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A.

Key Messages (end notes also refer to relevant indicators at annex)


For every three poor rice consumers, there are two poor wheat consumers in todays world. More than half
of all wheat is now grown in the developing worldi, where urbanization and the need for faster, more
energy efficient cooking makes millions of poor women change to wheat, to prepare their family meals.
Wheat is the main calorie provider for 1.2 billion poor. It meets 20% of the developing worlds protein
demand, more than any other crop. WHEAT impact focuses on 84% of the worlds wheat-dependent poor
(900mn), living in regions making up 67% of the global wheat productionii.
In 2012, around 1.6 million farmers made use of the results of 145 projects under WHEATiii, which make up
the ten WHEAT Strategic Initiatives (Themes). The farmers work in wheat-based systems with a total size of
around 1.5 Mha. Millions more have benefited from input-saving agronomy & precision agriculture tools
and other research results generated through past CGIAR funding for wheat research. Indeed, CGIARderived improved varieties are grown on over 50% of the entire area sown to wheat in the developing
world. In 2012, WHEAT funding ensured that 620 collaborators in 120 countries were able to receive
improved wheat germplasm with new traits from CIMMYT and ICARDA (see Maps, Annex 5). WHEAT
affiliated projects engaged in more than 40 multi-stakeholder innovation platforms in Africa, South Asia
and Mexico, trained 49 students (39% female) and over 23,000 farmers (21% female). A first round of
Competitive Partner Grants aimed at non-CGIAR research partners, to fill research gaps in the WHEAT
Strategic Initiatives - was kicked off in 2012 with US$ 2.4mn (see: Section E and Annex 6). Wheat is grown in
many male-dominated societies; hence WHEAT initiated a gender audit, to find new avenues for increasing
womens participation in wheat value chains.
2012 outcomes included Indian state governments investing in scaling out labor-saving tools and farmers
benefiting from lower costs and higher yields. Six countries became Ug99 epidemic-proof (secure from a
devastating stem rust spreading across the world) and India saw an early commercialization success, which
built on multi-year shuttle-breeding between Mexico and Kenya. On the upstream front, Seeds of
Discovery started the largest genetic diversity analyses ever to find heat tolerant wheat.
Across the globe, wheat-related research is largely public sector-funded and WHEAT made strides to better
leverage and coordinate this investment at national, regional and international level. Researchers from 36
institutions jointly developed the Wheat Yield Consortium Business Plan (under WHEAT Theme 7) and took
it to a group of 21 donors & research councils from 17 countries.iv Yet investments in increasing wheat
yields under climate change, countering new diseases and accelerating seed flow to farmers are not enough
to prevent further food price escalation. Wheat R4D funding must increase, to avoid pricing out 1.2 billion
poor from accessing a healthy and diverse die, due to staple foods price escalation. Given that context, the
WHEAT Stakeholder Committee (see below) is concerned about WHEAT becoming the 2nd lowest-funded CRP
in the Portfolio in 2013.
WHEAT Success Stories
1. Through a collaborative effort between Ethiopia, the African Union Commission (AUC), CIMMYT,
ICARDA and IFPRI, WHEAT succeeded in putting wheat-related research on the continental agenda.
African Agriculture Ministers (CAMAT), facing a growing wheat import bill, endorsed the 2012 Wheat
for African Food Security Conference Declaration one month after the Conference took place. Wheat
has been added to the list of strategic crops for Africa, first defined at the 2006 Abuja Food Security
Summit. This is in line with the emerging CGIAR-CAADP dialogue and should spur greater national and
international investment and African farmer participation in wheat production and value chains.
2. Wheat-based systems and precision agriculture research have increased their share of total WHEAT
budget and activities to close to a third. The innovation systems (NRM, agronomy) component of
WHEAT moves research outputs from other Strategic Initiativesv onto farmers fields, through cereal
systems (versus commodity) focused approaches and interventions, such as the Cereal Systems
Initiative in South Asia (CSISA; see section C4), MasAgro in Mexico and the new African Development
Bank-funded SARD-SC/Wheat program, approved in 2012.
a. Across these programs, WHEAT invests in identifying drivers of better wheat-based systems
performance and greater empowerment of women through the WHEAT value chain.

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b. As one of the most promising flagship technologies, handheld sensors for farmer-affordable
nutrient management is gaining traction in Mexico and is being validated in South Asia, leading
to significant cost savings and reduced nitrogen fertilizer losses to the environment among
adopting farmers.
Overall WHEAT progress is at 85% of annual milestone targets toward WHEAT outputsvi. For more
information, please see section G (about why some annual milestones have not been reached) and:
http://wheat.org/resources/project-documents/projects-performance-per-strategic-initiative-in-2012.
WHEAT funding in 2012
2012 total budget and expenditure was in line with anticipated budget (W1&2). Bilateral income was
greater than anticipated. Expenditure on gender strategy development and implementation was 5.7% of
2012 W1&2 budget (gender-related research not included in this figurevii).
$mn

As per PIA

Budget

Actual Spend

W1&2*

12.995

12.749

11.492

W3

Part of bilateral
figure below

3.102

2.338**

34.667

24.950**

Bilateral 23.130

of which on
Gender
0.7

*2012 Window 2 funding was $4.82mn. **Difference to Budget = Committed/carryover funds


Setting up the CRP: Governance & Program Management
The WHEAT Management Committee, responsible for managing the CRP at program (multi-Theme) level,
operates since October 2011viii. It reports to the WHEAT-Stakeholder Committee, responsible for
overseeing CRP Management and development of its strategy. The WHEAT-SC, composed of members from
six different world regions and areas of expertise, is operational since October 2012, reporting to the Lead
Centers Board of Trustees, through its Chair (Lead Center DG). See also: http://wheat.org/who-weare/governance.
The Program Manager reviewed the CRPs results-orientation (revised output logics and formulations). All
projects, regardless of funding source, have been matched to Theme outputs. WHEAT research priorities
have been driven by research partners feedback about the research content of each Theme, documented
during the January 2013 Launch Conference. A 2nd round of prioritization was initiated through the Partner
Priorities Survey (see sub-section E). WHEAT initiated discussion about linkages and collaboration with
CCAFS, MAIZE, GRiSP and Dryland Systems, and joined Systems CRPs meetings.
Partnership Strategy and Practices - See sub-section E below.

B.

Impact Pathway and Intermediate Development Outcomes (IDOs)

Focus was on review of the Strategic Initiatives Outputs and aligning bilateral project activities with the
overall WHEAT framework. WHEAT tested a Five Questions approach to reviewing outputs-to-outcome(s)
pathways and shared its 1st draft of Intermediate Development Outcomes with the Consortium Office and
ISPC. Baseline data generated under WHEAT in 2012 includeix:
-

Impact of wheat in Ethiopia: The nationally representative household survey shows that both
adopters (more) and non-adopters (less) would benefit from adopting improved varieties, increasing
the probability of food security, per capita food consumption, and probability of attaining the food
break-even and food surplus status. Results further show that wheat technology adoption is
inuenced by wheat price and price of competing crops (teff and maize), input costs (seed and
herbicide), farm size, and sources of technology informationx.

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C.

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National Rust Surveys & Wheat Rust Toolbox: Jointly, scientists can now monitor an unprecedented
42 million hectares of wheat in 27 developing countries: The Toolbox provides up-to-date, countryspecific information for 38 countries, currently with a focus on stem rust/Ug99 http://rusttracker.cimmyt.org/

The Wheat Atlas was updated with information from 60+ wheat-producing countries on production,
production constraints, cultivars and cultivar descriptors. In future, it will provide baseline data for
impact assessments: http://wheatatlas.cimmyt.org/

Progress along the Impact Pathway - See also Table 1, in Annex 1.

C.1 Narrative of major achievements, by Theme


Impact of Research on Policy in Africa - Better target and prioritize WHEAT research (SI1) & Strengthen
Capacities (SI10):
African countries spent about US$20 billion in 2012 to import some 40 million tons of wheatxi, used mostly
to feed the continents rapidly expanding population. Wheat is the largest item on Africas $40bn annual
food import bill. Yet Africas farmers produce only 44% of the wheat consumed, with wheat self-sufficiency
rates going down. Sub-Saharan Africa faces a particular challenge, due to urbanization. In 2012, those
countries imported 12 million tons, an estimated net value of US$ 6 billionxii. The authors of a study on
SSAs economic and biological potential for producing wheat reckon that farmers may be growing only 10 25 percent of the production that is biologically possible and economically profitablexiii.
During the Wheat for Food Security in Africa Conference (8-12 October, Addis), organized by WHEAT
(CIMMYT, ICARDA, IFPRI), the Ethiopian Institute Agricultural Research (EIAR) and AUC, more than 250
participants discussed the constraints and potential for wheat production in all of Africa and the policy
changes needed to achieve profitable domestic wheat systems (relating to WHEAT Themes 1-6 & 8). 100+
researchers from all over Africa were sponsored by the conference and presented posters on different
aspects of wheat research. The Ministers of Agriculture of Burundi, Ethiopia, Sudan, and Zimbabwe actively
participated. Participants and Ministers signed a conference declaration urging a decisive increase in
African wheat production, greater research collaboration across the continent, promoting and protecting
domestic producers and funding all this through a levy on wheat imports.
As a direct result of this declaration, the Joint Conference of African Union Ministers of Agriculture and
Trade (JCMAT, 29-30 November 2012) formally decided to include wheat among the strategic commodities
for achieving food and nutrition security in Africa, providing the basis for greater wheat research
investment.xiv
Grow more with less through precision agriculture Nutrient- and water use efficiency (SI3) and Wheatbased systems (SI2)
Precise management of fertilizer nutrients supports cropping systems and provides sustainable economic,
social and environmental benefits, whilst poorly managed nutrient applications decrease profitability and
increase nutrient losses, degrading water and air. Among the regions where WHEAT is present, countries
such as Zimbabwe and Ethiopia lack soil mapping and availability of fertilizer, whilst farmers in India and
China face over-nitrification of their soils and a resulting depletion of key nutrients.
MasAgro is working on integrated and scalable approaches, to better use nutrients. Sensors and decision
support tools for precision plant nutrition are geared to smallholders, who can thus increase their
productivity. The key focus is to develop, validate, and bring to scale NDVI sensors like the pocket
GreenSeekerTM ground sensors and satellite mounted sensors, combined with tools like Nutrient Expert,
to drive fertilizer recommendations at the farm, system, and regional levels. Sensors provide accurate
information on how much nitrogen fertilizer to apply to optimize yields (wheat, maize) and quality (wheat).
Calibration was completed and an adoption plan created for the GreenSeeker sensor for the fall-winter
2012-13 and spring-summer 2013 cycles, to measure the optimum use of nitrogen in maize-, wheat-based
and barley systems in different Mexican agro-economic zones. Reduced production costs of up to US$ 230

