in the form an d hands it to
the clerk,)
Porter: Come this w ay, sir .1
475

D . In a R estaurant
M r Jones: Ive booked a table in the corner. Its very
com fortable there.
Petrov: Its delightful here.
Waiter: H eres the menu, sir.
M r Jones: w ish th e y d use English in m enus.2
Petrov: Personally, I prefer good, sim ple English cooking.
Mr Jones: Mr Petrov, what will you have?
Petrov: I ca n t see it on the menu but I think Ill have a
steak and chips.
M r Jones: And so will I. Do you want soup first?
Petrov: Y es.
Waiter: May I take your order, sir? ( M r Jones orders f o o d
an d drinks. )
(After dinner.)
Petrov:

Thank you for a very enjoyable evening. It was a


w onderful m eal in spite of the menu.
E. In a Pub

M r D odd: Shall we have a snack lunch in a pub for a change?


There are a lot of interesting pubs round here.
Petrov: T h ats a good idea. I h aven t been to any pub yet.
M r D odd: What about this one? Its called George and
V ulture3.
(In the pub)
Petrov: It must be very old.
M r D odd: Over a hundred and fifty years, I think. It was
m entioned by Dickens in one of his novels. He
him self used to have lunch here. I like it because
there are not many people here at lunch time. Now
what would you like to drink? Bitter? T h ats a strong
beer.
Petrov: Y es, please, if thats what you drink; but let me
order it. ( T o the waiter.) Two pints of bitter, please.
Waiter: A nything to eat, sir?
Petrov: Just a snack. What can you offer us?
Waiter: T h eres ch eese, sausages, and pickles and meat
pies...
Petrov: Ill have bread and ch eese with pickles for two, and
two sausages.
476

F. At the D entists
Doctor: W hats the trouble?
Volkov: have a filling which is loose and 1 also have an
awful pain in my lower tooth on the right.
Doctor: Lets have a look at the filling. Open your mouth
wide. T h ats it. Y es, its about to drop out. Now le ts
see the bad tooth. Is it sensitive to heat and cold?
Volkov: Y es, very. I h aven t had anything hot to eat or drink
for the last three days.
Doctor: T h ats too bad. You should have come for a checkup
long ago, 1 think its been hurting you for quite a
w hile. W ed better have it X -rayed.
(T he doctor has the tooth X -rayed and then he
exam ines the pictures.)
Doctor: Im afraid Ill have to pull it out.
Volkov: Do you mean y o u ll pull it out now?
Doctor: Y es, certainly. W ell start with the filling and then
Ill pull the bad tooth out. D ont worry. Evervthingll
be OK.
Volkov: T h ats all right, Doctor.
N otes
1. Come this way, sir. , .
2. I wish th ey d (they would) use English in m enus.
. (,
.)
3. George and V ulture !$ ]
Exercise I, Read and translate the dialogues.
Exercise 2. Find in the dialogues English equivalents for these word
combinations and sentences.

1.

? 2.
. 3. . 4. ,
. 5, ,
. 6. . 7. . 8.
, . 9. ? 10.
, () - . 1.
. 12. .
13. .

477

Exercise 3. Quote the sentences in which these words and word combinations
are used in the dialogues and translate them.

passport, to declare, duty, key, single room, night;


delightful, to prefer, drink, snack, for a change, idea, offer;
filling, pain, to drop out, sensitive, w ed better, to puil out
Exercise 4. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

P assport con trol officer: How long are you going to stay
in this countrv?
B: For a m onth*
(: two w eeks, over a m onth, about a year)
2. C ustom s officer: Have you got anything to declare?
: I dont think so. Ive got a few packets o f cigarettes
for personal use.*
(B: nothing at all, a few souvenirs )
3. Clerk: What can I do for you, sir?
B: My nam es Bobrov. I have a reservation.
C: Just a m inute, sir. You want a single room, d on t
you? We reserved room 3 7 on the fourth flo o r for
you.
B: Can I see it, please?
(C: 26 on the third floor, 79 on the eighth floor)
4. B: Have you got a double room for three nights?
Clerk: Y es. You can have room 35 on the fourth floor.
(B: single; C; 38)
5 M r Jones (passing the menu to Petrov): What will you
have?
Petrov: Tom ato and cucumber salad, vegetable soup an d
steak.
(Petrov: Chicken soup and^*oast beef)
6. (In a pub) A: What would you have, John?
J: A bitter an d a sausage.
(J: A pint of ginger beer and ch eese. A bitter and a meat
pie.)
7. Doctor: W hats the trouble this tim e, Jane?
Jane: V ve com e f o r a checkup, Doctor.
(Jane: One of my upper teeth on the left is sensitive to
heat and cold. I think the filling in my lower tooth on
the right has got loose.)
* for personal use ['p9:snl'ju:sj
** souvenir [,su:v3'ni9]
478

Exercise 5. What would you say if you took part in these dialogues?

Dramatize them.

1.

Passport control officer: Your passport, please.


