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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

TELECOMMUNICATIONS
STANDARDS
Published
JANUARY 2002

January 2002 Page 1 of 137


CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

FOREWARD

Approval of this Standard

• This standard is written and approved by the Systems Engineering and Design, Communications
Resources, University of California, Davis.

Documents Superseded

• This standard replaces Communications Cabling Standards, dated December 2000 in its entirety.

Significant Administrative and Technical Changes from the Previous Edition

• Changed the name of this document from Communications Cabling Standards to CR Telecommunications
Standards.
• The format of this document has been changed to resemble the format used in the Campus Standards and
Design Guide.
• This forward has been added to this new edition.
• Updated ANSI/TIA/EIA Telecommunications Standards referenced in this document to the latest version
of these standards.
• Created a List of Tables and List of Figures.
• Added specifications for Fiber to the Desktop (FTTD), to include Singlemode/Multimode fiber optic cable,
interface boxes and Small Form Factor (SFF) connectors.
• Added reference to preferred and recommended product manufactures.
• Added reference to Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements for telecommunications
equipment.
• Added reference to UC Davis Emergency Call Boxes
• Updated reference to UC Davis Project Line Assigner.
• Updated requirements for Voice, Data and Fiber Optic cable testing parameters.
• Added new Chapter 3 for Equipment Rooms and Telecommunications Rooms.
• Added new Chapter 4 for Area Distribution Frames, Building Distribution Frames and Intermediate
Distribution Frames (ADF/BDF/IDF)
• Added Splicing Methods and Splice Closure requirements to the Campus Segment chapter.
• Added new Chapter 7 for In-Building Radio Systems.
• Added new Chapter 8 for Wireless Network Systems.
• Added new Chapter 9 for SED-CADD requirements.
• Added new Specification 02 for NAM Numbering, Matrix and Labeling.
• Added new Specification 03 for NAM Cabling Requirements.
• Added new Specification 04 for NAM Patch Panel and Patch Cord Requirements.
• Added new Specification 05 for Outside Plant Fiber Optic Cable Requirements.
• Added new Specification 06 for Fiber Optic Patch Panel and Patch Cords.
• Added new Specification 15 for Outside Plant and Riser Cable Labeling Requirements.
• Updated Appendix C, Glossary with new ANSI/TIA/EIA Telecommunications Standards.
• Deleted requirement for Appendix E and Appendix F.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

TABLE OF CONTENTS
_____________________________________________________________________________________________

FOREWARD ...............................................................................................................................................................2

LIST OF TABLES.......................................................................................................................................................7

LIST OF FIGURES.....................................................................................................................................................9

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................................11

1. ABOUT THIS MANUAL .............................................................................................................................................11

2. COMMUNICATIONS RESOURCES’ RESPONSIBILITIES FOR PROJECTS ........................................................................11

3. THE TELECOMMUNICATIONS DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM DESIGN PROCESS .................................................................13

4. OVERVIEW OF THIS MANUAL ..................................................................................................................................13

CHAPTER 2 THE HORIZONTAL SEGMENT ..................................................................................................14

1. THE DESIGN PROCESS ..............................................................................................................................................14

2. THE TYPE AND NUMBER OF NAM’S........................................................................................................................14

3. ADA REQUIREMENTS ............................................................................................................................................15

4. CABLE TYPES AND LENGTHS ...................................................................................................................................16

5. TERMINATION HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS AT THE OUTLET ...................................................................................17

6. TERMINATION HARDWARE REQUIREMENT AT THE IDF...........................................................................................18

7. ASSIGNING THE NAM NUMBERS .............................................................................................................................18

8. CROSS CONNECTING VOICE NAMS ........................................................................................................................18

9. STRUCTURES TO SUPPORT THE HORIZONTAL CABLING ...........................................................................................19

10. CABLE TESTING PROCEDURES ................................................................................................................................21

CHAPTER 3 THE EQUIPMENT AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS ROOM ................................................25

1. THE DESIGN PROCESS ..............................................................................................................................................25

2. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS ........................................................................................................................................26

3. THE SIZE OF THE ER/TR...........................................................................................................................................26

4. THE LOCATION OF THE ER/TR .................................................................................................................................28

5. DESIGN REQUIREMENT ............................................................................................................................................29

6. CABLE PATHWAYS ENTERING/EXITING THE ER/TR.................................................................................................32

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

7. DRAWINGS FOR CONSTRUCTION/PROJECT MANAGERS ............................................................................................34

CHAPTER 4 THE ADF/BDF/IDF ..........................................................................................................................35

1. THE DESIGN PROCESS ..............................................................................................................................................35

2. TERMINATION HARDWARE REQUIREMENTS AT THE ADF/BDF/IDF........................................................................35

3. STRUCTURES TO SUPPORT THE CABLING IN THE ADF/BDF/IDF .............................................................................37

4. DRAWINGS FOR CONSTRUCTION/PROJECT MANAGERS ............................................................................................39

CHAPTER 5 THE RISER SEGMENT .................................................................................................................41

1. THE DESIGN PROCESS ..............................................................................................................................................41

2. THE SIZE, TYPE AND TERMINATION OF COPPER RISER CABLE .................................................................................42

3. THE SIZE, TYPE AND TERMINATION OF FIBER OPTIC RISER CABLE. ........................................................................42

4. TESTING REQUIREMENTS FOR COPPER AND FIBER OPTIC RISER CABLES .................................................................43

5. STRUCTURES TO SUPPORT VERTICALLY ALIGNED IDF’S .........................................................................................44

6. STRUCTURES TO SUPPORT HORIZONTALLY OFFSET IDF’S .......................................................................................44

CHAPTER 6 THE CAMPUS SEGMENT ............................................................................................................46

1. THE DESIGN PROCESS ..............................................................................................................................................46

2. CABLE ROUTES ........................................................................................................................................................46

3. CABLE DISTRIBUTION METHODS .............................................................................................................................47

4. UNDERGROUND AND DIRECT BURIED CABLE REQUIREMENTS .................................................................................47

5. CABLE TYPES ...........................................................................................................................................................50

6. MAINTENANCE HOLES (MH) AND HAND HOLES (HH). ............................................................................................50

7. AERIAL CABLE REQUIREMENTS ..............................................................................................................................54

8. SPLICING METHODS AND SPLICE CLOSURES ............................................................................................................55

9. BUILDING ENTRANCE TERMINALS ...........................................................................................................................56

10. ELECTRICAL PROTECTION AND BONDING/GROUNDING REQUIREMENTS ................................................................57

11. TESTING REQUIREMENTS FOR CAMPUS CABLES .....................................................................................................57

12. LABELING REQUIREMENTS ....................................................................................................................................57

CHAPTER 7 IN-BUILDING RADIO SYSTEMS ................................................................................................58

1. THE DESIGN PROCESS. .............................................................................................................................................58

2. GENERAL RADIO COMMUNICATIONS COVERAGE.....................................................................................................58


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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

3. DEFINITIONS.............................................................................................................................................................58

4. GENERAL POLICY .....................................................................................................................................................58

5. COST EVALUATION / RFSP ......................................................................................................................................61

6. VENDOR REQUEST....................................................................................................................................................61

7. TESTING AND ACCEPTANCE ....................................................................................................................................62

8. ADDITIONAL SYSTEM TESTING ................................................................................................................................63

9. QUALIFICATIONS OF TESTING PERSONNEL ...............................................................................................................63

10. UC DAVIS OUTDOOR RF SURVEY REPORT ............................................................................................................63

11. ANNUAL TESTS .....................................................................................................................................................63

12. FIVE-YEAR TESTS .................................................................................................................................................63

13. FIELD TESTING .......................................................................................................................................................64

CHAPTER 8 WIRELESS NETWORK SYSTEMS .............................................................................................65

CHAPTER 9 CAD DRAWING STANDARDS.....................................................................................................66

1. COMMUNICATION OSP DRAWING REQUIREMENTS FOR SED-CADD ......................................................................67

2. COMMUNICATION ISP DRAWING REQUIREMENTS FOR SED-CADD........................................................................69

3. COMMUNICATION DRAWING REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTRACTORS ...........................................................................71

APPENDIX A SPECIFICATIONS........................................................................................................................71

SPECIFICATION 01 NAM FACEPLATES, SURFACE MOUNT BOXES AND MODULES .....................................................73

SPECIFICATION 02 NAM NUMBERING, MATRIX AND LABELING REQUIREMENTS .....................................................75

SPECIFICATION 03 NAM CABLING REQUIREMENTS...................................................................................................80

SPECIFICATION 04 NAM PATCH PANEL AND PATCH CORD REQUIREMENTS .............................................................83

SPECIFICATION 05 OUTSIDE PLANT FIBER OPTIC CABLE REQUIREMENTS .................................................................89

SPECIFICATION 06 FIBER OPTIC PATCH PANEL/PATCH CORDS ..................................................................................93

SPECIFICATION 07 INTERIOR HORIZONTAL CONDUIT .................................................................................................94

SPECIFICATION 08 CABLE TRAYS/LADDERS ..............................................................................................................96

SPECIFICATION 09 COLOR CODES FOR CROSS CONNECT FIELDS................................................................................97

SPECIFICATION 10 DISTRIBUTION CABINETS ..............................................................................................................98

SPECIFICATION 11 RISER CABLE REQUIREMENTS ....................................................................................................108

SPECIFICATION 12 INTERIOR PULL BOXES ...............................................................................................................109


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SPECIFICATION 13 CONDUIT FOR UNDERGROUND CABLING ....................................................................................111

SPECIFICATION 14 ELECTRICAL PROTECTIONS, BONDING AND GROUNDING ...........................................................113

SPECIFICATION 15 OUTSIDE PLANT AND RISER CABLE LABELING REQUIREMENTS .................................................116

APPENDIX B REFERENCE MATERIALS ......................................................................................................124

APPENDIX C GLOSSARY..................................................................................................................................127

APPENDIX D UC DAVIS POLICY AND PROCEDURE MANUAL..............................................................135

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

LIST OF TABLES
________________________________________________________________________________________________

TABLE 2-1 PERMANENT LINK TESTING........................................................................................................22

TABLE 2-2 BASIC GUIDELINE FOR LOSS MEASUREMENTS ....................................................................24

TABLE 3-1 MINIMUM ER/TR ROOM SIZE .......................................................................................................27

TABLE 3-2 QUANTITIES OF SLEEVES ..............................................................................................................33

TABLE 3-3 AREA SERVED BY SLOT..................................................................................................................33

TABLE 5-1 RISER CABLE SIZING......................................................................................................................42

TABLE 5-2 RECOMMENDED SIZE OF HORIZONTAL FIBER OPTIC CABLE ........................................43

TABLE 6-1 VERTICAL AND HORIZONTAL SEPARATIONS ........................................................................48

TABLE 7-2 RF LOSS CHARACTERISTICS .......................................................................................................64

TABLE 7-3 IN-BUILDING RF COVERAGE SYSTEM COST ESTIMATING ...............................................65

TABLE 9-1 OSP LAYER CONVENTION DETAILS...........................................................................................67

TABLE 9-2 OSP DRAWING CALLOUTS.............................................................................................................69

TABLE 9-3 ISP FLOOR PLAN SYMBOLS AND DESCRIPTIONS .................................................................70

TABLE 9-4 ISP FLOORPLANS – NAM REFERENCE LAYERS .....................................................................70

TABLE 9-5 ISP CLOSET BIRD’S EYE DETAILS – COMM. ROOM LAYERING CONVENTION ...........71

TABLE 01-1 NAM FACEPLATES AND SURFACE MOUNT BOXES..............................................................74

TABLE 01-2 COPPER AND FIBER NAM MODULES........................................................................................74

TABLE 02-1 VOICE NAM MATRICES ................................................................................................................78

TABLE 02-2 DATA NAM MATRICES .................................................................................................................78

TABLE 02-3 MATV NAM MATRIX .....................................................................................................................79

TABLE 02-4 FTTD NAM MATRIX.......................................................................................................................79

TABLE 03-1 COPPER UTP CABLE SPECIFICATIONS..................................................................................81

TABLE 03-2 FIBER OPTIC CABLE SPECIFICATIONS .................................................................................82

TABLE 04-1 DATA PATCH PANEL SPECIFICATIONS ..................................................................................86

TABLE 04-2 MANUFACTURED DATA PATCH CORDS LENGTHS/SPECIFICATIONS..........................86

TABLE 04-3 MANUFACTURED FTTD PATCH CORDS LENGTHS/SPECIFICATIONS...........................86

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TABLE 05-2 SINGLEMODE CABLE SPECIFICATIONS.................................................................................92

TABLE 05-3 MULTIMODE CABLE SPECIFICATIONS ..................................................................................92

TABLE 07-1 CONDUIT BEND RADIUS ...............................................................................................................94

TABLE 07-2 MAXIMUM ALLOWABLE CONDUIT FILL................................................................................95

TABLE 09-1 CROSS CONNECT FIELD COLOR CODES.................................................................................97

TABLE 10-1 DISTRIBUTION CABINET DESCRIPTIONS ...............................................................................98

TABLE 10-2 CABINET DIMENSIONS..................................................................................................................99

TABLE 11-1 MAXIMUM FILL REQUIREMENTS FOR RISER CABLE.....................................................108

TABLE 12-1 SIZING A PULL BOX ....................................................................................................................110

TABLE 13-1 CONDUIT SIZE REQUIREMENTS..............................................................................................112

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LIST OF FIGURES

_____________________________________________________________________________________________

FIGURE 2-1 ADA COMPLIANT TELEPHONE/EMERGENCY CALL BOXES ............................................16

FIGURE 2-2 FIRESTOPPING REQUIREMENTS..............................................................................................20

FIGURE 2-3 CONDUIT PLACED ABOVE HARD OR LIMITED ACCESS CEILING .................................20

FIGURE 3-1 ADF/BDF/IDF EQUIPMENT AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS ROOM .................................27

FIGURE 3-2 PROPER SLEEVE AND SLOT CONSTRUCTION.....................................................................33

FIGURE 4-1 SC AND LC CONNECTORS ............................................................................................................37

FIGURE 4-2 EQUIPMENT RACK LAYOUT .......................................................................................................39

FIGURE 4-3 TYPICAL ADF/BDF/IDF LAYOUT ...............................................................................................40

FIGURE 5-1 RISER SEGMENT .............................................................................................................................41

FIGURE 6-1 TRENCH CROSS-SECTION FOR PAVED AREAS ....................................................................49

FIGURE 6-2 TRENCH CROSS-SECTION FOR NON-PAVED AREAS. .........................................................49

FIGURE 6-3 MAINTENANCE HOLE ..................................................................................................................52

FIGURE 6-4 HAND HOLE ....................................................................................................................................53

FIGURE 9-1 OSP DRAWING COPPER CABLE CALLOUT...........................................................................67

FIGURE 9-3 OSP DRAWING FIBER OPTIC CABLE CALLOUT..................................................................68

FIGURE 9-4 OSP DRAWING TERMINAL CALLOUTS...................................................................................68

FIGURE 9-5 OSP DRAWING MAINTENANCE HOLE CALLOUTS...............................................................69

FIGURE 02-1 LABELING FLUSH MOUNTED NAM.........................................................................................76

FIGURE 02-2 LABELING SURFACE MOUNTED NAM ...................................................................................76

FIGURE 02-3 LABELING SURFACE MOUNTED FTTD NAM........................................................................77

FIGURE 04-1 SAMPLE LABELING 24-PORT PATCH PANEL. ....................................................................87

FIGURE 04-2 SAMPLE LABELING FTTD PATCH PANEL...........................................................................87

FIGURE 05-1 DIELECTRIC OSP FIBER OPTIC CABLE .................................................................................90

FIGURE 05-2 ARMORED OSP FIBER OPTIC CABLE .....................................................................................91

FIGURE 10-1 ADF CABINET ..............................................................................................................................100

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

FIGURE 10-2 BDF/IDF CABINET: .....................................................................................................................101

FIGURE 10-3 TYPE 1 IDF CABINET: ..............................................................................................................102

FIGURE 10-4 TYPE 2 IDF CABINET: ................................................................................................................103

FIGURE 10-5 TYPE 3 IDF CABINET: ...............................................................................................................104

FIGURE 10-6 TYPE 3A WALL-MOUNTED LAYOUT...................................................................................105

FIGURE 10-7 TYPE 3B:.......................................................................................................................................106

FIGURE 10-8 TYPE 3L CABINET .....................................................................................................................106

FIGURE 12-1 PULL BOX CONFIGURATIONS ...............................................................................................109

FIGURE 12-2 MEASURING A PULL BOX........................................................................................................110

FIGURE 14-1 BONDING AND GROUNDING LAYOUT.................................................................................115

FIGURE 15-1 FIBER OPTIC CONNECTOR HOUSING LABELS .................................................................119

FIGURE 15-2 VERTICAL FIBER OPTIC CONNECTOR PANEL NUMBERING SEQUENCE ................120

FIGURE 15-3 HORIZONTAL FIBER OPTIC CONNECTOR PANEL NUMBERING SEQUENCE ..........120

FIGURE 15-4 FIBER OPTIC CABLE SHEATH LABELS................................................................................120

FIGURE 15-5 FIBER OPTIC CABLE LABEL SEQUENCE...........................................................................121

FIGURE 15-6 FIBER OPTIC CABLE LABEL SEQUENCE (MH/HH SPLICE)..........................................121

FIGURE 15-7 BUILDING ENTRANCE TERMINAL LABEL SEQUENCE.................................................122

FIGURE 15-8 COPPER CABLE SHEATH LABELS .......................................................................................123

FIGURE 15-9 COPPER CABLE LABEL SEQUENCE ....................................................................................123

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION

1. About This Manual

a. This manual contains the policies and procedures for architects, contractors, and
telecommunications design professionals who are involved in telecommunications projects on the
UC Davis campus. The manual should be used as a guide for projects providing
telecommunications cabling, to include Outside Plant Cable, Wireless Radio and Network
Systems. Work may include new or renovated buildings and may consist of upgrading or adding
cabling infrastructures, cable and network electronics equipment.

b. This manual assumes that the user is familiar with telecommunications distribution systems,
the cable and hardware used in them, the cabling pathways and support structures and the
installation of cabling and wireless radio and network systems in buildings and campus
environments. It is not intended to be a training manual in telecommunication distribution
systems or to replace existing industry standards.

c. Terminology used throughout this document to identify building termination locations is


unique only to the UC Davis campus. Terms such as Area Distribution Frame (ADF), Building
Distribution Frame (BDF) and Intermediate Distribution Frame (IDF) are used in lieu of Industry
Standard terms, such as Horizontal Cross-Connect (HC) and Intermediate Cross-Connect (IC).
The requirements for these locations still adhered to the American National Standards Institute
(ANSI), Telecommunications Industry Association (TIA) and Electronic Industries Alliance (EIA)
standards.

d. Request for waivers or clarification of specific design issues must be forwarded to the
Manager System Engineering & Design, UC Davis Communications Resources.

2. Communications Resources’ Responsibilities for Projects

a. Communications Resources is responsible for UC Davis’ inside and outside


telecommunications system facilities, and network connectivity and the associated backbone
equipment. Communications Resources’ responsibilities are outlined in the UC Davis Policy and
Procedure Manual, Section 310-10 found in Appendix D of this document.

b. These responsibilities include the review of all new telecommunications project plans, and
require the following review items:

1) Communications Resources shall be provided copies of the Project Planning Guide


(PPG), Capital Improvement Budget (CIB), Detailed Project Program (DPP), Design
Guide or other such documents describing the University approved program. 1These
documents shall be provided to Communications Resources upon approval of the
governing agency, responsible for managing that project.

2) Communications Resources shall be provided schematic design (SD) documents for


review at each stage of the schematic design process, and provided a minimum of ten
workdays from date documents are received by CR for review and return of comments.

3) Communications Resources shall be provided Design Development (DD) documents


for review at each stage of the Design Development process, and provided a minimum of
ten workdays from date documents are received by CR for review and return of
comments.

1
Reference: UC Davis Campus Standards & Design Guide Administrative Requirements Page 1
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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

4) Communications Resources shall be provided Construction


Documents (CD) for review at each stage of the Construction Document process, and
provided a minimum of ten workdays from date documents are received by CR for
review and return of comments.

c. When a new building or building renovation is planned, architectural drawings are typically
released for review by Communications Resources in the following order:

1) Schematic – These are the initial planning documents and design drawings which
assist departments in the early stage of the project. The Schematic Design documents
shall consist of System Narrative, including Area Distribution Frame (ADF), Building
Distribution Frame (BDF) and Intermediate Distribution Frame (IDF) information, and
campus connection points. Drawings should include title Sheet, single line diagrams, site
plan (may be part of electrical site plan).

2) Design Development—As the architectural design process progresses, overlays are


developed to show the various structures and systems planned for the building. Design
Development documents shall consist of outline specifications, in the CSI model.
Drawings should include title Sheet, single line diagram site plan, enlarged floor plans of
ADF, BDF, IDF and Details.

3) Construction Documents—These documents depict the final design before bid


submittal is undertaken. The Construction Documents shall consist of a completed
Cabling Specifications and Drawing set.

4) Working Copy—This is the Bid Copy.

5) “Record Document” Drawings – These drawings and documents represent the


project as it is finally constructed and are deliverable prior to final inspection of the
project.

Note: Communications Resources comments and requests must be incorporated into the reviewed
documents in full for the next review of documents, or an explanation must be provided to
Communications Resources, regarding the status of comments and requests. Communications
Resources will postpone further reviews until all comments and requests have been addressed or
incorporated into current documents and drawing.

d. Architects, contractors, and telecommunications design professionals must indicate, on the


design drawings, and in the design specifications, the location and specification of the physical
infrastructure required for a complete telecommunications cabling pathway and distribution
system, as well as, the date and revision number of the CR Telecommunications Standards
document used at the time of this design. This physical infrastructure shall include:

1) Network Access Module (NAM). Reference Chapter 2 for a complete description of


a NAM.

2) Cabling and wiring for a complete telecommunications system.

3) The infrastructure necessary to support the horizontal, riser and campus cable plants.

4) The ADF, BDF and IDF locations.

5) The infrastructure necessary to interconnect buildings, to include conduit,


maintenance holes, hand holes, pull boxes, building entrances, cables, splices, and
connection to Communications Resources Service Points.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

6) Grounding and bonding requirement and points.

7) Electrical service requirements and service points for ADF’s, BDF’s and IDF’s, as
well as, any necessary ancillary electrical work as part of the project.

8) During the planning, design and construction document phases of a project, the In
Building Radio Systems shall be planned and accounted for. Reference Chapter 7

3. The Telecommunications Distribution System Design Process

a. The UC Davis telecommunications distribution design system is divided into five segments:

1) The Horizontal Segment, Chapter 2, consists of the NAM’s, cabling to the IDF, and
the associated pathways.

2) The Equipment and Telecommunications Room, Chapter 3, is the space that houses
the ADF, BDF and IDF.

3) The ADF, BDF and IDF, Chapter 4, contain the hardware for terminating the
horizontal cable from the NAM, along with riser and campus cables. The BDF and IDF is
the room that can also house common equipment, such as switches and hubs.

4) The Riser Segment, Chapter 5, refers to the riser cable, and the sleeves, slots, and
conduits that enable the cable to pass from floor to floor, BDF to IDF and IDF to IDF.

5) The Campus Segment, Chapter 6, refers to the cabling and infrastructure that
interconnect buildings or systems on a campus.

b. The network electronic equipment, to include design, engineering and installation, is typically
accomplished by Communications Resources.

4. Overview of this Manual

a. This manual is divided into nine chapters with each chapter divided into three or more
paragraphs. Chapter 1 is an overview of this manual, and the responsibilities of the
Communications Resources office.

b. Chapters 2 through 9 describe in detail the seven segments of the telecommunications


distribution system. These sections describe “The Design Process”, the main topics and
components that must be considered when planning and designing a particular segment of the
system.

c. This manual also includes the following appendices:

1) Appendix A - Specifications contain detailed technical specifications.

2) Appendix B - References contain a list and brief description of the industry standards
and guidelines for telecommunications systems and how to obtain a copy of them.

3) Appendix C - Glossary contains the definition of terms used in telecommunications


design, engineering, construction, and provisioning.

4) Appendix D - UC Davis Policy and Procedure Manual, Section 310-10.

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CHAPTER 2 THE HORIZONTAL SEGMENT

1. The Design Process

a. The horizontal segment consists of two elements:

1) The horizontal cable and connecting hardware that provide the means for
transporting the telecommunications signals between the Network Access Module
(NAM) in the work area and the Intermediate Distribution Frame (IDF).

2) The horizontal cabling pathways and spaces that distribute and support the horizontal
cable and connecting hardware between the NAM and the IDF.

Note: Cables that interconnect in IDF’s on the same floor, while physically horizontal in orientation,
are considered part of the riser segment.

b. This section describes the policies and procedures for the following design activities:

1) Determining the type and number of NAM’s in the work area.

2) Identifying the types and lengths of cable used in the horizontal segment.

3) Determining termination hardware requirements at the NAM.

4) Designing the structures needed to support the horizontal cabling.

5) Assigning the NAM numbers to the appropriate locations


.
6) Cable testing procedures.

2. The Type and Number of NAM’s

a. Network Access Modules (NAM) at UC Davis fall into three general configurations: Basic,
Enhanced, and Integrated.

b. The basic design supports voice or data applications. It consists of a single NAM module
supported by one 4-pair UTP Category 5e cable. A basic outlet may be used for a wall phone, a
courtesy phone, a card reader, or to augment an existing work area with additional voice or data
capacity.

c. The enhanced design supports voice and data applications. It consists of two NAM modules
per outlet supported by two 4-pair UTP Category 5e cables. Each 4-pair UTP Category 5e cable
supports one NAM module only. The enhanced outlet is the most commonly used configuration
at UC Davis.

d. The integrated design supports complex systems including voice, data, and video
applications. In general, it consists of three or more 4-pair UTP Category 5e cables supporting
three or more NAM modules per outlet. Each 4-pair UTP Category 5e cable supports one NAM
module only. It may also consist of a combination of 4-pair UTP Category 5e cables with a 4-
strand indoor fiber optic cable (Multimode and/or Singlemode). A fiber optic supported NAM will
consist of a surface mounted interface box that will allow for proper fiber bend radius, with LC
type connectors. Reference Specification 01 for additional information.

e. The features of these three designs may be combined in the most cost-effective manner with
Communications Resources’ approval.
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f. A minimum of two enhanced NAM’s must be provided in each office and conference room.

g. At least one basic NAM must be provided in each conference room for a wall-mounted
telephone. Location of NAM shall be near an exit door, and meet ADA requirements for access.

h. Laboratories require additional NAM’s to support workstations and test equipment. Wall-
mounted telephones shall not be installed over laboratory countertops.

i. Large classrooms shall use a wireless network for their data access. Contact Communications
Resources for the latest design standard for this area.

j. A 4 × 4 × 2 1/8 inch electrical back box with a single gang plaster ring must be used at each
work area for NAM installations. From each back box a minimum of ¾” EMT conduit for basic
and enhanced NAM, minimum 1” for integrated NAM’s, will be installed to the cable pathway
support system. Conduit is to be sized appropriately for the fill of cable it is to accommodate.
Reference Specification 06 for additional information.

k. Height and location of NAM and electrical back box for ADA accessible wall-mounted
telephones and voice/data outlets must take into consideration the height of the telephone set and
faceplate to insure height and distance requirements are satisfied.

3. ADA Requirements

a. Installed wall, counter-top and weatherproof telephones, in addition to, emergency call boxes
and NAM’s, shall meet the requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). This
requirement is referenced in ANSI/TIA/EIA 568-B.1.

Note: Wall telephones shall not be installed above or over Laboratory countertops. A standard desktop
telephone shall be installed in these unique locations, if required.

b. All campus ADA approved wall phones (with an ADA compliant handset), weatherproof
telephones and emergency call boxes and towers shall be installed in accordance with ADA
requirements. The following is a list of currently installed products: (Reference Figure 2-1).