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per hectare were confirmed with sensors in the validation plots. To speed up the adoption of this
technology, a pocket sensor costing roughly US$ 500 was developed (ten times cheaper than the model
available on the market). The commercial version of this pocket sensor is now available.xv
Developing precision agriculture solutions is a good example of realizing linkages across MAIZE and WHEAT,
as well as between the larger, bilaterally funded WHEAT systems research programs.
Systems research and mobile communication for scaling-out of precision agriculture information - Nutrientand water use efficiency (Theme 3)
Mobile phone technology has proven to be a game changer in rural developmentxvi. Mobile phone-based
services provide easy access to more knowledge and information and thus greater adoption of new
technologies, reduced transaction costs, better market efficiencies and ultimately, improved livelihoods for
farmers.
MasAgro (the Sustainable Modernization of Traditional Agriculture) wants to narrow the information gap
and the financial exclusion that farmers in maize and wheat based systems face, by providing needed
services that will ultimately increase their productivity. The MasAgro Movil pilot was launched in October
2012. This subscription service delivers regionally specific climate and market data and location specific
agronomic advice, through a network of 2500 extension technicians. Using a train-the-trainer approach,
100 trainers are training around 2500 technicians, who in turn work with around 80.000 farmers.
Monitoring and evaluation studies with farmers and technicians have been performed at different stages of
the MasAgro Movil pilot. The lessons learned, also from the deployment of other mobile agricultural tools
in different countries, will be the foundation for MasAgro Movil Phase II: A more ambitious platform, which
facilitates strong public private partnerships (PPPs), to sustain a MasAgro Movil that improves access to
agricultural information and financial services, improves data visibility and value chain efficiency and
enhances access to markets.
Search for new sources of heat and drought tolerance - Enhanced heat and drought tolerance (Theme 6&9)
Heat and drought are predicted to strongly reduce wheat production in the coming years, putting further
pressure on food prices. Winter wheat is primarily grown in rain-fed areas and is a natural resource of
drought adaptive traits and alleles; winter wheat in Turkey most likely represents the richest and oldest
reservoir of accumulated adaptive alleles. Winter wheat landraces from West and Central Asia have been
tested in Turkey, to capture traits and alleles, in particular adaptation to drought in rain-fed systems (SI6
output: Better yield under heat and/or drought stress). Preliminary results show a broad genetic diversity
among collections. Many landraces were later maturing than the elite checks, had higher grain size and
some even showed higher grain yields than the checks. The best landraces will be further used in strategic
spring-winter, winter-spring and winter-winter crossing, to enrich both genetic backgrounds. This may lead
to the identification of new allelic sources of adaptation to heat and drought stress.
34 research institutions developed a joint business plan to break the wheat yield barrier (Theme 7)
The Wheat Yield Consortium is an integral part of the WHEAT strategy to break the genetic yield barrier. In
March 2012, 34 research organizations finalized a 10-year integrated research plan. The organizations are
already sharing advanced scientific expertise, facilities and germplasm, to improve the wheat plants
photosynthesis, ear size and stalk strength working together to succeed in raising the genetic yield
potential by up to 50% in the next 20 years. The WYC findings will be incorporated into the WHEAT
breeding platform, to deliver high-yielding varieties to farmers fields in WHEAT target regions.
Using existing funding, two students started to conduct their PhD research on photosynthesis at ANU and
Cambridge University (UK).xvii Five WYC research partners received Competitive Partner Grants to conduct
research on, amongst other topics, phenotypic selection for leaf photosynthesis capacity & efficiency and
optimizing RuBP regeneration by transforming wheat with SBPase (see Annex 6). The grants made
progress along WYC Business & Research Plan possible, as potential Funders convened in November.
The Consortium has so far been funded by Mexico (MasAgro program) and represents Mexicos major
contribution to IAR4D. Other sources of funding are CGIAR W1&2, including for Competitive Partner Grants
and national in-kind contributions (China, India). In November, funders and research organizations from

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16 countries, led by BBSRC (UK) and USAID, met in Mexico City and agreed to create a Wheat Yield
Network. The Network aims to assure adequate long-term funding (core and competitive) to sustain a
researcher network, including the CIMMYT-led Mexican phenotyping platform (MEXPLAT), building on what
the WYC has achieved. For more info, see: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/web/FILES/Resources/wheat-yieldnetwork.pdf
Comprehensively harnessing wheat genetic diversity - Seeds of discovery tackling the black box of genetic
resources (Theme 9):
The genetic diversity conserved in CGIAR and national wheat genebanks represents the genetic heritage of
wheat, its progenitors and wild relatives. The conserved collections potentially harbor many undiscovered
genes, alleles and/or haplotypes that have yet to be harnessed for wheat improvement. The wheat
component of Seeds of Discovery (SeeD) has started to comprehensively characterize some of the
ultimately 130,000 genebank accessions and to promote and facilitate their use as new diversity sources for
breeding programs. Breeders and physiologists will then improve existing lines, for adaptation to an
increasingly difficult agricultural scenario (Theme 9 contributions to Themes 4-6).

To achieve these goals, the genebank accessions are being genotyped through high-density genome
profiles (genotyping-by-sequencing, GbS). The information generated in the first 2 years -from more than
30,000 accessions- is being used in studies of genetic relationships among accessions and to establish
strategic subsets that capture maximum genotypic diversity (SI9 output: Accession subsets assembled and
made available to users). SeeD scientists have so far phenotyped 60,000 accessions under field and
glasshouse conditions. They want to find heat, drought, tan spot, spot blotch, Karnal bunt and sunn pest
resistance traits, in addition to phosphorous use efficiency and grain quality. These are traits where
sufficient genetic variation is so far missing. Researchers also defined a pathway to introgress the useful
exotic wheat alleles into elite genetic backgrounds, in order to generate the improvements for future
varieties.
SeeD, also funded by Mexico, with some W1&2 funding of complementary research activities, shows how a
national donor can integrate commitment to International Public Goods through a major research program
(MasAgro) with mainly national scope.xviii
C.2 Progress towards outputs
145 research projects, grouped under WHEATs ten Strategic Initiatives, pursue 66 outputs. Overall WHEAT
progress is at 85% of annual milestone targets. The WHEAT Traffic Light System aggregates the progress of

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WHEAT projects from all funding sources, in terms of reaching 2012 milestones towards achieving Strategic
Initiatives outputs. The outputs have different target dates: Some should be achieved by 2012, some by
2016. The Traffic Light System is currently template-based, but should be partially automated and
integrated into the Research Management System by the end of 2013.
Make field work on pests and diseases easier Durable pest and disease resistance (Theme 5)
A new, extremely virulent stem rust race was identified in Uganda in 1999. At the time of Ug99s first
occurrence, nearly 90% of all wheat varieties cultivated world-wide were susceptible.
Today, FAO
estimates that 29 countries (including most WHEAT target regions), accounting for 37% of global wheat
production, are potentially at risk to harvest losses. Whilst South America is free of Ug99, crops there face
an equally challenging threat: Fusarium head blight (FHB), or scab, a devastating fungal disease (North
America, East Asia and Europe). FHB often results in 3040% yield losses, going up to 70% for susceptible
cultivars in severe epidemics. Toxins produced by the fungus can make the wheat unsuitable for human
consumption. Other diseases affecting wheat are yellow and leaf rust, septoria, tan spot, spot blotch in
South Asia, wheat blast in Latin Americas Southern Cone region, and Karnal bunt. To complicate things,
climate change and the changing agriculture practices have resulted in enhancing the severity and
incidence of certain diseases. In order to spot these diseases and prevent their spread, farmers, agricultural
researchers, and technicians need to conduct accurate in-field diagnoses.
Projects under WHEAT are researching solutions for all of the above. ICARDA colleagues identified several
sources of resistance to wheat fungal and viral diseases and key insect key pests, which they shared with
breeders and NARS. Also, they identified potential novel genes for resistance to Russian wheat aphid and
Hessian flyxix. In addition, they found that several flowering medicinal plants, if used in cropping systems,
would enhance natural enemies of pests and also generate income to farmers.
In 2012, CIMMYT published the 2nd edition of Wheat Diseases and Pests: A guide for field identification
(contributes to Theme 5 output: Monitoring systems developed for emerging diseases). Not updated since
1989, the new edition includes recently-identified wheat and triticale diseases, as well as high-resolution
photos and a quick reference Guide to Diagnosis. The Guide is widely distributed by WHEAT researchers,
Centers regional offices and web information platforms: http://www.scribd.com/doc/128458848/Wheatdiseases-and-pests-a-guide-for-field-identification
Systematic approach to seed system analysis More and better seed (Theme 8)
Wheat is dominated by public sector seed systems. National seed systems vary in terms of policy,
regulatory, institutional and technical arrangements. A weak seed system limits adoption of improved
wheat varieties and associated technologies in farmers fields. In 2012, ICARDA developed a framework for
seed system analysis, with key research questions, questionnaires and checklists for analysis of each seed
sector component. For case studies, target countries at different levels of seed sector development have
been identified (Morocco, Uzbekistan and Iran). The research methodology combines comparative
analytical studies across countries and specific country studies along the seed chain. The aim is to derive
successful models, with the potential for adaptation to specific country situations. (SI8 output: Comparative
assessments of wheat seed sector status & SI1 output: New knowledge, tools, and methods to better
prioritize WHEAT research and better target interventions in wheat-based farming systems).xx
C.3 Progress towards the achievement of outcomes
Rust resistance: Early commercialization success (adoption) due to more lines available to NARS
Globally, at least 40 new wheat varieties descending from WHEAT research were released by NARS in
2012xxi. As a particular highlight, two new higher yielding Ug99 resistant varieties in India, derived by the
private seed sector from CGIAR Ug99 resistant germplasm, provide spread and yield advantages of 12-14%
over current popular varieties (tested on ca. 2,000 farmers fields). The two varieties are promoted in
northwestern India. In 2011-12, seed sales for 50,000 ha were achieved. For 2013, seed sales for 150,000
ha are planned.
That would not have been possible without the shuttle breeding efforts between CIMMYT and Kenya over
the last few years, funded by BGRI/Durable Rust Resistance in Wheat. The two Indian lines resistance was