B: ...
P. a : Where are you going?
B: ...
p . .; How long will you stay in this country?
B:
P, a : H eres your passport. Thank you.

2.

Custom s officer: Is this your luggage, sir?


B: ...
C. a ; Have you anythin g to declare?
B: ...
.: Will you please open your brown suitcase?
*
JL/
C. a : Everythings OK. Have a pleasant stay in this
country. G ood-bye.

3.

4.

5.

Have you a double room for three nights?


**
How much is it?
* 4

Can I see it, please?


* *

What can I do for you, sir?


*

You can have room 45 on the third floor.


*

Y es, of course. Come this way.

M r Smith: I ve booked a table near a window, I think


its com fortable here.
Belov: ...
Waiter: H eres th e m enu, sir.
M r Smith: What will you have, Mr Belov?
Belov: ...
M r Smith: And so will I. Do you want h o rs-d oeuvres*?
Belov: ...
Waiter: May I take your order, sir?
* hors-d'oeuvre [,D:'d9:vr]
479

(A fter dinner.)

6.

7.

Belov: ...
M r Knott: Shall we have a snack lunch in a pub for a
change?
Belov: ...
M r Knott: What about this one? like it because there
are not m any people here at lunchtim e. What would
you like to drink? Bitter?
Belov: ...
Waiter: A nything to eat, sir?
Belov: ...
D entist: W hats the trouble this time, Vlasov?
V
D: Lets have a look at the filling. Open your mouth
wide. T h a ts it. Y es, its about to drop out. Now
le ts see the bad tooth. Is it sensitive to heat and
cold?
V: ...
D: T hats too bad. You sh ould ve come for a checkup
long ago. I think its been hurting you for quite a
w hile. W ed better have it X -rayed.
p

* *

$
D:
V*
t
D:

V*
F

I m afraid Ill have to pull it out.


Y es, certainly. W ell start with the filling and then


Ill pull the bad tooth out. D on t worry.
* *

Exercise 6* Think of situations in which these sentences can be used.


Dramatize them.

1.
How long are you going to stay in this country? 2.
Have you got anything to declare? 3. I think Ive got nothing
liable to duty. 4. Have a pleasant stay in this country. 5. Id
like a single room for three nights. 6. Should I leave the key
to th e room here? 7, May 1 take your order, sir? 8. Let me
order today. 9. What can you offer us? 10. Id like a bitter,
pickles and cheese for two. 11. My lower tooth on the right is
sensitive to heat and cold. Its been hurting me for quite a
w hile. 12. Im afraid Ill have to pull it out today.
Exercise 7. Reproduce dialogues A F in pairs.
Exercise 8. Act as interpreter.

1.
480

Passport control officer: Your passport, please.


: , .

..,: How long are you going to stay in this country?


H: .
P ...: Where are you going to stay?
H: , .
...: Fill in this form, please.
2.

C u sto m s officer: Is this your luggage?


: , .
..: Have you got anything to declare?
H: , ,
.
..: Will you please open that suitcase?
H: . (
.)
.. (ex am in es the co n ten ts): E verythings OK. Have a
pleasant stay in this country.
H: .

3.

Clerk: What can I do for *vou,


madam?
>
: .
.
: Just a m om ent. 11 have a look. Yes, madam, you
want a single room for three nights, d ont you?
H: .
: We reserved room 65 on the seventh floor.
H: ?
: Y es, certainly. T he porter will take you there.
Y oud better fill in this form first.
H: , .

4.

M r A nderson ( to the head waiter): My nam es


A nderson. Ive reserved a table for two near a
window.
H e a d waiter: Y es, sir. Will you follow me, please?*
M r A nderson ( to P opov): Its comfortable here, isn't it?
: , .
Waiter ( to M r A n d erso n ): H eres the m enu, sir.
M r A nderson (p a ssin g the menu to P opov): What will
you have, Mr Popov?
: , (som e meat course):
(veal fillet [,'filit j).
M r Anderson: And what about dessert [di'zo;t ]?

*
Wiil you foliow ['folou] me, please? () , '/.
481

: .
5.

D octor: W hats the trouble, Bubnova?


:
.
D: Is there a cavity?
: .
.
D: Let me have a look at it. Open your mouth w ide. There
is a cavity in it. I m afraid the tooth is too bad to be
filled . I think Ill have to pull it o u 1.
: ? ,
?
D: Y es, certainly, but I dont think it will help.

Exercise 9. Translate into English.

1.

, .
, .
?
, .

?
.
. , .

2. , - ?
, .
-,
?
. ,
,
.
, . , , ,
.
. (
.)
. .
.
3. ?
.
.
. . ,
37 .
.
, ,
482

. ,
, .
, , .
(): , , .
4.

- ( A ndrew s): .
, ?
: , .
( - ): , , ,
.
( ): ,
.
: ,
.
: (tradition [trs'd ijn ])
.
?
: () - ,
.
: . ?
: .
(- .
,
.)
: .
: . , .
5. , ?
.
. .
?
.
. (
.) , .
, , (to fill) .
, . .
, (nothing can be
done).
Kxercise 10. Make up dialogues based on the pictures (see p. 133).
Txercise 11. Dramatize these situations.