1) Wall-Mounted Telephone with ADA compliant handset, Cortelco, Part Number 2554

2) Weatherproof Telephone, Allen Tel Products, Part Number GB70 Series, Black
Handset, Red Enclosure

3) Weatherproof Emergency Push-to-Talk Speakerphone, Surface Mount, Talk-A-Phone


Products, Model ETP-SM with an ETP-400K Emergency/Assistance Phone, Yellow
Enclosure

4) Emergency/Information Tower, Talk-A-Phone Products, Model Number ETP-MT/R


with an ETP-400C Phone.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Figure 2-1 ADA Compliant Telephone/Emergency Call Boxes

4. Cable Types and Lengths

a. UC Davis recognizes two types of cables for use in the horizontal segment: UTP (unshielded
twisted pair) and Multimode/Singlemode fiber optic cable.

1) UTP cable will be 4-pair, 24 AWG, solid conductor cabling that meets ANSI/TIA/EIA
568-B.1 and B.2 cabling specifications for Category 5e cable, to include any/all
Amendments and Bulletins, and must meet specified specifications and performance
requirements. Reference Specification 03, Table 03-1 for cable specifications and
performance. Performance testing shall be conducted at the component level by a UL
certified testing laboratory, and include Active Live Channel Testing to insure
manufacture and performance quality. LANmark-350 manufactured by Berk-Tek is the
preferred and recommended manufacture. If substitutions are requested by the
consultant/contractor, then demonstrated equivalency must be provided. Reference Berk-
Tek’s web site for additional information.
(http://www.berktek.com/)

2) Fiber optic cable will be a minimum of 4-strands, Multimode, 62.5/125mµ graded


index, tight-buffered, indoor cable, or 4-strand, Singlemode, 8.3/125mµ, tight-buffered,
indoor cable. Reference Specification 03, Table 03-2 for cable specifications. Corning
Cable Systems MIC type cable is the preferred and recommended manufacture. If
substitutions are requested by the consultant/contractor, then demonstrated equivalency
must be provided. Reference Corning Cable Systems web site for additional information.
(http://www.corning.com/cablesystems)

b. All conductive cabling and associated components must comply with Article 800 of the NEC
(1999). Furthermore, all fiber optic cabling must comply with Article 770 of the NEC (1999),
OFN-FT4 (Non-plenum) and OFN-FT6 (Plenum).

c. All cabling will be UL Listed Type CMP, OFNR or OFNP if it is placed in air-handling
plenums without conduit. The cable sheath will be marked with the UL listing.

d. Horizontal UTP and fiber optic cables will not be spliced, nor with these cables contain
manufacture splices.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

e. Horizontal cables will not be connected directly to telecommunications equipment. Suitable


connecting hardware (i.e. patch panels and punch-down blocks) and factory-manufactured patch
cords must be used to make the connection. Cross-connect jumper wire shall be used for voice and
fire circuits only.

f. Patch cords shall be manufactured by the same manufacture as the data patch panels and
information modules, meet or exceed Category 5e requirements and specific performance
requirements. Reference Specification 04, Table 04-1 for minimum performance specifications.
Performance testing shall be conducted at the component level by a UL certified testing
laboratory, and include Active Live Channel Testing to insure manufacture and performance
quality. If substitutions are requested by the consultant/contractor, then demonstrated equivalency
must be provided. Ortronics is the preferred and recommended manufacture.

g. The maximum total length of horizontal cable IDF to NAM and patch cords (patch panel to
equipment and NAM faceplate to workstation) shall not exceed 328 feet (100 meters). CR
approved patch cord and jumper wire lengths are shown in Specification 04, Table 04-2.

h. Cable slack must be provided at both ends of cable runs to accommodate future cabling
system changes.

1) The minimum amount of slack shall be 1 foot for UTP cables and 3 feet for fiber
optic cables at the outlet. In the IDF, UTP horizontal cables shall meet manufactures
procedures for slack, patch panels, and 110 type blocks.

2) Service Loops placed during installation of 4-pair horizontal cable were tested and
determined to cause Return Loss and NEXT problems on the order of 2-3dB. When
creating service loops, they should be coiled in a Figure-Eight configuration to eliminate
this effect. At UC Davis, service loops are not required for every installation, therefore,
prior approval from CR must be obtained prior the installation of service loops.

3) The fiber optic cable must have a 10-foot service loop at the ADF/BDF/IDF location.

4) The slack must be included in all length calculations to ensure that the horizontal
cable does not exceed 295 feet.

Note: These limits apply to all types of horizontal cables. In establishing these limits, a 33-foot allowance was
made for the combined length of the manufactured patch cords used to connect equipment at the NAM and IDF
locations.

5. Termination Hardware Requirements at the Outlet

a. Each UTP cable will be terminated at the outlet with a Cat 5e, RJ-45 Module, 8P8C, T568A,
180° degree exit, Orange for Data, Fog White for Voice, Module Information Outlet. Reference
Specification 01, Table 01-1 and 01-2 for module specifications, and Specification 04, Table 04-1
for hardware performance specifications. Performance testing shall be conducted at the component
level by a UL certified testing laboratory, and include Active Live Channel Testing to insure
manufacture and performance quality. Ortronics GigaMo NetClear Solution TracJack
Information Modular is the preferred and recommended manufacture. If substitutions are
requested by the consultant/contractor, then demonstrated equivalency must be provided.
Reference Ortronics web site for additional information.
(http://www.ortronics.com/usa/channel_solutions/default.asp?channel=gigamo)

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

b. Each fiber optic cable will be terminated at the outlet using a Small Form Factor LC style
connector mounted in an LC type faceplate module. All strands shall be terminated at the NAM
and IDF location for testing and verification purposes. Reference Specification 01, Table 01-1 and
01-2 for surface mount box and module specifications. The LC connector module shall be from
the same manufacture as the surface mount box, and the LC fiber optic connector shall be from the
same manufacture as the fiber optic cable to insure manufacture compatibility, performance and
warranty. Ortronics and Corning Cable System is the preferred and recommended
manufacture. If substitutions are requested by the consultant/contractor, then demonstrated
equivalency must be provided.

c. Faceplates for the designated modules must be from the same manufacture as the Information
Modular, and will be in a standard Fog White color, or will match the existing décor of the room,
to include metal type faceplates. Reference Specification 01, Table 01-1 for faceplate
specifications. The preferred and recommended manufacture of the faceplate is the TracJack
manufactured by Ortronics. If substitutions are requested by the consultant/contractor, then
demonstrated equivalency must be provided.

6. Termination Hardware Requirement at the IDF

Termination hardware required to terminate the horizontal copper UTP and fiber optic cables at the ADF,
BDF and IDF are covered in Chapter 4, The ADF/BDF/IDF.

7. Assigning the NAM numbers

a. The NAM matrices are used by the Communications Resources department in the application of
operational databases, for assignment of services to departments, and other service related
purposes. They are crucial to the implementation of service to the project. Reference Specification
02 for addition information.

b. The Consultant shall obtain NAM numbers from the UC Davis Project Line Assigner. Contact
the CR Program Manager for contact information.

c. All additional NAM numbers shall be obtained only from the UC Davis Project Line Assigner.
NAM numbers shall not be duplicated. The Project Consultant or Design Professional is
responsible for the issuing of accurate NAM numbers and drawings.

d. After NAM numbers have been assigned to the floor plans, the Consultant will complete the
NAM matrices. Refer to Specification 02 for information on NAM’s, and NAM matrices. NAM
matrices are to be completed at the beginning of Construction Document preparation. A hardcopy
of NAM matrices shall be provided to the UCD Project Manager, and a MS-Excel 2000
spreadsheet file to be provided to Communications Resources.

e. The Consultant will ensure that specifications are placed in the contract documents that inform
the Cabling Contractor regarding use and maintenance of the NAM matrices for the project.

8. Cross Connecting Voice NAMS

a. The Project Consultant shall ensure that the Contractor provides a Voice NAM Matrix,
identifying all cross connections from the NAM to the IDF. The Contractor is responsible for
completing all voice cross-connect terminations at the IDF. Communications Resources shall
complete all voice cross-connect terminations at the ADF and BDF.

b. The Voice NAM Matrix shall be provided to Communications Resources as part of the record
drawing documentation, and shall be provided prior to final inspection of the cabling work.

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c. Reference Specification 02, NAM Numbering, Matrix and Labeling Requirements for
additional information.

9. Structures to Support the Horizontal Cabling

a. Special attention must be provided when selecting and designing the type and layout of
structures to support the horizontal cabling. The design must accommodate cabling changes with
a minimum of disruptions to building occupants.

Note: UC Davis requires that the space above the ceiling grid be used, whenever possible, to route the
horizontal cabling.

b. Listed below are the steps needed to complete this phase of the design process:

1) Obtain an accurate set of floor plans.

2) Annotate, on the floor plan, the locations and types of NAM’s.

3) Annotate, on the floor plan, the locations of the equipment racks/cabinets located
within the Equipment and Telecommunications Room for the ADF/BDF/IDF hardware.
If these locations have not been identified, please reference Chapter 4 before proceeding
with this section.

4) Verify that the distance from each NAM to the IDF does not exceed 295 feet. This
distance must include the planned cable path as well as any vertical transitions.

Note: If there are horizontal cable lengths that exceed 295 feet, the IDF must be relocated to a more
centralized location or another IDF must be added.

5) Sketch the route of the conduit and the cable tray on the floor plan.

Note: The preferred method of routing the horizontal cabling is to run conduit from the outlet to a cable
tray placed along natural building corridors. The cable tray then channels the cabling to the IDF. See
Specification 07 for conduit design considerations.

6) A ¾-inch EMT conduit must be used from basic and enhanced outlet boxes to the
cable tray. A 1-inch, or larger, if appropriate, EMT conduit must also be used if the bulk
of the cables to be supported exceed the recommended 40% fill ratio.

7) A 1-inch or larger EMT conduit must be used from an integrated design outlet to the
cable tray. See Specifications 07 for details on horizontal conduit capacity. The following
additional specifications also apply to the installation of conduit.

(a) Flexible EMT conduit is restricted to a 20-foot length, if required, in


accordance with TIA/EIA 569-A.

(b) All conduits will be shall be appropriately firestopped in accordance with


TIA/EIA 569-A, Annex A, and any/all local fire codes.

(c) Conduit will be installed with a pull string with a minimum test rating of 200
pounds.

(d) The ends of conduits will be reamed and bushed to eliminate sharp edges
that can damage cables during installation or service.

8) Identify firewalls or fire rated barriers that will be breached during cable installation.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

9) Conduit must extend through the fire rated barrier when a fire rated barrier exists
between the outlet and cable tray.

Note: All horizontal pathways that penetrate fire rated barriers must be firestopped in accordance with
TIA/EIA 569-A, Annex A and local fire codes. See Figure 2-2.

10) Identify hard ceiling or ceilings with restricted access that must be traversed during
cable installation.

(a) Multiple metallic conduits will be used in these areas.

(b) Conduits will be of a size that will ensure that a 40% fill ratio is not
exceeded.

(c) The ends of the conduit will be bonded and grounded. Conduit will be
grounded to Main Terminal Grounding Busbar (MTGB). Refer to Figure 2-3.

(d) Surface molding will be used to route cables from the work area outlet to the
interstitial space in areas with limited ceiling access. Ortronics or Wiremold
surface raceway is the preferred and recommended manufacture to insure
compatibility with the Ortronics faceplates and modules. If substitutions are
requested by the consultant/contractor, then demonstrated equivalency must be
provided.

Figure 2-2 Firestopping Requirements

Metallic
d it Approved fire stop
bl

Fire rated
b i

Figure 2-3 Conduit Placed Above Hard or Limited Access Ceiling

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

11) Identify NAM’s that will be located on walls that are not made of sheet rock
construction such as plaster walls, concrete block walls, exterior walls, and insulated
walls. Written approval must be obtained from the Manager, Systems Engineering &
Design, Communications Resources to use surface mounted NAM’s if these walls cannot
be fished. Ortronics or Wiremold surface raceway is the preferred and recommended
manufacture to insure compatibility with the Ortronics faceplates and modules. If
substitutions are requested by the consultant/contractor, then demonstrated equivalency
must be provided.

Note: Exterior walls, while furred and covered with sheet rock, may not provide the necessary clearance
between the sheet rock and the backing material (commonly concrete block) for standard NAM’s.

12) Identify the location of system furniture that will be cabled for communications.
System furniture can be fed from furred columns, wire whips from abutting walls, or
power poles or under-floor systems.

Note: The use of power poles will be minimized.

13) Minimum cable bend radii and conduit capacity must be considered when using a
modular furniture system.

14) The minimum bend radius for 4-pair UTP cable, no load, is 4 times the outside
diameter, or 1.0 inches. The minimum bend radius for horizontal fiber optic cable is 2.0
inches.

15) Refer to Specification 07 for details on conduit capacity.

16) The maximum pulling tension of 4-pair UTP cable shall be 25 lbs, and the maximum
tensile load for horizontal fiber optic cable is 148 lbf .

17) Annotate on the floor plan the cable paths that will be supported with J-hooks or
Adjustable Cable Supports (Hanger Bags). The type and size of J-hook or Hanger Bag
will conform to the manufactures specification for size and number of cables, and the
environment for which they are to be installed. This specification shall not be exceeded.

18) J-hooks and Hanger Bags will be spaced a maximum of every 4 feet to support the
cable as referenced in TIA/EIA 569-A, and will be annotated on the construction
drawings.

19) Velcro cable ties shall be used to secure cable bundles and patch cords, where
required. Plastic Ty-Raps will only be used with prior CR approval, and then must meet
installation requirements per TIA/EIA specifications.

10. Cable Testing Procedures

a. General

1) Test and report on each intermediate cabling segment separately, including Main
Distribution Frame (MDF) to ADF/BDF/IDF, riser cabling, campus and horizontal
distribution cabling (each segment, if multiple).

2) Test each end-to-end cable link.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

b. Voice Cabling Plant. The Contractor shall perform tests on the voice telephone plant cable. The
tests shall be performed end-to-end from each termination block on each pair. Provide computer-
generated documentation of all test results on Contractor-provided, and University’s
Representative-approved forms. This end-to-end test shall include the following:

1) DC Continuity
2) Reversals
3) Shorts
4) Opens
5) Overall loop resistance/cable length
6) Attenuation
7) Splits
8) Transpositions
9) Grounds

c. UTP Horizontal Cable Testing

1) UC Davis requires that all UTP cable pairs be Permanent Link tested with a Level
IIE or Level III tester for full compliance with TIA/EIA 568-B.1 and B.2, Category 5e
specifications regardless of intended use.

2) Test results must be provided for all conductor pairs of each cable, and meet Table 2-
1 requirements.

3) The test results must be provided on a 3.5-inch MS-DOS formatted diskette in an MS


Excel worksheet format.

4) Reference Table 2-1 for testing parameters.

Table 2-1 Permanent Link Testing

Parameter Category 5e
Specified Frequency Range 1-100 MHz

Pair to Pair NEXT 30.1 dB

Power Sum NEXT 15.6 dB

Insertion Loss 21.0 dB

Pair to Pair ELFEXT 18.6 dB

Power Sum ELFEXT 15.6 dB

Return Loss 12.0 dB

Propagation Delay 498ns @ 10MHz

Delay Skew 44ns

Wire Map T568A

Length <295 feet

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d. Fiber Cable Testing (Horizontal and Campus/Riser/Backbone).

1) Field-testing instruments for multimode fiber optic cabling shall meet the
requirements of ANSI/TIA/EIA-526-14-A. The light source shall meet the launch
requirements of ANSI/TIA/EIA-455-50B, Method A. Reference TIA/EIA-568-B.3 for
additional information. Per ANSI/TIA/EIA 526-14A, Annex B, Test Method B shall be
accomplished.

2) Field-testing instruments for Singlemode fiber optic cabling shall meet the
requirements of ANSI/TIA/EIA-526-7. Testing Method A and B shall be accomplished.
Reference TIA/EIA-568-B.3 for additional information.

3) All fiber optic cables must be tested for link attenuation (i.e. power insertion loss,
power meter test) as referenced in TIA/EIA-568-B.1, Section 11.3. See Table 2-2 for
proper fiber testing measures. All strands will be tested in a bi-directional method with a
Power Meter. Riser cables (installed and terminated within a building) shall be tested for
link attenuation only. Outside plant cables shall be tested for link attenuation with both a
power meter and an OTDR. Actual cable distance shall also be recorded and documented
with the OTDR.
.
4) All fiber optic cable, to include connectors, shall be tested in-line between two
reference cables. One cable will be attached to the light source and the other to the power
meter to measure the dB loss from both connectors, as well as any dB loss associated
with the cable between the connectors.

5) The dB loss for a horizontal segment must not exceed 2.0dB. TIA/EIA 568-B.1 and
526-14A outlines the steps required to test multimode horizontal fiber optic cabling.
TIA/EIA 526-7 outline the steps required to test Singlemode fiber optic cable. Horizontal
multimode cable only needs to be tested at one wavelength (850 or 1300µm). Backbone
cable (Campus, Riser, OSP) (multimode and Singlemode) shall be tested at both
wavelengths (850 and 1300µm for multimode) and (1310µm and 1550µm for
singlemode).

Note: Because of the relatively short cable lengths within the horizontal segment (less than 295 feet), the
main loss will be connector loss.

6) Select two test jumpers. Ensure that the jumpers have a fiber core size of 62.5 µm
(multimode) or 8.3µm (singlemode) and terminated with an LC style connector at the
NAM and an LC- style connector at the IDF.

7) Ensure the optical source (light) meter is stabilized and has a center wavelength within
± 20 nm of the multi-mode nominal wavelength. The light source should be allowed to
stabilize for approximately 5 minutes before testing begins.

8) Ensure the power meter and the light source are set to 850/1300 nm if testing multi-
mode fiber or 1310/1550 nm if testing single mode fiber.

9) Ensure that all connectors are clean.

10) Establish a reference. A baseline must be established for the test jumper between the
power meter and light source unit.

11) Verify the second test jumper by adding this second jumper between the power meter
and the original jumper.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Note: If the loss is greater than 0.5 dB, clean all connectors (except the connector inserted at the source)
and test again. If the loss is still unacceptable, replace the second test jumper.

12) Test the horizontal segment from one end of the fiber - from the distribution cabinet
in the telecommunications room, horizontal or intermediate cross connect to the NAM.
Place the light source at the distribution cabinet location and the power meter at the NAM
location. The light source should not be disturbed once the testing begins.

13) The total signal loss for a fiber link will not be greater than 2.0 dB - this includes
connector loss and fiber loss.

14) The installing contactor shall perform fiber optic testing on all installed fiber optic
cabling. Test results and documentation, to include OTDR traces and Power Meter test
results, shall be provided to the Communications Resources (CR) representative utilizing
contractor-supplied and CR approved forms. Forms shall be submitted in a pre-agreed
upon format (i.e. MS Excel spreadsheet, diskette, CD Rom, etc). The contractor shall
submit these forms with all required information no later than five days after the cables
are tested.

15) The contractor shall provide calibration certifications for testing equipment to be
used. The contractor shall submit these certificates to CR, with all required information,
prior to commencement of testing.

Note: Reversing the direction of test to see if the end connector is bad should isolate high loss, in a
double-ended test.

Table 2-2 Basic Guideline for Loss Measurements

Basic Guideline for Loss Measurements for Installed Fiber Optic Cables
Connector Loss: 0.75 dB per mated pair
Splice Loss: (Fusion or Mechanical) 0.3 dB
Fiber loss: Multimode 3.5 dB/km @ 850 nm
1.5 dB/km @ 1300 nm
Fiber loss: Singlemode 0.5dB/km @ 1310 nm (Outside Plant Cable)
0.5 dB/km @ 1550 nm (Outside Plant Cable)
1.0 dB/km @ 1310 nm (Inside Plant Cable)
1.0 dB/km @ 1550 nm (Inside Plant Cable)

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

CHAPTER 3 THE EQUIPMENT AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS ROOM

1. The Design Process

a. The Equipment Room (ER)

1) The ER is the room within a building that houses the Area Distribution Frame (ADF),
Building Distribution Frame (BDF) and Intermediate Distribution Frame (IDF) on the
UC Davis campus for telecommunications equipment that meets the voice, data, video
and wireless needs of an entire building.

2) An ER provides a controlled environment to house telecommunications equipment,


connecting hardware, splice closures, Main Telecommunications Grounding Busbar
(MTGB) grounding and bonding facilities and protection apparatus where applicable.
This equipment may also include Private Branch Exchange (PBX) equipment, switching
nodes, local area network hubs, video distribution equipment, network routers, wireless
equipment and large interruptible power sources (up to 100kVA).

3) ER’s are considered distinct from Telecommunications Rooms (TR) due to the nature
or complexity of the equipment they contain.

4) ER’s shall be designed and provisioned according to the requirements in


ANSI/TIA/EIA-569-A.

5) Reference Figure 3-1 for additional ER information.

6) ER’s are referred to as ADF/BDF/IDF’s on the UC Davis campus.

b. The Telecommunications Room (TR)

1) The TR is the room within a building that houses the Area Distribution Frame (ADF),
Building Distribution Frame (BDF) and Intermediate Distribution Frame (IDF) on the
UC Davis campus for the primary function of terminating the horizontal and backbone
cables from compatible connecting hardware to the NAM. This is room commonly
referred to as the IDF on the UC Davis campus. ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-B.1 has replaced the
term Telecommunications Closet with the term Telecommunications Room.

2) Horizontal and backbone cable terminations shall be accomplished using manufactured


patch panels and cords for data and jumper wire for voice circuits. On the UC Davis
campus, the term IDF shall be used for termination points servicing NAM locations.

3) A TR may also contain the ADF and BDF for different portions of the backbone
cabling system. The term ADF shall be used for terminations between backbones cables
that service numerous buildings. The term BDF shall be used for terminations between
backbone cables within the same building.

4) TR’s shall be designed and provisioned according to the requirements in


ANSI/TIA/EIA-569-A.

5) The TR (IDF) will be the most common rooms used at UC Davis.

6) Reference Figure 3-1 for additional TR information.

January 2002 Page 25 of 137


CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

2. General Requirements

a. Equipment and telecommunication room space shall be dedicated to the telecommunications


function and related support facilities only. This space should not be shared with electrical
installations other then those for telecommunications.

b. Equipment not related to the support of the telecommunications function (e.g. sprinkler,
steam, chilled water, supply and waste piping, ductwork, pneumatic tubing, etc) shall not be
installed in, pass through or enter the telecommunications space.

c. The ER and TR shall be located as close as practicable to the center of the area served and
preferably in the core area.

d. Horizontal pathways shall terminate in the ER/TR located on the same floor as the area being
served.

e. Specifications for related facilities shall accommodate the applicable seismic zone
requirements.

3. The Size of the ER/TR

a. The size of the ER/TR depends upon the size and variety of the equipment to be installed and
the size of the area that the room will serve.

1) The ER/TR must provide enough space for all planned termination and electronic
equipment and cables, including any environmental control equipment, power
distribution/conditioners, and uninterrupted power supply systems that will be installed
there to serve the telecommunications equipment.

2) The ER/TR must also provide space for access to the equipment for maintenance and
administration, and for equipment changes with minimal disruptions.

3) The minimum ER/TR is based on providing telecommunications service to one


individual work area of 100 sq. ft.

4) Multiple TR’s are required if the usable floor space to be served exceeds 10,000
square feet or the cable length between the NAM and the horizontal cross-connect in the
ER/TR exceeds 295 feet. Minimum ER/TR sizes are shown in Table 3-1.

5) Additional floor space must be allocated for additional applications, such as Video
Distribution cabling and equipment, etc.

January 2002 Page 26 of 137


CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Figure 3-1 ADF/BDF/IDF Equipment and Telecommunications Room

Table 3-1 Minimum ER/TR Room Size

Floor Area Served Minimum ER/TR


(Square Feet) Room Size (Feet)
5,000 or less 10 × 8
5,000 to 8,000 10 × 9
8,000 to 10,000 10 × 11

Note: These wall lengths are the minimum acceptable. Shorter wall lengths will not allow space for
equipment.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

b. The minimum size of the ER/TR can be determined as follows:

1) In an ER/TR dedicated to Communications Resources (if the environment allows)


open equipment racks a 19” x 84” rack will be utilized with 6” vertical cable
management on each side. This equates to a 32” equipment bay. A minimum of three
bays will be installed in any size building with the “x” wall is a minimum of 10 feet.

2) A minimum of 2 feet shall be left at the end of the row of equipment bays. A
minimum of 5 feet between walls and equipment bays will allow space for wall mounted
copper cable terminations and the required 36” distance from equipment for work space.

3) In larger size buildings requiring additional rows of equipment bays, the bays shall
be lined up in rows with 5 feet between the rows and walls. Use the formula below to
determine the minimum square footage. The number of equipment bays required will
determine the “x” dimension.

4) For one row of equipment bays hold the “x” dimension to 10 feet, for two rows of
equipment bays hold the “x” dimension to 16 feet, and for three rows of equipment bays
hold the “x” dimension to 22 feet.

4. The Location of the ER/TR

a. The ER/TR must be located as close as possible to the building entrance so that it is accessible
for the delivery of large equipment.

b. The ER/TR must not be located in any place that may be subject to water or steam
infiltration, humidity from nearby water or steam, heat, and any other corrosive atmospheric or
environmental conditions.

c. The ER/TR must not be located near electrical power supply transformers, elevator or pump
motors, generators, x-ray equipment, radio transmitters, radar transmitters, induction heating
devices, and other potential sources of electromagnetic interference (EMI).

d. The ER/TR must not share space in or be located near electrical closets, boiler rooms,
washrooms, janitorial closets, and storage rooms.

e. The ER/TR must not be located near sources of mechanical vibration that could convey to the
room via the building structure.

f. Acoustic noise levels in the ER/TR must be maintained to a minimum by locating noise-
generating equipment outside the ER/TR.

g. The ER/TR shall not be located below water level unless preventive measures against water
infiltration are employed. The room shall be free of water or drain pipes not directly required in
support of the equipment within the room. A floor drain shall be provided within the room if risks
of water ingress exist.

h. ER/TR’s must be vertical aligned in multistory buildings.

i. Access to the ER/TR must be directly from hallways, not through classrooms, offices, or
mechanical spaces.

j. The location of the ER/TR must be submitted to the project manager for inclusion in the
construction drawings, and it must be annotated on the floor plan.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

5. Design Requirement

The major factors that must be considered when designing the ER/TR are as follows:

a. Ceiling:

1) The minimum ceiling height must be 8 feet, 6 inches.

2) Ceiling protrusions must be placed to assure a minimum clear height of 8 feet 6 inches
to provide space over the equipment frames for cables and suspended racks.

3) For maximum flexibility, false ceiling tiles shall not be provided.

4) Ceiling shall be treated to eliminate dust.

b. Entrance Doors:

1) The door shall be a minimum of 3 feet wide and 6 feet, 7 inches high, without
doorsill. Door shall be fire rated for a minimum of one hour, or more as required by local
code requirements.

2) If it is anticipated that large equipment will be delivered to the ER/TR, a double door
6 feet wide by 7 feet, 5 inches high without a doorsill and center post is recommended.

3) Doors must open outward (code permitting).

4) The keying of doors for all ER/TR’s and Controlled Environmental Facilities (CEF)
shall be keyed alike. Contact CR for proper key number.

5) Signage consistent with UCDavis and/or building requirements shall be installed


indicating “Communications Room”.

c. Walls and Floors:

1) Floors must be sealed concrete or tile to minimize dust and static electricity. Removal
computer floor tiles shall be of a tile type surface.

2) Floor loading capacity in the ER shall be designed for a minimum distributed load
rating of 100 lbf/ft² and a minimum concentrated load rating of at least 2000 lbf. The
floor loading for a TR shall be designed for a minimum load rating of 50 lbf/ft². It shall
be verified that concentrations of proposed equipment do not exceed the floor limit.