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identified in Kenya 2006-7. Overall, shuttle breeding has led to a substantial increase in internationally
distributed wheat germplasm with resistance to Ug99, without compromising on grain yield and other
necessary traits. The 2012 international wheat trials & nurseries distributed 436 entries, of which 71% have
adequate adult plant resistance to Ug99; another 20% of entries possess effective race-specific resistance
genes. This compares very favorably with
2006, when the first targeted crosses were
made and 90% of entries had inadequate
resistance.
Now, NARS have more options for testing and
release in their environments, which
increases chances of new varieties made
available to farmers, as in the Indian example,
above. In Kenya, for instance, Ug99 had been
brought largely under control because of
shifts to new varieties, states Ronnie
Coffman, vice-chair of the Borlaug Global Rust
Initiative (BGRI)xxii.
Assure readiness for an Ug99 outbreak in 6
countries
The release of a new variety is usually slow and subject to tough criteria that vary from country to country.
Funded by the USAID Famine Fund, six countries (Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Egypt, Ethiopia, Nepal &
Pakistan) embraced a quicker production method and sowed 52 hectares with 11 varieties, producing
nearly 145 tons of Ug99 resistant seed in the 2008-09 crop cycle. In parallel, Iran planted 34,000 hectares
and produced 80,000 tons of Ug99 resistant wheat seed. All countries repeated this in 2009-10. The seven
countries combined have sown over 47,000 hectares, yielding 118,000 tons of improved seed. This way,
Bangladesh, Egypt, and Iran had enough Ug99-resistant seed in 2012 to sow at least 5% of their national
wheat area. One hectare of wheat produces enough seed to sow 20 hectares, so 5% is the safeguard
threshold for replacing susceptible varieties in case of a Ug99 outbreak.
The maps in Annex 5 show current WHEAT engagement systems research (Themes 2&3) and annual
distribution of germplasm to partners worldwide (Theme 4). They show the powerful network of partners,
using WHEAT outputs and turning them into outcomes.
C.4 Progress towards Impact also see Annex 4
The Cereal Systems initiative in South Asia (Phase 1: 2009- mid 2012) sees adoption success (Pakistan) and
scaling out by partners (India)
In Pakistan, farmer adoption has led to ca. 250,000 ha zero tillagexxiii, 45,000 ha relay cropping & >0.6
million ha laser land leveling. Farmers benefited in terms of average farm profitability with zero tillage,
which increased by US$ 181/ha (joint contribution of cost saving & yield enhancement). Conservation
Agriculture practices are now included in a package of practices support offered by the Government of
Pakistan.
Several Indian State governments have bought-in the technologies promoted by the 5 CSISA hubs:

Punjab invested INR 70 million on Turbo Happy Seeder for residue management.xxiv

Haryana developed an action plan on Conservation Agriculture and prioritized investments. The
government is implementing the same in close collaboration with CSISA, whilst Bihar made large
investments on CSISA prioritized technologies.xxv

The Indian Central Government has included CSISA prioritized technologies in several well-funded
investment programs (e.g. Natl Food Security Mission, Bringing Green Revolution in E. India, Rashtriya
Krishi Vikash Yojana).

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Farmers in Indian hub domains have purchased over 8,000 zero-till seeders and laser levelers and the
acreage under Conservation Agriculture-based technologies has increased substantially.

Overall, the area under resource conservation technologies (RCTs) is rapidly expanding in South Asia under
different initiatives, though much more is needed. They cover more than 8 million acres in the IGP. Most of
its adoption (about 74%) is concentrated in India, with some expansion in the lowlands of Nepal and
Bangladesh. For more information, see: https://sites.google.com/site/csisaportal/Home
Annex 4 documents (pre-CRP) External Reviews with impact-relevant learning, as well as the impact studies
undertaken in 2012. The Annex also lists the relevant, most recent global studies about the economic
benefits of wheat breeding research. Depending on the period studied, benefits amount to $1 1.8bn p.a.
WHEAT impact targets are based on these studies. Studies, which investigate different options to raise
wheat productivity, are also summarized. Closing the yield gap between researchers and farmers fields is
the top option, underlining the need for a comprehensive approach, reflected in the 10 mutually
reinforcing WHEAT Strategic Themes.
A structured M&E approach to WHEAT was finalised in May 2012, to enhance concerted efforts towards
understanding and documenting project progress, and better document outcomes and impactsxxvi.

D.

GENDER RESEARCH ACHIEVEMENTS

Key achievements with regard to gender integration and research in 2012 include:
1. A draft strategy was developed with input at several stages from CIMMYT, ICARDA and the Consortium
Office (CO). After circulating the 2nd draft for review by stakeholders, the final version was formally
submitted to the COxxvii.
2. The Scoping Study on Avenues for Strengthening the Integration of Gender and Social Equity in R4D on
Wheat-Based Systems in South Asia, started in October 2012, is progressing as planned.
3. A Gender Audit is being implemented by the Social Development and Gender Equity Group of the Royal
Tropical Institute (KIT). The design phase was successfully completed with a collaborative design
workshop in December 2012. Implementation is ongoing. The results of the collaborative analysis
workshop will bring WHEAT scientists and partners together, to develop an action plan by end of 2013.
4. Technical support to research teams on integration of gender considerations in research proposals and
implementation, incl. contracting and supervision of a consultancy for gender integration in the climate
change related research portfolio (Themes 2, 3, 4, 6 & 10).
5. Active participation in CGIAR Gender and Agriculture Network by the two Centers Gender Focal points.
D.1 Gender equality targets defined
The WHEAT Gender Strategy includes a number of indicators for implementation progress and WHEATs
contribution to the promotion of gender equality in wheat-based systems. At outcome level they include:

Increased number of WHEAT projects with explicit gender commitments and budgeting

More female and young farmers involved in and providing feedback to participatory research activities

Systematic collection and use of sex-disaggregated data and information in socio-economic and
participatory research

The monitoring of these and other indicators will primarily be based on gender mainstreaming /
integration into the Research Management Framework (to begin 2013 as part of Output III of Gender
Strategy).

Specific, regional gender equality targets, e.g. for end beneficiary technology adoption, have yet to be
defined.

D.2 Institutional architecture for gender mainstreaming in place (integration of gender across the
research cycle)

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A. The capacity for gender analysis in WHEAT is moderate. However, implementation of the WHEAT
Gender Strategy during 2013-2015 will lay the foundation for gender integration, i.e. building the
enabling institutional conditions and resources that will encourage and facilitate the systematic
consideration and integration of gender in research design and implementation. As institutional
frameworks and the incentives for gender integration are strengthened, this will influence research
design & implementation and lead to greater integration of gender.
B. Making gender analysis a regular element in the research cycle will be driven by the CIMMYT Research
Management Framework, of which Gender is an integral part. This is an example of institutional
frameworks and procedures actively promoting the consideration of gender issues when identifying
research questions & developing research plans - and ensure that such issues are addressed (including
budget requirements). A key element is the piloting of a proposal screening procedure in the early
proposal development stages, which will constitute the foundation for follow-up on integration of
gender in implementation, as well as output and outcome monitoring. Indicators for tracking progress
and effectiveness for gender mainstreaming will be developed by mid-2013.
C. Performance indicators for gender mainstreaming status for WHEAT (see Annex 2): Performance
approaches requirements.

E.

PARTNERSHIPS BUILDING ACHIEVEMENTS

Partnership Strategy and Practices (See also: Key Messages section: Wheat for Africa & Annex 5: Maps)

F.

WHEAT collaborates with 219 partners (NARS, universities, Regional and International Orgs, ARIs,
private sector institutions, NGOs and CBOs and host countries), of whom 68 are funded/with formal
agreements.

The WHEAT-Stakeholder Committee has a majority of non-CGIAR partner members, to ensure


independent oversight. The WHEAT-Management Committee includes 3 non-CGIAR Primary
Research Partners (BBSRC -UK, GRDC-Australia, ICAR-India); to ensure research partner interests are
well represented.

WHEAT agreements with research partners have been standardized (sub-grant agreement with
reporting requirements, Terms & Conditions; MoU).

A first round of Competitive Partner Grants (W1&2-funded Partner Budget of $2.4mn), to fill
research gaps in the WHEAT Strategic Initiatives portfolio, attracted 25 proposals from non-CGIAR
research partners for 18 Requests for Proposal (see Annex 6).

WHEAT-MC mandated major partner events included the WHEAT Launch Meeting, the Wheat for
African Food Security Conference and a Conference with South Asian MAIZE & WHEAT partners.

A Partner Priorities Survey, launched in September, asks the 200+ WHEAT research partners (at
national level) to articulate their priorities among the 10 WHEAT Themes (see:
http://fs4.formsite.com/cimmyt/CRP-Wheat-survey/index.html). By end February 2013, sixty
partners had responded. In January 2012, partners contributed to shaping the Themes research
focus and content.

CAPACITY BUILDING
Anybody working in wheat research will come to CIMMYT at least once in their lifetime. (Tony Fischer,
WHEAT-Stakeholder Committee, 15th March 2013)

WHEAT training events bring national wheat researchers together, across disciplines and departments.
Participants attest that it was the first time they met colleagues from other countries and in several cases,
colleagues from other institutions in their own country. The cumulative networking effect of recurring
capacity development programs can be observed in ex-trainees joining CIMMYT or ICARDA Offices or
university departments, which are WHEAT research partners.

W H E A T An n u a l P r o g r e s s R e p o r t 2 0 1 2

Page | 11

In 2012, 23,000 pilot farmers, extension agents and wheat researchers participated in short-term capacity
development activities, of which 27% were women. xxviii Forty-nine persons engaged in long-term
training/research programs (2/3 of which women). In the context of a new Capacity Development Strategy
(approved by its Board May 2012), ICARDA organized 8 short-term and 1 long-term course, bringing
together participants from 14 countries. CIMMYT ran 2 group trainings on basic and advanced wheat
improvement in Mexico, established in 2010 to replace the general training course and take in more
participants each year. In addition, six trainees participated in the 5-week visiting scientist program
Conservation agriculture: Laying the groundwork for sustainable and productive cropping systems They
worked on sustainable practice in Argentina, India, Iran, Mexico and Nepal, which they documented in a
Compendium publication.
Building global wheat researcher communitys competence (Theme 10)
The international wheat improvement training courses have been a major part of CIMMYTs commitment
to long-term in-depth capacity development. As many national programs are refocusing their activities to
include wheat bioinformatics, molecular breeding, physiology, conservation agriculture, pathology, and
seed health issues, the Wheat Improvement Course offers a broad curriculum to the highly motivated
wheat scientists from developing countries. Among other activities, participants are trained in pollination
techniques, disease identification, and how to select plants and seed. From March to May 2012,
participants benefited from Obregons 170 hectares of wheat experimental fields, visits to farmers fields,
the Mexican national research programs and from interactions with established wheat scientists at
CIMMYT.
The 2012 course was attended by 23 participants from 16 countries, who returned to their respective
countries with skills and knowledge needed to design and run a modern wheat improvement, valuing
teamwork and interdisciplinary research. Lutanga Makweti, a Zambian wheat breeder, for example, has
initiated a crossing program to expand his companies breeding activities in Zambia, passing on the skills
and techniques he gained during the course to other young researchers in his country.
In two years, women participation in the Wheat Improvement Courses increased from 4% (2005-2010) to
24% (2011-12). In cooperation with Borlaug Global Rust Initiative (BGRI, led by Cornell Univ.) and its Jeannie
Borlaug Women In Triticum Fellowships, the number of women participating should rise to more than 30%
over the next 2 years. Over the past 2 years more than 50% of the participants were young scientists,
mostly MSc holders.