1. You have to pass through the passport control. Answer


the passport control officers questions.
2. You have to pass through the custom s. T he custom s
officer asks you questions and you answer them.
3. Invite your foreign colleague to a restaurant and ask
483

At the Customs House

wish theyd use English in menus.

M r Davey: What!
Twenty
dollars!
For two minutes!
Dentist: Well, if
youd like me to, I
can pull it out
more slowly.

him what he would like to have for dinner. Order the meal.
Speak about your hobbies over the meal.
4.
One of your teeth is hurting you. You have to go to the
d en tists. T ell the doctor what is troubling you.

L E S S O N N IN E
I. NEW GRAMMAR STRUCTURES

1. M odal V erbs with Perfect Infinitive


1) Can
1) Could + perfect infinitive
:
) ,
.
could have given an answer yesterd ay but he d id n t.
, .
) , .
T h ey could have helped him. , ,
. ( .)
)

.
Co**ld they have co m p leted the work? T hey had so little
time. ?
.
:
.
Can he have fa iled us? ?

2) C ant (couldnt) + perfect infinitive


()
.
P eter can t have tran slated this article, he does not know
Spanish. (
, ),
.
T his couldnt have been done yesterday. He
.
2) M ay
1)
M ay (m ight) + perfect infinitive
.
485

He might have already m ade an appointm ent with Mr


Smith. He said he would. , ,
- . ,
.
2)
Might + peffect infinitive
, .
You might have a d v ise d him to join them .
.

3) Must
M ust + perfect infin itive ,
, ,
.
T here m ust have been a m isunderstanding.
( , ),
.
T hey m ust have left yesterd ay. , (
), .
: m ust may
.

4) Be to
Be to + perfect infinitive ,
, .
was to have checked out before 12.00 but
unfortunately he failed to.
12 , ,
, .
5) N eednt
N eed n t + perfect infinitive ,
.
You neednt have brought the textbook for him. He has
got one. H e ( )
. .
6) Would
W ould + perfect infinitive
(
) .
That would have been the right way. - (
.
would have been about forty then. , -,
.
7) Should, ought to*
Exercise 1. Read the following. Translate the sentences containing modal
verbs into Russian.
* . 5
486

1.

I hope Bill has reserved a hotel room.


He can't have don e that. N o one has asked him to.

2.

Why did n t Peter come to see us yesterday?


I don t know. He m ay have been too busy.
N o, he can 't have been too busy.
Oh, you can t be sure about that.

3.

I d id n t know John had left on b u sin ess. You


might have told me.
Im sorry. I thought you knew that.

4.

Jim looks very tired today.


He m u st have worked very hard last night.
Y es, I think he did.

5.

6.

I ought to have thought about that before, but I d id n t


know he was so worried about his s is te r , said Jane.

7.

C ould Ben have told them it was Mr B aileys fault?

8.

You should have fought, J im , Dr N ich olass friend said


to him.

9.

You n eedn 't have h elped him. He was able to m anage it


alone.

Why are they so angry with George?


He m ust have fa ile d them. He was to have dealt
with the matter but I d on t think he did.

Exercise 2. Respond to these statements according to the models. Translate


the responses.

a) His visit upset their plans.


Can (could) his visit have upset their plans?
His visit cant (couldnt) have upset their plans.
1. T he centre forward m issed the ball. 2. His letter
disappeared. 3. Gravot managed to get Johnny out of the
gam e. 4. Guff hit Johnny.
b) It is possible that he attended the lecture.
He could have attended the lecture.
1.
It is possible that h e s made a hotel reservation. 2. It
is possible that he asked P eters advice. 3. It is possible that
she answ ered the call. 4, It is possible that he broke the
appointm ent.
c) I hope (m aybe) he found the book yesterday.
He might have found the book yesterday.
487

1. I hope he told them about the m eeting yesterday. 2. I


hope he checked out before iunch. 3. I hope John handed the
papers to Mr Brown. 4. I hope he has passed through the
custom s.
d) Im sure he went (has gone) sight-seeing.
He must have gone sight-seeing.
1. Im sure he has left his suitcases in the luggage room.
2. Im sure he went to the d en tists. He had an awful tooth
ache in the morning. 3. Im sure there was a
m isunderstanding betw een them. 4. Im sure it was Mr
Sm iths fault.
e) She went by the seven o clock train. (The lecture d id n t
begin till ten.)
She n eed n t have gone by the seven o clock train as the
lecture didnt begin till ten.
1. She did everything herself. (Everyone was ready to
help her.) 2. T hey worried about Johnny. (He came back in
tim e.) 3. Bill dealt with the matter. (Tom was going to deal
with it.) 4, Bill reserved a hotel room for him for ten days.
(H e w as going to stay only for a w eek.)
f) I believe he was about thirty then.
He would have been about thirty then.
1. I believe he was at college then. 2. I believe he helped
them . 3. I believe he left the cinem a before the end of the
film . 4. I believe Jim brought him the book.
Exercise 3. Make up sentences saying what a person should (sh o u ld n t) have
done or ought (o u g h tn 't) to have done. Use these words and word
combinations.

to upset sm b., to worry about sm th., to m iss an


opportunity, to take to hospital, to apologize to sm b., to
hurry
Exercise 4. Translate into English.