3) Interior finishes shall be in a light color to enhance room lighting.

4) All walls must be lined with Trade Size, void free, ¾-inch AC-grade plywood, 8 feet
high.

5) The plywood must be securely fastened to the wall-framing members, and painted
with two coats of white fire-retardant paint.

6) Plywood will be mounted vertically starting at 2 inches above the finished floor.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

d. Environmental Controls:

1) The air handling system and environment controls for ER/TR’s must be continuous
and dedicated, and designed to provide positive airflow and cooling even during times
when the main building systems are shut down. This may require separate air handlers
and/or small stand-alone cooling systems that are thermostatically controlled in this
space. If this room is to be used as a Area Distribution Facility (ADF), the air handling
system should be connected to the building’s backup power generation system. Whether
this space is separated or combined with the building service entrance, it is, by almost
every definition, a specialized area. The room will house sensitive electronic components
that will generate heat 24 hours a day, 365 days a year and must be cooled to maintain
operating performance.

2) Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning sensors and control equipment related to
the environment within the ER/TR must be located in the ER/TR.

3) The room temperature must be maintained between 64°F and 75°F.

4) The relative humidity must be 30% to 55%.

5) The ambient temperature and humidity shall be measured at a distance of 5 ft above


the floor level, after the equipment is in operation, at any point along an equipment aisle
centerline.

6) Heat load is 5,000 BTUs per hour per electronic cabinet, equipment rack.

7) The ER/TR shall be protected from contaminates and pollutants that could affect
operation and material integrity of the installed equipment. When contaminates are
present in concentrations greater than indicated in ANSI/TIA/EIA 569-A, Table 8.2-2,
vapor barriers, positive room pressure or absolute filters shall be provided.

e. Lighting:

1) Lighting must provide a minimum equivalent of 50 foot-candles when measured three


feet above the finished floor.

2) The light fixtures must be mounted a minimum of 8 feet, 6 inches above the finished
floor. Position lighting above aisle area only, and not directly over equipment racks or
cabinets.

3) The light switches must be located near the entrance of the ER/TR. Dimmer switches
are not permitted.

4) Power for the lighting must not come from the same circuits as power for the
telecommunications equipment.

5) Emergency lighting and signs should be properly placed such that an absence of light
will not hamper emergency exit.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

f. Electrical:

1) ER/TR’s shall be provided electrical service by a dedicated sub-panel located within


the ER/TR room. A 225-amp panel shall be installed in an Equipment Room, and a 100-
amp panel installed in a Telecommunications Room.

2) Sub-panels shall be located near the room entrance door, whenever possible, to
conserve wall space, and should be connected to an emergency power source when ever
such a source is provided to the building.

3) The ER/TR must be equipped with a minimum of two dedicated 3-wire 120V AC
nominal, non-switched, quad electrical receptacles on separate branch circuits and 20-
ampere rated.

4) Provide duplex 20 Amp, 120V AC NEMA 5-20R spade receptacles. These


receptacles are required by some manufactures of UPS equipment.

5) Separately identify and marked (labeled) duplex 120V AC convenience receptacles


(for tools, test sets, etc.) to be installed 18 inches above the finished floor at 6 foot
intervals around the perimeter walls. Convenience receptacles shall be divided and
serviced from separate circuits (i.e. 3 receptacles on one circuit and 3 receptacles on
another.)

6) Receptacles are to be located on active equipment racks 24” Above the Finished Floor
(AFF).

g. Grounding:

1) The ER/TR must be provided with a Main Telecommunications Grounding Busbar


(MTGR) (electrical ground) on a 4-inch or larger busbar as defined by NEC Article 250-
71(b) and ANSI/TIA/EIA 607.

2) The busbar must be mounted 6 feet, 6 inches above the finished floor if ladder racking
is included in the design. If ladder racking is not part of the design, the busbar must be
located near, but not behind, the riser sleeves between floors.

3) This grounding bar must be connected to a main building ground electrode, reference
ANSI/EIA/TIA-607.

h. Security and Fire Protection

1) Portable fire extinguishers shall be provided and maintained within 75 feet travel
distance from any part of the occupied space within the ER/TR per local code
requirements. The size of the fire extinguisher shall be a minimum 2-A, 10-B, C rating.

2) If sprinklers are required within the equipment area, the heads shall be provided with
wire cages to prevent accidental operation.

3) Drainage troughs shall be placed under the sprinkler pipes to prevent leakage onto
the equipment within the room. Consideration should be given to the installation of
alternate fire-suppression systems.

4) Additional equipment such as fire alarm panels and/or building monitoring devices
must not be housed in the ER/TR. Separate space for these services can be provided as
part of the electrical room or in a separate space.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

5) The ER/TR shall be located in an accessible area on each floor (e.g. a common
hallway).

6. Cable Pathways Entering/Exiting the ER/TR

a. Sleeves, slots, and conduit are used to route the cables entering and exiting the ER/TR.

b. A sleeve is a circular opening through the ceiling or floor of an ER/TR that allows the passage
of cables. A slot is similar to a sleeve except that it is a rectangular opening. Reference Figure 3-1.

c. ER/TC that are vertically aligned must be connected with sleeves or slots.

1) Sleeves and slots must be positioned near a wall on which the cables can be
supported.

2) They must be located where pulling and termination will be easy, preferably on the
left side of the ER/TR.

3) Sleeves and slots must not be placed directly above or below the wall space that is
used for termination fields.

4) Sleeves and slots must conform to the fire stopping requirements as established by
the National Electrical Code (NEC) and local fire codes.

5) They must not be left open after cable installation and they must be properly
firestopped in accordance with TIA/EIA 569-A, Annex A, and any/all local fire codes.

6) Sleeves must extend a maximum of 4 inches above the floor level. Slots must have a
1-inch high curb.

7) Rigid Steel Conduit (RSC) sleeves must be 4 inches in diameter unless a structural
engineer requires a smaller size or obstructions are present. They must be fitted with
plastic bushings on both ends and equipped with a pull string.

8) All unused sleeves must be appropriately firestopped in accordance with TIA/EIA


569-A, Annex A, and any/all local fire codes.

9) Table 3-2 lists the minimum number of 4-inch sleeves that must be used based on the
total square feet that the sleeves support.

10) Table 3-3 lists the sizes of slots that are required based on the total usable area
served by the slot.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Figure 3-2 Proper sleeve and slot construction

Table 3-2 Quantities of Sleeves

Total Square Feet Quantity of Sleeves

Up to 50,000 3
50,000 to 100,000 4

100,000 to 300,000 5-8

300,000 to 500,00 9-12

Table 3-3 Area Served by Slot

Total Usable Area Served by Slot (Square Feet) Size of Slot (Inches)
Up to 250,000 6×9
250,000 to 500,000 6 × 18
500,000 to 1,000,000 9 × 20

Note: The number of sleeves and/or sizes of slots must be specified prior to construction because coring
holes through concrete is expensive, it creates dust, and it may cause water damage or create structural
hazards.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

d. An engineer registered in the State of California must approve all structural changes and floor
penetrations.

e. Conduit will be metallic conduit, 4 inches in diameter.

1) All conduits will be firestopped in accordance with TIA/EIA 569-A, Annex A, and
any/all local fire codes.

2) The conduit will be grounded on both ends.

3) The conduit will be equipped with a pull string.

4) The conduit ends will be bushed to protect the cable.

7. Drawings for Construction/Project Managers

a. The following steps must be taken once the size, location, design requirements, cross-connect
termination hardware, and support structures have been determined for the ER/TR:

1) Notify the construction/project manager of the location of the ER/TR for inclusion in
the construction drawings for University review of appropriate schematic, design, or
construction stage of documents.

2) Annotate on the floor plan the location of the ER/TR.

b. Prepare a sketch of the ER/TR. The following information must be included:

1) Overall room dimensions.

2) Electrical service outlet locations.

3) 20 ampere dedicated branch electrical service locations.

4) Earth busbar location.

5) Door opening - size, direction, location.

6) Location and size of all sleeves and/or slots. Include details of each.

7) Location and height of emergency lighting (insure that ladder racking will not block
or otherwise interfere with the lighting).

8) Provide the sketch2 to the construction/ project manager for dissemination to the other
engineering disciplines involved in the design project. Provide AutoCAD version 14 or
greater, in electronic format, and on D size drawing.

2
Reference: UC Davis Campus Standards & Design Guide for drawing content pages, 29, 30 &
31 dated June 2000.
January 2002 Page 34 of 137
CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

CHAPTER 4 THE ADF/BDF/IDF

1. The Design Process

a. The Area Distribution Frame (ADF), Building Distribution Frame (BDF) and Intermediate
Distribution Frame (IDF) refer to the type of termination equipment located within an Equipment
Room (ER) or Telecommunications Room (TR). Reference Chapter 3 for additional information
on ER/TR requirements.

b. The term ADF refers to a cross-connect point for fiber optic cable servicing a geographical area
on the UC Davis campus, and outlaying areas. This cross connect hardware is physically located
within an ER, TR or Controlled Environmental Facility (CEF), and can vary in size depending
upon termination space requirements, (i.e. equipment cabinets and/or equipment racks).

c. The term BDF refers to a cross-connect point for both copper and fiber optic cable serving a
single or multiple buildings within an immediate area. This cross connect hardware is physically
located within an ER or TR, and can vary in size depending upon termination space requirements,
(i.e. equipment cabinets, equipment racks or backboard space).

d. The term IDF refers to a termination point for horizontal copper and fiber optic cables within
a single building and/or floor. This would apply to our horizontal cabling from the NAM to the
110 type cross-connect blocks for voice and RJ-45 patch panels for data, mounted within an
equipment rack, cabinet or mounted onto a wall. This termination hardware is located within an
ER or TR, and can vary in size depending upon termination space requirements.

e. Although the ANSI/TIA/EIA 568-B.1 replaced the term IDF with the term Intermediate Cross-
Connect (IC), on the UC Davis campus the terms ADF, BDF and IDF are used.

f. It is important to note that an IDF can be collocated with an ADF/BDF. Additional space, racks,
electrical and cable management are required to support these locations.

g. The locations of the ADF/BDF/IDF’s must be submitted to the project manager for inclusion in
the construction drawings, and they must be annotated on the floor plan.

2. Termination Hardware Requirements at the ADF/BDF/IDF

a. Patch Panels for Data Copper Horizontal Cabling

1) The cabling in the horizontal segment shall be terminated on patch panels for data
cabling in the IDF. UTP cables supporting data NAM’s must be terminated on T568A
24- or 48-port, High Density, Category 5e patch panels which are mounted on a wall-
mounted bracket, in a free standing welded steel equipment rack, or in an enclosed data
cabinet. Ortronics GigaMo is the preferred and recommended patch panel. If
substitutions are requested by the consultant/contractor, then demonstrated equivalency
must be provided.

2) Reference Specification 04, Table 04-1 for hardware performance specifications.


Performance testing shall be conducted at the component level by a UL certified testing
laboratory, and will include Active Live Channel Testing to insure manufacture and
performance quality.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

3) Cross-connect fields, patch panels, and active equipment in the ADF/BDF/IDF must
be placed to allow cross-connections and interconnections via jumpers, patch cords, and
equipment cables whose lengths per channel do not exceed:

(a) 7 feet per patch cord or jumper in the horizontal cross-connect.

(b) 15 feet total for patch cords or jumpers and line cords used to connect to the
NAM.

4) Manufactured patch cords shall be installed to meet the minimum bending radius of
0.25 inches as specified in ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-B.1-AD-1, Sub clause Addendum
10.2.1.3.

b. Cable Management Panel for Data Horizontal Copper Cabling

1) Cable management panels shall be installed with data patch panels in all wall, rack
and cabinet installations. One cable management panel is recommended for every data
patch panel.

2) Ortronics cable management panel (OR-808044855) is the preferred and


recommended manufacture. If substitutions are requested by the consultant/contractor,
then demonstrated equivalency must be provided.

c. Patch Panels for Fiber Optic Cabling

1) Fiber optic cable for Outside Plant and Riser/Backbone installations shall be
terminated on Duplex 568SC Ultra PC Polish connectors at the ADF/BDF/IDF.

2) All loose-tube Outside Plant fiber optic cables shall have a Buffer Tube Fan Out kit
installed prior to the installation of fiber connectors.

3) Fiber optic cable for horizontal installations shall be terminated on LC type


connectors at the IDF and NAM locations.

4) Fiber optic termination cabinets/terminals shall be wall or rack mounted in either


welded steel equipment racks or enclosed data cabinets.

5) Reference Specification 06 for addition information on fiber optic patch panels, and
Specification 15 for labeling requirements. Reference Figure 4-1 for SC and LC type
connectors

6) All rack and wall-mounted Fiber Optic Closet Connector Housings shall be labeled
accordance with Specification 15.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Figure 4-1 SC and LC Connectors

3. Structures to Support the Cabling in the ADF/BDF/IDF

a. Ladder racking, equipment racks, plywood backboards, data equipment cabinets, and wire
management brackets for the ADF/BDF/IDF equipment must be used to keep the cabling and
equipment organized, and to allow the cable plant to be installed to TIA/EIA 569-A specifications.
Ladder racking must be used to route bulk telecommunications cables within the ER/TR.

1) Ladder racking must be at least 12 inches wide and placed 7 feet above the finished
floor to coincide with the top of the equipment racks and cabinets.

2) Provide proper clearance from top of cable tray and HVAC ducting or other
obstacles.

3) Ladder racking must include vertical sections secured to the floor for riser cables
entering from floor sleeves and slots, and runway drop-offs for racks installed above
equipment racks and cabinets.

4) All ladder racking, to include splice points and T-sections, must be bonded and
grounded to the busbar located within the ER/TR.

5) Free standing equipment racks must be one piece welded steel, 19 inches wide by 84
inches tall, double sided with ANSI/EIA-310D spacing and 12-24 threads. Enclosed
cabinets shall be ordered with the same ANSI/EIA-310D spacing and 12-24 threads to
insure consistency. Metric threaded screws and cage nuts will not be used.

(a) A 3-foot working clearance must be maintained in the front and in the rear of
each equipment rack, and a 2-foot working clearance must be maintained at one
end of the equipment rack or multiple rack assemblies, as a minimum. The front
and rear clearance must be measured from the outermost surface of the
electronic equipment and connecting hardware rather than from the equipment
rack itself since some of these devices may extend beyond the equipment rack.

(b) The equipment racks must be one piece, welded steel, braced to meet Zone 3
seismic requirements, and bonded and grounded to the MTGB/TGB in the
ER/TR in accordance with ANSI/TIA/EIA 607.

(c) Vertical cabling management sections, Single or Double, shall be installed


with each freestanding rack. Cable management sections shall be of the same
manufacture as the free standing rack to insure compatibility and quality.

b. Equipment and connecting hardware may be wall mounted using wood screws on rigid
plywood backboard. Installed plywood backboard shall meet all requirements as listed in Chapter
3, and ANSI/TIA/EIA 569-A.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

1) Horizontal and vertical wire management brackets must be used to manage cables and
jumpers. Velcro cable ties will be used to secure cable bundles and patch cords, where
required. Plastic Ty-Raps will only be used with CR approval, and if used, must meet
installation requirements per TIA/EIA specifications.

2) The cross-connect points must be located near the end of the riser pathways to
minimize the need for cable routing in the ER/TR

3) The distribution cabinets must be configured with jumper troughs to aid in jumper
management. The fiber distribution cabinets must be wall mounted or rack either
mounted in equipment racks or enclosed data cabinets. Reference Specification 06.

4) See Figure 4-2 for an illustration of a typical equipment rack layout.

c. Equipment Racks are used in lieu of Electronic Cabinets based upon:

1) Security, and cleanliness of the room in which the proposed equipment rack is to be
placed.

2) If the communications room is a single use room, for communications access only, and
is a secure, heated and cooled, space with appropriate lighting, electronic racks are used
in lieu of cabinets.

d. All ADF's (Area Distribution Frames) require cabinets. Contact CR for the allocation of space
required for each type of termination within these cabinets.

1) A clear space of 5 to 6 inches above and below the connecting hardware must be
provided for cabling handling.

2) There must be additional backboard space for routing cables, patch cords, and/or
cross-connect jumpers.

3) See Specification 10 for details on these cabinets.

e. Manufactured patch cords shall be installed to meet the minimum bending radius of 0.25 inches
as specified in ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-B.1-AD-1, Sub clause Addendum 10.2.1.3.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Figure 4-2 Equipment Rack Layout

Fiber housing is
at the top of the
equipment rack

In smaller fiber
Network and UTP
networks, all
Electronics items can be
located in the
same equipment
rack/cabinet

Install a 6” x 84” vertical cable


management channel between the
racks

4. Drawings for Construction/Project Managers

a. The following steps must be taken once the size, location, design requirements, termination
hardware, and support structures for the cabling have been determined for the ADF/BDF/IDF:

1) Notify the construction/project manager of the locations of the ADF/BDF/IDF’s for


inclusion in the construction drawings for University review of appropriate schematic,
design, or construction stage of documents.

2) Annotate on the floor plan the locations of the ADF/BDF/IDF’s.

3) Prepare sketches of each ADF/BDF/IDF. The following information must be


included:

(a) Overall room dimensions

(b) Electric service convenience outlet locations

(c) 20 ampere electric service locations

(d) Telecommunications grounding busbar (TGB) location

(e) Door openings - size, direction, location

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

(f) Location and size of sleeves and/or slots, entrance conduit, cable tray
entering room - include details of each

(g) Location and height of lighting (insure that ladder racking will not block or
otherwise interfere with the lighting)

(h) Overhead cable ladder racking system within the room.

(i) Equipment racks, enclosed electronic cabinets, wall mounted cross connect
fields.

(j) ADF/BDF/IDF terminal number, room number.

(k) See Figure 4-3 for an example of a typical ADF/BDF/IDF layout.

b. Provide sketches3 to the construction/project manager for dissemination to the other


engineering disciplines involved in the design project. Provide AutoCAD version 14 or greater in
electronic format, and on D size drawing.

Figure 4-3 Typical ADF/BDF/IDF Layout

3
Reference: UC Davis Campus Standards & Design Guide for drawing content pages, 29, 30 & 31 dated June
2000.
January 2002 Page 40 of 137
CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

CHAPTER 5 THE RISER SEGMENT

1. The Design Process

a. The riser segment consists of the riser cable and the supporting infrastructure within a
building or cluster of buildings that connect the ADF/BDF within the ER/TR.

b. The riser segment must be designed one segment at a time as illustrated in Figure 5-1, even
though the riser cables may follow the same path.

Figure 5-1 Riser Segment

c. This section describes the policies and procedures for the following design activities:

1) The sizing, type and termination of copper and fiber riser cable.

2) Designing the structures to support a vertically aligned riser segment.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

3) Designing the structures to support a horizontally offset riser segment.

2. The Size, Type and Termination of Copper Riser Cable

a. The size of the riser cable is a function of the number of basic, enhanced, and integrated NAM’s
supported by the IDF.

1) The minimum number of copper cable pairs required for each type of outlet is as
follows: basic NAM’s = 1.5 pairs; enhanced NAM’s = 2 pairs, integrated NAM’s = 2.5
pairs.

2) Commonly available copper cable sizes are 50, 100, 200, 300, 600, 900 and 1200
pairs.

3) As an example: The riser cable for an IDF supporting 5 basic NAM’s, 50 enhanced
NAM’s, and 4 integrated NAM’s would be sized as shown in Table 5-1. In this case, the
riser cable would be 200 pairs, the next larger, commonly available copper cable above
100 pair.

Table 5-1 Riser Cable Sizing

Number and Type of NAM’s Number of Pairs Required


5 each Basic NAM’s x 1.5 pairs 7.5
50 each Enhanced NAM’s x 2 pairs 100
4 each Integrated NAM’s x 2.5 pairs 10
Size of Riser Cable 117.5

b. The type of riser cable shall meet the following requirements:

1) Conform to NEC Article 800-3(b)(1), NEC Article 800-3(b)(3), and comply with the
State of California fire codes.

2) The type of riser cable will be ARMM, UL listed CMR rated. This type of cable can be
placed in vertical shafts without the use of conduit. Filled-core Outside Plant cable will
not be used for interior backbone cable.

3) The riser cable is labeled based on a cable number assigned by Communications


Resources. The cable pair numbers will also be included in the label.

4) ARMM riser cables shall be grounded and bonded in accordance with TIA/EIA 607
requirements, as applicable.

c. The method of termination of the copper riser cable will conform to the requirements in
Chapter 4.

3. The Size, Type and Termination of Fiber Optic Riser Cable.

a. The size of the riser fiber optic cable is a function of the number of data NAM’s served by the
IDF, and the type of IDF.

b. The recommended minimum number of fiber strands for each type of IDF is shown in Table 5-
2.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

c. Each IDF fiber cable shall be comprised of 50% multimode and 50% singlemode fiber strands
(example: 12 fiber cable with 6 multimode and 6 singlemode fiber strands). This example is a
suggested fiber count only. Actual fiber type and strand counts will be based upon the
requirements of each project. Contact CR for fiber type and strand information.

d. Riser fiber optic cables shall be terminated on Duplex 568SC type terminations. All fiber
strands shall be terminated and tested in accordance with this standard.

Table 5-2 Recommended Size of Horizontal Fiber Optic Cable

Number of NAM’s Number and Type of Fiber Strands


Required
Less than 24 data NAM’s 12 strands =
6sm + 6mm
Less than 48 or more than 24 data NAM’s 24 strands =
12sm + 12mm
Less than 96 but more than 48 data NAM’s 48 strands=
24sm + 24mm
More than 96 data NAM’s 60 strands=
30sm + 30 mm

e. The type of riser cable shall meet the following requirements:

1) Conform to NEC Article 770, and comply with the State of California fire codes as
interpreted by the State Fire Marshal’s department.

2) The type of riser cable will be UL listed OFNR rated. This type of cable can be placed
in vertical shafts without the use of conduit. Filled-core Outside Plant cable will not be
used for interior backbone cable.

3) The riser cable is labeled based on a cable number assigned by Communications


Resources. The fiber strand numbers will also be included in the label.

4) Manufacture of the cable shall of the same manufacture as the fiber optic termination
equipment to insure compatibility, performance and warranty. Recommended/preferred
cable shall be Infinicor™ MIC® type cable as manufactured by Corning Cable
Systems®.

5) The method of termination of the fiber optic riser cable will conform to the
requirements in Chapter 4.

4. Testing Requirements for Copper and Fiber Optic Riser Cables

a. Riser copper cables shall be tested upon completion of installation. Reference Chapter 2,
Paragraph 9b for testing requirements.

b. All pairs shall be tested and documented.

c. Fiber optic riser cables shall be tested upon completion of installation. Reference Chapter 2,
Paragraph 9d for testing requirements.

d. All strands shall be tested from each end and documented.

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5. Structures to Support Vertically Aligned IDF’s

a. IDF’s that are located in vertically aligned ER/TR's will utilize sleeves and slots as identified
in Chapter 3, Equipment and Telecommunications Rooms.

b. In a multi-story building, grip brackets must be specified to support the riser cable’s weight as
it passes through the ER/TC.

6. Structures to Support Horizontally Offset IDF’s

a. IDF’s that are located in ER/TR’s that are not vertically aligned must be connected with cable
trays, conduits and pull boxes.

b. Cable trays that are used to support horizontal cabling may be used to support riser cables
provided the following conditions are met:

1) The cable trays’ carrying capacity can accommodate the riser cables.

2) The route of the cable trays can be used or modified to accommodate the lateral run
between the IDF and the NAM’s.

3) Refer to Specification 08 for cable tray specifications.

c. Conduit will be used to route the riser cables between the BDF/IDF located in the ER/TR if
cable trays are not used to support the horizontal cabling. Conduit paths are tightly controlled
pathways that must be coordinated with other trades during construction or remodeling.

1) The conduit will be rigid steel conduit (RSC), Electrical Metallic Tubing (EMT), or
Intermediate Metallic Conduit (IMC), 4 inches in diameter.

2) The conduit will be grounded at each end.

3) The conduit will be installed with a pull string and the ends will be bushed to protect
the cable.

4) Conduits that enter the ER/TR must be placed near the corner and as close as
possible to the wall where the backboard is mounted to allow for proper cable racking
and to minimize the cable route inside the ER/TR.

5) Conduit located in the ceiling must protrude into the ER/TR 1 to 2 inches and a
minimum 7½ feet above the finished floor. Conduit will not turn down.

6) Reference Specification 07 for details on conduit fill for riser cables.

Note: A 1-inch conduit must be dedicated from the ER/TR to a sealed junction box on the roof of the
building for use as an antenna access point. This conduit must be grounded using a path other than the
telecommunications ground provided in the ER/TR.

7) Identify on the floor plans the BDF/IDF’s that will be supported using conduit.

8) Determine the number of conduits required. This number is the same as the number of
sleeves required if the ER/TR’s had been vertically stacked.

9) Sketch the proposed route of the conduit on the floor plan.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

d. Pull boxes

1) Determine if any pull boxes are needed along the conduit run.

2) Pull boxes are required in sections of conduit that are 100 feet or more in length or
that contain more than two 90° bends. Pull boxes must not be used in lieu of a bend.

3) Cables must feed straight through a pull box.

4) Reference Specification 12 for details on installing and selecting the proper size of
pull boxes.

5) Notify the project manager of the locations and sizes of the pull boxes for inclusion in
the mechanical or electrical designs.

6) Annotate on the floor plan the locations and sizes of the pull boxes.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

CHAPTER 6 THE CAMPUS SEGMENT

1. The Design Process

a. The campus segment consists of the Outside Plant (OSP) cables and structures needed to
inter-connect the Central Office (CO), Network Operations Center (NOC) and ADF’s, BDF’s and
IDF’s located within Equipment and Telecommunications Rooms (ER/TR).

b. The supporting structure includes underground (in conduit) cables, direct buried cables,
maintenance holes (MH), hand holes (HH), pull boxes (PB), aerial cables, pole lines, pedestals
and outside terminals. The campus segment must be designed and installed to the NESC and
ANSI/EIA/TIA-758 and 758-1 Specifications for Outside Plant Construction.

c. This section describes the policies and procedures for the following design activities:

1) Identifying cable routes from building to building.

2) Selecting cable distribution methods.

3) Determining the aerial, underground and direct buried cable requirements.

4) Identifying the types of cable used in the campus segment.

5) Determining maintenance hole, hand hole, and pull box requirements.

6) Determining electrical protection and bonding/grounding requirements.

7) Provide Outside Plant and Riser cable labeling requirements.

2. Cable Routes

The following steps must be taken to identify the cable routes between new buildings and major
building renovations.

a. Obtain a photocopy of the campus layout map.

b. Determine where the cable entrance point is for each building.

c. Sketch the cable route from the starting point to the terminating point in the buildings to be
served on the campus layout map.

d. Note any obstacles, existing cable facilities, or other underground utilities on the campus
layout map.

e. Note if right-of-way permits or easements are required.

f. Review proposed cable route to determine if conditions exist that require environmental impact
applications. Identify sources of future cable maintenance problems.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

3. Cable Distribution Methods

a. Systems Engineering & Design, Communications Resources and appointed layout engineers
must be contacted to determine the best cable distribution method along the proposed cable route.
The method may be one or a combination of underground (in conduit), direct buried, directional
boring, or aerial.

b. An underground cable system consists of cables placed in buried conduits connected to


maintenance holes (MH), hand holes (HH), and pull boxes (PB). Conduits are also installed from
the building entrance location to poles, pedestals, MH’s and HH’s. Splices shall be located in
maintenance holes only, when required.

c. A direct buried cable system consists of cables and associated splices directly placed in the
earth. The trench runs from the building entrance location to a pole, pedestal, MH or HH. This
method is used only in cases where underground or aerial installations cannot be accomplished.

d. An aerial cable system consists of cables installed on aerial supporting structures such as poles,
sides of buildings, and other above ground structures.