G.

RISK MANAGEMENT

Biophysical risks associated with international germplasm exchange: A project on wheat blast was delayed
by one year due to a virus, which made seed shipments to Brazil impossible. A repeat activity will take place
2013.
Political risk: ICARDAs research operations were greatly affected by the Syrian civil war. ICARDA has
responded with a decentralization strategy, with most WHEAT researchers moving to Morocco. The
genebank has been relocated to Tunis.
Partnership risk: The Morocco impact study was delayed and moved into 2013.

H.

LESSONS LEARNED

Analysis of variance from what was planned:


i.

Estimate the overall level of confidence/uncertainty of the indicators provided in Table 1: Medium,
as some of the indicators were part of the CRP Performance Matrix agreed as part of the PIA, whilst
some indicators are new and the whole set of indicators were only agreed upon in March 2013.
It is not realistic to (re-)collect such data reliably in such a short period.

ii.

Description, if relevant, of research avenues that did not produce expected results, and description
of implications for the CRP, such as new research directions pursued instead and their expected

W H E A T An n u a l P r o g r e s s R e p o r t 2 0 1 2

Page | 12

outputs and outcomes: Not applicable for 2012. Additional, new research directions discussed
during 2012, with follow-up actions in 2013 (ex-ante studies to better guide targeting and
prioritizing of WHEAT research).
iii.

Lessons learned by the CRP from monitoring the indicators and from qualitative analyses of
progress: Not applicable for 2012.

WHEAT Program Management has learnt that


-

A significant number of non-CGIAR and CGIAR researchers remain confused about what the CGIAR
change towards CRPs entails;

Managing linkages between projects within a Theme, between Themes and between different CRPs
Themes requires additional time & effort on both sides;

Reviewing outputs-to-outcomes pathways in a participatory manner was not feasible in 2012, due to
time constraints that researchers and partners were experiencing.

T e mp l a t e s f o r a n n u a l r e p o r t i n g f o r t h e ye a r s 2 0 1 2 a n d 2 0 1 3
February 2013

Page | 13

Annex 1: CRP indicators of progress, with glossary and targets


CRPs
concerned
by this
indicator

Indicator

Glossary/guidelines for measuring the indicator

Deviation
narrative
(if actual is
more than
10%
off
target)

2012

Target (if
available
for 2012)
KNOWLEDGE, TOOLS, DATA
All
1. Number of flagship
products produced by CRP

All

All

All

All

2. % of flagship products
produced that have explicit
target of women
farmers/NRM managers
3. % of flagship products
produced that have been
assessed for likely genderdisaggregated impact
4. Number of tools
produced by CRP

5. % of tools that have an


explicit target of women
farmers

See: http://wheat.org/our-strategy
Strategic lnitiative (Theme) 1 Technology targeting for greatest
impact
Sl 2 Sustainable wheat-based systems
Sl 3 Nutrient and water- use efficiency
Sl 4 Productive wheat varieties
Sl 5 Durable disease and pest resistance
Sl 6 Enhanced heat and drought tolerance
Sl 7 Breaking the yield barrier
Sl 8 More and better seed
Sl 9 Seeds of discovery
Sl 10 Strengthening capacities
"that include" not "have" (applies to several projects under an SI)
Sl 1 Technology targeting for greatest impact
Sl 2 Sustainable wheat-based systems
Sl 10 Strengthening capacities
Gender Audit initiated

Manuals and web-based applications


nd
ICARDA (Tadesse, 2 April)

Tools are not targeted individually, but at flagship product level

2013

2014

Actual

Target

Target

10

10

10

10

10

522

522

327 (16
codeveloped
with other
CRPs)

T e mp l a t e s f o r a n n u a l r e p o r t i n g f o r t h e ye a r s 2 0 1 2 a n d 2 0 1 3
February 2013

All

All

All
All

6. % of tools assessed for


likely gender-disaggregated
impact
7. Number of open access
databases maintained by
CRP

8. Total number of users of


these open access databases
9. Number of publications in
ISI journals produced by CRP

Tools are not targeted individually, but at flagship product level

IWIS, rusttracker.org, Wheat Doctor, Wheat Atlas - Wheat Seed


Catalogue prototype & GRIS (both in collaboration)
http://iwis.cimmyt.org/confluence/display/IWIS/Home
wheatpedigree.net
http://iwis.cimmyt.org/confluence/display/IWIS/Home
http://wheatatlas.cimmyt.org/
http://bioinf.hutton.ac.uk/germinate_cimmyt/app/index.pl
http://wheatdoctor.cimmyt.org/
Unique visitors in 2012 (excludes Wheat Seed Catalogue)
KPI Indicator Database (CIMMYT only)
ICARDA ISI pubs list
No data gathered from (other) research partners

1,2,3, 4, 6

10. Number of strategic


value chains analyzed by CRP

2012
1 Scoping study on Varietal Replacement and Evolving Seed
Systems for Wheat and Maize in South Asia
1 Study on potential for wheat production in Africa
2 pilot studies on wheat value chains in India in the states of
Haryana and Bihar
2013
3 studies on wheat value chains in India in the states Bihar,
Haryana and Madhya Pradesh
ICARDA: Seed Systems Analysis

1,5,6,7

11. Number of targeted agroecosystems analysed/characterised


by CRP

Use the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MEA) typology of cultivated systems


and of forests and woodland systems (MEA, 2005, Ecosystems and Human WellBeing: Current State and Trends, Volume 1) to define these agro-ecosystems and
specify the regions concerned

1,5,6,7

12. Estimated population of abovementioned agro-ecosystems

CAPACITY ENHANCEMENT AND


INNOVATION PLATFORMS
All
13. Number of trainees in
short-term programs
facilitated by CRP (male)

Page | 14

ICARDA: CAC, IWWIP, Travelling Rust WS,


CIMMYT: Training DB (incomplete).

124,450

125,000

130,000

121

121

18,220

16,415

17,000

121
(includes
18 jointly
with other
CRPs)

(15,144
shared with
other CRPs)

T e mp l a t e s f o r a n n u a l r e p o r t i n g f o r t h e ye a r s 2 0 1 2 a n d 2 0 1 3
February 2013

All

All

All

1,5,6,7

14. Number of trainees in


short-term programs
facilitated by CRP (female)
15. Number of trainees in
long-term programs
facilitated by CRP (male)
16.Number of trainees in
long-term programs
facilitated by CRP (female)
17. Number of multistakeholder R4D innovation
platforms established for the
targeted agro-ecosystems by
the CRPs

TECHNOLOGIES/PRACTICES IN VARIOUS
STAGES OF DEVELOPMENT
All
18. Number of
technologies/NRM practices
under research in the CRP
(Phase I)
All
19. % of technologies under
research that have an explicit
target of women farmers
All
20. % of technologies under
research that have been
assessed for likely genderdisaggregated impact
1,5,6,7

1,5,6,7

21 Number of agro-ecosystems for


which CRP has identified feasible
approaches for improving
ecosystem services and for
establishing positive incentives for
farmers to improve ecosystem
functions as per the CRPs
recommendations
22. Number of people who will
potentially benefit from plans, once
finalised, for the scaling up of
strategies

(see above, but for female)

Page | 15

4,883

5,226

10,000

(3,418 with
other CRPs)

ICARDA: MSc, PhD students (thesis), YASP junior scientists


CIMMYT: MSc & PhD only
(see above, but for female)

To be counted, a multi-stakeholder platform has to have a clear


purpose, generally to manage some type of tradeoff/conflict
among the different interests of different stakeholders in the
targeted agro-ecosystems, and inclusive and clear governance
mechanisms, leading to decisions to manage the variety of
perspectives of stakeholders in a manner satisfactory to the whole
platform.

Germplasm: 265,572
Agronomy: 260
From CIMMYT KPI database
ICARDA: FTF figures
Technologies are not targeted individually, but at flagship
product level
ICARDA: 10% Yr1 / 15% Yr2 / 15% Yr3)
Technologies are not targeted individually, but at flagship
product level
ICARDA: 5% Yr1 / 10% Yr2 / 15% Yr3)
Use the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MEA) typology of cultivated systems
and of forests and woodland systems (MEA, 2005, Ecosystems and Human WellBeing: Current State and Trends, Volume 1) to define these agro-ecosystems;
identify the regions if possible

Indicate the potential number of both women and men

30 (5
shared with
other CRPs)

40

45

19 (1
shared)

23

28

38

43

47

265,730

260,000

265,000

T e mp l a t e s f o r a n n u a l r e p o r t i n g f o r t h e ye a r s 2 0 1 2 a n d 2 0 1 3
February 2013

All, except
2

23. Number of technologies


/NRM practices field tested
(phase II)

1,5,6,7

24. Number of agroecosystems for which


innovations (technologies,
policies, practices,
integrative approaches) and
options for improvement at
system level have been
developed and are being
field tested (Phase II)
25. % of above
innovations/approaches/opti
ons that are targeted at
decreasing inequality
between men and women
26. Number of published
research outputs from CRP
utilised in targeted agroecosystems
27.Number of
technologies/NRM practices
released by public and
private sector partners
globally (phase III)

1,5,6,7

1,5,6,7

All, except
2

POLICIES IN VARIOUS STAGES OF


DEVELOPMENT
All
28. Numbers of Policies/
Regulations/ Administrative
Procedures
Analyzed (Stage 1)

Page | 16

Germplasm: 14,834
Agronomy: 20
From CIMMYT KPI database
ICARDA FTF Figures

34,850

35,500

36,500

50

50

50

1) Irrigated rice-wheat double crop (IGP maize can also be a


significant crop)
2) High altitude rainfed systems (Ethiopia, Kenya, Mexico, Nepal).
Irrigated subtropical (Northern Mexico). Map of MEA/AEZ would
be of great help here to extract exact typology

Basically innovations related to CA are also targeted at reducing


inequalities between man and women due to innovations reducing
labor and labor drudgery
CIMMYT CAP figure: 32 (to be verified)

Germplasm: 31 (+ ICARDA: 10)


Agronomy: 10 (estimate)
From CIMMYT KPI database

2012
1 Policy brief on Wheat for Food Security in Africa
1 Seed policy review within scoping study on Varietal Replacement
and Evolving Seed Systems for Wheat and Maize in South Asia (incl
Seed Policy and Legislation and policy recommendations)
+ ICARDA: Wheat baseline survey and adoption studies

T e mp l a t e s f o r a n n u a l r e p o r t i n g f o r t h e ye a r s 2 0 1 2 a n d 2 0 1 3
February 2013

All

All

29. Number of policies /


regulations / administrative
procedures drafted and
presented for
public/stakeholder
consultation (Stage 2)

30. Number of policies /


regulations / administrative
procedures presented for
legislation(Stage 3)
All
31. Number of policies /
regulations / administrative
procedures prepared
passed/approved (Stage 4)
All
32. Number of policies /
regulations / administrative
procedures passed for which
implementation has begun
(Stage 5)
OUTCOMES ON THE GROUND
All
33. Number of hectares
under improved technologies
or management practices as
a result of CRP research
All
34. Number of farmers and
others who have applied
new technologies or
management practices as a
result of CRP research

Page | 17

2012
1 Wheat for Food Security in Africa Conference in Addis Ababa,
Ethiopia (Oct 12 )ends with Declaration: Wheat is a strategic crop
for Africa
1 African Union Joint Conference of MoA and Trade (JCMAT, Addis
Ababa, Ethiopia, End Nov 12:) endorses the Declaration that
Wheat is a strategic crop for Africa
1 Roadmap for Action / Summary of Discussion from the
Bangladesh Seed Summit 2012 (Apr 12)
: underwent the third stage of the policy reform process
(policies were presented for legislation/decree to improve the
policy environment for smallholder-based agriculture.)