1.
,
? , . 2.
, . 3. ,
.
. 4. .
. 5. , , . 6.

. 7. .
8. . 9. , , .
488

2. Correlative conjunctions both ... a n d , either ... or ,


neither ... nor ( ... ( ...
), ... ... , ... )

.
It was both cold an d w indy. , .
can speak neither French nor English.
-, -.
You may take either P eters textbook or mine.
, .
both ... and , ^
.
Both the captain an d the goalkeeper were badly hurt during
yesterd ays gam e. (),

.
either ... or neither ... nor
, -
,
.
Neither we nor he was tired. ,
.
knows that either the Browns or Mr Smith has reserved a
hotel room for him . , ,
- .
: 1. ,
, ,
, neither ... nor.
Neither John nor I have anything to do with it. ,
.
2.
either ... or, neither ... nor
,
or .
Either John or Peter or Bill has to stay at home today.
He said that neither you nor Miss Vickers nor Ann was to be left alone.
Exercise 5. Join these sentences using either ... or or neither ... nor.

a) Peter (Max) knows Mr Browns phone number.


Either Peter or Max knows Mr Browns phone number.
1. John (Bill) told them about the convention. 2. T hey
will confirm the reservation today, (tomorrow) 3. You m ay
489

check out now. (after lunch) 4. He says it will be rainy


(sunny) tomorrow morning. The w eather is so unpredictable.
b) Mary h a sn t been to Bukhara yet. Peter h a sn t either.
N eith er Mary nor Peter has been to Bukhara yet.
1. John h a sn t attended the final match. My brother
h a sn t either. 2. George w ouldnt like to have his tooth
pulled out. Bill w ouldnt either. 3. Abe d id n t expect to see
Johnny so soon. T he Eskimo players d id n t either. 4. He
d id n t take them round the city the day before yesterday. He
d id n t do it yesterd ay either.
Exercise 6. Join these sentences using both ... and.

It w as cold yesterd ay. It was rainy, too.


It w as both cold and rainy yesterday.
I. It w as hot yesterd ay. It was su nn y, too. 2. T he country
is rich in coal. T h e country is rich in oil, too. 3. John is doing
w ell at school. Mary is doing well at school, too. 4. T he
doctor advised P eter to come for a checkup. T he doctor
advised Martin to com e for a checkup, too. 5. Jane is
sn eezin g. Jane is coughing, too.
Exercise 7. Translate into English.

1. ,
. 2. -
, - ? 3.
,
. 4. , ,
. 5. ,
. 6. ,
, ?
Exercise 8. Make up six sentences using both ... and, eith er ... or, n eith er ...
nor.

II. TEXT

Learn these speech patterns


1.
H e is good (b a d ) at it. (at draw ing).
( ) , ( ).
E xercise 1. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

490

T hey
Nick
My son

is, are
was, were

good
bad

at

English.
painting.
singing.
skiing.
playing
tennis.

Exercise 2. Paraphrase these sentences using pattern 1.

1. My daughter can ski very w ell. 2. H is friend is an


excellen t skater. 3. I could never play hockey. 4. T hey know
history very w ell. 5. She does not know literature well. 6, She
is a good singer.
2. What if your son refuses to change his mind? ,
?
Exercise 3. Make up sentences using the table and translate them.

What if

they m iss the train?


your words hurt him?
she fails to do the translation?
you do not manage to book tickets?

Exercise 4. Translate into English.

1. , ? 2 .,
? 3. , ? 4.
, ? 5. ,
5 ?
Learn these words and word com binations

strike (struck) v ( )
servant ['sa:vant] n
studio ['stju:diou] n , ,

card ()
painter ,
paint v ,

mean (m eant [ment]) v ,
; ; This
word means ...
() ... What does all this
mean? ?
dislike {disiaik] v
;

obviously ['Dbvisslij adv , ,

be determ ined [di'ta:ntind] v


;
;
Charles
was
determined to become a painter,
please [pli;z] v ,

forgive [fa'giv] (forgave, forgiven


[fa'geiv, fa'givn]) v ; to
forgive smb. for sm th.
-. -.; "Please, forgive
me for this misunderstanding," said
the painter,
grow up I'grou '] (grew up, grown
up [gru:, groun]) v ,

441

, ;
; has
Politics is much more difficult
grown up. (
than
physics said Einstein, to go
).
into politics
grown up

mind [mamd] , , ; to make


marry ['maeri] v ,
up one *5 mind to do smth.
; to marry smb.; He
,
married the girl he loved. B u t :
-.; We made up our minds
They got married.
to go there, to change ones mind
. to be married
,
, ; Charles was not
( ); I hope he
married, to be married to smb.
will not change his mind this time,