Note: An underground cable system must be used if a conduit route is available between buildings.

4. Underground and Direct Buried Cable Requirements

a. The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) regulates underground and direct-buried
cable placement specifications. All underground conduit and direct buried construction at UC
Davis must conform to CPUC’s General Order Number 128, Section IV.

b. Underground and direct buried cable projects must be designed from engineering drawings
approved by the Manager, Systems Engineering & Design, Communications Resources. These
drawings4 must include the following information:

1) Details of typical trench cross sections showing cable and duct locations in the trench,
clearances from final grade, backfill materials and depths, pavement cutting information,
and compacting requirements for both paved and unpaved areas.

2) Construction notes applicable to the work being performed.

3) A scale drawing showing location ties to existing structures, cable, conduit, utility
boxes, and any conflicting substructures and profile drawings of congested areas where
vertical and horizontal separation from other utilities is critical during cutting and placing
operations and any other areas as requested by UC Davis.

4) A legend explaining symbols of all relevant structures and work operations.

5) Cable types, counts, and directions of feed.

6) Conduit types, dimensions, and wall-to-wall measurements when used with MH, HH,
PB, Pedestals and ER/TR’s.

7) MH drawings showing cable-racking information, applicable cable counts, conduit


assignments, splicing details, north point arrows, and street names. MH drawings must
be consistent with UC Davis Communications Resources standards.

4
Reference: UC Davis Campus Standards & Design Guide for drawing content pages, 29, 30, &
31 dated June 2000.
January 2002 Page 47 of 137
CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

c. All cables entering a building must conform to the bonding and grounding requirements listed
in the NEC, Articles 250, 770 and 800.

d. Warning tape containing metallic tracings must be placed a minimum of 12 inches above the
underground conduit/duct structure and direct buried cable to minimize any chance of an
accidental dig-up. The American Public Works Association has adopted the color orange for the
telecommunications cables. Both ends of the metallic warning tape will be assessable from both
ends after installation. Communications Resources must approve this assess ability prior to
complete of conduit/duct and cable placement.

e. Refer to Specification 13 for details on underground conduit requirements and conduit sizing.

f. The minimum depth of a trench must allow 24 inches of cover from the top of the
conduit/cable to final grade. Local underground utilities must be contacted, (48 hours prior to
excavation or in accordance with statutes regulation utilities), a Underground Service Alert (USA)
call number receipt (ticket) must be present and on site during any construction, and utilities
located before digging to locate all subsurface facilities such as power, gas, water and outdoor
lighting.

g. Table 6-1 shows the vertical or horizontal separations that must be maintained between
telecommunications facilities and other facilities sharing a common trench.

h. See Figures 6-1 and 6-2 for typical trench cross-sections.

i. Install a 12-14 AWG copper wire in any unused conduit structures not programmed for
immediate fiber or copper cable installation, or where all dielectric fiber optic cable is installed
singularly, for the purpose of tracing the conduit/cable route.

Table 6-1 Vertical and Horizontal Separations

Adjacent Structure Minimum Separation


Power or other foreign conduit 3 inches of concrete, or

4 inches of masonry, or

12 inches of well-tamped earth


Pipes (gas, oil, water, etc.) 6 inches when crossing perpendicular

12 inches when parallel


Railroad crossings (except street railways 50 Inches below top of rail

12 feet from the nearest rail if terminating on a pole

7 feet from the nearest rail if terminating on a pole at a


siding
Street railway 3 feet below the top of the rail

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Figure 6-1 Trench cross-section for paved areas

Figure 6-2 Trench cross-section for Non-paved areas.

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5. Cable Types

UC Davis recognizes two types of cable for outside use in the campus segment, copper telephone
cable and fiber optic cable.

a. Outside Plant copper cable:

1) Filled core, (waterproofing compound) cable must be used for underground and
direct buried cable installations. Filled cable preserves the integrity of the cable by
providing physical protection against moisture penetration and seepage.

2) Direct buried cable requires an armored sheath to resist rodent and penetration type
damage.

3) Plastic Insulated Cable (PIC) cables must be marked with cable length, cable code,
date and manufacturer.

4) The following standard designations for copper exchange cable have been assigned
by the Rural Utilities Services (RUS):

(a) PE-39 refers to filled cable with solid polyolefin insulation, and is suitable
for both conduit and direct-buried applications. Cable must meet ANSI ICEA
7CFR-1755-039/390 specifications.

(b) PE-89 refers to filled cable with formed polyolefin insulation for conduit
and direct-buried applications. Cable must meet ANSI ICEA 7CFR-1755-089
and 890 specifications.

b. Outside Plant Fiber Optic cable:

1) Loose Tube, filled core, (waterproofing compound) cable must be used for
underground and direct buried fiber optic cable installations. Filled cable preserves the
integrity of the cable by providing physical protection against moisture penetration and
seepage. Loose tube fiber optic cable is the preferred and recommended cable for Outside
Plant applications at UC Davis.

2) Direct buried fiber optic cable requires an armored sheath to resist rodent and
penetration type damage.

3) Reference Specification 05, Outside Plant Fiber Optic Cable Requirements, for cable
specifications.

6. Maintenance Holes (MH) and Hand holes (HH).

a. MH’s or HH’s are required where maximum cable reel lengths are exceeded, at the
intersection of main and branch conduit runs, and at other locations where access to the cable in a
conduit system is required. Splices will not be located in HH’s or PB’s.

1) UC Davis has accepted the general sizing guidelines for MH’s and HH’s as used by
PacBell. These guidelines or specifications are referred to as PTS, and are based on
ultimate requirements.

2) MH’s and HH’s must meet the weight-bearing standards required under CPUC’s
General Order Number 128.

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3) MH’s, HH’s, and subsurface equipment enclosures in street areas, which are subject
to vehicular traffic, must be constructed to withstand a minimum of H-20-44 highway
loading as designated by the American Association of State Highway Officials. Floors of
manholes must meet the requirements of Public Utilities Code, Section 8054.

4) Precast MH/HH’s must be used whenever possible. Site-cast MH/HH’s may be used
when the size required exceeds precast sizes, obstructions prohibit placing precast
MH/HH’s must be rebuilt, or a custom design is required.

5) MH’s must be sized to meet the maximum conduit requirements and be located to
optimize the use of the associated conduit routes.

6) All conduits must be sealed in a MH/HH system to prevent water entry.

7) The strength of concrete used for MH’s must be at least 3,500 psi.

8) All hardware in maintenance holes will be galvanized. Maintenance holes must be


equipped with:

(a) Bonding and grounding attachments and Uni-struts for racking.

(b) Pulling eyes at least 7/8 inches in diameter, and at a minimum, be located
opposite of each conduit entrance point.

(c) A sump of at least 8 inches in diameter.

(d) An entry ladder.

9) MH’s that are between 12 feet and 20 feet long must use two covers. MH’s over 20
feet long must use three covers. All MH covers must be marked for easy identification (T
for telephone, S for signal, and TV for CCTV/CATV).

10) Conduit entry points:

(a) Located at opposite ends have the MH/HH, and preferably the main conduit
formations should enter the end walls of the MH/HH at a point approximately
halfway between the floor and roof.

(b) For wall racking considerations, design splayed duct bank entrances at the
end walls rather than center placement to ease in the racking of the cables and
splices.

(c) Conduit servicing buildings or other MH/HH’s will be installed using the
subsidiary conduit method.

(d) Lateral conduits entering MH/HH’s will be avoided.

(e) If the total number of conduits being placed is significantly less than the
capacity of the termination MH or cable entrance, conduit should enter at the
lower level. The upper space should be reserved for future additions.

(f) Conduits installed between MH/HH’s and Buildings, and between other
MH/HH’s will be sloped per ANSI/TIA/EIA 758 to insure proper drainage of
water.

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(g) All conduits in buildings and MH/HH’s shall be plugged (firestopping


material, duct seal) to prevent the entrance of water and gases.

11) Cores into existing MH’s can only be done via shop drawings clearly identify the
methods and procedures to be used in the coring process. Shop drawings for coring into
MH’s are to be submitted to Communications Resources for review and comment prior to
commencement of work.

12) The maximum distance allowed between buildings and MH/HH’s and between
MH/HH’s is 600 feet. The installation of plastic or fabric type innerduct within the
conduit should be considered in locations that exceed this distance limitation.

13) No more than two 90º sweeps or bends will be allowed between buildings,
MH/HH’s, and MH/HH to MH/HH’s. 45º conduit angles are preferred. Bends and sweeps
will be concrete encased to prevent the pull rope from cutting through the conduit during
the cable installation.

14) See Figure 6-3 for an example of a typical MH.

Figure 6-3 Maintenance Hole

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b. Hand holes (HH) must be placed at strategic locations in a conduit system to allow installers to
pull cable through the conduit with minimum difficulty and to protect the cable from excess
tension.

1) Conduit entry points must be at opposite ends of the HH.

2) HH’s will shall not be sized over 4 ft x 4ft x 4ft.

3) All HH covers must be marked for easy identification (UC Davis Communications).

4) All HH covers will be spring loaded and secured with hex head type bolts.

5) All HH covers will be rated for the area in which they are installed (i.e. sidewalks,
traffic lanes, etc).

6) See Figure 6-4 for an illustration of a typical HH.

7) HH’s will not be used as a splice points.

Figure 6-4 Hand Hole

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

c. All cables located within the MH and HH’s shall be labeled in accordance with Specification
15.

7. Aerial Cable Requirements

a. Overhead line construction (aerial electric supply and communications systems) specifications
are regulated by the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC), and must conform to General
Order (G.O.) Number 95.

b. Aerial cable projects must be worked from engineering drawings approved by


Communications Resources. These drawings5 must include the following information:

1) Pole data, including pole class, length, heights of attachments, cross arms, pole steps

2) Cable support strand sizes, down guys, anchors, lead-height ratios

3) Span lengths, including appropriate information for slack span constructions, cross-
over, pull-offs, or any other special proposals

4) Grounding and bonding instructions

5) Construction notes that are applicable to the work being performed

6) A legend explaining symbols of all relevant structures

7) Cable counts, types, directions of feed

8) Terminal counts, splicing details

c. Aerial entrances must be limited to small buildings requiring 100 cable pairs or less for service
provider connections.

d. The following steps must be taken to design an aerial plant:

1) Select permanent locations for pole lines while considering:

(a) Future road widening expansion of other utilities special problems such as
road, railway, and power line crossings.

(b) Safety and convenience of workers and the public.

2) Obtain necessary permits and easements for building and maintaining pole lines.

3) Coordinate with other utilities with respect to possible joint use and to minimize
inductive interference.

4) Design the pole line for ultimate needs, taking into consideration pole line
classification, storm loading, and clearance requirements.

5) Poles must be of proper strength, class and length to meet the weights of cables,
wires, and strands supported by them. See Table 6 in CPUC’s G.O. 95 for the proper
setting depths for various pole lengths

5
Reference: UC Davis Campus Standards & Design Guide for drawing content pages, 29, 30 &
31 dated June 2000.
January 2002 Page 54 of 137
CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

6) The most economical span length must be used:

(a) The span from the last pole to the building must not exceed 100 feet.

(b) Slack span construction must be used.

(c) Self-supporting cable must be used.

(d) The suspension strand and cable must be placed on the roadside of the pole
line.

7) For minimum clearances of wires and cables over streets, sidewalks, agricultural
areas, railroads, etc., see Rule 37 and Table 1 of CPUC’s G.O. 95, the NESC and
ANSI/TIA/EIA 758.

8) Aerial cables must enter a building through a conduit with an approved service head.

9) Aerial cables shall be labeled upon entering and prior to exiting a building, MH/HH
in accordance with Specification 15.

8. Splicing Methods and Splice Closures

a. Copper Cable Splices

1) Copper telephone cables will be spliced using an Avaya Communications 710 type
connector (710SC1-5, 710SD1-5 and 710TC1-25) for underground, direct buried, aerial
and building terminal splices.

2) All splices will be accomplished using the conductor fold-back method to ease future
splicing and maintenance efforts.

b. Fiber Optic Cable Splices

1) All fiber optic cables on the UC Davis campus will be either installed as a home run
from the NOC to the ER/TR, or spliced within the ER/TR (ADF/BDF/IDF). Therefore,
prior approval from Communications Resources must be obtained prior to splicing fiber
optic cables in the field.

2) Should a field splices be required, both Multimode and Singlemode OSP fiber cables
will be spliced using a CR approved fusion splicing machine only. Mechanical splices
will not be allowed. Heat shrink type fusion protectors with a strength member shall be
used for all fusion splices.

3) The larger Singlemode type splice trays shall be used for both Multimode and
Singlemode splices to allow additional space for retaining fiber loops and controlling
bend radius.

4) A minimum of 30 ft of slack fiber optic cable will be provided in the MH/HH after
splicing activities are completed. This slack is required to allow splicing activities to take
place outside of the MH/HH and in a controlled environment (e.g. splicing trailer/van).
This slack shall be properly stored and lashed to the MH/HH racks, and will not interfere
with existing cables and splice closures.

5) All splices shall be inspected by a Communication Resources designated


representative prior to sealing the splice.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

c. Copper Cable Splice Closures

1) Copper cable splices (Underground and Direct Buried) shall be sealed using a 3M®
Better Buried (BB) type closure. Obtain CR approval prior to the installation and the
filling of this closure.

2) Aerial cables, and in some applications underground and direct buried, copper cable
splices shall be sealed using a stainless steel splice closure from Preformed Line
Products® (PLP).

3) Both the 3M BB and the PLP closure shall be sized to allow sufficient interior
space for the fold-back method of splicing, and to allow for the addition of future bridge
spliced cables.

4) The PLP closure shall be air pressure tested (flash-tested) upon installation and will
not be filled with encapsulate. All 3M® BB’s will be filled with encapsulate.

5) All splice closures shall be properly racked and lashed to the MH/HH racks.

6) All splice closures shall be properly grounded to the MH/HH grounding and bonding
system.

7) All splices shall be inspected by a Communication Resources designated


representative prior to the encapsulation and sealing the splice.

d. Fiber Optic Splice Closures

1) Fiber optic cable splices shall be sealed using a Preformed Line Products® Coyote®
or Corning Cable Systems type fiber optic cable closure.

2) Allow manufactures recommended slack (typically 8 to 10 ft) within the Coyote®


closure to facilitate present and future fiber splicing and maintenance activities.

3) All splice closures shall be properly racked and lashed to the MH/HH racks.

4) All splice closures shall be properly grounded to the MH/HH grounding system, when
applicable.

e. All Copper and Fiber Optic cables shall be labeled in accordance with Specification 15.

9. Building Entrance Terminals

a. Outside Plant copper cables entering the ADF/BDF/IDF shall be terminated on wall-mounted
building entrance protector terminal(s) equipped with Gas Tube with Heat Coils type (4B1-EW)
protector modules.

b. Building entrance terminals shall be equipped with full and lockable covers.

c. Building entrance terminals will not be located directly above the room entrance conduits, slots
or sleeves. Terminals shall be mounted in a location on the backboard that will allow sufficient
space for future cable and cross-connect installations.

d. Copper cables up to and including 100 pairs shall be terminated on protected terminals
equipped with a splice chamber and factory installed 710 type splice modules on the In-side (field
side), and 110 type terminations on the Out-side (equipment side).

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

e. Copper cables over 100 pairs shall be terminated on individual 100 pair protected terminals
equipped with a factory installed, 26AWG swivel cable stub on the In-side (field side), and 110
type terminations on the Out-side (equipment side). Cable stubs shall be no shorter than 2 feet in
length after installation.

f. Factory cable stubs shall be spliced with 710 type splice modules to the Outside Plant copper
cable, using the fold-back splice method. An indoor rated splice closure and 710 type connectors
shall be installed and securely mounted to the plywood backboard or existing cable ladder. Indoor
closures will not be encapsulated.

g. In addition to each building entrance terminal installed, a separate 110-type termination block
shall be installed adjacent to the building entrance terminal, and an indoor rated copper cable
installed and terminated, pair for pair, to provide a separate cross-connect point. Reference Figure
09-6, Type 3A Wall-Mounted Layout.

h. All terminals shall be labeled in accordance with Specification 15.

10. Electrical Protection and Bonding/Grounding Requirements

a. Any system installed on the UC Davis campus must conform to the NEC for electrical, and
bonding/grounding requirements. Also, buildings shall meet ANSI/TIA/EIA-607 (1994)
Commercial Building Grounding and Bonding Requirements for Telecommunications

b. See Specification 14 for details on electrical protection, bonding/grounding requirements.

c. All underground, direct-buried and aerial cables (copper and fiber) shall be properly grounded
and bonded at each end, and in each MH/HH, where applicable.

11. Testing Requirements for Campus Cables

a. Campus copper cables shall be tested upon completion of installation. Reference Chapter 2,
Paragraph 9b for testing requirements.

b. All pairs shall be tested and documented.

c. Campus Outside Plant and Riser fiber optic cables shall be tested upon completion of
installation. Reference Chapter 2, Paragraph 10d for testing requirements.

d. All strands shall be tested from each end and documented.

12. Labeling Requirements

All outside plant and riser cables and termination housings (copper and fiber optic) shall be
labeled in accordance with Specification 15.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

CHAPTER 7 IN-BUILDING RADIO SYSTEMS

1. The Design Process.

a. This chapter establishes the policies and procedures regarding an in-building radio system
required in new campus buildings.

b. This chapter also covers the needs assessment, specifications, type, cost evaluation, testing and
acceptance of an in-building radio system.

2. General Radio Communications Coverage.

a. All buildings require the capability to support radio communications of the local public safety
entities (Fire, Police etc.)

b. This document provides guidance in support of the formal Radio System Coverage Evaluation /
In-Building Radio Communication Systems that requires consideration of funding appropriations
for specific radio system coverage of each newly constructed facility and/or consideration for
existing facilities that may be impacted by the new construction. In many cases, a placeholder is
to be used for in-building amplification costs, based on historical data, and a recommendation of
$35,000 should be used for capital projects exceeding 5000 square feet or multi-level structures.
Refine estimate during cost evaluation.

3. Definitions.

BTS – Base Transceiver Station also known as the donor site.


DBm – dB, decibels, in milli-watts. A unit of measure for RF signal level.
Distributive Antenna – A system of non-radiating cable connected to an array of passive antenna.
Donor – Base Transceiver Station also known as the donor site.
Donor channel – The frequency in which the donor site transmits digital control information
Grade of Service – Typical service is stated as 95% coverage, 95% calls Received and Transmitted
at Circuit Merit Level 3 (CM3). Reference Table 7-1, Circuit Merit Rating.
Fiber Optic – Optical transport of radio signals over fiber optic cable.
Off – Air Repeater – A repeater that receives frequencies from and antenna and amplifies and
retransmits these frequencies.
NPSPAC – National Public Safety planning and Advisory Committee
FCC – Federal Communications Commission

4. General Policy

a. Except as otherwise provided, no person shall erect, construct, change the use of or provide an
addition of more than 20% to, any building or structure or any part thereof, or cause the same to be
done which fails to support adequate radio coverage for the clients of the University of California,
Davis 800 MHz Trunked Communications System, (including, but not limited to, Firefighters,
Police Officers or Emergency Response Personnel).

b. For purposed of this section, adequate radio coverage shall include all of the following:

1) A minimum signal strength of -95 dBm available in 95% of the area of each floor of
the building or structure when transmitted from the campus Central Transceiver of the
University of California, Davis 800 MHz Trunked Communications System. 6

6
When measuring the performance of a bi-directional amplifier, signal strength measurements are
January 2002 Page 58 of 137
CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

2) A minimum signal strength of -95 dBm received at the campus Central Transceiver
of the University of California, Davis 800 MHz Trunked Communications System when
transmitted from 95% of the area of each floor of the building.

3) The frequency range which must be supported shall be 821-823 MHz and 866-868
MHz

4) A 100% reliability factor.

c. Amplification Systems Allowed. Buildings and structures which cannot support the required
level of radio coverage shall be equipped with:

1) An internal multiple antenna system with or without FCC type accepted bi-directional
800 MHz amplifiers as needed.

2) Or radiating cable system (leaky coax).

3) If any part of the installed system or systems contains an electrically powered


component, the system shall be capable of operating on an independent battery and/or
generator system for a period of at least twelve (12) hours without external power input.
The battery system shall automatically charge in the presence of an external power input.
If used, bi-directional amplifiers shall include filters to reduce adjacent frequency
interference at least 35 dB below the NPSPAC band. The filters shall be tuned to 825
MHz and to 870 MHz so that they will be 35 dB below the NPSPAC frequencies of 824
MHz and 869 MHz respectively. Other settings may be used if they don’t attenuate the
NPSPAC frequencies and further if they are not more than one MHz from the NPSPAC
frequencies.

d. Evaluation Process. The evaluation process for determining the need for in-building
amplification is conducted in a minimum of three phases: Pre-construction, construction, and
acceptance/implementation.

1) Pre-construction Phase. Before the construction of the new building, basic


information can be gathered to begin the process of determining the need, type and actual
implementation of augmentation to the radio system. In most cases, the following
information must be known to properly design and cost estimate an in-building radio
system.

(a) New Building Information.

(1) Type/Size of building – single story, multi-level, square foot

(2) If multi-level, number of stories

(3) Orientation of building – above/below ground, line of sight

(4) Construction of the outer and inner walls. – Plaster, drywall, brick.

(5) Proposed equipment locations – Equipment rooms, cableways,


conduits.

(6) Building location - Longitude and latitude coordinates.

based on one input signal adequate to obtain a maximum continuous operating output level.

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(7) Local building code requirements and special requirements.

(8) Building Blueprints or drawings.

(b) Existing System Information.

(1) BTS location – Longitude and latitude coordinates.

(2) Donor channel frequency – Specific digital channel to enhance


radio coverage.

(3) Grade of Service required meeting objective.

(4) Type of subscriber unit.

(5) Number of channels and their frequencies.

(6) Signal strength of donor site at the building location.

2) With the information above, the following steps can establish determining the
potential need for an in-building radio system.

3) Needs Determination - Signal Strength Measurements. At the planned construction


site, measure (or have measured) the signal strength of the donor control channel:

a) If the signal strength of the donor is –95 dBm or less on the outside of the
building, the probability of additional in-building coverage is high.

b) If the signal strength of the donor is greater than –95 dBm, determine the
expected signal strength of the donor by subtracting the sum of the interior
losses due to walls, doors and windows from the ambient signal outside the
building. (See Table 7-2)

c) If a signal strength of -95 dBm or greater is calculated at the inner most


point of the building, an in building system may not be required.

d) If the signal strength is calculated at –95 dBm or less, an in-building system


is warranted.

e) To determine signal strengths for specific areas on campus and evaluate the
impact of the facility on existing structures, consult the latest UC Davis Outdoor
RF Survey report.

f) If determined that In-building amplification is required for either the


proposed site or existing structures impacted by the proposed construction,
provide a placeholder in the budget for cost of a communication system based
on results of the above.

e. Construction Phase. As the construction progresses, refinements to the placeholder budget


should be made to ensure adequate funds are available to cover the cost of providing in-building
amplification to the new facility and to re-evaluate the impact on existing structures. Re-visiting
the specifications from the initial evaluation will fine-tune the proposed cost line item.

f. Acceptance / Implementation Phase. Using criteria from Section 7, the Project Manager will
accept the In-Building amplification measurements, ensuring they are within design specification.
The budget line item may be closed out upon final acceptance.

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5. Cost Evaluation / RFSP

a. Once a determination has been made that in-building amplification is required for the proposed
facility or as an augmentation to existing facilities impacted by the new facility, cost estimating an
in building coverage system is mostly an academic process. The first step in this process is to
determine if the system should be fiber based or an Off- air system. Each system has it own
unique advantages and disadvantages. Table 2 identifies several cost considerations that may be
quantified in the planning stage.

b. Off – Air Repeater. If dark fiber is not present or too expensive to route to the building, in
building coverage can be provided through the use of Bi-Directional Amplifiers and distributed
antenna system or leaky feeder radiating cable. Off – Air Repeater systems are simple and reliable
and typically cost less than fiber-based solutions. They are however, susceptible to interference
caused by large level signals that are close to the pass band of the amplifier. Extra RF filtering can
be engineered into the system design to reject the unwanted signals. Typical applications have a
central head end amplifier, which drives the distributed antenna or leaky feeder cable and the
remainder of the antenna system. Adding the cost of the amplifier installed plus the cost of the
distributed cable system can determine a budgetary cost estimate of an Off-Air Repeater system. 3

6. Vendor Request

a. Request for Survey and Proposal (RFSP) should be created to provide to multiple wireless
system vendors.

b. The format of the RFP can be mandated or left open to each vendor. However, the RFSP
should at the minimum include the following sections:

1) Cover Letter stating overall system price

2) Company Capabilities

3) Statement of Work

4) System Description

5) System Block Diagram

6) General Schedule

7) Turnkey Pricing 4

8) Conditions of Quotation

9) Acceptance Test Plan (ATP)

10) Maintenance, Service and Warranty

3
NOTE: Radiating cable is typically used in narrow spaces such as tunnels and hallways. This is
due the high coupling loss between the radiating cable and subscriber unit. As well, radiating
cable has limited propagation and poor wall penetration characteristics.
4
Overall project management of the implementation of an in building coverage system should be
offered and included in the turnkey proposal submitted.
January 2002 Page 61 of 137
CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

11) The RFSP should clearly state the areas where coverage is needed, the grade of
service expected (GOS), and construction schedule of the building in process.
Additionally, the RFP should include the information gathered in the pre-construction
assessment phase of this policy.

7. Testing and Acceptance

a. Once implemented, the RF coverage system should be tested via the pre-determined
Acceptance Test Plan (ATP).

b. The ATP should include personnel from Information and Educational Technology, Police,
Fire, Safety and Vendor. A walk through test should be completed and any discrepancies noted
and resolved by the vendor.

c. When an in-building radio system is required, and upon completion of project installation, it
will be the Project Manager’s responsibility to have the radio system tested to ensure that two-way
coverage on each floor of the building are within General policy requirements as prescribed
below:

d. Each floor of the building shall be divided into a grid of approximately twenty (20) equal
areas.

e. The test shall be conducted using a Motorola MTS 2000, or equivalent, portable radio, talking
through the campus Central Transceiver of the University of California, Davis 800 MHz Trunked
Communications System.

f. A spot located approximately in the center of a grid area will be selected for the test.

g. The radio will be keyed to verify two-way communications to and from the outside of the
building through the campus Central Transceiver.

h. Once the spot has been selected, prospecting for a better spot within the grid area will not be
permitted.

i. Each grid area will be tested for transmission/reception, minimum signal strength of –95 dBm.
If signal strength fails to meet the requirement, the grid area shall be marked as a fail.

j. A maximum of two (2) nonadjacent areas will be allowed to fail the test. In the event that
three (3) of the areas fail the test, in order to be more statistically accurate, the floor may be
divided into forty (40) equal areas.

k. In such event, a maximum of four (4) nonadjacent areas will be allowed to fail the test.

l. After the forty (40) -area tests, if the system continues to fail, the project Manager shall have
the system altered to meet the 95% coverage requirement.

m. The gain values of all amplifiers shall be measured and the test measurement results shall be
kept on file with Communications Resources, a Division of Information and Educational
Technology, so that the measurements can be verified each year during the annual tests. In the
event that the measurement results became lost, the building owner will be required to rerun the
acceptance test to reestablish, the gain values.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

8. Additional System Testing

a. Communications Resources will periodically test in-building amplification systems.

b. Results of the testing will be compared to designed specifications and corrective action taken
if required maintaining the system within the desired design specification.

9. Qualifications of Testing Personnel

a. Communications Resources shall be responsible for conducting or contracting system testing.


All tests shall be conducted, documented and signed by a person in possession of a current FCC
license, or a current technician certification issued by the Associated Public-Safety
Communications Officials International (APCO) or the Personal Communications Industry
Association (PCIA).

b. All test records shall be retained on the inspected premises and a copy submitted to
Communications Resources and to the Police/Fire Department officials.