: underwent the fourth stage of the policy reform process


(official approval (legislation/decree) of new or revised policy /
regulation / administrative procedure by relevant authority).

: completed the policy reform process (implementation of new


or revised policy / regulation / administrative procedure by
relevant authority)

1,500,000

1,650,000

2,350,000

1,650,000

1,802,000

2,050,000

CWANA (ICARDA): Both new & continuing areas in North Africa,


East Africa, West & Central Asia
CIMMYT: Based on KNOWN seed production in 2012
INCOMPLETE
ICARDA FTF figures (CWANA, see regions above)
CIMMYT: Assumption: farmer average use 1 hectare
INCOMPLETE

T e mp l a t e s f o r a n n u a l r e p o r t i n g f o r t h e ye a r s 2 0 1 2 a n d 2 0 1 3
February 2013

Page | 18

Annex 2: Performance indicators for gender mainstreaming


Performance Indicator
1. Gender inequality targets defined

Performance approaches requirements


Sex-disaggregated social data is being
collected and used to diagnose important
gender-related constraints in at least one
of the CRPs main target populations

Meets requirements

Exceeds requirements

Sex-disaggregated social data is being collected


and used to diagnose important gender-related
constraints in at least one of the CRPs main
target populations

Sex-disaggregated social data is being collected and


used to diagnose important gender-related
constraints in at least one of the CRPs main target
populations

And

And

The CRP has designed a way to define or baseline


empirically the main dimensions of gender
inequality in the CRPs main target populations
relevant to its expected outcomes ( IDOs)

The CRP has designed a way to define or baseline


empirically the main dimensions of gender
inequality in the CRPs main target populations
relevant to its expected outcomes (IDOs)
And
Baseline data is used to target changes in levels of
gender inequality to which the CRP is or plans to
contribute, with related numbers of men and
women beneficiaries in the CRPs main target
populations

2. Institutional architecture for


integration of gender is in place
Means of verification:
- CRP Annual Report
- CRP policy/procedure for gender
assessment of research priorities
(flagship designation), proposals, and
final products
- M&E gender protocol

- CRP scientists and managers with


responsibility for gender in the CRPs
outputs are appointed, have written
TORS. - Procedures defined to report use
of available diagnostic or baseline
knowledge on gender routinely for
assessment of the gender equality
implications of the CRPs flagship research
products as per the Gender Strategy ??
-CRP M&E system has protocol for
tracking progress on integration of gender
in research

- CRP scientists and managers with responsibility


for gender in the CRPs outputs are appointed,
have written TORS and funds allocated to support
their interaction.

CRP scientists and managers with responsibility for


gender in the CRPs outputs are appointed, have
written TORS and funds allocated to support their
interaction.

- Procedures defined to report use of available


diagnostic or baseline knowledge on gender
routinely for assessment of the gender equality
implications of the CRPs flagship research
products as per the Gender Strategy

- Procedures defined to report use of available


diagnostic or baseline knowledge on gender
routinely for assessment of the gender equality
implications of the CRPs flagship research products
as per the Gender Strategy

-CRP M&E system has protocol for tracking


progress on integration of gender in research

-CRP M&E system has protocol for tracking


progress on integration of gender in research

And

And

A CRP plan approved for capacity development in


gender analysis

A CRP plan approved for capacity development in


gender analysis
And
The CRP uses feedback provided by its M&E system
to improve its integration of gender into research

T e mp l a t e s f o r a n n u a l r e p o r t i n g f o r t h e ye a r s 2 0 1 2 a n d 2 0 1 3
February 2013

Annex 3: CRP FINANCIAL REPORT


INDEX
CRP Financial Reporting Templates
Ref

Description

Files needed

Responsibility

2012

2013

Comments

L101 CRP Cumulative Financial Summary

Lead Center

Yes

Yes

Simplified format - no longer at Theme level

L106 CRP Annual Funding Summary

Lead Center

Yes

Yes

Small changes in format

L111 CRP Annual Financial Summary

Lead Center

Yes

Yes

Small changes in format

L121 CRP - Expenditure by Natural Classification Report

Lead Center

Yes

Yes

Small changes in format

L131 CRP - Themes Report

Lead Center

Yes

Yes

New report - but note this information was previously incorporated in L101

L201 CRP - Bilateral Grants Report

Lead Center

Yes

Yes

No changes in format

L211 CRP Partnerships Report

Lead Center

Yes

Yes

No changes in format

L401 Funding - Windows 1 and 2 Cash Flows

Lead Center

Yes

Yes

No changes in format

L411 Funding - Window 2 Report

Lead Center

Yes

Yes

New report, requested by Donors, Paris meeting

Budget and Financial Reports

Analytical Financial Reports

Cash Flow Reports

CRP FS ANEXES (sent and wo


TOTAL EXPENSES OF JUNE (2
FINAL EXPENSES REPORT ( w
ICARDA FILE

T e mp l a t e s f o r a n n u a l r e p o r t i n g f o r t h e ye a r s 2 0 1 2 a n d 2 0 1 3
February 2013

Page |

L101 Whole of Life

Report Description
Name of Report
Reporting Line
Frequency/Period

Period

L101
CRP Cumuative Financial Summary
Lead Center Report to Consortium Office
Every 6 months

1 January 2011 - 31 December 2012

3.1 CRP on Wheat

(a) Cumulative budget per annual financial plans.

Windows
1&2

Window
3

Bilateral
funding

Center
funds

Total
Funding

Africa Rice
Bioversity
CIAT
CIFOR
CIMMYT
CIP
ICARDA
ICRISAT
IFPRI
IITA
ILRI
IRRI
IWMI
World Agroforestry
World Fish

Totals for CRP

(b) Actual Expenses - Cumulative

Windows Window Bilateral


1&2
3
funding

34,093
6,687
40,780
(0)
100%

11,244

79,249

31%

9%

61%

0%

100%

64,567

6,986

4,230

14,682

Windows Window Bilateral Center


Total
1&2
3
funding funds Funding
-

40,192

7,014

Total
Funding

104,787
25,898
130,685

33,206

Center
funds

(c) Variance - Cumulative

9,796

1,017

23,280

1,696

1,321

3,670

11,492
28%

Notes

All figures shown here are illustrative only, and are in USD 000's
Section (a) is cumulative - includes financial plan of current year as well as those of prior years.
Section (b) is cumulative - refers to all costs since inception, not just current year.
Section (c) amounts are the differences between Sections (a) and (b).

2,338
(0)
6%

26,950
0
66%

0%

(23,409)

(5,997)

(41,287)

(70,694)

(5,290)

(2,909)

(11,012)

(19,211)

(28,700)
32%

(8,906) (52,299)
10%

58%

- (89,905)
0%

100%

T e mp l a t e s f o r a n n u a l r e p o r t i n g f o r t h e ye a r s 2 0 1 2 a n d 2 0 1 3
February 2013
Report Description
Name of Report
Reporting Line
Frequency/Period

Period

Page |

L101
CRP Cumuative Financial Summary
Lead Center Report to Consortium Office
Every 6 months

1 January 2011 - 31 December 2012

3.1 CRP on Wheat

(a) Cumulative budget per annual financial plans.

Windows
1&2

Window
3

Bilateral
funding

Center
funds

Total
Funding

Africa Rice
Bioversity
CIAT
CIFOR
CIMMYT
CIP
ICARDA
ICRISAT
IFPRI
IITA
ILRI
IRRI
IWMI
World Agroforestry
World Fish

Totals for CRP

10,533

1,687

29,520

2,216

2,007

7,015

12,749
24%

3,694
7%

36,535
69%

(b) Actual Expenses - Cumulative

0%

Windows Window Bilateral


1&2
3
funding

Center
funds

(c) Variance - Cumulative

Total
Funding

41,740
11,238
52,977
100%

34,093
6,687
40,780
100%

9,796

1,017

23,280

1,696

1,321

3,670

11,492
28%

Notes

All figures shown here are illustrative only, and are in USD 000's
Section (a) is cumulative - includes financial plan of current year as well as those of prior years.
Section (b) is cumulative - refers to all costs since inception, not just current year.
Section (c) amounts are the differences between Sections (a) and (b).

