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CEREBROVASCULAR

(Hemorrhagic Stroke)

DISEASE

BLEED

Cerebrovascular Disease (CVD)- is a group of brain


dysfunctions
related
to disease
of
the
blood
vessels supplying the brain.
Cerebrovascular Disease Bleed also called
Hemorrhagic stroke. It results from a weakened vessel that
ruptures and bleeds into the surrounding brain. The blood
accumulates and compresses the surrounding brain tissue.

The patient will need to rest in bed and avoid activities that
may increase the pressure in the head (increased
intracranial pressure), such as:

Bending

Lying flat

Sudden position changes

Straining during bowel movement (stool softeners


or laxatives may be prescribed)

Pathophysiology
CVD Bleed or Hemorrhagic stroke occurs when a blood
vessel in your brain leaks or ruptures leading to
compression of brain tissue from an expanding
haematoma. In addition, the pressure may lead to a loss of
blood supply to affected tissue, and the blood released by
brain haemorrhage appears to have direct toxic effects on
brain tissue and vasculature.
Types of Hemorrhagic Stroke includes:

Intracerebral- a blood vessel in the brain bursts


and spills into the surrounding brain tissue,
damaging brain cells.
Subarachnoid hemorrhage- an artery on or near
the surface of your brain bursts and spills into the
space between the surface of your brain and your
skull.

Causes

Signs & Symptoms


Confusion
Sleepiness
Stupor
Apathetic
Restless
Sudden severe headache
Difficulty in speaking
Difficulty in swallowing
Numbness
Loss of coordination & fine motor skills
Hemiplegia or hemiapresis

Risk Factors
Non-Modifiable

Age (above 55)


Gender (Male)
Heredity

Modifiable

Relieve symptoms
Prevent complications
Lifestyle
Dietary changes
Physical activity
Weight control
Alcohol intake

Medications (IV or Oral)

Amlodipine
Paracetamol
Phenytoin
Mannitol
Losartan

Diagnostic Exams

Cerebrovascular
disease
can
be
divided
into embolism, aneurysms, and low flow states depending
on its cause.

Prevention

Hypertension
Diabetes
Smoking
Excess alcohol
Heart disease

NURSING MANAGEMENT

CT Scans

MRI

Electrical Activity Tests

Blood Flow Tests

Angiography

Magnetic Resonance Angiography

Echocardiography

.Other Tests

Surgery

Stereotactic radiosurgery

Surgical AVM removal

Coiling (endovascular embolization)

Intracranial bypass

Treatment

Physical therapy

Speech therapy

Outlook (Prognosis)
Hemorrhagic stroke is less common but more frequently
deadly than ischemic stroke. Recovery may occur over

time as other areas of the brain take over functioning for


the damaged areas. Death is possible, and may quickly
occur despite prompt medical treatment.

Reported By:

Maglaya, Hosanna
Luna, Isel Nelo