10. UC Davis Outdoor RF Survey Report

a. At the discretion of Communications Resources, but no less than semi-annually, the campus
shall conduct an Outdoor RF Survey mapping the campus footprint for RF energy.

b. The report should specify specific frequencies, coverage with relative signal strength. Highlight
those areas of signal strength below standards.

11. Annual Tests

a. When an in-building radio system is installed, Communications Resources shall test all active
components of the system, including but not limited to amplifiers, power supplies and backup
batteries, a minimum of once every twelve (12) months.

b. Amplifiers shall be tested to ensure that the gain is the same as it was upon initial installation
and acceptance. Backup batteries and power supplies shall be tested under load for a period of one
(1) hour to verify that, they will properly operate during an actual power outage. If within the one
(1) hour test period, in the opinion of the testing technician, the battery exhibits symptoms of
failure, the test shall be extended for additional one (1) hour periods until the /testing technician
confirms the integrity of the battery. All other active components shall be checked to determine
that they are operating within the manufacturer’s specifications for the intended purpose.

12. Five-Year Tests

In addition to the annual test, Communications Resources shall perform a radio coverage test a minimum of
once every five (5) years to ensure that the radio system continues to meet the requirements of the original
acceptance test. The procedure set forth above shall apply to such tests.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

13. Field Testing

a. Police and fire personnel, after providing reasonable notice to Communications Resources, shall
have the right to enter property to conduct field-testing to be certain that the required level of radio
coverage is present.

b. Discrepancies from field-testing and recorded tests shall immediately be brought to the attention
of Communications Resources. Communications Resources will provide corrective action in
response to reported discrepancies.

Table 7-1 OES/ACS Circuit Merit Rating System

The California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (OES) Auxiliary Communications Service
(ACS) Circuit Merit Rating System
Rating Transmission Quality
CM 5 Completely clear, each word fully understood.
CM 4 Clear with slight amount of static and/or interference.
CM 3 Static and/or interference present, but the bulk of the transmission is
understood without having to be repeated. Deemed to be the margin of
acceptable, professional communications.
CM 2 Static and interference are prevalent and words are missing.
CM 1 Signal is barely evident and words are not understandable.
CM 0 Nothing heard

Table 7-2 RF Loss Characteristics

ITEM
LOSS (dB)
Loss from Structured Components
Ceiling Duct 1-8
Metal Pole (small) 3
Metal Catwalk 5
Large I-Beam 8-10
Concrete Block Wall 13-20
One Floor 20-30
One Floor and One Wall 40-50

Machinery

Light Machinery 1-4


Metallic Hoppers 3-6
General Machinery (10-20 sq ft) 5-10
Heavy Machinery (>20 sq ft) 10-15

Inventory

Light Textile 3-5


Empty Cardboard 3-6
Metal Inventory 4-7
Heavy Textile 8-11

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Table 7-3 In-building RF Coverage System Cost Estimating

ITEM COST
Coax Cable Installed
Antenna Installed
Amplifier Low Power Installed
Amplifier High Power Installed
Fiber Antenna Installed
Fiber Support Equipment Installed

CHAPTER 8 WIRELESS NETWORK SYSTEMS


January 2002 Page 65 of 137
CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

1. This chapter establishes the policies and procedures regarding the specifications, type, testing
and acceptance of a wireless network system.

2. At the time of this of publication, the System Engineering & Design, UC Davis
communications Resources office is evaluating current and emerging wireless standards, as well
as, the different manufacture’s wireless products.

3. This chapter will be updated in future revisions as this new system progresses.

CHAPTER 9 CAD DRAWING STANDARDS

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

1. Communication OSP drawing requirements for SED-CADD

This section establishes the procedures regarding the development of OSP communication drawings.
Included in this section are:

a. Table 9-1 shows the proper OSP drawing layering convention used for all communication
cable, fiber, conduit and maintenance holes. This convention applies to text, lines and symbols.

b. CAD communication drawings shall be produced using AutoCAD 2000 of later and saved in
the DWG format.

Table 9-1 OSP Layer Convention Details

Layer Name Layer Description Layer Color Layer Linetype


0 Blank 7 (White) Continuous
Butterfly Maintenance hole Butterfly and details 7 (White) Continuous
Cable Cable lines 12 (Dk.Red) Continuous
Cable_Splice Cable Splice symbols 12 (Dk.Red) Continuous
Cabletxt Cable text 7 (White) Continuous
Coax Coax lines 4 (Cyan) Continuous
Coaxtxt Coax text 7(White) Continuons
Conduit Conduit lines 104 (Green) Continuous
Condtxt Conduit text 7 (White) Continuous
Fiber Fiber lines & symbols 30 (Orange) Continuous
Fibtxt Fiber text 7 (White) Continuous
Title Title Block, and North Arrow 7 (White) Continuous
Mhcable Manhole symbols (Cable Size 1"=40') 40 (Gold) Continuous
Mhcabletxt Manhole text (Cable Size 1"=40') 7 (White) Continuous
Mhcond Manhole symbols (Conduit Size 1"=200') 40 (Gold) Continuous
Mhcondtxt Manhole text (Conduit Size 1"=200') 7 (White) Continuous

c. Figure 9-1 shows the proper format used for cable lines and callouts used on the Outside Plant
copper cable drawings.

Figure 9-1 OSP Drawing Copper Cable Callout

No.of Cable Pairs


Cable Line

AFMW-25 200FT Total Footage


Type of Cable
1406,14-31
XD, 13 Cable Count

Cable No. No. of Dead Cable Pairs

d. Figure 9-2 shows the proper format used for Outside Plant fiber lines and callouts used on the
communication drawings.

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Figure 9-3 OSP Drawing Fiber Optic Cable Callout

Fiber Count Total Footage Term. No. Singlemode Count

Singlemode

16-F 240 FT
Fiber Line
3896-1.1/3904-1.1_F01,1-7:SM
From CAAN#
3896-1.1/3904-1.1_F01.8-16:MM

Multimode
Term. No. To CAAN #

Unique Fiber Callout Multimode Count

e. Figure 9-4 shows the proper format used for Outside Plant cable terminal callouts used on the
communication drawings.

Figure 9-4 OSP Drawing Terminal Callouts

Terminal Floor No. Term. No.

Cable No. into


Terminal T-0.1 Cable Count Coming into Terminal

In:1306,1-30 Coming out of Terminal


Cable Count
Cable No. Out Out:1306,24-30
of terminal

If same cable leaves the terminal the


Callout will be the same. If a new cable
leaves the terminal the callout will change.

f. Figure 9-5 shows the proper format used for Outside Plant conduit line and callouts used on
the communication drawings

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Figure 9-5 OSP Drawing Maintenance Hole Callouts

Maintenance Hole
Callout Number of Conduit

Conduit Size
Maintenance
Hole symbol on
conduit layer

Conduit Line Length of Conduit

g. Table 9-2 defines the symbols used on the communications drawings.

Table 9-2 OSP Drawing Callouts

Symbol Description Layer Color Layer Linetype

40 (Gold)
Conduit MH on Conduit Layer Continuous

Fiber Symbol 30 (Orange) Continuous

104 (Green)
Cable/Fiber MH Symbols Continuous

Cable Straight Splice Continuous


12 (Red)
12 (Red)
Cable Splice with Branch Continuous

12 (Red)
Cable Terminal Box Termination Continuous

12 (Red)
Cable Cross-Connect Hardware Continuous

2. Communication ISP drawing requirements for SED-CADD

a. This section establishes the procedures regarding the development of Inside Plant
communication drawings.
January 2002 Page 69 of 137
CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

b. NAM’s, ADF’s, BDF’s, IDF’s symbols and callouts used on the communication drawings.

c. Layering convention for test fonts, line type, color, line thickness and name.

d. Size convention for symbols and text fonts.

Table 9-3 ISP Floor plan Symbols and Descriptions

Symbol Description Layer Color Layer Name

Indicates Voice communication NAM. Cyan NAM_ACTIVE

Indicates Data NAM Cyan NAM_ACTIVE

Indicates Wall Phone Cyan NAM_ACTIVE


W
Indicates combination of Voice and Data
Cyan NAM_ACTIVE
NAM.

Indicates the Nam is located on furniture.


Cyan NAM_ACTIVE
Both voice and Data.

Indicates NAMs located on the floor. Cyan NAM_ACTIVE

Indicates that fiber runs through here. Cyan NAM_ACTIVE


F

Indicates where the Terminal is located on


Magenta TERMINAL
the Floor plan.

Indicates FireWall Orange Firewall

Indicates Double Nam (2 Home Run of


Cyan NAM_ACTIVE
Wire)

Indicates Master Antenna Television


MATV Cyan NAM_ACTIVE
System
The NAMS are located on the walls with the center point to the wall and the triangles are equilateral.

Table 9-4 ISP Floorplans – NAM Reference Layers

Layer Name Layer Description Layer Color Layer Linetype


Cable Cable Runs 12 (Dk. Red) Continuous

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Continuous with
Fiber Fiber Runs 30 (Orange)
Fiber Symbols
Horizontal Cable/Fiber Pathways,
Hor_pathway 104 (Green) Continuous
Cabletrays, J-hooks, & Panduit
Nam All NAM Symbols with text 161(Lt. Blue) Continuous
Notes Miscellaneous Notes 7 (White) Continuous
Roomno All floor plan room numbers 104 (Green) Continuous
Terminals All Comm. Terminals with text 6 (Magenta) Continuous

Table 9-5 ISP Closet Bird’s Eye Details – Comm. Room Layering Convention

Layer Name Layer Description Layer Color Layer Linetype


7ft-cabletray-aff 7 foot high cable tray Above Finish Floor 9 (Grey) Continuous
8ft-cabletray-aff 8 foot high cable tray Above Finish Floor 9 (Grey) Continuous
Cabinets Communication Cabinets 6 (Magenta) Continuous
Cable ISP Terminal Cable Runs 12 (Dk. Red) Continuons
Coax Coax 4 (Cyan) Continuons
Conduits Conduits 104 (Green) Continuons
Dimensions Dimension lines 7 (White) Continuous
Fiber ISP Terminal Fiber Runs 12 (Dk. Red) Continuous
Misc-equip Miscellaneous equipment 7 (White) Continuous

3. Communication Drawing Requirements for Contractors

a. This section describes the communication drawing requirements that contractors shall use in the
creation of CAD drawings.

b. Contractors shall conform to the UCD Campus Standards & Design Guide, dated August 1999,
Content of Drawings, page 29.

c. Contractors shall follow the guidelines provide in section 1 and 2 of this chapter on OSP and
ISP drawing requirements.

APPENDIX A Specifications

SPECIFICATION 01 NAM FACEPLATES, SURFACE MOUNT BOXES AND MODULES .....................................................73

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SPECIFICATION 02 NAM NUMBERING, MATRIX AND LABELING REQUIREMENTS .....................................................75

SPECIFICATION 03 NAM CABLING REQUIREMENTS...................................................................................................80

SPECIFICATION 04 NAM PATCH PANEL AND PATCH CORD REQUIREMENTS .............................................................83

SPECIFICATION 05 OUTSIDE PLANT FIBER OPTIC CABLE REQUIREMENTS .................................................................89

SPECIFICATION 06 FIBER OPTIC PATCH PANEL/PATCH CORDS ..................................................................................93

SPECIFICATION 07 INTERIOR HORIZONTAL CONDUIT .................................................................................................94

SPECIFICATION 08 CABLE TRAYS/LADDERS ..............................................................................................................96

SPECIFICATION 09 COLOR CODES FOR CROSS CONNECT FIELDS................................................................................97

SPECIFICATION 10 DISTRIBUTION CABINETS ..............................................................................................................98

SPECIFICATION 11 RISER CABLE REQUIREMENTS ....................................................................................................108

SPECIFICATION 12 INTERIOR PULL BOXES ...............................................................................................................109

SPECIFICATION 13 CONDUIT FOR UNDERGROUND CABLING ....................................................................................111

SPECIFICATION 14 ELECTRICAL PROTECTIONS, BONDING AND GROUNDING ...........................................................113

SPECIFICATION 15 OUTSIDE PLANT AND RISER CABLE LABELING REQUIREMENTS..................................................116

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Specification 01 NAM Faceplates, Surface Mount Boxes and Modules

These specifications provide a minimum configuration that must be used when planning new construction or major
remodeling of an existing facility. Communications Resources must be consulted during the early utilities planning
phase of the project since each site may have technical requirements requiring a modification of these specifications.

1. The Network Access Module (NAM) is the connector on which the UTP cable and/or fiber optic cable
terminates at the work area.

2. The term “NAM” is not interchangeable with faceplate, outlet or work area outlet (WOA).

3. Faceplates, Surface Mount Interface Boxes and 106-Type Receptacles:

a. NAM’s shall be installed using Flush Mounted faceplates and Surface Mount Interface Boxes.
Ortronics TracJack are the preferred and recommended manufacture. Fog White is the
standard color for UC Davis. Faceplates color can also match the décor of the room area, to
include metal type faceplates for laboratories, where required.

b. NAM’s providing Voice and Data service only shall be installed using the faceplates listed in
Table 01-1.

c. NAM’s providing Voice, Data and Fiber Optic shall be installed using a 6-Port Surface Mount
Box (Ortronics Part Number OR-62100041).

d. NAM’s providing Fiber Optic only shall be installed using a 4-Port Surface Mount Box
(Ortronics® 40400043).

e. 106-Type Receptacles, as listed in Table 01-1, will be used when installing NAM’s in metallic
type surface raceways using Electrical receptacle type faceplates.

f. Modular furniture adapters, bezels and brackets shall be used when installing TracJack
modules on modular furniture and Wiremold raceway products. Adapters, bezels and brackets
shall meet the manufactures specific requirements for their product. The color of the adapters,
bezels and brackets shall match the particular furniture or Wiremold item.

g. Table 01-1 provides a summary of preferred and recommended faceplate products. If


substitutions are requested by the consultant/contractor, then demonstrated equivalency must be
provided. Reference Ortronics web site for additional information.
(http://www.ortronics.com/usa/channel_solutions/default.asp?channel=gigamo)

4. Copper Information Modules.

a. NAM’s servicing UTP Voice and Data circuits shall be terminated using Cat 5e, 8P8C, 568A,
180°-exit modules. Ortronics TracJack, GigaMo solution modules are the preferred and
recommended manufacture. Performance testing shall be conducted at the component level by a
UL certified testing laboratory, and include Active Live Channel Testing to insure manufacture
and performance quality. If substitutions are requested by the consultant/contractor, then
demonstrated equivalency must be provided. The standard NAM module colors are Orange for
data and Fog White for voice. No substitutions in these colors will be allowed.

b. Table 01-2 provides a summary of approved modules. Reference Ortronics web site for
additional information.
(http://www.ortronics.com/usa/channel_solutions/default.asp?channel=gigamo)

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

c. Blank modules will be installed when an active module is not in place. Blank color will match
the color of the faceplate.

Table 01-1 NAM Faceplates and Surface Mount Boxes

Ortronics Part Description


Number
OR-40300548 Single Gang, Holds 2 TracJack, Fog White
OR-40300546 Single Gang, Holds 4 TracJack, Fog White
OR-40300545 Single Gang, Holds 6 TracJack, Fog White
OR-40300185 Surface Mount Box, Single Gang, Fog White
OR-40400054 Surface Mount Box, 2-Port, TracJack, Fog White
OR-40400072 Surface Mount Box, 4-Port, TracJack, Fog White
OR-40800017 106-Type Receptacles, 2-Port, TracJack, Fog White
OR-40800019 106-Type Receptacles, 4-Port, TracJack, Fog White
OR-62100041 Surface Mount Box, 6-Port TracJack, Fog White (for Fiber Optic and Copper NAM’s)
OR-62100040 Bottom adapter plate for OR-62100041
OR-40400043 Surface Mount Box, Dual Gang (Fiber Optic Only)
OR-854045438 Baseplate Fiber Adapter, 1-LC, for OR-40400043
OR-854045212 Single Gang, Holds 1 TracJack for Wall-Mounted Telephone, Stainless Steel

Table 01-2 Copper and Fiber NAM Modules

Ortronics® Part Description


Number
OR-63750001-23 TracJack, 1-RJ-45 Module, 8P8C, T568A/B, 180° degree exit, Orange for Data
OR-63750001 TracJack 1-RJ-45 Module, 8P8C, T568A/B, 180° degree exit, Fog White for Voice
OR-42100002 TracJack Blank Module, Fog White
OR-63700039 TracJack LC Multimode, 180° degree exit, Beige
OR-63700031 TracJack LC Singlemode, 180° degree exit, Blue

5. Fiber Optic Modules. NAM’s providing Multimode and/or Singlemode Fiber to the Desktop (FTTD)
will use LC type fiber optic modules.

a. The Ortronics TracJack faceplate module is the preferred and recommended manufacture.
If substitutions are requested by the consultant/contractor, then demonstrated equivalency must be
provided.

b. Table 01-2 provides a summary of approved modules. Reference Ortronics web site for
additional information.
(http://www.ortronics.com/usa/channel_solutions/default.asp?channel=gigamo)

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Specification 02 NAM Numbering, Matrix and Labeling Requirements

These specifications provide a minimum configuration that must be used when planning new construction or major
remodeling of an existing facility. Communications Resources must be consulted during the early utilities planning
phase of the project since each site may have technical requirements requiring a modification of these specifications.

1. NAM Numbering:

a. Contact the UC Davis Project Line Assignor to obtain blocks of NAM numbers for project
assignment. Contact the CR Program Manager for contact information.

b. The UC Davis Project Line Assignor will need to know how many Voice, Data and Master
Antenna Television (MATV) NAM numbers the Project Consultant requires.

c. Assign the NAM numbers to the floor plans.

2. NAM Matrices:

a. Ensure the Contractor provides a cross connect sheet (NAM Voice, Data, Master Antenna
Television [MATV] and Fiber to the Desktop [FTTD] Matrix) which identifies all cross-connects
from the NAM to the IDF. Reference Table 02-1, 02-2 and 02-3.

b. Prepare and provide Contract specifications that will instruct the Cabling Contractor on the use
and maintenance of the NAM Matrices during the project construction.

3. NAM Labeling: The UC Davis Communications Resources Project Line Assigner will provide the
project consultant a unique 6-digit (7-digit for FTTD) NAM number. This number is referred to as a NAM
number or NAM ID. NAM's are to be labeled either on a pre-printed label or using an electronic label
maker such as the Brother P-Touch®. The electronic label shall contain black, Helvetica, 10 Font, block
letters on a white background.

a. The NAM number shall be placed above and below the NAM modular on the faceplate as
shown in Figure 02-1.

b. When a surface mounted interface box is used, the top of the box shall be labeled as shown in
Figure 02-2.

c. Surface mounted Fiber to the Desktop (FTTD) interface boxes shall be labeled as shown in
Figure 02-3.

January 2002 Page 75 of 137


CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Figure 02-1 Labeling Flush Mounted NAM

Figure 02-2 Labeling Surface Mounted NAM

January 2002 Page 76 of 137


CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Figure 02-3 Labeling Surface Mounted FTTD NAM

January 2002 Page 77 of 137


CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Table 02-1 VOICE NAM MATRICES

Bldg:
CAAN:
Zone:

NAM VOICE IDF BDF/IDF BDF/IDF REFERENCE RISER RISER


ROOM # NAM # TERM # ROOM # TERM # DRAWING # CABLE # PAIR #

Table 02-2 DATA NAM MATRICES

Bldg:
CAAN:
Zone:

NAM DATA OUTLET BDF/IDF BDF/IDF REFERENCE


ROOM# NAM# NO. ROOM# TERM# DRAWING#

January 2002 Page 78 of 137


CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Table 02-3 MATV NAM MATRIX

Bldg:
CAAN:
Zone:

NAM MATV OUTLET BDF/IDF BDF/IDF REFERENCE


ROOM # NAM # NO. ROOM# TERM# DRAWING#

Table 02-4 FTTD NAM MATRIX

Bldg:
CAAN:
Zone:

POSITION
NAM FTTD IDF
BLDG CAAN FLOOR HOUSING NUMBER CABLE NAM MEDIA
ROOM NAM ROOM
# # # # IN I.D. # TYPE TYPE
# # #
HOUSING

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Specification 03 NAM Cabling Requirements

These specifications provide a minimum configuration that must be used when planning new construction or major
remodeling of an existing facility. Communications Resources must be consulted during the early utilities planning
phase of the project since each site may have technical requirements requiring a modification of these specifications.

1. NAM’s providing Voice and Data service will be cabled using 4-pair, 24AWG Unshielded Twisted Pair
Cable. The following Berk-Tek LANmark-350 manufacture part numbers are the preferred and
recommended manufacture. If substitutions are requested by the consultant/contractor, then demonstrated
equivalency must be provided.

a. Non-Plenum, 530538, White Jacket for voice circuits.

b. Plenum, 230670, White Jacket for voice circuits.

c. Non-Plenum, 530463, Yellow Jacket for data circuits.

d. Plenum, 230600, Yellow Jacket for data circuits.

e. Low Smoke, CMP-50, FEP, 235030, Clear Jacket for voice and data circuits located in Student
Co-Habitation areas, as required by local fire code.

f. Cable must be tested, certified and meet the performance test requirements listed in Table 03-
1. Performance requirements must be tested at the 250 MHz level, as a minimum. Performance
testing shall be conducted at the component level by a UL certified testing laboratory, and include
Active Live Channel Testing to insure manufacture and performance quality. Documentation of
this performance tests must be provided to CR prior to installation. If substitutions are requested
by the consultant/contractor, then demonstrated equivalency must be provided.

2. NAM’s providing Fiber to the Desk (FTTD) service shall be cabled using Riser-Rated or Plenum Rated
Multimode and/or Singlemode fiber optic cable. Corning Cable System Infinicor MIC cable is the
preferred and recommended manufacture. If substitutions are requested by the consultant/contractor, then
demonstrated equivalency must be provided. The following technical information shall apply:

a. Multimode:

1) 4-fiber, 62.5/125, tight-buffered, OFNR (Riser) rated

2) Maximum Attenuation: 3.5/1.0 dB/km at 850nm/1300nm

3) Maximum Bandwidth: 200/500 MHz at 300m/500m at 850nm/1300nm

4) Non-Plenum part number: 004K81-31130-24. Plenum part number: 004K88-31130-


29.

b. Singlemode:

1) 4-fiber, 8.3/125, tight-buffered, OFNR (Riser), OFNP (Plenum) rated

2) Maximum Attenuation: 1.0/0.75 dB/km at 1310 and 1550nm

3) Gigabit Ethernet Distance Guarantee: 5000 meters

4) Non-Plenum part number: 004R81-31131-24. Plenum part number: 004R88-31131-


29.
January 2002 Page 80 of 137
CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Table 03-1 Copper UTP Cable Specifications

Copper UTP Cable Specifications

0.52mm (24AWG), bare copper wire insulated with


polyethylene (non-plenum) or FEP (plenum). Two
Construction insulated conductors twisted together to form a pair
and four such pairs lay up to form the basic unit
jacketed with flame-retardant PVC.
Physical Data Conductor diameter: .020 inches
Cable diameter: .187 inches
Nominal cable weight: 22 lb/kft
Maximum installation tension: 25 lb
Minimum bend radius: 1.0 inches
Electrical Data (tested at 100MHz) SRL: 20.1 dB/100m
Return Loss: 21.5 dB
Attenuation: 21.7 dB
Power Sum NEXT: 34.3 dB
NEXT: 40.3 dB
ACR: 21.0 dB
Power Sum-ACR: 12.6
ELFEXT: 24 dB
PS-ELFEXT: 23.8 dB
Mutual Capacitance: 4.4 nF
Parametric Measurement (tested at 100 meters) DC resistance: 9.4 ohms
Skew: 18 ns
Pair to Ground Unbalance: 330 pF
Velocity of Propagation: 70% (Non-plenum) 72%
(Plenum)
Characteristic/Input Impedance: 100 ± 22% 100-
200MHz
Active Live Channel Testing 0.17 Errors per minute allowable
Preferred/Recommended Manufacture Berk-Tek LANmark-350

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Table 03-2 Fiber Optic Cable Specifications

Horizontal Fiber Optic Cable, Specification


Multimode (MM) and Singlemode (SM)
900 micron TBII buffered fibers wrapped in an all-
dielectric strength member, ripcord and polyvinyl
chloride outer jacket. All components of the cable
(glass and jacketing) shall be from the same
Construction manufacture to insure quality of product.

Core Diameter 62.5 (+/-) 3.0 µm (MM), 8.3 µm (SM)

Cladding Diameter 125.0 (+/-) 2.0 um


Refractive Index Profile Graded Index (MM)

Coating to be easily mechanically strippable,


dual layered, UV-Cured acryl ate applied by the
fiber manufacture
Minimum LED Bandwidth (MM): 850nm: 200 MHz at 1km
1300nm: 500 MHz at 1km
Minimum Restricted Mode Launch (RML)
Bandwidth (MM) 220 MHz/km at 850 nm (MM)

Maximum Attenuation (MM) 3.5dB @ 850nm, 1.0dB @ 1300nm

Maximum Attenuation (SM) 1.0dB @ 1310nm, 0.75dB @ 1550nm

Gigabit Ethernet Distance Guarantee (MM) 300 meters at 850nm, 550 meters at 1300nm

Gigabit Ethernet Distance Guarantee (SM) 5000 meters at 1310nm and 1550nm
There shall be no point discontinuities greater than
Attenuation Uniformity (MM): 0.2 dB at either 850 nm or 1300 nm.
The attenuation due to 100 turns of fiber around a
75(+/-) 2 mm diameter mandrel shall not exceed 0.5
Attenuation Macro bend (MM): dB at 850nm or 1300nm
The attenuation coefficient at 1380nm shall not
exceed the attenuation coefficient at 1300nm by
Attenuation at the Water Peak (MM): more than 1.0 dB/km.

Preferred/Recommended Manufacture: Corning Cable Systems MIC Cable

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Specification 04 NAM Patch Panel and Patch Cord Requirements

These specifications provide a minimum configuration that must be used when planning new construction or major
remodeling of an existing facility. Communications Resources must be consulted during the early utilities planning
phase of the project since each site may have technical requirements requiring a modification of these specifications.

1. Data Patch Panels. UTP patch panels that provide Data service to NAM’s shall be installed using the
following preferred and recommended products.

a. Ortronics GigaMo, High Density, with 8 port modules. Part number OR-851044818 (24 port)

b. Ortronics GigaMo, High Density, with 8 port modules OR-851044820 (48 port)

c. The patch panel must support RJ-45 modules wired to the TIA/EIA 568-A standard on the
front, and have 110-style IDC connectors on the back.

d. The patch panel must support 8P8C, RJ-45 modules wired to the TIA/EIA 568-A standard on
the front, and have 110-style IDC connectors on the back.

e. The patch panel must provide front and real designation strips for labeling, to include above the
RJ45 module as shown in Figure 4-1.

f. The patch panels must be labeled above the RJ45 module as shown in Figure 04-1.

g. Patch Panels must meet specified performance requirements. Performance testing shall be
conducted at the component level by a UL certified testing laboratory, and include Active Live
Channel Testing to insure manufacture and performance quality. Table 04-1 lists performance
requirements tested at 250 MHz. If substitutions are requested by the consultant/contractor, then
demonstrated equivalency must be provided.