-. (
regret [ri'gret] v ; to regret
-.); is
smth. -.; I am
married to a very good woman,
sure you do not regret your visit
agree [a'gri:] v 1. ,
here. I regret to say...
;
, ... I regret to
; to agree with smb.
say that he came too late,
-.;
exclaim [iks'klejm] v
-.; I quite agree
on the contrary [']
with you, the drawing is good,
; I think you have nothing to
said the painter. 2.
do now. On the contrary, I have
, ; to agree to
a lot to do.
do smth.;
talent I'taebnt] n ,
-.; We agreed to go there
; to have a talent for music
together.
(painting, etc.)
( refuse [ri'fju:z] v (),
; to refuse to do smth.
4t.); Your son has a talent for
-.; He
music.
refused to deal with that matter, to
in short , ,
refuse smth.; He refused my help.

Cf: He refused to study the prob
discourage [dis'kAncfe] v
lem.
, ; to
(
discourage smb. from doing
). gave up
smth. -.
(studying) the problem.
-.; You should not

have discouraged him from going
(,
in for sport,
),
think v (-.) ; to
firm , ; firm
think much (highly, a lot) of
measures (steps, etc.)
smb., smth.
( . .); They
-., -.; I think
should take firm steps,
much of his paintings, not to think
check oneself v ,
much of smb., smth.
, ; He was
-., -.;
going to say something but
She does not think much of this
checked himself,
novel.
go on v ; to go on doing
drawing ['dnngj n ,
smth. -.;

He went on painting. He went on


draw [dro:] (drew, drawn [dru:,
to say... ...
dro:nl) v ( , politely [pa'laith] adv ,
)
,
politics ['politiks] n (ynomp. sympathize ['simp30aiz] v
. .)
,
492

wish n
save v , ; to save
smb. (smb.s life) -.
(-. )
miserable ()1] ,

sheet n ()
silence t'saibns] n ,
; to keep silence ,
; They kept
silence for a long time, in silence
; He smoked in silence,
masterpiece ['ma:stapi:s] n
promising f'promisig]
, ,

humour ['hjutma] n
inspiration [.inspa'reifn] n

hopeless ,
, ; hopeless
situation
; I dont think the situation is
hopeless, said the painter. Ant.
hopeful ;

be prepared Ipri'pead] v
; ; to be prepared to do smth.
-.;
was prepared to apologize for the
misunderstanding,
sum n
figure ['figs] n
sweetly adv ;
jsasp [ga:sp] v (

joke [djoukj v
to ones surprise [sg'praiz]
-. ; his great
surprise they agreed at once,
dial E'daial] a (telephone) number
()
solicitor [sg'lisita] n
cheque [t$ek] n
nervous ['ngivss]
excited [ik'saitid] ,

worthless ['W3:9bs]
,
run (ran, run) out v
in despair [di'speg]
be independent [.indi'pendant]
, ;
to be independent of smb., smth.
-.,
-.; Charles wanted to be in
dependent of his mother,
congratulate [kan'grsetjuleit] v
; to congratulate smb. on
(upon) smth.
-. -.; I congratulate you
on this happy event. Bu t : Many
happy returns of the day! Br.
Happy birthday! Am.
! A Happy
New Year!
! (
!)
sincerely [stn'siah] adv
benefactor ['benifaekta] n

Exercise 5. Read and translate these sentences. Pay attention to active words
and word combinations.

1.
He must have borrowed the m agazine from Peter. 2. I
regret to say that he has changed his mind. 3. Dr Ingram was
determined to clear up the matter. 4. You should not
discourage him. H e has m ade up his mind to becom e a
painter and he will be as he has a talent. 5. I think very
much of this young man. He is a prom ising painter. 6. Can
you lend me this book? I need it badly. 7. T h ey listened to
the painter in silen ce. 8. She was very angry with her son but
she managed to check h erself. 9. Many of the K ennedy men
went into politics. 10. Pushkin was married to N atalie
<ioncharova. T h ey got married in 1831. 11. Charles refused
give up painting as he was really good at it. 12. M endozas
493

