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TIPS TO GARDEN WITH LESS WATER SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 17 LANDMARKDEAL OFFICIALS SIGN UNUSUAL PACT

TIPS TO GARDEN WITH LESS WATER

SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 17

TIPS TO GARDEN WITH LESS WATER SUBURBAN LIVING PAGE 17 LANDMARKDEAL OFFICIALS SIGN UNUSUAL PACT TO

LANDMARKDEAL

OFFICIALS SIGN UNUSUAL PACT TO TEAR DOWN HYDROELECTRIC DAMS

STATE PAGE 6

UNUSUAL PACT TO TEAR DOWN HYDROELECTRIC DAMS STATE PAGE 6 HILLSDALE GETS PAST PANTHERS SPORTS PAGE

HILLSDALE GETS PAST PANTHERS

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula

Thursday April 7, 2016 XVI, Edition 201

www.smdailyjournal.com

Private school plan sees praise

Belmont Planning Commission favors Crystal Springs Uplands School

By Samantha Weigel

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Whether to allow a private middle school to construct a new campus in place of an aging business park off Ralston Avenue is now in the hands of the Belmont council after the Planning Commission overwhelmingly sup- ported the proposal that’s drawn mixed community opinions. Crystal Springs Uplands School has spent years seeking to redevelop the

6.5-acre site on Davis Drive into a state-of-the-art institution for up to 240 middle school students and 43 staff. Despite being denied by a former City Council in 2012, the Hillsborough-based sixth- through 12th-grade school has gained signifi- cant traction for a new, yet similar pro- posal planners said take community concerns into account. “I was pretty impressed with the work that CSUS has put into this. Alot

of applicants after a first rejection [several] years ago would have looked for another town. And I really appreci- ate that you came back, you thought about it more, and you really listened to people,” said Planning Commissioner Nathan Majeski, according to a video of the meeting. The commission deliberated Tuesday night during its second meeting on the proposal after hearing comments from the public and reviewing the project

See CSUS, Page 18

the public and reviewing the project See CSUS , Page 18 An artist’s rendering of the

An artist’s rendering of the proposed Crystal Springs Upland School’s campus on Davis Drive in Belmont.

Springs Upland School’s campus on Davis Drive in Belmont. BILL SILVERFARB/ DAILY JOURNAL Vesta in downtown
Springs Upland School’s campus on Davis Drive in Belmont. BILL SILVERFARB/ DAILY JOURNAL Vesta in downtown
Springs Upland School’s campus on Davis Drive in Belmont. BILL SILVERFARB/ DAILY JOURNAL Vesta in downtown

BILL SILVERFARB/

DAILY JOURNAL

Vesta in downtown Redwood City specializes in wood-fired pizzas. The restaurant also serves small plates of vegetables such as asparagus and a variety of salads.

Wood, fire, pizza

Vesta packs the house with small plates,wood-fired pizzas

By Bill Silverfarb

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

While Peter Barrone grew up in the restaurant business, his wife Courtney did not. One day, however, she applied to work at Cafe Barrone and it was Peter who reviewed the application of his future wife.

my best

hire,” Peter said. Today, the two own and operate Vesta in downtown Redwood City in the same building on Broadway that once housed Cafe Barrone, now located in Menlo Park. Vesta is famous for its wood-fired pizzas and is inspired by a restaurant in

“I hired her and she was

Venice the couple used to frequent while living in Southern California. It was the busiest restaurant in Venice and it served wood-fired pizzas, Peter said. They decided to open up their own place but it took quite a while to per-

See VESTA, Page 18

Foster City’s Gilead seeks six-story lab

New expansion proposed for biotech’s corporate campus

By Samantha Weigel

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The multi-billion dollar success of the Foster City-head- quartered Gilead Sciences is propelling the biopharmaceuti- cal giant to continue expanding into its nearly 72-acre cor- porate campus, including a proposed new laboratory offi- cials say could help the company save lives. The city’s Planning Commission will meet Thursday, April 7, for a study session to review the proposal to demol- ish an existing single-story building and construct a six- story lab and office building that will bring it closer to fully building out the 2.5 million square feet of space to which Gilead holds entitlements.