2. Voice UTP Patch Panels. Voice UTP patch panels that provide Voice service to NAM’s shall be installed
using the following preferred and recommended products.

a. The cabling in the horizontal segment for voice circuits shall be terminated on 110-type blocks.

b. Ortronics or Avaya Communications is the preferred and recommended manufacture of


these 110-type blocks. If substitutions are requested by the consultant/contractor, then
demonstrated equivalency must be provided.

c. Support the appropriate Category 5e rating, and facilitate cross-connection and/or intermediate
cross-connection using either cross-connect wire or patch cords. Appropriately, the cross-connect
hardware shall be of the same 110-type.

d. Manufactured of flame-retardant thermoplastic, with the base consisting of horizontal index


strips for termination of up to 25-pairs of conductors.

e. Manufactured in 50-, 100-, and 300- pair sizes.

f. Non-detachable standoff legs available for the 50-, 100- and 300-pair bases.

g. Contain access opening for rear to front cable routing to the point of termination.

h. Termination strips on the base to be notched and divided into 5-pair increments.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

i. Clear label holders with the appropriate colored inserts available for the wiring blocks. The
insert labels provided with the product shall contain vertical lines spaced on the basis of circuit
size (1-, 3-, 4- or 5-pair) and shall not interfere with running, tracing or removing jumper
wire/patch cords. Contact CR for required color code of these labels prior to installation.

j. Bases available with 19-inch panels and high-density frame configurations for rack or wall
mounting with cable management hardware.

k. Connecting blocks used for either the termination of cross-connect (jumper) wire or patch cords.
The connecting blocks shall be available in 2-, 3-, 4-, and 5-pair sizes. All connecting blocks shall
have color-coded tip and ring designation markers and be single piece construction.

l. Connecting blocks with a minimum of 200 re-terminations without signal degradation below
standards compliance limit.

m. Support wire sizes: Solid 22-26 AWG (0.64 mm – 0.40 mm).

n. Electrical Specification:

1) ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-B.1, B.2 and Category 5e compliant.

2) The following requirements listed in Table 4-1 shall also be met.

3) Meet TIA/EIA 568-B.1 and B.2 Category 5e electrical performance.

4) Be UL LISTED 1863, Communications Circuit Accessories, 1995.

5) Be made by an ISO 9001 Certified Manufacturer.

3. Fiber to the Desktop (FTTD) Patch Panels. FTTD patch panels that provide fiber service to NAM’s shall
be installed using the following preferred and recommended products.

a. Corning Cable Systems Closet Connector Housings, Rack-mountable: CCH-01U (48 fibers),
CCH-02U (96 fibers), CCH-03U (144 fibers) CCH-04U (288 fibers) and Wall-mountable: WCH-
02P (24 fibers), WCH-04P (48 fibers), WCH-06P (72 fibers), WCH-08P (96 fibers) and WCH-
12P (144 fibers).

b. Corning Cable Systems Closet Connector Housing Panels, LC Adapter Duplex: CCH-CP06-
A8 (Multimode), CCH-CP06-A9 (Singlemode) and CCH-CP12-A8 (Multimode) and CCH-CP12-
A9 (Singlemode).

c. All rack and wall-mounted Fiber Optic Closet Connector Housings shall be labeled in
accordance with Figure 04-2. The background color of the housing label shall match the type of
fiber strand terminated.

d. Housing and Housing Panels shall be of the same manufacture as the fiber optic cable and
connectors to insure proper compatibility and highest system performance levels. If substitutions
are requested by the consultant/contractor, then demonstrated equivalency must be provided.

4. Data Patch Cords.

a. Table 04-2 lists the preferred and recommended manufacture of patch cord providing data
service to NAM’s.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

b. Patch cords shall be from the same manufacture as the termination (patch panels and NAM
modules) hardware to insure proper compatibility and highest system performance levels. If
substitutions are requested by the consultant/contractor, then demonstrated equivalency must be
provided.

c. Patch cords are designed to work best with components from the same manufacturer or from
manufacturers who design their products to work with that specific patch cord.

d. Performance testing of patch cords shall be conducted at the component level by a UL certified
testing laboratory to insure performance, compatibility and warranty. Performance testing shall
include Active Live Channel Testing to insure manufacture and performance quality. If
substitutions are requested by the consultant/contractor, then demonstrated equivalency must be
provided.

e. Manufactured patch cords shall be installed to meet the minimum bending radius of 0.25 inches
as specified in ANSI/TIA/EIA 568-B.1-AD-1, Sub clause Addendum 10.2.1.3

5. Voice Cross-Connect Wire.

a. Ensure the Contractor provides sufficient jumper wire (blue/yellow, 24AWG for Voice,
white/red, 24AWG for Fire Systems) to complete all identified cross-connectors by CR personnel
at the ADF/BDF locations.

b. Proper selection and installation of cross-connect jumper wire used between cross-connect
blocks is essential to the overall performance of the network.

c. Cross-connect jumper wire shall be of the same or higher transmission category as the cross-
connect block. The twist shall be maintained to within 0.5 inches of the entry into the cross-
connect block.

d. Contractors shall complete the cross-connections at the IDF location only. CR personnel shall
complete all cross-connectors at the ADF/BDF locations.

6. Fiber to the Desktop (FTTD) Patch Cords.

a. Table 04-3 lists the preferred and recommended manufacture of duplex patch cords providing
FTTD service to NAM’s.

b. Patch cords shall be from the same manufacture as the termination (patch panels, LC type
connectors and horizontal cable) to insure proper compatibility and highest system performance
levels. If substitutions are requested by the consultant/contractor, then demonstrated equivalency
must be provided.

c. Patch cords are designed to work best with components from the same manufacturer or from
manufacturers who design their products to work with that specific patch cord.

January 2002 Page 85 of 137


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Table 04-1 Data Patch Panel Specifications

Data Patch Panel Termination


Specifications
Hardware
Construction (Information Modular) Category 5e to 110 IDC, 568A wiring, 8P8C, 180° degree exit,
front removable, UL Listed
Construction (24 and 48 Port Patch Category 5e to 110 IDC, 568A wiring, 8P8C, high density, rear
Panels) cable management, front and rear designation strips, 19”
(483mm) wide by 1.75” (45mm) high (24 port) and 3.5” (89mm)
high (48 port), UL Listed
Electrical Data (tested at 250MHz) Return Loss: 21.0 dB
Attenuation: 0.4 dB
Power Sum-NEXT: 41.0 dB
Power Sum-ELFEXT: 34.0 dB
Power Sum-ACR Channel: 4.9 dB
Active Live Channel Testing 0.17 errors per minute allowable
Preferred/Recommended Manufacture Ortronics GigaMo TracJack

Table 04-2 Manufactured Data Patch Cords Lengths/Specifications

Manufactured Patch Cords Maximum Ortronics Part Numbers


Length/Performance
From the patch panel to the electronic 3, 5, 7 foot lengths only OR-836GTP8003DE (3 ft)
equipment located within the OR-836GTP8005DE (5 ft)
equipment rack, cabinet or backboard OR-836GTP8007DE (7 ft)

From the NAM to the computer 7, 9, 15 foot lengths only OR-836GTP8007DE (7 ft)
workstation OR-836GTP8009DE (9 ft)
OR-836GTP8015DE (15 ft)
Pair to Pair NEXT Loss @ 100MHz 37.2 to 38.1 dB
Return Loss @ 100MHz 18 dB
Active Live Channel Testing 0.17 error per minute
allowable

Table 04-3 Manufactured FTTD Patch Cords Lengths/Specifications

Corning Cable System© Corning Cable System©


Manufactured Patch Maximum
Cords Length Part Numbers for Part Numbers for
Singlemode Cords Multimode Cords
From the patch panel to
the electronic equipment 040402R5120003F (3 feet) 050502K5120003F (3 feet)
3, 5, 7 foot
located within the 040402R5120005F (5 feet) 050502K5120005F (5 feet)
lengths only
equipment rack, cabinet 040402R5120007F (7 feet) 050502K5120007F (7 feet)
or backboard
040402R5120007F (7 feet)
050502K5120007F (7 feet)
From the NAM to the 7, 9, 15 foot 040402R5120009F (9 feet)
050502K5120009F (9 feet)
computer workstation lengths only 040402R5120015F (15
050502K5120015F (15 feet)
feet)
Attenuation (dB/km) 1.0/.75 dB/km 3.75/1.5 dB/km
Bandwidth (MHz/km) N/A 160/500

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Figure 04-1 Sample Labeling 24-port Patch Panel.

60125 60126 60127 60128 60129 60130 60131 60132 60133 60134 60135 60136 60137 60138 60139 60140 60141 60142 60143 60144 60145 60146 60147 60148

Figure 04-2 Sample Labeling FTTD Patch Panel.

Vertical

CAAN: 4910*
Singlemode*** Multimode*** Hybrid SM/MM***
1 F1XXXXX-01 F1XXXXX-07 F1XXXXX-13
2 F1XXXXX-02 F1XXXXX-08 F1XXXXX-14
3 F1XXXXX-03 F1XXXXX-09 F1XXXXX-15
4 F1XXXXX-04 F1XXXXX-10 F1XXXXX-16
5 F1XXXXX-05 F1XXXXX-11 F1XXXXX-17
6 F1XXXXX-06 F1XXXXX-12 F1XXXXX-18

January 2002 Page 87 of 137


CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Horizontal

CAAN: 5566**
1 2 3 4 5 6
F1XXXXX-01 F1XXXXX-02 F1XXXXX-03 F1XXXXX-04 F1XXXXX-05 F1XXXXX-06

F1XXXXX-07 F1XXXXX-08 F1XXXXX-09 F1XXXXX-10 F1XXXXX-11 F1XXXXX-12

F1XXXXX-13 F1XXXXX-14 F1XXXXX-15 F1XXXXX-16 F1XXXXX-17 F1XXXXX-18

*Label numbering sequence for Vertically mounted housing panel. Fiber ports shall be number consecutively.
** Label numbering sequence for Horizontal mounted housing panels. Fiber ports shall be number consecutively.
***Yellow is Singlemode fiber strands, Orange is Multimode fiber strands.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Specification 05 Outside Plant Fiber Optic Cable Requirements

These specifications provide a minimum configuration that must be used when planning new construction or major
remodeling of an existing facility. Communications Resources must be consulted during the early utilities planning
phase of the project since each site may have technical requirements requiring a modification of these specifications.

1. Outside Plant fiber optic cable construction:

a. Optical fibers shall be placed inside a gel-filled, loose buffer tube. The nominal outer
diameter of the buffer tube shall be 3.0 mm.

b. Each buffer tube shall contain up to 12 fibers.

c. The fibers shall not adhere to the inside of the buffer tube.

d. Each fiber shall be distinguishable by means of color-coding in accordance with TIA/EIA-


598-A, “Optical Fiber Cable Color Coding.”

e. The fibers shall be colored with ultraviolet (UV) curable inks.

f. Buffer tubes containing fibers shall be color-coded with distinct and recognizable colors in
accordance with TIA/EIA-598-A, “Optical Fiber Cable Color Coding.”

g. Buffer tube colored stripes shall be inlaid in the tube by means of co-extrusion when required.
The nominal stripe width shall be 1 mm.

h. For dual layer buffer tube construction cables, standard colors are used for tubes 1 through 12
and stripes are used to denote tubes 13 through 24. The color sequence applies to tubes containing
fibers only, and shall begin with the first tube. If fillers are required, they shall be placed in the
inner layer of the cable. The tube color sequence shall start from the inside layer and progress
outward.

i. In buffer tubes containing multiple fibers, the colors shall be stable across the specified
storage and operating temperature range and not subject to fading or smearing onto each other or
into the gel filling material. Colors shall not cause fibers to stick together.

j. The buffer tubes shall be resistant to external forces and shall meet the buffer tube cold bend
and shrink back requirements of 7 CFR 1755.900.

k. Fillers may be included in the cable core to lend symmetry to the cable cross-section where
needed. Fillers shall be placed so that they do not interrupt the consecutive positioning of the
buffer tubes. In dual layer cables, any fillers shall be placed in the inner layer. Fillers shall be
nominally 3.0 mm in outer diameter.

l. The central anti-buckling member shall consist of a dielectric, glass reinforced plastic (GRP)
rod. The purpose of the central member is to prevent buckling of the cable. The GRP rod shall be
over coated with a black colored thermoplastic when required to achieve dimensional sizing to
accommodate buffer tubes/fillers.

m. Each buffer tube shall be filled with a non-hygroscopic, non-nutritive to fungus, electrically
non-conductive, homogenous gel. The gel shall be free from dirt and foreign matter. The gel shall
be readily removable with conventional nontoxic solvents.

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n. Buffer tubes shall be stranded around the dielectric central member using the reverse
oscillation, or “S-Z”, stranding process. Water blocking yarn(s) shall be applied longitudinally
along the central member during stranding.

o. Two polyester yarn binders shall be applied contra helically with sufficient tension to secure
each buffer tube layer to the dielectric central member without crushing the buffer tubes. The
binders shall be non-hygroscopic, non-wicking and dielectric with low shrinkage.

p. For single layer cables, a water blocking tape shall be applied longitudinally around the
outside of the stranded tubes/fillers. The tape shall be held in place by a single polyester binder
yarn. The water blocking tape shall be non-nutritive to fungus, electrically non-conductive and
homogenous. It shall also be free from dirt and foreign matter.

q. For dual layer cables, a second (outer) layer of buffer tubes shall be stranded over the original
core to form a two-layer core. A water blocking tape shall be applied longitudinally over both the
inner and outer layer with each being held in place with a single polyester binder yarn. The water
blocking tape shall be non-nutritive to fungus, electrically non-conductive and homogenous. It
shall also be free from dirt and foreign matter.

r. The cable shall contain at least one ripcord under the sheath for easy sheath removal of all-
dielectric cable. The cable shall contain at least one ripcord under the inner sheath and under the
steel armor for armored cable. The ripcord color shall be orange for non-armored sheaths and
yellow for armored sheaths.

s. Dielectric yarns shall provide tensile strength.

t. The high tensile strength dielectric yarns shall be helically stranded evenly around the cable
core.

u. All-dielectric cables (non-armored) shall be sheathed with medium density polyethylene


(MDPE). The minimum nominal jacket thickness shall be 1.4 mm. Jacketing material shall be
applied directly over the tensile strength members and water blocking tape. The polyethylene
shall contain carbon black to provide ultraviolet light protection and shall not promote the growth
of fungus. See Figure 6-3.

Figure 05-1 Dielectric OSP Fiber Optic Cable

January 2002 Page 90 of 137


CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

v. Armored cables shall have an inner sheath of MDPE. The minimum nominal jacket thickness
of the inner sheath shall be 1.0 mm. The inner jacket shall be applied directly over the tensile
strength members and water blocking tape. A water blocking tape shall be applied longitudinally
around the outside of the inner jacket. The armor shall be a corrugated steel tape, plastic-coated
on both sides for corrosion resistance, and shall be applied around the outside of the water
blocking tape with an overlapping seam with the corrugations in register. The outer jacket shall be
applied over the corrugated steel tape armor. The outer jacket shall be a MDPE with a minimum
nominal jacket thickness of 1.4 mm. The polyethylene shall contain carbon black to provide
ultraviolet light protection and shall not promote the growth of fungus. See Figure 05-2.

Figure 05-2 Armored OSP Fiber Optic Cable

w. The MDPE jacket material shall be as defined by ASTM D1248, Type II, Class C and Grades
J4, E7 and E8.

1) The jacket or sheath shall be free of holes, splits, and blisters.

2) The cable jacket shall contain no metal elements and shall be of a consistent
thickness.

3) Cable jackets shall be marked with manufacturer’s name, sequential meter or foot
markings, month and year, or quarter and year of manufacture, and a telecommunication
handset symbol, as required by Section 350G of the National Electrical Safety Code
(NESC). The actual length of the cable shall be within –0/+1% of the length markings.
The print color shall be white, with the exception that cable jackets containing one or
more co-extruded white stripes shall be printed in light blue. The height of the marking
shall be approximately 2.5 mm.

4) The cable jacket of a cable containing two different fiber types (hybrid construction)
shall be marked to indicate quantity of each fiber type, identity of each fiber type and the
fiber sequence.

5) If the initial marking fails to meet the specified requirements (i.e., improper text
statement, color, legibility, or print interval), the cable may be remarked using a
contrasting alternate color. The numbering sequence will differ from the previous
numbering sequence, and a tag will be attached to both the outside end of the cable and to
the reel to indicate the sequence of remarking. The preferred remarking color will be
yellow, with the secondary choice being blue.

January 2002 Page 91 of 137


CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

x. The maximum pulling tension shall be 2700 N (600 lbf) during installation (short term) and
890 N (200 lbf) long term installed.

y. Be manufactured by a TL 9000 Certified Manufacturer.

Table 05-2 Singlemode Cable Specifications

Singlemode Fiber Optic Cable Description Specification


Maximum Attenuation: (dB/km) 0.4 @ 1310nm
0.3 @ 1550nm
Gigabit Ethernet Distance Guarantee: (meter) 5000 @ 1310/1550nm
Temperatures: (Operation) -40 to +70°C (-40 to +158°F) All Dielectric
-40 to +75°C (-40 to +167°F) Armored
Maximum Tensile Load: 2700N (600 lbf) Short Term
890N (200 lbf) Long Term
Approvals and Listings RUS 7 CFR 1755.900
Design and Test Criteria ANSI/ICEA S-87-640
NEC Listing Article 770
Preferred and Recommended Manufacturer: Corning Cable Systems

Table 05-3 Multimode Cable Specifications

Multimode Fiber Optic Cable Description Specification


Maximum Attenuation: (dB/km) 3.5 @ 850nm
1.0 @ 1300nm
Minimum LED Bandwidth (MHz/km) 200 @ 850nm, 500 @ 1300nm
Minimum RML Bandwidth (MHz/km) 385 @ 850nm
Gigabit Ethernet Distance Guarantee: (meter) 500 @ 850, 1000 @ 1300
Temperatures: (Operation) -40 to +70°C (-40 to +158°F) All Dielectric
-40 to +75°C (-40 to +167°F) Armored
Maximum Tensile Load: 2700N (600 lbf) Short Term
890N (200 lbf) Long Term
Approvals and Listings RUS 7 CFR 1755.900
Design and Test Criteria ANSI/ICEA S-87-640
NEC Listing Article 770
Preferred and Recommended Manufacturer: Corning Cable Systems

January 2002 Page 92 of 137


CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Specification 06 Fiber Optic Patch Panel/Patch Cords

These specifications provide a minimum configuration that must be used when planning new construction or major
remodeling of an existing facility. Communications Resources must be consulted during the early utilities planning
phase of the project since each site may have technical requirements requiring a modification of these specifications.

1. Fiber Optic Patch Panels

a. Fiber optic cable for Outside Plant and Riser/Backbone installations shall be terminated on
Duplex 568SC Ultra PC Polish connectors at the ADF/BDF/IDF. Fiber optic cable for horizontal
installations shall be terminated on LC type connectors at the IDF and NAM locations.

b. The Multimode connector panel must be preloaded with Duplex 568SC (OSP and Riser) or LC
(Horizontal) adapters with metal inserts. Color of connectors shall be beige.

c. The Singlemode connector panel must be preloaded with Duplex 568SC (OSP and Riser) or LC
(Horizontal) adapters with ceramic inserts. Color of connector shall be blue.

d. 568SC type fiber connector panels can be either Duplex 6 or 12 ports depending upon the
availability of termination space within the cabinet, and shall be from the same manufacture as the
cabinet. Size of connector panel installed will require the approval of Communications Resources.

e. The preferred and recommended type and manufacture of the fiber optic termination cabinets
shall be the Closet Connector Housings (CCH) as manufactured by Corning Cable Systems. If
substitutions are requested by the consultant/contractor, then demonstrated equivalency must be
provided.

f. The fiber distribution cabinets must be configured with jumper troughs to aid in jumper
management.

g. Fiber distribution cabinets must be wall mountable or rack-mounted in either welded steel
equipment racks or enclosed data cabinets.

h. All loose-tube Outside Plant fiber optic cables shall have a Buffer Tube Fan Out kit installed
prior to the installation of fiber connectors.

i. Fiber distribution cabinets (rack and wall-mounted closet connector housings) shall be labeled
in accordance with Specification 15.

2. Fiber Optic Patch Cords

a. Fiber optic patch cords shall be of the manufactured duplex type, and from the same
manufacture as the termination hardware and cable to insure compatibility and performance. Field
fabricated patch cords shall be avoided.

b. Proper bend radius shall be maintained at the termination and NAM locations.

c. Patch cords shall be properly labeled in accordance with UCDavis and TIA/EIA 606 standards.

d. Ultra PC 568SC duplex type connector patch cords shall be used at the Outside Plant and Riser
cable termination locations. Ultra PC LC duplex type patch cords shall be used at the horizontal
cable termination and NAM locations.

January 2002 Page 93 of 137


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Specification 07 Interior Horizontal Conduit

These specifications provide a minimum configuration that must be used when planning new construction or major
remodeling of an existing facility. Communications Resources must be consulted during the early utilities planning
phase of the project since each site may have technical requirements requiring a modification of these specifications.

1. Conduit Runs. Conduit runs must be designed and installed to:

a. Follow the most direct route possible with no more than two 90° bend between pull boxes.

b. Contain no continuous sections longer than 100 feet. Pull boxes must be used for runs that
exceed 100 feet in length.

c. Pull boxes will not be used in place of a conduit sweep.

d. Pull boxes must be bonded and grounded IAW TIA/EIA-607.

e. Conduit must not be run through areas in which flammable materials may be stored or over or
adjacent to boilers, incinerators hot water lines or steam lines.

2. Bend Radii. The radius of a conduit bend must be at least 6 to 10 times the diameter of the conduit,
depending on its size. Choose the bend radii for conduits according to Table 07-1.

Table 07-1 Conduit Bend Radius

Internal Diameter Minimum Bend Radius


2 inches or less 6 times the internal conduit diameter
2 inches or more 10 times the internal conduit diameter

3. For additional information on conduit bend radius requirements and recommendations, see specifications
in ANSI/NFPA 70 and ANSI/TIA/EIA 569-A-1 thru A-4.

January 2002 Page 94 of 137


CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Table 07-2 Maximum Allowable Conduit Fill

Conduit Maximum Number of Cables Based Upon Allowable Fill


Trade Size Cable Outside Diameter mm (inches)
3.3 4.6 5.6 6.1 7.4 7.9 9.4 13.5 15.8 17.8
(.13) (.18) (.22) (.24) (.29) (.31) (.37) (.53) (.62) (.70)
16 ½ 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
21 ¾ 6 5 4 3 2 2 1 0 0 0
27 1 8 8 7 6 3 3 2 1 0 0
35 1¼ 16 14 12 10 6 4 3 1 1 1
41 1½ 20 18 16 15 7 6 4 2 1 1
53 2 30 26 22 20 14 12 7 4 3 2
63 2½ 45 40 36 30 17 14 12 6 3 3
78 3 70 60 50 40 20 20 17 7 6 6
91 3½ 22 12 7 6
103 4 30 14 12 7

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Specification 08 Cable Trays/Ladders

Specifications provide a minimum configuration that must be used when planning new construction or major
remodeling of an existing facility. Communications Resources must be consulted during the early utilities planning
phase of the project since each site may have technical requirements requiring a modification of these specifications.

1. Cable trays must be aluminum or steel ladder type for Equipment Room/Telecommunications Room
(ER/TR) (ADF/BDF/IDF) locations and mesh ventilated trays for hallway (false ceiling) areas. They must
be 18 inches wide and at least 6 inches deep. Smaller buildings and secondary tray sections serving fewer
than 25 work areas may utilize a 12-inch wide tray.

2. Cable trays must be secured on 10-foot centers using a single center-mounted steel supporting rod and
bottom “T” connector, angled wall supports, or a standard trapeze type support system.

3. Cable trays must meet Zone 3 seismic bracing standards.

4. Cable trays will be used only over areas with ceiling access and must transition to a minimum of three
4-inch conduits when routed over fixed ceiling spaces that are longer than 15 feet.

5. Cable trays must be bonded end-to-end.

6. Cable trays must extend 6 inches into the ER/TR (ADF/BDF/IDF) then utilize a drop out to protect
station cables from potential damage from the end of the tray.

7. All cable tray penetrations through firewalls must allow cable installers to fire-seal around the cables
after they are installed. Tray-based mechanical fire stop systems will be used when a cable tray must
penetrate a fire barrier.

8. Cable trays will not be placed within 5 inches of any overhead light fixture and within 12 inches of any
electrical ballast. A minimum clearance of 12 inches above the cable tray must be maintained at all times.
All bends and T-joints in the cable trays must be fully accessible from above (within one foot).

9. Cable trays must be mounted no higher than 12 feet above the finished floor, and must not extend more
than 8 feet over a fixed ceiling area.

10. Plenum mesh type trays must be used in plenum ceiling areas.

11. Installed cable trays and ladders shall meet the requirements in TIA/EIA 569-A and applicable
addendums, to include the latest Addendum 7, Cable Trays and Wireways, dated December 2001.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Specification 09 Color Codes for Cross Connect Fields

These specifications provide a minimum configuration that must be used when planning new construction or major
remodeling of an existing facility. Communications Resources must be consulted during the early utilities planning
phase of the project since each site may have technical requirements requiring a modification of these specifications.

Table 09-1 Lists the following color codes for cross connect fields must be used to identify horizontal and riser
cables.

Table 09-1 Cross Connect Field Color Codes

TERMINATION COLOR COMMENTS


TYPE
Demarcation point Orange Central office terminations
Network connections Green Network connections or auxiliary circuit termination
Common equipment Used for all major switching and data equipment
Purple
PBX, Host, LANs terminations
First level backbone White ADF/BDF/IDF cable terminations
Second level backbone Gray BDF to IDF cable terminations
Station Blue Horizontal cable terminations
Interbuilding riser Campus cable terminations
Brown
(backbone)
Miscellaneous Yellow Auxiliary, maintenance alarms, security, etc.
Key telephone systems Red

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Specification 10 Distribution Cabinets

These specifications provide a minimum configuration that must be used when planning new construction or major
remodeling of an existing facility. Communications Resources must be consulted during the early utilities planning
phase of the project since each site may have technical requirements requiring a modification of these specifications.

1. UC Davis recognizes five types of distribution cabinets for use in the Equipment
Room/Telecommunications Room (ER/TR) (ADF/BDF/IDF): Type 1, Type 2, Type 3, Type 3A, 3L, 3B
and 3R.

2 . The type of cabinet used depends on the network electronics, termination hardware housed in them and
the number of Network Access Modules (NAM)’s they serve.

3. Table 09-1 lists the types of distribution cabinets and the application for each type.

Table 10-1 Distribution Cabinet Descriptions

Distribution Cabinet Uses


Type 1 96 to 192 NAM’s
Type 2 48 to 96 NAM’s
Type 3 48 NAM’s or less
Type 3A 48 NAM’s or less (wall mounted components)
Type 3B 48 NAM’s or less
Type 3L 48 NAM’s or less (Lab Cabinet)
Type 3R 48 NAM’s or less (Outside Plant Equipment
enclosure)

4. The cabinets must be designed as follows:

a. Indoor use, (except the Type 3R), as an equipment safeguard against dust, filling dirt, non-
corrosive liquids and pedestrian traffic in congested locations.

b. UL/NEMA 4 specifications, where cabinets are exposed to harsh conditions.

c. UL/NEMA 2 specifications in the HC/ICs and ER/TR with locked doors.

d. To accommodate both single and double-bay frames so the sides of the frame will be open in
cases where they must be joined with additional enclosures.

e. Solid sides to close the end panels of single or joined enclosures.

f. Solid top panels, or top panels equipped with fans. In some cases, side-mount or top-mount
air conditioning units may be required.

g. When required, top mounted fans will provide approximately 535 CFM at 115 VAC. The fan
must include finger guards and power cord.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

h. Air filters in the doors of each unit.

i. A solid bottom panel, 16 gauge, zinc plate to enclose the bottom of the cabinet and secure it.

j. The doors to be solid, hinged on the left, and easily changed to hinge on the right. Two door
configurations must be hinged on their respective sides.

k. Handles that can be locked with a key. Keys will be common for all cabinet types, See CR for
Key Code.

l. Pre-assembled prior to delivery. The pre-assembly instructions must include any


modifications. Cabinets designed to mate with adjoining units must be shipped as single units to
facilitate transportation and movement on small elevators and in other tight quarters.

m. Equipped with ANSI/EIA RS-310-D drillings. Holes for internal mountings must be 10-32
tapped. Extra screws and miscellaneous hardware for future maintenance requirements must be
included. Each rack angle assembly must be adjustable in depth, so that there is a minimum of 6
inches of clearance between the closed door and the face of any installed panel.

n. Cables can enter the cabinets from either the top or bottom. Provision for cable entry
knockouts are required in all designs. 2-inch trade size, T&B XTRAFLEX liquid-tite nonmetallic
conduit, equipped with XTRAFLEX must be used. All plastic connectors, both 90° and/or 45°
angles for bringing cables into the cabinets must be used, plastic bushing must be installed on end
of conduit to protect cable.

o. Sufficient bracing to meet or exceed Zone 3 seismic requirements.

p. Color to be determined by UC Davis.