voice was firm when he told Charles that he (C harles) was


hop eless. 13. What do you m ean by this? asked the
painter. 14. T he country becam e independent in 1971. 15.
Som e people say that SO S m eans Save our so u ls , which
is quite wrong.
MENDOZA SELLS HIMSELF
T h e clock had just struck ten in the morning w hen
M endozas servant came into the studio with a card. The
painter took the card and read: Mrs C atacre-B urtenshaw .
T he nam e meant nothing to him.
T he servant said, T he lady looks rich. I do not get the
im pression that she has com e to borrow . All rig h t, said
M endoza. Ask her in .
M endoza disliked her at once though she was obviously
determ ined to please him.
I hope you will forgive my early v isit, she began. I
want to speak to you about my son Charlie. I want your
advice, and I want your help. He is my only child, all I have
in the world. H e grew up a good boy until he m ade up his
m ind to go in for A rt. T he woman stopped for a m om ent.
Do you want me to give him lessons? If so I regret to say
I sh a n t be able to ...
O h, no, my dear Mr M endoza, she exclaim ed, on the
contrary, I want you to let him come and show you his
draw ings, and then I want you to tell him that he has no
talent; in short, to discourage him. You are the on ly man
who can do me this favour. Charlie thinks a lot of you, he
has collected hundreds of your drawings. Just tell him that
he is no good. He should go into politics and marry w e ll.
Perhaps he sh o u ld , M endoza agreed. But what if your
son refu ses to change his mind? What will you do th en ?
T he wom ans voice becam e firm, In that case he will
never get a penny from me as long as I live. 1
M endoza realized that she would be as good as her
w ord.2 H e had an im pulse to put her out of the studio by the
sh o u ld ers,3 but he checked him self and went on politely. I
sym pathize with you, Mrs C atacre-B urtenshaw , he said , in
your w ish to see your son saved from the m iserable life of an
artist. But I can t prom ise anything definite until I see his
work. He may be really g ifte d .
She produced a sheet of paper which she handed to
M endoza.
* soul [soul]
494

M endoza looked at the drawing, in silen ce. T he drawing


was not a m asterpiece but it certainly was prom ising.
But my dear m adam , he said, I must say the drawing
show s both humour and inspiration. Now you must know that
neither humour nor inspiration can be taught. A painter
either has got it or he h a sn t. D on t you understand that 1
find that drawing of your son most promising? W hy should I
tell him that he is h op eless?
She looked at him. You d o n t think that I am asking you
to criticize my so n s work for nothing? I am prepared to pay
a large sum of m on ey.
May I ask you what figure you have in m ind? M endoza
asked sw eetly. W ell, she said, it will be one hundred
p ou n d s.
M endoza shook his head. You d ont understand you are
dealing with M endoza. I will not do this for less than a
thousand p ou nds.
A thousand pounds! she gasped. You must be joking.
N ot at a ll, M endoza was firm. A thousand pounds and
not a penny le s s .
To his great surprise she agreed.
W hen M endoza was alone he went to the telephone and
d ialled a number, F red d ie, he said to his friend, a
solicitor, Will you dine with me tonight? I have som ething to
arrange with y o u . 4

T h e cheque for 1,000 from Mrs C atacre-Burtenshaw


cam e the next day. And two days later Mrs CatacreBurtenshaw with her son appeared in the studio. C harles, very
nervous and excited, brought som e more of his drawings
which he showed to M endoza. N o word said M endoza5 w hile
he looked through them. N o word said C harles.5
T h en M endoza put down the drawings and said: Mr
C atacre-Burtenshaw , I regret to say that your drawings are
w orthless. I think you should give up Art and go into politics
as your m other w ants. G oodbye to you both, good b ye.
H e opened the door. Charles ran out of the room in
despair.
*

Four years had passed. T he same servant showed Mr


C harles C atacre-Burtenshaw into M endozas studio. You
may have forgotten m e , he said, I was here four years ago
495

with my mother and you said I was hopeless. Could you look
at m y work now?
You havent given up drawing th en ?
N o, I havent. When 1 left your studio 1 was in despair.
In the street a young man cam e up to me and handed me a
note from a firm of solicitors. It turned out a client of theirs
had placed with them a sum of one thousand pounds for my
b en efit.6 Well, it made me independent of my mother. I left
her house for Paris where I lived hard and worked hard.
Now Im back. This is my first published draw ing.
M endoza exam ined the drawing carefully. It was really
good.
I th in k , he said, its a fine piece of work. I
congratulate you on it sincercly. T he thing is as good as
g o ld .
C harles flushed with pleasure.7 Thank you very m uch,
he said. If I could only thank my benefactor... But the
solicitor d id n t give me his n am e.
In your place I w ould nt worry! Just go ahead and make
a big success of you rself.8 I think your unknown benefactor
will be quite happy.
(After Mendoza Sells Himself by William Caine)

N am es
M endoza [m sn'douza]
C atacre-Burtenshaw [' ':1(){: J -
C harlie rt$a:li]
Freddie ['fredj ]
N otes
1. as long as I live
2. she would be as good as her word

3. to put her out of the studio by the shoulders ['jouldsz J
, ,
4. I have som ething to arrange with you.
.
5. No word said M endoza... No word said Charles.
(
) .
6. It turned out a client ['klaiant] of theirs had placed with
them a sum of one thousand pounds for my benefit
496

['b en ifit]. ,
.
7. C harles flushed with pleasure.
,
8. Just go ahead [a'h ed ] and make a big success of
yourself.
.
Exercise 6. Read and translate the text.
Exercise 7. Find in the text English equivalents for these word combinations
and sentences.