2,338
6%

26,950
66%

0%

Windows Window Bilateral Center


Total
1&2
3
funding funds Funding
(736)

(670)

(6,240)

(7,647)

(520)

(686)

(3,344)

(4,551)

(1,257)
(0)
10%

(1,356)
11%

(9,584)
79%

- (12,197)
0%
100%

T e mp l a t e s f o r a n n u a l r e p o r t i n g f o r t h e ye a r s 2 0 1 2 a n d 2 0 1 3
February 2013
Report Description
Name of Report
Reporting Line
Frequency/Period

Period

L106
CRP Annual Funding Summary
Lead Center Report to Consortium Office
Every 6 months

1 January 2012 - 31 December 2012

3.1 CRP on Wheat

PART 1 - Annual FINANCE PLAN (Totals for Windows 1 and 2 combined) *


Approved Level for Year - Initial Approval
Approved Level for Year - Final Amount

12,749
12,749

* Note: It does not include contribution to the CGIAR


PART 2 - Funding Summary for Year
CRP 2012 Actual Funding

Window 1

Window 2

Window 3 Bilateral funding Total Funding


393

W1 Donors

393

BMGF
European Commission
ICAR, India
MARA
Turkey
USAID
Other
AARD
ACIAR
AFESD
Agrovegetal
Australia
CIMMYT (As ICARDAs Bilat Donor)
Cornell
FAO
GCP
Germany
GRDC
Hplus
ILRI
INIFAP
Iran
IRRI
ISDB
Japan
JIRCAS
Kuwait Fund
SAGARPA
SFSA
USAID
USDA
Other

Totals for CRP

419
307
269
242
666
42

2,338
0

91
111
349
135
187
198
4,065
107
240
392
1,355
933
105
228
175
2,151
152
371
219
576
9,666
390
882
2,895
976

419
307
269
242
666
42
91
111
349
135
187
198
4,065
107
240
392
1,355
933
105
228
175
2,151
152
371
219
576
9,666
390
882
2,895
976

26,950
0

29,288
-

Notes

All figures shown here are illustrative only, and are in USD 000's
Amount shown for Window 1 donors is total, as these funds are co-mingled
Amounts shown for Window 2 donors are as per Report L411.
Amounts shown for Window 3 donors are as per Report L201
Amounts shown for Bilateral funding are as per Report L201

T e mp l a t e s f o r a n n u a l r e p o r t i n g f o r t h e ye a r s 2 0 1 2 a n d 2 0 1 3
February 2013
Report Description
Name of Report
Reporting Line
Frequency/Period

Period

Page |

L111
CRP Annual Financial Summary
Lead Center Report to Consortium Office
Every 6 months

1 January 2012 - 31 December 2012


(a) CRP2012 Fin plan approved budget

Windows Window Bilateral


1&2
3
funding

Center
funds

Africa Rice
Bioversity
CIAT
CIFOR
CIMMYT
CIP
ICARDA
ICRISAT
IFPRI
IITA
ILRI
IRRI
IWMI
World Agroforestry
World Fish

Totals for CRP

10,533

1,687

29,520

2,216

2,007

7,015

12,749
-105%

3,694
-30%

36,535
-300%

0%

(b) CRP 2012 Expenditure

(c) Variance this Year

Total
Funding
-

Windows Window Bilateral Center


Total
1&2
3
funding funds Funding
-

41,740
11,238
52,977
-434%

34,093
6,687
40,780
-334%

9,796

1,017

23,280

1,696

1,321

3,670

11,492
28%

Notes

All figures are for current year. Amounts shown here are illustrative only, and are in USD 000's
Section (a) amounts are as per the latest financing plan
Section (b) amounts are for actual expenses in current year.
Section (c) amounts are the differences between Sections (a) and (b).

2,338
-19%

26,950
-221%

0%

Windows
1&2

Window
3

Bilateral
funding

Center
funds

Total
Funding
-

(736)

(670)

(6,240)

(7,647)

(520)

(686)

(3,344)

(4,551)

(1,257)

(1,356)

(9,584)

(12,197)

10%

11%

79%

0%

100%

T e mp l a t e s f o r a n n u a l r e p o r t i n g f o r t h e ye a r s 2 0 1 2 a n d 2 0 1 3
February 2013
Report Description
Name of Report
Reporting Line
Frequency/Period

Period

Page |

L121
CRP Financial Report - Expenditure by natural classification (by Center)
Lead Center Report to Consortium Office
Every 6 months

1 January 2011 - 31 December 2012


Annual Budget
Windows
Window Bilateral
1 and 2
3
funding
Funds

Total CRP
Personnel
Collaborator Costs - CGIAR Centers
Collaborator Costs - Partners
Supplies and Services
Operational Travel
Depreciation
Sub-total of Direct Costs
Indirect Costs
Total - all Costs

4,259
86
2,718
2,511
805
999
11,379
1,370
12,749

959
624
1,126
233
213
3,155
539
3,694

10,279
507
5,484
11,867
1,759
1,733
31,630
4,905
36,535

Center
Funds

Actual Expenses - This Year


Windows
Window Bilateral Center
1 and 2
Funds
3
funding
Funds

Total

15,497
592
8,826
15,504
2,797
2,946
46,163
6,814
52,977

Unspent Budget
Windows
Window Bilateral Center
1 and 2
3
funding Funds
Funds

Total

3,356
50
1,585
3,557
642
817
10,007
1,485
11,492

586
496
553
191
179
2,005
333
2,338

7,092
374
4,020
7,810
1,376
2,746
23,417
3,533
26,950

11,034
424
6,101
11,920
2,208
3,742
35,429
5,351
40,780

(0)

12,898
592
7,190
11,460
1,934
2,265
36,341
5,399
41,740

2,524
50
1,581
3,201
446
792
8,594
1,203
9,796

334
76
353
105
23
891
126
1,017

6,220
374
3,178
6,858
1,046
2,410
20,085
3,195
23,280

9,078
424
4,835
10,411
1,596
3,225
29,569
4,523
34,093

(2,211)

Total

(903)
(36)
(1,133)
1,045
(163)
(182)
(1,372)
115
(1,257)

(373)
(128)
(573)
(42)
(34)
(1,150)
(206)
(1,356)

(3,187)
(132)
(1,464)
(4,057)
(384)
1,012
(8,212)
(1,372)
(9,584)

(4,463)
(168)
(2,726)
(3,584)
(589)
796
(10,734)
(1,463)
(12,197)

(648)
(36)
(1,132)
1,155
(103)
(175)
(938)
202
(736)

(337)
(98)
(136)
16
(13)
(568)
(102)
(670)

(2,836)
(132)
(1,125)
(2,068)
(251)
1,148
(5,265)
(975)
(6,240)

(3,821)
(168)
(2,356)
(1,049)
(338)
960
(6,771)
(875)
(7,647)

(255)
(1)
(110)
(60)
(7)
(434)
(87)
(520)

(36)
(30)
(437)
(58)
(21)
(582)
(104)
(686)

(352)
(339)
(1,989)
(132)
(135)
(2,947)
(397)
(3,344)

(643)
(370)
(2,536)
(251)
(164)
(3,963)
(588)
(4,551)

Amounts for each participating center below:


CIMMYT
Personnel
Collaborator Costs - CGIAR Centers
Collaborator Costs - Partners
Supplies and Services
Operational Travel
Depreciation
Sub-total of Direct Costs
Indirect Costs
Total - all Costs
ICARDA
Personnel
Collaborator Costs - CGIAR Centers
Collaborator Costs - Partners
Supplies and Services
Operational Travel
Depreciation
Sub-total of Direct Costs
Indirect Costs
Total - all Costs

3,172
86
2,714
2,045
549
967
9,532
1,001
10,533

671
174
489
89
36
1,459
228
1,687

9,055
507
4,303
8,926
1,297
1,262
25,350
4,170
29,520

1,087
5
466
256
32
1,847
369
2,216

288
450
637
144
177
1,696
311
2,007

1,224
1,181
2,941
462
471
6,280
735
7,015

2,599
1,636
4,044
863
681
9,822
1,415
11,238

832
4
356
196
25
1,413
283
1,696

252
420
200
86
156
1,114
207
1,321

872
842
952
330
336
3,332
338
3,670

1,956
1,266
1,509
612
517
5,860
828
6,687

(0)

Center 3, 4, etc to be added

Notes

All figures shown here are illustrative only, and are in USD 000's
Totals within this report must agree with amounts reported in L111.

T e mp l a t e s f o r a n n u a l r e p o r t i n g f o r t h e ye a r s 2 0 1 2 a n d 2 0 1 3
February 2013
Report Description
Name of Report
Reporting Line
Frequency/Period
Period

Page |

L131
CRP Themes Report (by Center, and Funding Source)
Lead Center Report to Consortium Office
Every 6 months

1 January 2012 - 31 December 2012


Annual Budget

Windows
1&2

Window
3

Bilateral
funding

Actual Expenses this Year

Center
funds

Total
Funding

Unspent Budget

Windows Window Bilateral


1&2
3
funding

Center
funds

Total
Funding

Windows Window Bilateral Center


1&2
3
funding
funds

Total
Funding

CRP Report - by Themes

Sl 1 Technology targeting for greatest impact


Sl 2 Susteinable wheat-based systems
Sl 3 Nutrient and water- use efficency
Sl 4 Productive wheat varieties
Sl 5 Durable disease and pest resistance
Sl 6 Enchanced heat and drought tolerance
Sl 7 Breaking the yield barrier
Sl 8 More and better seed
Sl 9 Seeds of discovery
Sl 10 Strengthening capacities
Gender Strategies
CRP Management
Totals for CRP

1,458
457
675
4,281
1,463
920
1,051
275
958
517
21
672
12,749
-

31
660
753
908
97
912
333
3,694
-

1,024
4,613
184
5,735
7,425
1,827
1,782
6,797
6,460
687
36,535
(0)

2,513
5,730
860
10,769
9,796
2,844
2,833
7,985
7,417
1,538
21
672
52,977
(0)

1,040
233
423
4,003
1,273
609
1,132
198
750
555
38
1,240
11,492
-

2
147
1,094
167
97
666
166
2,338
0

665
3,963
147
4,758
5,314
1,201
1,704
2,858
5,566
774
26,950
(0)

1,707
4,343
570
9,854
6,754
1,907
2,836
3,722
6,316
1,495
38
1,240
40,780
0

(419)
(224)
(252)
(279)
(190)
(310)
81
(77)
(208)
38
16
568
(1,257)

(29)
(514)
341
(741)
(246)
(167)
(1,356)

(359)
(649)
(38)
(977)
(2,111)
(627)
(78)
(3,939)
(893)
87
(9,584)

(806)
- (1,387)
(290)
(915)
- (3,043)
(937)
3
- (4,263)
- (1,101)
(43)
16
568
- (12,197)

1,258
457

31
660

874
4,613

2,163
5,730

899
233

2
147

665
3,963

1,566
4,343

(359)
(224)

(29)
(514)

(209)
(649)

(597)
(1,387)

675
3,367
1,210
677
1,051
80
738
327
21
672
10,533
-

540
190
97
125
44
1,687
-

184
2,948
6,009
1,131
1,782
4,976
6,460
543
29,520
-

860
6,855
7,409
1,904
2,833
5,181
7,197
914
21
672
41,740
-

423
3,219
1,076
433
1,132
58
681
366
38
1,240
9,796
-

556
167
97
6
42
1,017
-

147
2,674
4,631
904
1,704
2,411
5,559
622
23,280
-

570
6,449
5,874
1,434
2,836
2,475
6,240
1,030
38
1,240
34,093
-

(252)
(148)
(134)
(243)
81
(22)
(57)
39
16
568
(736)

17
(23)
(119)
(2)
(670)

(38)
(274)
(1,378)
(227)
(78)
(2,566)
(900)
79
(6,240)

(290)
(406)
(1,535)
(471)
3
(2,706)
(957)
116
16
568
(7,647)