5. All cabinets are designed to accommodate standard 19-inch rack mountable equipment. A dedicated
125V AC, 20 AMP circuit with a four-plex, NEMA 5-20R spade receptacle outlet must be located near
each cabinet. The cabinets must have the following dimensions listed in Table 07-2.

Table 10-2 Cabinet Dimensions

Distribution Cabinet Dimensions (H × W × D)


Type 1 (ADF/BDF) 84” × 24” × 32”
Type 2 84” × 24” × 32”
Type 3 30” × 24” × 24”
Type 3A Components mounted on wall (without a cabinet) 4’x
8’ of wall space
Type 3B 42” × 36” × 13.25” Changed with advent UCNet 2
Hubbell Cabinet 42”X 24.2” X 9.7”
Type 3L 30” × 24” × 24”, for use as a lab cabinet
Type 3R 63” x 56” x 46”, outdoor enclosure

Note: Overall height of all standing cabinets must not exceed 84 inches.

6. ADF Cabinet: ADF cabinets are used only in Area Distribution Frame locations. Planning for a new
ADF must be coordinated with Communications Resources Department Systems Engineering & Design
office. See Figure 08-1

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Figure 10-1 ADF Cabinet

January 2002 Page 100 of 137


CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Figure 10-2 BDF/IDF Cabinet:

January 2002 Page 101 of 137


CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Figure 10-3 Type 1 IDF Cabinet:

January 2002 Page 102 of 137


CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Figure 10-4 Type 2 IDF Cabinet:

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Figure 10-5 Type 3 IDF Cabinet:

The IDF Type 3 wall unit must be designed to house electronic and electrical components with appropriately placed
knockouts for cable entries. A design providing for 90° pivoting must be provided. This feature must allow access to
the rear of the enclosure for future maintenance requirements. The hinged component of the wall-mounted cabinet
must support equipment weights up to 100 pounds.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Figure 10-6 Type 3A Wall-Mounted Layout

The Type 3A is not a cabinet. It defines wall mounted components on a 4’X8’ of wall space.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Figure 10-7 Type 3B:

The Type 3B (not pictured) must be designed for wall mounting. It is typically used in lieu of a
type 3 when there is not 24 inches of depth available. It must include its own mounting apparatus
and does not require a mounting platform. The IDF Type 3B must be designed to house electrical
components with appropriately placed knockouts for cable entries. The IDF Type 3B cabinet is
referred as the UCDNet2 Hubbell Remote Equipment Box 42”.

Figure 10-8 Type 3L Cabinet

The “Type 3L” IC/HC closet, also referred to the “labcab,” has the same architectural limitation imposed
on all “Type 3” cabinets. The maximum number of NAM’s that a “Type 3L” cabinet will support is 48. In
addition, this configuration is applied where local wiring may only extend to within the same room as the
cabinet. Typical applications for this configuration are in laboratory or classroom environments where
frequent local wiring changes are necessary. All “Type 3L” cabinets will house the networking
components in a cabinet structure for security and management purposes. The UC Davis policy dictates
that the networking electronics shall be housed in a secure cabinet when co-located with any other
equipment not related to communications. The closet shall have a ¾ inch plywood wall that is at least 3 feet
by 4 feet. A ground from the TMBG shall be used on all Type 3L cabinets.
January 2002 Page 106 of 137
CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Type 3R:

a. The Type 3R Outside Plant external enclosure is used to house telephone, data and video system
patch panels, and equipment. The enclosure shall be water and gas tight (when sealed) and shall
be provided with a built-in heating and cooling unit to maintain consistent temperatures within the
enclosure at all times.

b. The enclosure shall conform to the following specification:

1) The entire enclosure shall meet NEMA type 3R, 4X and Bellcore TA-NWT-000487,
Newton 7101, part number 2143990079, and shall be constructed of steel or aluminum
panels a minimum of 1/8” thick, powder coat painted for exposed conditions. It shall be
fitted with lifting eyebolts.

2) All exterior seams shall be made weather tight with a silicone sealant.

3) The doors shall have a three point latching mechanism, external vandal resistant door
handle, provision to mount padlocks, and each door shall have grounding straps. All
doors shall be fitted with a documentation pocket, all external doors shall have Bellcore
quarter turn style door locks.

4) Overall dimension are not to exceed 63” (H) x 56” (W) x 46” (D).

5) Provide all mounting components and accessories and securely fix enclosure to
concrete pad.

6) Connect built-in heating and cooling systems, and power strip, to electrical system.

7) Provide strain relief and cable management inside the enclosure to ensure tidy
routing of all cables.

8) The enclosure shall consist of three chambers, communications cable entry chamber,
electrical chamber, (including a built in heat exchanger) and communications chamber
(central chamber). Each chamber to have it’s own chamber ground bus.

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Specification 11 Riser Cable Requirements

These specifications provide a minimum configuration that must be used when planning new construction or major
remodeling of an existing facility. Communications Resources must be consulted during the early utilities planning
phase of the project since each site may have technical requirements requiring a modification of these specifications.

Table 11-1 shows the conduit fill ratio requirements for riser cables. The number of cables, which can be installed, is
actually limited by the allowed maximum pulling tension of the cables. This fill ratio requirement does not apply to
sleeves and conduit runs without bends and under 50 feet.

Table 11-1 Maximum Fill Requirements for Riser Cable

Conduit Area of Conduit


Trade Internal Diameter* Maximum Recommended Fill
Size (Inches)
(Inches) 1 Cable 2 Cables 3 Cables
53% Fill (in2) 31% Fill (in2) 40% Fill (in2)
1 1.05 0.46 0.27 0.35
1¼ 1.38 0.80 0.47 0.60
1½ 1.61 1.09 0.64 0.82
2 2.07 1.80 1.05 1.36
2½ 2.47 2.56 1.49 1.93
3 3.07 3.95 2.31 2.98
3½ 3.55 5.28 3.09 3.98
4 4.03 6.80 3.98 5.13

*Internal diameters are taken from the manufacturing standard for electric metallic tubing and rigid metal conduit.

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Specification 12 Interior Pull Boxes

These specifications provide a minimum configuration that must be used when planning new construction or major
remodeling of an existing facility. Communications Resources must be consulted during the early utilities planning
phase of the project since each site may have technical requirements requiring a modification of these specifications.

1. Installing Pull Boxes

a. Pull boxes must be installed in easily accessible locations. A pull box may be placed in an
interstitial ceiling space only if it is listed for that purpose and it is placed above a suitable marked,
removable ceiling panel.

b. Horizontal cabling boxes must be installed immediately above suspended ceilings.

c. Figure 11-1 shows recommended pull box configurations.

Figure 12-1 Pull Box configurations

2. Choosing a Pull Box

a. For horizontal cable, the width and depth of the pull box must be adequate for fishing, pulling,
and looping the cable. The length must be 12 times the diameter of the largest conduit. Reference
Figure 11-2.

b. Use the Table 12-1 below to select the proper size of pull box.

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Figure 12-2 Measuring a Pull Box

Table 12-1 Sizing a Pull Box

Maximum Trade Size For Each Additional


of Conduit (Inches) Size of Box Conduit Increase
Width (Inches)

Width Length Depth


.75 4 12 3 2
1.0 4 16 3 2
1.25 6 20 3 3
1.5 8 27 4 4
2.0 8 36 4 5
2.5 10 42 5 6
3.0 12 48 5 6
3.5 12 54 6 6
4.0 15 60 8 8

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Specification 13 Conduit for Underground Cabling

These specifications provide a minimum configuration that must be used when planning new construction or major
remodeling of an existing facility. Communications Resources must be consulted during the early utilities planning
phase of the project since each site may have technical requirements requiring a modification of these specifications.

1. Conduit Requirements:

a. Conduit must be PVC Schedule 40 or 80 (depended upon concrete encasement requirements),


corrosion-resistant plastic with a 4 inch inside diameter for underground installations, and
Galvanized Rigid Steel Conduit for riser applications.

b. All installed conduits shall be cleaned and verified with a flexible mandrel and a stiff brush.
Mandrels shall be 12 inches in length, and sized to within ¼ inch of the inside diameter of the
conduit.

c. All conduits must be provided with a ¼ inch polypropylene pull rope or pull tape with a
minimum of 200 pound pulling tension, in addition to, a 12-14 AWG copper wire in any unused
conduit structures not programmed for immediate fiber or copper installations, or where all-
dielectric fiber optic cable is installed singularly, for the purpose of locating and tracing the cable
route.

d. All unused entrance conduits must be capped/plugged and installed with pull strings.

e. Conduit stubs entering the building must extend beyond the foundation landscaping. All
conduit ends adjacent to the building must be flagged for easy identification.

f. Conduit entering from a below grade point must extend 4 inches above the finished floor in the
ER/TR. Conduit entering from ceiling height must terminate 4 inches below the finished ceiling.

g. Conduit must be securely fastened to the building to withstand a typical placing operation
performed by the service provider. The area around the conduit entrance must be free of any
construction, storage, or mechanical apparatus.

h. All metallic conduit and sleeves must be reamed, bushed, and capped when placed.

i. Metal sleeves through foundation walls must extend to undisturbed earth to prevent shearing.

j. The top of the conduit must be buried at least 24 inches below the ground surface. Warning
tape equipped with a metallic tracer shall be placed 12-inches above top of conduit bank.

l. Underground conduit must be terminated at the designated property line with a minimum
cover of 24 inches.

m. Conduit must be encased in concrete when the following conditions exist: minimum conduit
depth cannot be attained, conduits must pass under roads, driveways, or railroad tracks, or bend
points might be subject to movement. Reinforcing bars within the concrete must be used at any
location subject to potentially extreme stress. CR shall inspect and approve all conduits prior to
encasement.

n. The inside-the-building end of the conduit must be sealed to prevent rodents, water, or gases
from entering the building.

o. There shall be no more than two 90° bends between pulling points on all conduits. All bends
must be long, sweeping bends with a radius not less than 6 times the internal diameter of conduits
2 inches or smaller, or 10 times the internal diameter of conduits larger than 2 inches.
January 2002 Page 111 of 137
CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

p. All conduit bends shall be concrete encased to prevent a “burn-through” by the pull rope
during large cable installations.

q. Conduit must be positioned on the field side of the poles (the side that is protected from the
normal flow of traffic). On joint use electrical poles, the telecommunications conduit shall be
located 180 degrees any electrical conduit, when possible, but no less than 90 degrees.

2. Sizing Underground Conduit. The quantity and size of underground entrance conduits are based on the
anticipated number and type of telecommunications circuits that will be brought into the building. UC
Davis requires two entrance pairs per 100 square feet of usable office space. The following table shows the
data for the quantity and size of underground entrance conduits. ReferenceTable 13-1.

Table 13-1 Conduit Size Requirements

Copper Entrance Pairs Conduits Required


1 - 1000 1each 4-inch conduit + 2 spare 4-inch conduits
1001 - 2000 2 each 4-inch conduits + 2 spare 4-inch conduits
2001 - 3000 3 each 4-inch conduits + 2 spare 4-inch conduits
3001 - 5000 4 each 4-inch conduit + 2 spare 4-inch conduits
5001 - 7000 5 each 4-inch conduits + 2 spare 4-inch conduits
7001 - 9000 6 each 4-inch conduits + 2 spare 4-inch conduits

Note: Two spare 4-inch conduits must be brought into every building in addition to the quantities
specified above.

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Specification 14 Electrical Protections, Bonding and Grounding

These specifications provide a minimum configuration that must be used when planning new construction or major
remodeling of an existing facility. Communications Resources must be consulted during the early utilities planning
phase of the project since each site may have technical requirements requiring a modification of these specifications.

1. Electrical protection must be provided for cables that are subject to lightning, power contact, ground
potential rise, or induction. The minimum protection is a tri-element gas module device.

2. Cables exposed to power sources must be provided with sneak current protectors that will protect
cables against voltage and power surges by interrupting the current or by grounding the conductors.

3. Ground systems must conform to the NEC and NESC specifications. Approved ground systems are:

a. Building entrance power ground from transformer – single point

b. Building steel (the metal frame of the building itself)

c. Building footing (a concrete-encased electrode near the bottom of the building’s foundation).

d. Ground ring (20 feet or more of bare copper wire in direct contact with the earth-it encircles
the building).

e. Metallic power service conduit, enclosure, or grounding electrode

f. Ground rod or pipe

4. Equipment single point grounds must be grounded to the building grounding systems as defined in
ANSI/TIA/EIA-607 (1994) Commercial Building Grounding and Bonding Requirements for
Telecommunications.

5. Riser cables must be grounded at the point of origination and at any floor in which pairs leave the
cable sheath. Riser cable sheaths must be bonded to approve grounds in the ER/TR (ADF/BDF/IDF)’s.
Reference Figure 14-1

6. Lateral cables must be bonded to approve grounds in the ER/TR (ADF/BDF/IDF)’s.

7. Cable sheaths of cables entering a building must be bonded to an approved ground at the building
entrance location.

8. Protector panels will be wired to an approved ground by the straightest and shortest means.

9. The NEC requires a listed primary protector (such as an Entrance Building Protector with 4B1E-W
Protector Modules) at both ends whenever an aerial communications cable is routed across a street and
whenever aerial or underground campus circuits may be exposed to accidental contact with power
conductors operating at over 300 volts.

10. Exposed refers to an outdoor communications cable’s susceptibility to electrical power system faults or
to lightning or other transients. A cable is also considered electrically exposed if any of its branches or
individual circuits is exposed.

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11. A lightning exposure guideline is included in the NEC Section 800-30(a). It states that inter-building
circuits are considered to have exposure to lightening unless cable runs are 140 feet or less, buried with a
properly grounded shield. The NEC also states that the shield must be bonded to the building’s ground
electrode system at each end.

12. NEC Article 100 and Section 250-70 define bonding as the permanent joining of metallic parts to form
an electrically conductive path that will assure electrical continuity and the capacity to conduct safely any
current that is likely to be imposed.

13. Bonding conductors are not intended to carry electrical load currents under normal conditions, but
must carry fault currents so that electrical protection (circuit breakers) will properly operate.

14. A #6 AWG copper conductor will be used to bond the communications components to the ground. A
larger conductor will be used if the ground source exceeds 5 ohms.

15. The electrical contractor must provide access to a bonding connection at the electrical service ground
during new construction (NEC 250-71(b)). A telecommunications main grounding busbar (TMGB) must be
specified in the ER/TR with an approved ground connector back to the electrical service ground point.

16. A telecommunications grounding busbar (TGB) must be specified for each ER/TR in the building.
Each TGB will have a #6 AWG conductor back to the TMGB.

17. In a renovation or remodeling project where a suitable ground to the electrical service ground is not
available, a grounding electrode will be installed in accordance with the NEC Section 250-83. Note: a
metallic water pipe connected to a utility water distribution system is no longer the first choice for a
grounding electrode. The NEC recommends the ½ inch diameter, 5 foot ground rod be used.

18. Communications bonding relies on short direct paths that have minimum resistive and inductive
impedance:

a. Bonding conductors must be routed with minimum bends or changes in direction.

b. Bonding connections must be made directly to the points being bonded, avoiding unnecessary
connections or splices.

19. All ground attachments shall be properly tagged and labeled in accordance with TIA/EIA-606.

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Figure 14-1 Bonding and Grounding Layout

TGB3.1
Equipment

TGB2.1
Equipment

#6 insulated copper conductor

TMGB
Equipment

Grounding
Electrode
System

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CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

Specification 15 Outside Plant and Riser Cable Labeling Requirements

These specifications provide a minimum configuration that must be used when planning new construction or major
remodeling of an existing facility. Communications Resources must be consulted during the early utilities planning
phase of the project since each site may have technical requirements requiring a modification of these specifications.

1. This specification is intended to depict the installation of identification labels for Outside Plant/Riser
cable and termination equipment. Labeling materials identified in this specification are the preferred and
recommended manufactured product required for the complete identification of the installed cable systems.
If substitutions are requested by the consultant/contractor, then demonstrated equivalency must be
provided.

2. The intent of this labeling specification is to allow the UC Davis personnel to identify any part of the
cabling system through physical identification of its components, and their related components at the
campus wide access points without the means of electrical, electronic or mechanical means of
identification.

3. Labeling shall meet the requirements in this document, and the ANSI/TIA/EIA 606, Administration
Standard for the Telecommunications Infrastructure of Commercial Buildings, where applicable.

4. Fiber Optic Cable Termination Cabinet/Housing Labeling:

a. Fiber optic termination housings shall be labeled using the plastic panel provided by the
termination housing manufacture. The plastic panel shall be overlaid with a one-piece, self-
adhesive, full-size, laser-printer generated label sheet adhered to the inside door of the enclosure.
Contractor shall cut sheet to size. An 8.5-inch by 11-inch laser printable adhesive backed sheet,
part number Avery 5165 or equal, is the preferred and recommended manufactured product.
Reference Figure 15-1.

b. The background color of the labeling sheet shall be colored coded. Singlemode labels shall be
Yellow in color and Multimode labels shall be Orange in color. Singlemode housing connector
panels shall always be placed first, and to the immediate left hand side of the housing, followed by
the Multimode connectors. This sequence shall apply to both Singlemode and Multimode strands
in the same cable (Hybrid), or in separate cables. In wall-mounted housings, the Singlemode
connectors shall always be placed in the very most top position, followed by the Multimode
connectors. Reference Figure 15-1.

c. Each terminal housing shall contain only one labeling sheet to identify the fiber optic strands.
Multiple labels on a single door shall not be used.

d. Labeling font shall be Helvetica, 10 point, Black in color, or as specified by the CR Program
Manager or Representative.

e. Housing labels shall contain the Capital Asset Account Number (CAAN) for the building
(Source) where the fiber optic cable originates, the CAAN for the building (Destination) where the
fiber optic strands terminate and the ADF/BDF/IDF identification number where the Destination
housing is located.

f. Fiber strand numbering shall be consistent with the Consecutive Fiber Numbering (CFN)
sequence as identified in TIA/EIA 568-B.1. This fiber stand numbering sequence shall be
accomplished at each terminated end of the fiber optic cable. The rolling of fiber optic strands, as
identified in TIA/EIA 568-B.1 as Reverse Pair Positioning (RPP) shall not be used.

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g. Fiber optic housings containing vertical connector panels shall be labeled as follows.

1) Fiber strand number 1 (Blue) shall occupy fiber port number 1 in the upper most left
position of the first duplex bulkhead connector installed in the connector panel placed in
the first slot on the left side of the housing.

2) Fiber strand number 2 (Orange) shall occupy fiber port number 2 of the same duplex
bulkhead connector installed in the connector panel. This number 2 port is to the
immediate right of fiber port number 1.

3) All remaining fiber optic strands shall be number consecutively left to right, top to
bottom. Reference Figure 15-2.

h. Fiber optic housings containing horizontal connector panels shall be labeled as follows.

1) Fiber strand number 1 (Blue) shall occupy fiber port number 1 in the upper most top,
left position, of the first duplex bulkhead connector installed in the connector panel
placed in the upper most left slot of the housing.

2) Fiber strand number 2 (Orange) shall occupy fiber port number 2 of the same duplex
bulkhead connector installed in the connector panel. This number 2 port is located
immediate below fiber port number 1.

3) All remaining fiber optic strands shall be number consecutively top to bottom, left to
right. Reference Figure 15-3.

5. Fiber Optic Splice Shelf Labeling:

a. Fiber optic splice shelves and drawers shall be labeled sequentially from top to bottom.

b. Identify the fiber splices using a single sheet, adhesive backed, labeling stock printed using a
laser printer trimmed to fit the inside door of the splice shelf.

c. Identify in tabular form the splice tray, position number and the fiber strand spliced at that
location.

d. Labeling shall consist of the cable number, the fiber optic strand number and the strand type.

6. Fiber Optic Cable Sheath Labeling:

a. Fiber optic cables located inside buildings shall have their sheaths labeled within 12 inches of
the fiber termination housing, the point at which the cable enters and/or exits the room, and at one
mid-point location when the cable is installed in a cable tray or ladder, as a minimum. Additional
sheath labels may be installed at the request of a CR representative.

b. Fiber optic cables located in Maintenance Holes (MH) and Hand Holes (HH) shall have their
sheaths labeled in at least one location that is visible from grade level. MH’s and HH’s containing
splice closures shall be labeled on each side of the splice closure, and shall be visible from grade
level.

c. The fiber optic cable label shall consist of either a stainless steel or a plastic type tag attached
with a steel or plastic tie wrap. Plastic label shall be yellow and black in color, and contain a self-
laminating cover for use with pre-printed labels. Both the tag and tie wrap shall be approved for
interior and exterior use. White color tie wraps shall be used indoors, and black color tie wraps
shall be used outdoors. Riser rated labels and tie wraps shall be used where required. Panduit type
PST-FO, self-laminating, GMV4 Rigid Vinyl is the preferred and recommended manufacture.
Reference Figure 15-4
January 2002 Page 117 of 137
CR TELECOMMUNICATIONS STANDARDS

d. All fiber optic cables shall contain a fiber optic warning tag. All warning tags shall be orange
in color and contain large black letters. Tags shall be made from PVC type material and install by
snapping over the cable sheath. Panduit type PCV-FOR is the preferred and recommended
manufacture. Reference Figure 15-4.

e. The fiber optic cable sheath label shall contain the cable type, total strand count of the cable, the
source and destination CAAN and terminal number (ADF/BDF/IDF number), strand type and
strand count. Reference Figure 15-5.

f. The fiber optic cable sheath label in Maintenance and Handholes that contain a splice, and a
change in fiber counts, shall have labels attached to each cable as shown in Figure 15-6. Each
label shall contain the Source NOC/MDF, CAAN or ADF identification, Designation location
information, fiber type, total number of fiber strands and active fiber count.

7. Copper Cable Termination Housing Labeling:

a. Building entrance terminals shall be labeled with the name of the building, the building Zone
number, the building CAAN number, the cable pair numbers entering the terminal, and the cable
pair number exiting the terminal (if applicable). Reference Figure 15-7.

b. Terminals shall to be labeled using an electronic label maker such as the Brother P-Touch®,
and the label shall be placed on the wall above the terminal housing. The terminal housing itself
shall not be labeled.

c. Labeling font shall be Helvetica, 10 point, Black in color on a White background or as specified
by the CR Program Manager or Representative.

8. Copper Cable Sheath Labeling

a. Copper cables located inside buildings shall have their sheaths labeled within 12 inches of the
fiber termination housing, the point at which the cable enters and/or exits the room, and at one
mid-point location when the cable is installed in a cable tray or ladder, as a minimum. Additional
sheath labels may be installed at the request of a CR representative.

b. Copper cables located in Maintenance Holes (MH) and Hand Holes (HH) shall have their
sheaths labeled in at least one location that is visible from grade level. MH’s and HH’s containing
splice closures shall be labeled on each side of the splice closure, and shall be visible from grade
level.

c. The copper cable label shall consist of either a stainless steel or a plastic type tag attached with
a steel or plastic tie wrap. Plastic label shall be gray in color, and have a write-on surface. This tag
shall be approved for interior and exterior use. White color tie wraps shall be used indoors, and
black color tie wraps shall be used outdoors. Riser rated labels and tie wraps shall be used where
required. Panduit type CM4S-L8 is the preferred and recommended manufacture. Reference
Figure 15-8

d. The copper cable sheath label shall contain the type of cable, cable number, cable pair count
and number of dead cable pairs, if applicable. Reference Figure 15-9.

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Figure 15-1 Fiber Optic Connector Housing Labels

Example A: 96SM/48MM Cable from CAAN: 4021 to CAAN: 4678/ADF 7 using Figure 15-2 Vertical Connector
Panel
CAAN: 4021*
4678** 4678** 4678** 4678** 4678** 4678** 4678** 4678** 4678** 4678** 4678** 4678**
ADF 7 ADF 7 ADF 7 ADF 7 ADF 7 ADF 7 ADF 7 ADF 7 ADF 7 ADF 7 ADF 7 ADF 7
1/2 13/14 25/26 37/38 49/50 61/62 73/74 85/86 97/98 109/110 121/122 133/134
3/4 15/16 27/28 39/40 51/52 63/64 75/76 87/88 99/100 111/112 123/124 135/136
5/6 17/18 29/30 41/42 53/54 65/66 77/78 89/90 101/102 113/114 125/126 137/138
7/8 19/20 31/32 43/44 55/56 67/68 79/80 91/92 103/104 115/116 127/128 139/140
9/10 21/22 33/34 45/46 57/58 69/70 81.82 93/94 105/106 117/118 129/130 141/142
11/12 23/24 35/36 47/48 59/60 71/72 83/84 95/96 107/108 119/120 131/132 143/144

Example B: 48SM/24MM Cable from CAAN: 4021 to CAAN: 4343/BDF 0.1 and a 48SM/24MM from CAAN:
4021 to CAAN: 4910/BDF 0.1 using Figure 15-2 Vertical Connector Panel
CAAN: 4021*
4343** 4343** 4343** 4343* 4343* 4343** 4910** 4910** 4910** 4910** 4910** 4910**
BDF BDF BDF BDF BDF BDF BDF BDF BDF BDF BDF BDF
0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1 0.1
1/2 13/14 25/26 37/38 49/50 61/62 1/2 13/14 25/26 37/38 49/50 61/62
3/4 15/16 27/28 39/40 51/52 63/64 3/4 15/16 27/28 39/40 51/52 63/64
5/6 17/18 29/30 41/42 53/54 65/66 5/6 17/18 29/30 41/42 53/54 65/66
7/8 19/20 31/32 43/44 55/56 67/68 7/8 19/20 31/32 43/44 55/56 67/68

9/10 21/22 33/34 45/46 57/58 69/70 9/10 21/22 33/34 45/46 57/58 69/70
11/12 23/24 35/36 47/48 59/60 71/72 11/12 23/24 35/36 47/48 59/60 71/72

Example C: 24SM/24MM Cable from CAAN: 4030 to CAAN: 4566/IDF 1.1 using Figure 15-3 Horizontal
Connector Panel
CAAN: 4030*
4566** 4566** 4566** 4566** 4566** 4566** 4566** 4566** 4566** 4566** 4566** 4566**

IDF 1.1 IDF 1.1 IDF 1.1 IDF 1.1 IDF 1.1 IDF 1.1 IDF 1.1 IDF 1.1 IDF 1.1 IDF 1.1 IDF 1.1 IDF 1.1
1/2 3/4 5/6 7/8 9/10 11/12 25/26 27/28 29/30 31/32 33/34 35/36
13/14 15/16 17/18 19/20 21/22 23/24 37/38 39/40 41/42 43/44 45/46 47/48

*Source CAAN Number (Beginning of Fiber Strand)


**Destination CAAN Number (End Point of Fiber Strand)
AND
ADF Number (opposite terminated location of strand) (where applicable)
OR
BDF Number (opposite terminated location of strand) (where applicable)
OR
IDF Number (opposite terminated location of strand) (where applicable)

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Figure 15-2 Vertical Fiber Optic Connector Panel Numbering Sequence

Figure 15-3 Horizontal Fiber Optic Connector Panel Numbering Sequence

Figure 15-4 Fiber Optic Cable Sheath Labels

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Figure 15-5 Fiber Optic Cable Label Sequence

Figure 15-6 Fiber Optic Cable Label Sequence (MH/HH Splice)

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Figure 15-7 Building Entrance Terminal Label Sequence

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Figure 15-8 Copper Cable Sheath Labels

Figure 15-9 Copper Cable Label Sequence

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APPENDIX B Reference Materials

Following is a list of reference material on telecommunications infrastructure:

ANSI/TIA/EIA 526-7, (August 1998), Measurement of Optical Power Loss of Installed Single-Mode Fiber
Cable Plant. The intent of this procedure is to ensure that meaningful data describing the optical loss performance
of installed single-mode cable plant can be obtained. It is not intended for component testing, nor does it define
those elements of an installation that must be measured.