1. , ,
. 2. , , , ... 3.
, (
). 4. . 5. ,
? 6.
. 7. ,
? 8. . 9.
. 10.
. 11. .
Exercise 8. Give Russian equivalents for these sentences.

1. The nam e m eant nothing to him. 2. You will forgive my


early visit. 3. He grew up a good boy until he made up his
mind to go in for Art. 4. On the contrary, tell him he has no
talent. 5. He should go into politics. 6. T he w om ans voice
becam e firm. 7. M endoza looked at the drawing in silence. 8.
T he drawing was not a m asterpiece. 9. am asking you to
criticize my so n s work. 10. M endoza exam ined the drawing
carefully. 11. I congratulate you on it.
Exercise 9. Answer these questions.

1, W hat do you think of the servants remark; T he lady


looks rich. I do not think she has com e to borrow? D oes it
mean that there were visitors who came to borrow money from
M endoza? 2. Why did Mrs Catacre-Burtenshaw want to see
M endoza? 3. Did M endoza like the drawings of her son? Why?
4. U nder what conditions did Mendoza agree to help Mrs
C atacre-Burtenshaw? 5. Why did Charles come to M endoza
again four years later? 6. Who do you think gave Charles one
thousand dollars? 7. What do you think of Mendoza?
Exercise 10. Explain or comment on these statements.

1.
T he name m eant nothing to him. 2. He grew up a good
boy until he m ade up his mind to becom e a p ain ter.'3. I
sym pathize with you in your wish to save your son from the
m iserable life of an artist. 4. It was not a m asterpiece but it
was prom ising. 5. T he drawing shows both humour and
497

inspiration. 6. You don t understand you are dealing with


M endoza. 7. In your place I w ouldnt worry. Just go ahead
and make a big success of yourself. I think your benefactor
will be happy.
Exercise II. Make up sentences using the tables and translate them.

a)
I
She
T he
artist

made up

my
her
his

mind

not to lend him any


books,
to refuse his (m y, her)
help.
to exam ine the situation
carefully,
to becom e independent.

b)
He
M endoza
I

thought much of
did not think much
of

the film he (I) saw.


the book he (I) read
last week.
C harlies first
drawings,
the young writer.

c)
I
He

regret(s)

that he (I) refused to do it.


that he (I) discouraged the artist.
the advice he (I) gave him.
that he (I) did not join them.

Exercise 12. Change these sentences into the negatives.

1. Both Peter and Ann managed to get this book. 2. He


has talent for both painting and literature. 3. Though he is
only five he can both read and write w ell. 4. He can both
paint and draw. 5. He was good at both music and
m athem atics.
Exercise 13. Make the necessary substitutions and reproduce the dialogues.

1.

2.

3.

498

A; W ould you like me to take her to hospital?


: Oh, thanks, that would be very nice of you.
(A: to lend you the book you need, to exam ine th ese
docum ents)
A: Your friend is very good at drawing.
B: H e m ust be. H e has a talent for it.
(A: painting, playing the piano, singing)
A: H e is determ ined to go into p o litic s .
: I m very glad to hear that.
(A: to marry the girl, to criticize the book, to check
him self)

Exercise 14. Insert the words given below.

1.
M ichelangelo ... ... to becom e a sculptor* when he was
about ten years old. 2. What do you ... by saying that he is
not ... to go into ...? 3. He could not have ... this painter.
Everybody thinks he is very .... 4. My son is already .... He
is 18. 5. I wonder w hy he ... to take part in the exhibition. 6.
Mendoza was sure that Mrs C atacre-Burtenshaw would never
her son and help him with m oney if he did not give up
painting. 7. Johnny understood at once what the Eskimos
were going to do and this ... his life. 8. 1 hope h e .......... of
this picture. ..........h e did not like it at a ll. 9. We ... to see
the new film this evening. 10. She promised not to tell
anybody about th e m isunderstanding, that is ....
to forgive, to m ean, to agree, to save, to make up o n es
mind, on the contrary, grown up, politics, to refuse, prepared,
to keep silence, talen ted , to criticize, to think much
Exercise 15. Use the appropriate form of the infinitive given in brackets.

1.
H e should (to borrow) the book from the library
yesterday w hen he was there. 2. H e cou ld n t (to change) his
mind. He prom ised me long ago to do this job. 3. H e might
(to go) into politics. He was alw ays interested in history and
foreign languages. 4. H e may (to be) a promising boy who
was good at drawing at school. But he never becam e a
painter. 5. He m ust (to tell) the young artist that he did not
like his paintings. 6. You n eed n t (to exam ine) those facts so
carefully. We have already done that. 7. He sh ould nt (to
feel) so independent of his parents* H e is still a student.
Exercise 16. Make up twelve questions based on the text Mendoza Sells
Himself and answer them.
Exercise 17. Insert prepositions or adverbs.