200
-

150
-

350
-

141
-

141
-

(59)
-

(150)
-

(209)
-

914
253
243
196
220
190
2,216

213
718
787
289
2,007

2,787
1,416
696
1,821
144
7,015

3,914
2,387
940
2,803
220
623
11,238

784
197
176
140
69
189
1,696

537
660
124
1,321

2,084
683
297
447
7
152
3,670

3,405
880
473
1,247
76
465
6,687

(130)
(56)
(67)
(56)
(151)
(1)
(520)

324
(718)
(127)
(165)
(686)

(703)
(733)
(399)
(1,374)
7
8
(3,344)

(509)
(1,507)
(467)
(1,556)
(144)
(158)
(4,551)

Amounts for each participating center below:


CIMMYT

Sl 1 Technology targeting for greatest impact


Sl 2 Susteinable wheat-based systems
Sl 3 Nutrient and water- use efficency
Sl 4 Productive wheat varieties
Sl 5 Durable disease and pest resistance
Sl 6 Enchanced heat and drought tolerance
Sl 7 Breaking the yield barrier
Sl 8 More and better seed
Sl 9 Seeds of discovery
Sl 10 Strengthening capacities
Gender Strategies
CRP Management
Total all Costs
ICARDA

Sl 1 Technology targeting for greatest impact


Sl 2 Susteinable wheat-based systems
Sl 3 Nutrient and water- use efficency
Sl 4 Productive wheat varieties
Sl 5 Durable disease and pest resistance
Sl 6 Enchanced heat and drought tolerance
Sl 7 Breaking the yield barrier
Sl 8 More and better seed
Sl 9 Seeds of discovery
Sl 10 Strengthening capacities
Gender Strategies
CRP Management
Total all Costs

T e mp l a t e s f o r a n n u a l r e p o r t i n g f o r t h e ye a r s 2 0 1 2 a n d 2 0 1 3
February 2013

Page |

Report Description
Name of ReportCRP Partnerships Report
Reporting Line Lead Center Report to Consortium Office
Frequency/Period
Every 6 months
Annual Budget

Institute

CIMMYT
ICARDA
Others

Country

Actual Expenses - This Year

Windows Window Bilateral Center


1 and 2
3
funding Funds

Uzbesquitan
Sub-total CGIAR centers

CDRP
Pakistan
CINVESTA
Mexico
DIVERSITY ARRAYS TECHNOLOGY,
Australia
PTY LTD.
EIAR
Ethiopia
INIFAP
Mexico
LANCASTER UNIVERSITY Inglaterra,uk
PARC
Pakistan
Rothamsed
Mexico
ROTHAMSTED RESEARCH LTD
Inglaterra,uk
THE JAMES HUTTON INSTITUTE
Escocia
Others
Sub-total Others

Total

Windows
1 and 2

Window Bilateral Center


3
funding Funds

30
20
50

346
29
374

120
144
136
1,181
1,581

1,631

Unspent Budget
Total

Windows
1 and 2

Window Bilateral Center


3
funding Funds

Total

376
49
424

30
20
50

346
29
374

376
49
424

117
166
723
120
518
120
222
144
136
225
2,343
4,835

120
144
136
1,181
1,581

76
76

117
166
723
120
518
222
225
1,086
3,178

76
76

117
166
723
120
518
222
225
1,086
3,178

117
166
723
120
518
120
222
144
136
225
2,343
4,835

76

3,552

5,259

1,631

76

3,552

5,259

CIP
ICARDA
ICRISAT
IFPRI
IITA
ILRI
IRRI
IWMI
World Agroforestry
World Fish
Totals for CRP

T e mp l a t e s f o r a n n u a l r e p o r t i n g f o r t h e ye a r s 2 0 1 2 a n d 2 0 1 3
February 2013

Report Description
Name of Report CRP Financial Report - Bilateral Grants (by Center)
Reporting Line
Lead Center Report to Consortium Office
Frequency/Period Every 6 months

CRP Nr
Period

3.1 CRP on Wheat


1 January 2012 - 31 December 2012
Expenditure
Annual Budget

Actual Expenses
this Year

Variance

Totals for CRP


Window 3
BMGF
European Commission
ICAR, India
MARA
Turkey
USAID
Other
Sub-total
Bilateral
AARD
ACIAR
AFESD
Agrovegetal
Australia
CIMMYT (As ICARDAs Bilat Donor)
Cornell
FAO
GCP
Germany
GRDC
Hplus
ILRI
INIFAP
Iran
IRRI
ISDB
Japan
JIRCAS
Kuwait Fund
SAGARPA
SFSA
USAID
USDA
Other
Sub-total
Totals for CRP

822
1,031
404
264
287
841
44
3,694
(0)

393
419
307
269
242
666
42
2,338
0

(430)
(612)
(98)
5
(45)
(175)
(2)
(1,356)
-

94
633
854
154
414
437
5,291
227
251
996
1,445
1,034
105
233
220
2,354
153
565
220
939
11,016
455
1,244
5,296
1,903
36,535
0
40,229

91
111
349
135
187
198
4,065
107
240
392
1,355
933
105
228
175
2,151
152
371
219
576
9,666
390
882
2,895
976
26,950
0
29,288

(3)
(522)
(505)
(20)
(227)
(239)
(1,225)
(120)
(11)
(604)
(90)
(102)
(5)
(45)
(203)
(1)
(194)
(0)
(362)
(1,351)
(65)
(363)
(2,401)
(926)
(9,584)
(10,941)

T e mp l a t e s f o r a n n u a l r e p o r t i n g f o r t h e ye a r s 2 0 1 2 a n d 2 0 1 3
February 2013
Bilateral Grants for each participating center below:
CIMMYT
Window 3
BMGF
ICAR, India
MARA
Other
Sub-total
Bilateral
AARD
ACIAR
Agrovegetal
Cornell
GCP
GRDC
Hplus
ILRI
INIFAP
Iran
IRRI
Japan
JIRCAS
SAGARPA
SFSA
USAID
USDA
Other
Sub-total
Totals for CRP

822
404
264
196
1,687
(0)

393
307
269
48
1,017
0

(430)
(98)
5
(148)
(670)
-

94
633
154
4,855
251
1,445
1,034
105
233
220
2,354
118
220
11,016
455
316
4,618
1,397
29,520
(0)
31,207
(0)

91
111
135
3,773
240
1,355
933
105
228
175
2,151
103
219
9,666
390
315
2,591
698
23,280
0
24,297
0

(3)
(522)
(20)
(1,082)
(11)
(90)
(102)
(5)
(45)
(203)
(15)
(0)
(1,351)
(65)
(1)
(2,027)
(699)
(6,240)
(6,910)
-

1,031
287
689
2,007
-

419
242
660
1,321
(0)

(612)
(45)
(29)
(686)
-

854
414
437
436
221
996
153
447
939
928
678
512
7,015
0
9,022

349
187
198
292
101
392
152
268
576
567
304
284
3,670
4,991

(505)
(227)
(239)
(144)
(120)
(604)
(1)
(179)
(362)
(361)
(374)
(228)
(3,344)
(4,030)

ICARDA
Window 3
European Commission
Turkey
USAID
Sub-total
Bilateral
AFESD
Australia
CIMMYT
Cornell University
FAO
Germany
ISDB
Japan
Kuwait Fund
USAID
USDA
Other
Sub-total
Totals for CRP

T e mp l a t e s f o r a n n u a l r e p o r t i n g f o r t h e ye a r s 2 0 1 2 a n d 2 0 1 3
February 2013

Report Description
Name of Report
Reporting Line
Frequency/Period

CRP Funding Statement, Windows 1 and 2


Lead Center Report to Consortium Office
Every 3 months

PART 1 - REPORT OF LEAD CENTER (CIAT used as example)


Opening Balance - 1 January

W1 Receipts from Consortium Office (actual dates)


19-Mar-12
20-Dec-12
Total Receipts

2,381
2,128

W2 Receipts from Consortium Office (actual dates)


19-Mar-12
27-Nov-12
20-Dec-12
Total Receipts

4,319
732
3,430

Transfers to CG Partners
Africa Rice
Bioversity
CIAT
CIFOR
CIMMYT
CIP
ICARDA
ICRISAT
IFPRI
IITA
ILRI
IRRI
IWMI
World Agroforestry
World Fish
Total Disbursments
Expenditure by Lead Center
Unliquidated Advances to CIAT Partners
Funds held - end of Period

4,509

8,481

(2,216)

(2,216)
(9,796)
0
978

Commitments

(2,702)

NET Funds held - end of Period

(1,725)

T e mp l a t e s f o r a n n u a l r e p o r t i n g f o r t h e ye a r s 2 0 1 2 a n d 2 0 1 3
February 2013

PART 2 - REPORT OF CGIAR CENTERS


Unliquidated
Funds held - Transfers from
Advances to Funds held start of Period
Lead Center Expenditure
Partners end of Period
Africa Rice
Bioversity
CIAT
CIFOR
CIMMYT
CIP
ICARDA
ICRISAT
IFPRI
IITA
ILRI
IRRI
IWMI
World Agroforestry
World Fish

0
0

Totals
Notes

All figures illustrative only (taking CIAT as Lead Center)


Amounts should be reported in USD 000's
Report is for each financial year.
Quarterly Reports during year are on a cumulative basis.

2,216

(1,696)

2,216

(1,696)

0
520
520

T e mp l a t e s f o r a n n u a l r e p o r t i n g f o r t h e ye a r s 2 0 1 2 a n d 2 0 1 3
February 2013

Page | 31

Report Description
Name of Report
Reporting Line
Frequency/Period

CRP Funding Statement, Window 2


Lead Center Report to Consortium Office
Every 6 months
It is for the Consortium
Date
Donor Currency

USD

Year 1 - 2011
Receipts from Donors
DFID
USAID

7-Jul-11
10-Oct-11

GBP
USD

1,000
500

1,500
500
2,000

Transfers to Lead Center (via CO)


(if applicable)
Other Disbursments
CSP paid to Window 1
Funds held by Trustee - end of Period

12-Dec-11

(40)

31-Dec-11

1,960

Year 2 - 2012
Receipts from Donors
DGIS
IBRD
SIDA

GBP

400

600

USD

500

500
1,100

Transfers to Lead Center (via CO)


Transfer 1
Transfer 2
Transfer 3

15-Mar-12
6-Jun-12
12-Dec-12

(200)
(1,500)
(1,338)

Other Disbursments
CSP paid to Window 1

10-Dec-12

(22)

Funds held by Trustee - end of Period

31-Dec-12

Notes

Amounts should be reported in USD 000's


This reports is on a cumulative basis (prior periods also shown)

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Annex 4: Progress towards Impacts


External Reviews (done, ongoing)

2008

1.

2009

1.
2.
3.
4.

2010

1.

2011

1.
2.
3.

4.

2012

1.
2.

3.

4.
5.

6.