ANSI/TIA/EIA-526-14A, (August 1998), Optical Power Loss Measurements of Installed Multimode Fiber
Cable Plant. The intent of this procedure is to ensure that meaningful data describing the optical loss performance
of installed single-mode cable plant can be obtained. It is not intended for component testing, nor does it define
those elements of an installation that must be measured.

ANSI/TIA/EIA-568-B-1, (May 2001), Commercial Building Telecommunications Cabling Standard, Part 1,


General Requirements. Provides rules and guidelines for the physical design of a cabling infrastructure that
supports voice and data transmissions in a multi-product, multi-vendor environment. The standards specify a
cabling system with a physical star topology. This topology provides economic benefits in terms of initial cabling
costs, ongoing maintenance, and administration costs. The standards specify copper and fiber optic cable by
parameters that determine performance. They also identify connectors and their pin assignments to ensure inter-
connectivity. The standards specify maximum allowable distances within the various elements of a cabling system.
Include Part 2, 568-B.2 Balanced Twisted Pair Cabling Components (May 2001), Part 2, 568-B.3) Optical Fiber
Cabling Components Standard (April 2000), 568-B-1-Addendum 1, Minimum 4-Pair UTP and 4-Pair ScTP Patch
Cable Bend Radius (August 2001), and Part 2, 568-B.2-2-Addendum 2, Balance Twisted Pair Cabling Components
(December 2001).

ANSI/EIA/TIA-569-A, (February 1998) Commercial Building Telecommunications Pathways and Spaces,


describes design and construction practices for pathways and spaces to support telecommunications media and
equipment within and between buildings. Standards are given for the design of horizontal and work area pathways,
building entrance facilities, telecommunications closets, and equipment rooms. Includes 569-A-1, Addendum 1 –
Surface Raceways (April 2000), 569-A-2, Addendum 2 – Furniture Pathways and Spaces (April 2000), 569-A-3
Addendum 3, Access Floors (March 2000), 569-A-4 Addendum 4 – Poke-Thru Fittings (April 2000), 569-A-5
Addendum 5 – In Floor Systems (June 2001), 569-A-6 Addendum 6 - Multi-Tenant Pathways and Spaces
(September 2001), 569-A-7 Addendum 7 – Cable Trays and Wireways (December 2001).

ANSI/TIA/EIA-598-A (MAY 1995), Optical Fiber Cable Color Coding. Defines the recommended identification
scheme or system for individual fibers, fiber units or groups of fiber units within a cable structure. The method may
be used to identify appropriate fibers for the purpose of connection or termination within a communication system or
the topography of long haul, feeder route, and subscriber or distribution applications for both on-premises and
outside plant use.

ANSI/TIA/EIA-606, (February 1993), Administration Standard for the Telecommunications Infrastructure


of Commercial Buildings. Provide guidelines for labeling and administering the telecommunications equipment
space, cable pathways, grounding, cabling, termination, and other components that comprise a structured cabling
system. The administration of telecommunications includes documentation of telecommunications outlet boxes,
connectors, cables, termination hardware, patching and cross-connect facilities, conduits, other cable pathways,
telecommunications closets and other spaces. These standards specify a telecommunications infrastructure
administration scheme that is independent of applications. Use of these standards results in a cabling system that is
well documented and easily managed by the administrator over the life cycle of the building.

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ANSI/TIA/EIA-607, (August 1994), Commercial Building Grounding and Bonding Requirements for
Telecommunications. Describes a standard method for distributing signal ground throughout a building. These
standards provide the requirements for a ground reference for telecommunications systems within the
telecommunications entrance facility, the telecommunications closet, and the equipment room. They also specify
the requirements for bonding and connecting pathways, cable shields, conductors, and hardware at
telecommunications closets, equipment rooms, and entrance facilities. The grounding and bonding approach is
consistent with the cabling topology specified in ANSI/TIA/EIA-568- B-2001 and installed in accordance with
ANSI/EIA/TIA-569-A-1998.

ANSI/TIA/EIA-758, (April 1999) Customer-Owned Outside Plant Telecommunications Cabling Standard.


Standard specifies minimum requirements for customer-owned OSP telecommunications facilities in a campus
environment. The standard specifies the cabling, pathways and spaces to support the cabling. Customer-owned OSP
cabling extends between separated structures including the terminating connecting hardware at or within the
structures. The OSP pathway includes the pathway through the point of entry into the building space. Customer-
owned OSP pathways may include aerial, direct buried, underground (e.g., duct), and tunnel distribution techniques.
Customer-owned OSP pathways and spaces specified by this Standard are intended to have a useful life in excess of
forty (40) years. The OSP cabling specified by this Standard is intended to support a wide range of applications
(e.g., voice, data, video, alarms, environmental control, security, audio, etc.) on commercial, industrial, institutional
and residential sites. The customer-owned OSP cabling specified by this Standard is intended to have a useful life in
excess of thirty (30) years. This standard applies to all campuses, regardless of the size or population. Includes
ANSI/TIA/EIA-758-1, Addendum No. 1 Customer-Owned Outside Plant Telecommunications Cabling
Standard (April 1999).

Underwriters Laboratories (UL), LAN Cable Certification Program. Test products to verify that performance
meets or exceeds industry standards. The UL tests the electrical shock, flame spread, and smoke production
characteristics of cables. The UL also tests cables for transmission properties.

National Electrical Code (NEC) Sections 250, 770 and 800. A set of codes governing items such as voltage
limits, transmission media conductor size, over voltage protection requirements, fire resistance of cables, and
cabling methods. It is important to check with local governing bodies to determine if their codes supersede the NEC
articles.

National Electrical Safety Code® (NESC). This standard covers basic provisions for safeguarding of persons
from hazards arising from the installation, operation, or maintenance of conductors and equipment in electric supply
stations and overhead and underground electric supply and communication lines. It also includes work rules for the
construction, maintenance, and operation of electric supply and communication lines and equipment.

Building Industry Consulting Service International (BICSI) Telecommunications Distribution Methods


Manual (TDM).

BICSI Customer-Owned Outside Plant (CO-OSP) Design Manual.

California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) General Orders 95 and 128.

Copies of the ANSI/EIA/TIA/NESC industry standards may be purchased from Global Professional Publications, 15
Inverness Way East, Englewood, Colorado 80112- 5776, (800) 854-7179 or (714) 261-1455.
http://www.global.ihs.com/

BICSI TDM and CO-OSP Manuals can be purchased from BICSI, 10500 University Center Drive, Suite 100,
Tampa, Florida, 33612-6415, and (800) 242-7405. http://www.bicsi.org/

NEC book can be obtained through the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), Batterymarch Park, Quincy,
MA 02269, and (617) 770-3000. http://www.nfpa.org/

UL LAN Cable Certification Program publication is available from UL, Literature Stock, 333 Pfingsten Road,
Northbrook, IL 60062-2096, (708) 272-8800 ext. 43731. http://www.ul.com/lancable

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California Public Utilities Commission, 505 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, CA, (415) 703-1170.
http://www.cpuc.ca.gov/

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APPENDIX C Glossary

Correct and consistent use of color, labeling, and numbering when


Administration preparing and maintaining records of wire and cable work.

See Interbuilding Cable


Aerial
Telecommunications cable installed on aerial supporting structures such as
Aerial Cable poles, sides of buildings, and other structures.

A designated area, closed or open, used for environmental air.


Air-Handling Plenum
Aluminum-polyethylene. The primary sheath for aerial cable.
ALPETH
The standard gauge for measuring the diameter of copper, aluminum, and
American Wire Gauge
other conductors.
(AWG)
American National Standards Institute.
ANSI
Grounds that meet National Electric Code (NEC) requirements such as
Approved Ground building steel, ground rings, and other devices.

A strength element used in cable to provide support and additional


Agamid Yarn protection of the fiber bundles.

The additional protection between jacketing layers to provide protection


against severe outdoor environments. It is usually made of plastic-coated
Armoring
steel and may be corrugated for flexibility.

The decrease in power magnitude of a signal in transmission between


points. It expresses the total losses on an optical fiber consisting of the ratio
of light-to-light input.

Attenuation Attenuation is usually measured in decibels per kilometer (dB/km) at a


specific wavelength. The lower the number, the better the fiber. Typical
multi-mode wavelengths are 850 and 1300 nanometers (nm) single mode,
at 1310 and 1550 nm.

A wooden or metal panel used for mounting electronic equipment and


Backboard cross-connect hardware.

The radius a fiber can bend before the risk of breakage or increase in
Bend Radius attenuation.

The permanent joining of metallic parts to form an electrically conductive


path that will assure electrical continuity, the capacity to conduct safely any
Bonding
current likely to be imposed, and the ability to limit dangerous potentials.

A conductor used specifically for the purpose of bonding.


Bonding Conductor
Loose fitting covers over optical fibers used for protection and isolation.
Buffer Tubes
A protective material extruded directly on the fiber coating to protect the
Buffering fiber from the environment. Extruding a tube around the coated fiber to
allow isolation of the fiber from stresses on the cable.
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An over-voltage protector that uses closely spaced carbon electrodes for


Building Entrance
voltage limiting.
Protector
Cable determination equipment where an outside-plant cable plant enters a
Building Entrance
building.
Terminal
Many individual fibers contained within a single jacket or buffer tube. In
addition, a group of buffered fibers distinguished in some fashion from
Bundle
another group in the same cable core.

A container that may enclose connection devices, terminations, apparatus,


Cabinet wiring, and equipment.

An assembly of one or more conductors or optical fibers within an


Cable enveloping sheath, constructed to permit use of the conductors singly or in
groups.
An optical fiber cable that has connectors installed on one or both ends.
General use of these cable assemblies includes the optoelectronic
equipment and interconnection of multi-mode and single mode optical fiber
Cable Assembly cable systems. If connectors are attached to only one end of the cable, the
cable assembly is a pigtail. If connectors are attached to both ends, it is a
jumper.

Cable bend radius during installation implies that the cable is experiencing
a tensile load. Free bend implies a lower allowable bend radius since it is
Cable Bend Radius
at a condition of no load.

The portion of the pathway system that permits the placing of main or high
volume cables between the entrance location and all cross-connect points
within a building and between buildings. A ladder, trough, solid-bottom or
Cable Tray
channel raceway system intended for, but not limited to, the support of
telecommunications media.

The buildings and grounds of a complex, such as a university, college,


Campus industrial park, or military establishment.

Applying a closure device to an insert after the floor fitting is removed.


Capping

A surge-limiting device that is grounded by an arcing across the air gap


when the voltage of a conductor exceeds a predetermined level. If the
Carbon Block current flow across the gap is large or persists for a length of time, the
protector mechanism will operate and the protector will become
permanently grounded.
A distribution system that uses the space between a suspended or false
Ceiling Distribution
ceiling and the structural surface above the ceiling.
System
The material surrounding the core of an optical wave-guide. The cladding
Cladding must have a lower index of refraction in order to steer the light in the core.

A rigid or flexible metallic/nonmetallic raceway of circular cross-section


Conduit through which cables can be pulled or housed.

A mechanical device used on a fiber to provide a means for aligning,


attaching, and de-coupling the fiber to a transmitter, receiver, or another
Connector fiber.

Core The central region of an optical fiber through which light is transmitted.
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The area within a building that contains usable space for elevators, power
Core Area cables, and telecommunications cables.

A connection scheme between cabling runs, subsystems, and equipment


using patch cords or jumpers that attach to connecting hardware on each
Cross-connection
end.

A unit for measuring the relative strength of a signal.


Decibel (dB)
A point at which two services may interface and identify the division of
Demarcation Point
responsibility.
(DEMARC)
A material that is nonmetallic and nonconductive. A dielectric cable
Dielectric contains no metallic components.

A cable installed under the surface of the ground (not in conduit) in such a
Direct Buried Cable manner that it cannot be removed without disturbing the soil.

Wall- or floor-mounted vertical frame of ironwork with protectors or


terminal blocks (or both) used to terminate cable pairs. Structure with
Distribution Frame terminations for connecting the permanent wiring of a facility in such a
manner that interconnection by cross-connections may be made readily.

A wiring board that provides a patch panel function and mounts either in a
Distribution Panel rack or on a wall.

A ceiling that creates an area or space between the ceiling material and the
Drop Ceiling structure above the material.

Interior wall constructions consisting of plaster boards.


Dry Wall
Single enclosed raceway for wires or cables usually used in soil or concrete.
Enclosure in which air is moved (generally part of the HVAC system of a
Duct
building).
Single enclosed raceway of wires or cables.
An arrangement of ducts in tiers.
Duct Bank
An electrical connection to earth obtained by a grounding electrode system.
Earth Ground
Electronic Industries Alliance (EIA) is a standards association that
EIA publishes test procedures.

The interference in signal transmission or reception resulting from the


Electromagnetic
radiation of electrical or magnetic electrical and magnetic fields.
Interference (EMI)
A stand-alone electrical supply source not connected to the primary
Emergency Power electrical source.

An entrance to a building for both public and private network service cables
Entrance Facility (including antennae) including the entrance point at the building wall and
continuing to the entrance room or space.
The area inside a building where telecommunications cables enter and are
connected to riser cables, and where electrical protection is provided when
Equipment Room required. The network interface, as well as the protectors and other
distribution components for the campus sub-systems may be located here.

Thin filament of glass. Optical wave-guide consisting of a core and a


Fiber
cladding that is capable of carrying information in the form of light.
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Light transmission through optical fibers for communications or signaling.


Fiber Optics
The time in hours (or fractions of hours) that:
Full-scale material designs or assemblies show an acceptable resistance to
fire.
Fire Rating System A material or assembly of materials withstands the passage of flame and the
transmission of heat when exposed to fire under specified conditions of test
and performance criteria.

A wall that helps to prevent fire spreading from one container or area to
Fire Wall another and that runs from structural floor to structural ceiling.

An assembly of various materials and types of construction used in wall


Fire-Rated Doors openings to retard the passage of fire.

A material, device, or assembly of parts installed in a cable system in a fire-


rated wall or floor to prevent passage of flame, smoke, or gases through the
Firestop
rated barrier.

The use of special devices and materials to prevent the outbreak of fire
within telecommunications utility spaces and to block the spread of fire,
smoke, toxic gases, and fluids through cable apertures and along cable
pathways. Local building codes often mandates the techniques used.

An F rating withstands the fire test for the rating period without permitting
flames to pass through the fire stop; flame occurring on any element of the
Firestopping
unexposed side of the fire stop; or developing any opening in the fire stop
that permits a projection of water beyond the unexposed side during the
hose strength test.

A T rating meets the criteria of an F rating and prevents the transmission of


heat during the rating period so that the temperature rise is not more than
325°F on any unexposed surface thermocouple or penetrating item.
The upper part of a reinforced concrete floor carried on beams below the
slab.
Floor Slab A concrete mat poured on sub-grade serving as a floor rather than as a
structural member.

Furniture walls combined with furniture units such as desks, work surfaces,
Furniture System file cabinets, etc.

A permanent joint accomplished by applying localized heat sufficient to


Fusion Splice fuse or melt the ends of the optical fiber, forming a continuous single fiber.

An over-voltage protector featuring metallic electrodes that discharge in a


Gas Tube Protector
gas atmosphere within a glass or ceramic envelope.
A conducting connection, intentional or accidental, between a circuit or
equipment and the earth (or to some conducting body that acts in place of
Ground
the earth).

The conductor used to connect the electrical equipment to a grounding


electrode.
Grounding Conductor

A conductor (usually a rod, pipe, or plate) in direct contact with the earth
Grounding Electrode providing an electrical connection to the earth.

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A conductor used to connect the grounding electrode to the equipment-


Grounding Electrode grounding conductor and/or to the grounded conductor (neutral) at the
Conductor service equipment or at the source of a separately derived system.

A device that grounds a conductor when the conductor’s current time limits
is exceeded. Heat coils are suitable for sneak current protection if they are
Heat Coil
located at the building entrance terminal.

Another name for a frequency measurement of cycles per second.


Hertz
Horizontal cabling consists of cabling from the intermediate distribution
Horizontal Cabling frame to the horizontal cross-connect.

A cross-connect of horizontal cabling to other cabling, e.g., horizontal


Horizontal Cross-
equipment.
Connect (HC)
Additional conduit placed inside a larger diameter conduit.
Innerduct
A cross-connect between the main cross-connect and the horizontal cross-
connect in riser cabling. A distributor in which the building backbone
Intermediate Cross- cables terminate and at which connections to the campus backbone cables
Connect (IC) may be made. This term replaces the team Intermediate Distribution Frame
(IDF).

A small or narrow space located above or below the occupant’s space on


each floor that is used for routing building services (e.g., lighting, HVAC,
Interstitial Space
power, telecommunications, plumbing).

An optical fiber cable that has connectors installed on both ends.


Jumper
The vertical or horizontal open support (usually made of aluminum or steel)
Ladder Rack that is attached to a ceiling or wall.

A geographically limited communications network intended for the local


Local Area Network
transport of data, video, and voice.
(LAN)
The area inside a building where telecommunications cables enter and are
connected to riser cables, and where electrical protection is provided when
required. The network interface, as well as the protectors and other
distribution components for the campus sub-systems may be located here.
Main Cross-Connect
The cross-connect in the main equipment room for connecting entrance
cables, riser cables, and equipment cables. Campus Distributor (CD) is the
International expression for Main Cross-Connect.

The cross-connecting point of incoming cables from the


Main Terminal Room telecommunications external network.

Joining two fibers together by mechanical means to enable a continuous


Mechanical Splicing signal.

A unit of frequency that is equal to one million hertz


Megahertz (MHz)
.
Micron (µm) A term for micrometer (one millionth of a meter).
An optical wave-guide in which light travels in multiple modes. Typical
core cladding sizes (measured in microns) are 50/125, 62.5/125, and
Multimode Fiber
100/140.

Nanometer A unit of measurement equal to one billionth of a meter.


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The unit of measurement of the volume resistively of a cubic meter of


material (i.e., soil, rock, plastic, or water) as determined by measuring the
DC resistance between any two opposite faces of the cube. For soil
Ohm-meter measurements, the resulting reading in ohmmeters is the earth resistively
for that soil. When earth resistively is expressed in ohm-centimeters,
convert to ohmmeters by dividing by 100.

A short length of wire or fiber cable with connectors on each end used to
Patch Cord join communications circuits at a crosscurrent.

A facility for the placement of telecommunications cable.


Pathway
An air duct inside buildings through which cable can be pulled or housed.
Plenum
A type of connection established between two specific locations, as
Point-to-Point between two buildings.

A raceway placed between the ceiling and floor in conjunction with ceiling
distribution systems. It is used for the concealment of telecommunications
Power Pole
and electrical wiring from the ceiling space to the work area.

The minimum protection required on all exposed facilities to comply with


Primary Protection NEC requirements.

A device used to limit damaging foreign voltages on metallic


Protector telecommunications conductors.

A wire runs from the ground lug on the protector to an approved ground via
the shortest and straightest route. Limit this wire to 3.28 feet in length and
Protector (Ground
do not pass it within 5.9 inches of protected lines. This prevents inductive
Conductor)
coupling to the protected lines in the event of a high-energy discharge.

An outside plant protector that limits the voltage between


telecommunications conductors and the ground. Open wire protectors are
Protector (Open Wire)
equipped with either 10- or 20-mil carbon electrodes. Typical open wire
protectors limit voltage up to 1,250V DC.
A device to protect against either over-voltage or over-current or both. The
unit may contain carbon electrodes, gas tubes, diodes, solid state devices,
Protector Unit heat coils, fuses, or a combination of these components to address a
particular application that screws or plugs into a protector, protected
terminal, connecting block, central office connector.
The abbreviation for polyvinyl chloride used in manufacturing a type of
PVC jacketing material.

A disturbance in the reception of radio and other electromechanical signals


Radio Frequency
due to conflict with undesired signals.
Interference (RFI)
A cable used in the riser segment.
Riser Cable

The cabling that distributes from the entrance facility to the equipment
Riser Cabling room, intermediate distribution frames, and between buildings.

A type of loop diversity that assigns circuits among different sheaths or


Sheath (Cable) Loop cables.
Diversity

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Metallic layer placed around a conductor or group of conductors to prevent


electrostatic or electromagnetic interference between the enclosed wires
and external fields. The shield may be the metallic sheath of the cable or
the metallic layer inside a nonmetallic sheath. Housing, screen, or cover
Shield
that substantially reduces the coupling of electric and magnetic fields into
or out of circuits or prevents the accidental contact of objects or persons
with parts or components operating at hazardous voltage levels.

A metallic layer used to reduce EMI, noise, emissions, or absorption. In


addition, the reduction by means of shields of the undesirable effects on
Shielding
circuits causes by electromagnetic or electrostatic fields.

An optical wave guide (or fiber) in which the signal travels in one “mode”.
Singlemode Fiber The fiber has a small core diameter.

A concrete floor placed directly on soil without a basement or crawl space.


Slab on Grade
A circular opening through the wall, ceiling, or floor to allow the passage of
Sleeve cables and wires.

An opening (usually rectangular) through a wall, floor, or ceiling to allow


Slot the passage of cables and wires.

A foreign current flowing through terminal wiring and equipment that is


Sneak Current driven by a voltage that is too low to cause a protector to operate.

The use of devices to protect against sneak currents either by interrupting


Sneak Current Protection the current (sneak current fuses) or grounding the conductor (heat coils).

A container used to organize and protect splice trays.


Splice Closure
A container used to organize and protect spliced fibers.
Splice Tray
The permanent joining of fiber ends to identical or similar fibers without
Splicing the use of a connector.

A strong element used to carry the weight of the telecommunications cable


Support Strand and wiring.

See False Ceiling


Suspended Ceiling
The communication of information over some distance, including inter-
Telecommunications building and intra-building distances.

An enclosed space for housing telecommunications equipment, cable


Telecommunications terminations, and cross-connects. The room is the recognized cross-connect
Room between the backbone cable and horizontal cabling.

An assembly used to access the conductors of a cable.


Termination

A cable construction where each glass fiber is tightly buffered by a


protective thermoplastic coating to a diameter of 900 microns. High tensile
Tight Buffer
strength rating is achieved providing durability, ease of handling, and ease
of connectivity.
A narrow furrow dug into the earth for the direct installation of buried cable
or for the installation of troughs or ducts. The trench is refilled with soil or
Trench
covers the direct buried cable, trough, or duct.
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A telecommunications cable installed in an underground trough or duct


Underground Cable system and separates the cable from direct contact with the soil.

See Telecommunications Room.


Wiring Closet
A building space where the occupants interact with telecommunications
Work Area terminal equipment. Designated workspace in which constructive activity
occurs.

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APPENDIX D UC Davis Policy and Procedure Manual

UCD POLICY & PROCEDURE MANUAL

Section 310-10, Telecommunications Services 1/15/02


I. PURPOSE
This section describes policies regarding campus telecommunications networks and services. The policy
expands upon Section 310-16 to provide specific guidance associated with use of the telecommunications
resources provided by UC Davis. Information regarding services obtained through the UC Davis Health
System (UCDHS) Telecommunications Department is available in UCDHS Hospital Policies &
Procedures Manual Section 1368.

II. DEFINITIONS

A. Distribution closets--physical locations in buildings, usually a closet, where centralized distribution


frames are located.

B. Infrastructure--the aggregation of all key components needed for a functioning


telecommunications/networking system. Infrastructure includes physical facilities: underground conduit,
utility vaults, cables, building pathways, towers and antennas; electronics: routers, aggregators, repeaters,
switches, and other devices that control transmission paths; and software used to send, receive, and
manage the transmitted signals.

C. Telecommunications--all forms of distance communication, including data, voice, video, and radio.

D. Telecommunications services--services provided to the campus by the Communications Resources


(CR) Office, including, but not limited to:

1. Engineering, design, capital planning, installation, maintenance, operations, repair,


consultation, training, billing, and coordination functions related to the telecommunications
system, including land-based and wireless voice and data services, 800 MHz emergency radio
system, modems, and campus and residential hall video distribution systems, in compliance with
regulatory requirements.

2. Local and long-distance access.

3. Access to high bandwidth advanced services networks such as Calren2 and Abilene as well
as to the commercial Internet.

4. Technical support in isolating and mitigating security breaches to the campus network in
accordance with the campus network security policy. CR also provides some level of monitoring
to proactively detect potential intrusions.

5. Preparation of applications for initial licenses and renewal of existing licenses held by The
Regents of the University of California for radio, television, and microwave systems.

6. Provision of courtesy telephones for dialing on campus and to UCDHS, elevator phones, and
pay phones.

7. Management control of all inside and outside communications cables, ducts, frames, and
distribution closets.

8. Cable locator services for campus construction.

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9. Administration of the reuse or removal of old outside and inside cable plant.

10. Telecommunication support and services for campus departments on a fee-for-service basis.

III. POLICY

A. General

1. UCD respects the privacy of electronic communications while seeking to ensure that UCD
administrative records are accessible for the conduct of the University's business. Section 310-16
provides policies and procedures for accessing an individual's records, with or without the
individual's consent.

2. In compliance with Federal law, audio or video telephone conversations shall not be recorded
or monitored without advising the participants unless a court has explicitly approved such
monitoring or recording.

a. UCD Emergency Services shall record 911-type emergency calls in accordance


with Federal and State laws and regulations.

b. Participants shall be informed when a call is being monitored or recorded for the
purpose of evaluating customer service, assessing workload, or other business purpose
permitted by law. UCD units that monitor or record telephone calls shall provide an
alternative method of doing business with the University to clients who do not wish to
be part of a monitored telephone call.

3. To avoid damage to the system or disruption of services to customers and to prevent potential
security violations, only personnel authorized by CR may have access to distribution closets.
Customers may not reroute any internal wiring. The Director of Communications Resources, the
Vice Provost--Information & Educational Technology, or their designees must approve
exceptions to this policy. Exceptions are normally granted only for the placement of life safety
equipment and without departmental key access to the closet.

B. Equipment used on the campus phone system

Multi-line telephone sets used on the campus system must be those approved and provided by
CR. Departments may select their own single-line sets or choose to purchase single-line sets
available through CR. All telephones used on the system, including those in residence halls, must
be FCC approved.

C. Incidental personal use of telecommunications resources

University users may use telecommunications resources for incidental personal purposes
provided that it does not (1) directly or indirectly interfere with the University's operation of
these resources; (2) interfere with the user's employment or other obligations to the University;
or (3) burden the University with noticeable incremental costs. Students, staff, faculty, and
University affiliates should use their personal calling cards or other personal resources when
making toll calls. Departments shall seek reimbursement for toll charges due to incidental
personal use by employees.

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IV. REFERENCES AND RELATED POLICY

A. Office of the President: UC Electronic Communications Policy


(http://www.ucop.edu/ucophome/policies/ec/).

B. UCD Policy and Procedure Manual Section 310-16, Electronic Mail Policy
(http://manuals.ucdavis.edu/ppm/310/310-16.htm), under revision.

C. UC Business & Finance Bulletin IS-3, Electronic Information Security


(http://www.ucop.edu/ucophome/policies/bfb/is3.pdf).

D. Communications Resources Web site (http://cr.ucdavis.edu).

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