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ESTATURA ? CANBAL POSTRIMERO ?

CUERPO NUEVO 7 AOS ^?

REORDENAMIENTO MOLECULAR ? ALTA SUTILIDAD, VIBRACIN A


VOLUNTAD ?

THE SHIPWRECKS OF ODYSSEUS AND PAUL


DENNIS R. MACDONALD a1
a1
Claremont School of Theology, 1325 N. College Avenue, Claremont, CA 917113199,
USA

Abstract
Acts 2728 frequently points to the shipwrecks of Odysseus in Odyssey Books 5 and 12,
the second of which the hero narrates in the first person. The shipwrecks of Odysseus and
Paul share nautical images and vocabulary, the appearance of a goddess or angel assuring
safety, the riding of planks, the arrival of the hero on an island among hospitable
strangers, the mistaking of the hero as a god, and the sending of him on his way. Luke's
intention in relating Paul's shipwreck to those of Odysseus was to exalt Paul and his God
by comparison.
SSSaAA

MacDonald (Dennis R.) The Shipwrecks of Odysseus and Paul,


NTS,
45, 1999, pp. 88-107, eng (rs. eng)
- ULYXES - PAUL (SAINT) - NT ACTA APOST. 27-28 - HOMERUS OD. 5 ; 12 CHRISTIANISME - EPOPEE - HEROS - NAUFRAGE

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The Shipwrecks of Odysseus and Paul

Por : Dennis R. MacDonald


Fecha : 1999 | disponible en http://www2.misha.fr/flora/jsp/index_view_direct.jsp?

record=...
Parallle entre les descriptions de naufrages de Paul et d'Ulysse : mmes images et
vocabulaire nautiques, une intervention divine (desse ou ange) pour sauver le hros,
l'arrive sur une le aux milieu d'habitants hospitaliers prenant les naufrags pour des
dieux. Le but de Luc en faisant une telle comparaison est naturellement d'exalter Paul et
son Dieu
Palabras Clave : ULYXES, PAUL (SAINT), CHRISTIANISME, EPOPEE, HEROS y
NAUFRAGE

How the author of Mark and the other writers of the gospels borrowed from literary
forms of the time to shape the story of Jesus -- this is a real Da Vinci Code.
DM: The authors of Mark and Luke/Acts are heavily indebted to the Homeric epics. This
is not to say that they are plagiarizing, or that they are ripping things off. Rather, they are
transforming these texts, so that just as early Christians are interested in showing that
Jesus is superior to Moses and David and the prophets, they're also interested in showing
that Jesus is superior to Hector and Odysseus and Heracles. They're equal-opportunity
imitators.
For the first part of the gospels, the author is heavily indebted to "The Odyssey" [which
features] a hero who travels with idiots. And the sea is important; meals are important.
[The hero of "The Odyssey"] gets back home, and there are rivals for his house and he
needs to keep his identity secret, because if his enemies discover who he is, they'll kill
him. So, similarly in the Gospel of Mark, Jesus travels with nincompoops, he calls his
house a house of prayer that has become a den of thieves. He needs to keep his identity a
secret. The Sea of Galilee becomes a real sea and so on.
For the death and burial of Jesus, the author seems to be heavily indebted to Books 22
and 24 of "The Iliad" and the death of Hector.
[The author of] Luke has his own imitations of Homer over and over again: The
recognition of Jesus by his wounds is similar to the recognition of Odysseus by his scar.
The shipwreck story in Acts 27 is clearly modeled after the shipwreck of Odysseus in
"Odyssey 5." It goes on and on.
And the descent of Christ to the netherworld, where he empties Hades of all the dead -that is a Christian "Odyssey," like Odysseus going to the netherworld, but Odysseus
leaves them there.
The longest stretch of narrative in the New Testament is the two-volume book we call
Luke/Acts. It has been argued that Luke/Acts is a response to Virgil's "Aeneid." It is
doing for the Christian community what the "Aeneid" did for the early empire. Namely, it
talks about a hero who has one divine parent and one mortal one.
And that's why they have the virgin-birth story in the gospel -- because you have Aneus
with Venus [a pagan god] as his parent. Romulus [the legendary founder of Rome] and
[Roman Emperor] Augustus were both said to be sons of deities.

You have an ascension in Luke because the Roman emperors claimed that the bodies of
the emperors before them were raised in an ascension.
I don't think there was a historical Judas or Mary Magdalene, just in case you're
wondering. Let me put it another way: Jesus might have been married, but it was not to
Mary Magdalene. Jesus probably was betrayed, but it probably wasn't by Judas Iscariot.
Luke ... seeks to provide his readers an alternative to the hegemony of the Roman Empire
in the East.
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