WHEAT W1&2-funded
activities under SI1
(mainly ex-post impact)

WHEAT Competitive Partner Grants

Study: Wheat for food


security in Africa:
Biophysical Potential,
Economic Profitability
and Competitiveness of
Domestic production
(IFPRI) ex-ante

The Potential of Wheat Production in


Sub-Saharan Africa: Biophysical Suitability
and Economic Profitability, to expand the
study region to cover rainfed and
irrigated system across Sub-Saharan
Africa, including West Africa. In addition,
in the case of crop competition is
expected, further analysis will be
conducted to analyse farmers choice of
crops between wheat and others

Conservation Agriculture
Research at CIMMYT (WHEAT
SI2, SI3)
CGIAR Social Science Stripe
Review (WHEAT SI1)
CGIAR Harvest Plus Review
(WHEAT SI4)
Durable Rust Resistant Wheat
(WHEAT SI 5, bilateral)
Genotyping at CIMMYT (WHEAT
SI4, SI5)
Cereal Rust Control (WHEAT SI5,
bilateral)
Cereal Systems Initiative South
Asia (WHEAT SI2 &SI3, bilateral)
MycoRed (WHEAT SI5, bilateral)
Cereal crop improvement in
Afghanistan (WHEAT SI8,
bilateral)
Conservation, Characterization
and Utilization of Maize and
Wheat Genetic Resources
(GENEBANK)
NRM research in the CGIAR
(WHEAT SI2, SI3)
Alignment of WHEAT SI2 with
CRP1.1 (internal between two
CRPs involved)
CIMMYT-ICARDA winter wheat
program IWWIP (WHEAT SI4,
SI5, SI6)
Wheat breeding (WHEAT SI4,
SI5, SI6 bilateral)
Review of the integrated
breeding platform (WHEAT, SI4,
bilateral)
Wheat Yield Consortium
strategy (WHEAT SI7)

Rainfed wheat adoption


and impact in Ethiopia
highlands ex-post
Study of wheat seed
systems and adoption
and impacts in Morocco
ex-post (delayed into
2013)

Scoping Study on the Integration of


Gender and Social Equity in R4D on
Wheat-Based Systems in South Asia
Impact analysis of CIMMYT wheat (and its
training) in China (runs until early 2014)

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Summary of estimates of economic benefits of international wheat breeding research


Study

Period covered

All breeding

Byerlee and Traxler (1996)

1966-90

Heisey et al. (2002) midrange estimate

1996-97

$3.0 b per year Internal


rate of return of 53%
$2.4 b per year

Lantican et al. (2005)


mid-range estimate

1988-2002

$3.4-4.8 b per year

Marasas et al. (2004)


Leaf rust resistance only

1973-2007

Evenson and Rosegrant,


2002

1965-2000

Attributed to IWINxxix
(Wheat/SI4)
$1.5 b per year
$1.1 b per year
$1.0 to 1.8 b per year
$5.4 b net present value

With no breeding
research:
9-14% reduction in
output

With no CGIAR:
5-6% in output
19-22% increase in price

29-61% increase in price


Source: Byerlee and Dubin, 2008

Options to raise wheat productivity and how they relate to WHEAT Themes
Research domain

Agro-ecological
attainable yield
gaps

Productivity
increase
potential
75%

Source

Bruinsman 2009

Sharing germplasm
and knowledge

50%

Rassmusen, 1996

Breeding /
Physiology

50%

Reynolds et al,
2010

Agronomy yield
gap
Weeds/ Diseases /
Pests
Post Harvest Losses
in less developed
countries
Transgenics /
Cisgenics

48%

Fischer et al, 2009

28%

Oerke 2006

20%

Relates to which WHEAT Theme (SI)

SI1 (better targeting & prioritizing), SI3


(water and nutrient use efficiency), SI4
(productive wheat varieties), SI5 (pest
& diseases), SI6 (heat & drought), SI7
(breaking the yield barrier)
SI4 & SI10 (capacity development)
and all other projects in all other Sis
with knowledge-sharing activities
SI4-6

SI2 (wheat systems), SI3 & SI8 (more


and better seed)
SI2 & SI5
SI1 & SI2

SI4 & SI7 (breaking the yield barrier;


hybrids)

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Annex 5: Maps showing germplasm exchange research partners location and in-field/on-farm R4D sites worldwide

Map shows 620 cooperators, who send back data to CIMMYT or ICARDA. Not all nursery sites are shown, as some points are national coordinators, who distribute germplasm to
further sites. Cooperators who receive WHEAT germplasm, but do not send back data, are not shown.

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Annex 6 Competitive Partner Grants: Institutions, Research Topics and 1st YR Budget

CRP WHEAT Competitive


Partner Grant Progress Report
Feb 2013

Institution

Research Project

Budget YR1
(US$)

Department of Biological Sciences,


Indian Institute of Science
Education and Research Kolkota
IISER-K Mohanpur.

Deciphering phytohormone signaling in modulation of


resistance to spot blotch disease for identification of
novel resistance components for WHEAT improvement.

IFPRI

The potential of wheat production in Sub-Saharan Africa:


Biophysical Suitability and Economic Profitability

60,000

Center for Chinese Agricultural


Policy: Institute for Geographic
Sciences and Natural Resources

Impact analysis of CIMMYT wheat (and its training) in


China

50,172

Scoping study on the integration of gender and social


equity in R4D on WHEAT-Based Systems in South Asia.

180,000

The University Court of Glasgow


Caledonian University,
Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow, G4
OBA, Scotland UK

128,000

Oregon State University, Corvallis


Oregon USA

Integrated Data Acquisition System for Sunn Pest


Monitoring and Control: Design, Deployment, and Field
Training

Kashkadarya Research Institute of


grain breeding and seed
production - KRIGBSP - Karshi,
Uzbekistan.

Acelerating adoption of yellow rust resistant winter


wheat varieties in Central Asia (SI 4 5 & 8)

72,450

Banaras Hindu university (BHU)

Spot blotch of wheat: Delivering resistant WHEAT lines


and diagnostic and molecularmarkers for resistance

152,400

Directorate of Wheat Research


India(DWR)

Improving productivity of WHEAT through enhanced


Nitrogen Use Efficiency

119,000

Bahri Dagdas International


Agricultural Research Institute

Enhanced quality and healthy seed testing system for


international winter wheat improvement program (
IWWIP)

WYC Int'l Planning Workshop Heat and Drought

Type international planning workshop for SI6 (Heat and


Drought)

Wheat For Food Security in Africa


Conference 2012

Fund sponsored scientists and other event costs

Lancaster

Adapt lab based plant growth regulator (PGR) assays to


high throughput field applications in screening
germplasm

119,836

169,650

150,000
300,000

300,000

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CSIRO

phenotypic selection for leaf photosyn capacity &


efficiency

50,000

Rothamsted, Univ Essex

Optimize RuBP regeneration by transforming wheat with


SBPase

75,000

Rothamsted,USDA,Arizona
Lancaster

Improving the thermal stability of Rubisco through


transformation
Improving spike fertility through modifying its sensitivity
to environmental cues

ADAS, Nottingham Univ

Identifying traits and developing genetic sources for


lodging resistance

WHEAT Launch Conference, Jan


2012

WHEAT launch conference

2 external consultants

Genomic Selection and Modelling & Marker provider

75,000
50,000
100,000
197,400
60,000

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Endnotes
i Two thirds, if Russia and Ukraine are included.
ii Includes Russia and Ukraine.
iii See Indicators 33 & 34 for further reference.
iv The WYC/WYN (Wheat Yield Network) is an integral part of WHEAT, to be funded like a large bilateral project. It represents the major
project mass under Theme 7 (Breaking the Yield Barrier).
v For example, outputs from Strategic Initiatives 4-6: Improved varieties with greater tolerance / resistance, best heat & droughtadaptive germplasm identified from ~100.000 genetic resources of spring wheat; o greater improved seed availability in Ethiopia, which
could generate a positive economic impact of about $10.3mn.
vi Based on a project reporting completion rate of 93%, e.g. some project reports remain outstanding.
vii Common Consortium approach to accounting for gender-related R4D within CRPs is lacking.
viii A small CRP Management Team (5 FTEs), sharing resources between MAIZE and WHEAT, is fully operational since Sept 2012
with further support from the Lead Center.
ix Impact of wheat in Morocco: Surveying delayed into 2013.
x In the last 20 years, wheat area up from 0.7 to 1.9 M ha, yield up from 1.2 to 1.8 t/ha and production up three fold from 0.9 to 2.9 Mt,
according to FAOSTAT.
xi Estimate using FAO& AfDB figures: 39.6MMT, wheat price $316/T & transport costs ca. $200/T. Nigeria imported 3 million tons at
US$3 billion, implying a cost of $1000$/t, according to official Nigerian statistics.
xii CIMMYT estimate, including transport/logistics &gross value amounts to 3.6 billion US$.
xiii The Potential for Wheat Production in Sub-Saharan Africa: Analysis of Biophysical Suitability and Economic Profitability, Negassa et.
al., September 2012 (working paper)
xiv See also: http://conferences.cimmyt.org/index.php/en/wheat-for-food-security-in-africa & http://wheat.org/wheat-in-africa/wheat-astrategic-crop-for-africa
xv The official distributor in Mexico sold 86 portable GreenSeekers in the country in 2012.
xvi

For

more

info

see:

http://www.gsma.com/mobilefordevelopment/programmes/magri/programme-overview,

https://mobiledevelopmentintelligence.com/products?sector=Mobile+Agriculture#table
xvii Further, they published two manuals on physiological breeding (Interdisciplinary approaches to improve crop adaptation and A
field guide to wheat phenotyping) and a review article in Plant, Cell & Environment (Achieving yield gains in wheat).
xviii See: http://www.cimmyt.org/en/where-we-work/global-activities/seeds-of-discovery; http://masagro.mx/index.php/en/
xix In wheat/rye translocation bread wheat materials and in Aegilops taushii.
xx For further ICARDA-led research, see: http://www.icarda.org/search/node/wheat
xxi See Indicator 27; including 9 ICARDA lines, released as new varieties by Algerian, Ethiopian and Lebanese NARS in 2012.
xxii Quoted by Reuters, Aug 2012: http://in.reuters.com/article/2012/08/31/environment-wheat-idINL6E8JUAIQ20120831
xxiii Experts estimate awaiting further verification
xxiv A 60% subsidy of the purchase price, per farmer. Currently, 4 manufacturers build the seeder.
xxv https://sites.google.com/site/csisaportal/Home
xxvi Internal document: You cant eat potential: How to use a Research Management Framework to enhance and realize the potential
of research and innovation in MAIZE, WHEAT, and CIMMYT.
xxvii Approval for 1st year of Gender Strategy implementation received 7th March 2013.
xxviii Concrete measures for achieving greater and better women participation in training courses will be determined as part of the
WHEAT Gender Audit recommendations.
xxix International Wheat Improvement Network (IWIN)