I
called on Dirk Stroeve as soon as I arrived ... Paris. His
wife was a nice w om an, sh e did not see that her husband had
no talent ... painting. ... the contrary sh e thought highly ...
his works. I looked ... his pictures. T hey were the sam e
false** sw eet things he did years ago ... Rome. I did not want
to discourage him ... art but I was sure he should not have
become a painter.
sfs SfS 4s
sjs sjk {* sfc
Yet nobody w as more honest
and sincere
than Dirk
Stroeve. He had an excellen t understanding ... art. He was
*
sculptor I'skAlpts]
** false [fa:ls]
*** honest f'omst] ,
**** sincere [sm'sia]
499

alw ays quick to discover a talent. To go ... him ... a picture


gallery w as a real pleasure. He understood both old m asters
and m odern ones. H e never failed to congratulate a painter
... a talented picture. For me his advice was always
important.
It turned out that Dirk had met Strickland w ho like many
others cam e ... his studio to borrow ... him. To my great
surprise he thought Strickland was a good artist. It can t be
the sam e m a n , I exclaim ed. An E nglishm an, who gave ...
his fam ily to paint ... Paris? T h ats it , Dirk answ ered, I
tell you he is a great artist. ... a hundred years if you and I
are rem em bered at all it will be because we knew Charles
Strickland.
Is he having any success? I asked. Can I see his
works? N o, he is no success at all and he w ont show his
pictures ... anybody. But I ve seen them^ I know he is a great
artist. People laughed at Manet. Corot never sold a picture
... his life. Fame
cam e to them only after death.
... the conversation I made ... my m ind to go ...
Stricklands studio to se e for m yself.
(After The Moon and Sixpence by S. Maugham)

Exercise 18. Give Russian equivalents for these word combinations.

1) to think much (a lot, highly) of sm b., not to think


much of sm th., smb.;
2) to check in, to check out, to check oneself;
3) to go on doing sm th., to go on to say;
4) to congratulate sm b. on smth. Many happy returns of
the day! Happy birthday! A Happy N ew Year!
5) to exam ine facts (docum ents, a question, a situation).
Exercise 19. Translate into English using the word combinations given
In exercise 18.

1) 1. .
2. ,
.
2 ). 1. - ,
*
Manet ['] , XIX ,

** Corot ['] , XIX ,

*** fame ,
500

() . 2.
?
3) 1. ,
. 2. .
4) 1. .
2, ! 3. !
5) . , ().
2. , , . 3.
.
Exercise 20. Make up eighteen sentences using these word combinations.

to be good (bad) at sm th., to borrow sm th. from sm b., to


lend sm th. to sm b., to forgive smb. for sm th., to make up
o n es m ind, on the contrary, to have a talent for sm th., in
short, to discourage smb. from doing sm th., to think much of
sm b., to go into politics, to be married to sm b., to agree with
sm b., to go on doing sm th., to save smb. from sm th., in
silen ce, to be ind ependent of sm b., to congratulate smb. on
sm th.
Exercise 21. Give your responses according to the model. Use modal verbs.

Peter finally m ade up his m ind to becom e a diplomat, a)


W ell, he m ay have d on e so. I know he w as alw ays good at
history and languages, b) N o, he can't have d o n e that. At
school he was not in terested either in history or in
languages, c) T h a ts good. H e should have do n e that long
ago. H e has alw ays been good at history, d) He m u st have
don e so. I know he attend ed lectures on history last year.
1. He was discouraged from going into politics. 2. He
refused to speak on the subject. 3. I lent my dictionary to the
student whom I do not know very w ell. 4. John borrowed my
textbook for a few days. 5. T h e painter told M ichael that he
(M ichael) was hopeless.
Exercise 22. Say if these statements are true or false. Give your reasons.

1. Mrs C atacre-Burtenshaw came to M endozas studio


to borrow m oney from him , 2. Mrs Catacre-Burtenshaw
wanted M endoza to encourage her son to becom e a painter.
3. M endoza thought that C harless drawings were not bad.
4. M endoza prom ised Mrs Catacre-Burtenshaw that he
would discourage her son. 5. M endoza never saw Charles
501

again. 6. M endoza did not know who C harless unknown


benefactor was.
E xercise 23, Give a summary of the text Mendoza Sells Himself.
E xercise 24, Think of situations in which these sentences can be used.
Dramatize them.

1. And now he has changed his mind. 2. May I borrow


your notebook? 3. T h ey sh ou ld n t have been hurt by that. It
was a m isunderstanding. 4. You n eed n t have discouraged
him . He him self decided to give it up. 5. On the contrary Im
happy about it. 6. H e can t have been prepared to join them.
7. I quite agree w ith you, this painter has a talent. 8. In short
you sh ould n t be so determ ined to do it.
E xercise 25. Give extensive answers to the questions.

1. What will you sa y if a foreign colleague asks you in


w hat galleries he can se e R ussian paintings? 2. What Moscow
m useum s and galleries would you advise a foreign colleague
to see? 3. What m useum s and galleries of your native town
(city) do you think are worth seeing?
E xercise 26. Translate into English.

1. , - ,
? 2. , -