See GILEAD, Page 20

City official’s appointment draws transparency concerns

New commissioner’s relationship with Millbrae mayor raises questions

By Austin Walsh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Close ties between the newest member of the Millbrae Planing Commission and Mayor Anne Oliva have drawn concerns from community members regarding a perceived lack of transparency and potential conflict of interest.

See DAVIS, Page 20

members regarding a perceived lack of transparency and potential conflict of interest. See DAVIS , Page

Maureen Davis

members regarding a perceived lack of transparency and potential conflict of interest. See DAVIS , Page
members regarding a perceived lack of transparency and potential conflict of interest. See DAVIS , Page
members regarding a perceived lack of transparency and potential conflict of interest. See DAVIS , Page
members regarding a perceived lack of transparency and potential conflict of interest. See DAVIS , Page

2 Thursday April 7, 2016

FOR THE RECORD

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day

“Money is in some respects life’s fire: it is a very excellent servant,but a terrible master.”

— P.T. Barnum, American showman

This Day in History

1966 The U.S. Navy recovered a hydrogen bomb that the U.S. Air Force had lost in the Mediterranean Sea off Spain fol- lowing a B-52 crash.

In 1614, painter, sculptor and architect El Greco died in Toledo, Spain. In 1788 , an expedition led by Gen. Rufus Putnam estab- lished a settlement at present-day Marietta, Ohio. In 1862 , Union forces led by Gen. Ulysses S. Grant defeated the Confederates at the Battle of Shiloh in Tennessee. In 1927 , the image and voice of Commerce Secretary Herbert Hoover were transmitted live from Washington to New York in the first successful long-distance demonstra- tion of television. In 1939, Italy invaded Albania, which was annexed less than a week later. In 1949 , the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical “South Pacific” opened on Broadway. In 1953 , the U.N. General Assembly ratified Dag Hammarskjold of Sweden as the new secretary-general, suc- ceeding Trygve Lie of Norway. In 1962 , nearly 1,200 Cuban exiles tried by Cuba for their roles in the failed Bay of Pigs invasion were convicted of treason. In 1978 , President Jimmy Carter announced he was defer- ring development of the neutron bomb, a high-radiation weapon. In 1984, the Census Bureau reported Los Angeles had overtaken Chicago as the nation’s “second city” in terms of population.

Birthdays

Gov. Jerry Brown is Actor Jackie Chan Football,analyst 78. is 62. Tiki Barber is 41.
Gov. Jerry Brown is Actor Jackie Chan Football,analyst 78. is 62. Tiki Barber is 41.
Gov. Jerry Brown is Actor Jackie Chan Football,analyst 78. is 62. Tiki Barber is 41.

Gov. Jerry Brown is

Actor Jackie Chan

Football,analyst

78.

is 62.

Tiki Barber is 41.

Media commentator Hodding Carter III is 81. Country singer Bobby Bare is 81. Rhythm-and-blues singer Charlie Thomas (The Drifters) is 79. Movie director Francis Ford Coppola is 77. Singer Patricia Bennett (The Chiffons) is 69. Singer John Oates is 68. Former Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels is 67. Singer Janis Ian is 65. Country musician John Dittrich is 65. College and Pro Football Hall-of-Famer Tony Dorsett is 62. Actor Russell Crowe is 52. Christian/jazz singer Mark Kibble (Take 6) is 52. Actor Bill Bellamy is 51. Rock musi- cian Dave “Yorkie” Palmer (Space) is 51. Actress Heather Burns is 41.

Palmer (Space) is 51. Actress Heather Burns is 41. THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME by David L.

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME

by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles, one letter to each square, to form four ordinary words.

TEPYT

 
 
   
 
   
   

©2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved.

VOEEK

Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. VOEEK MOSCUT NIDTAY Check out the new, free JUST
Tribune Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. VOEEK MOSCUT NIDTAY Check out the new, free JUST

MOSCUT

Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. VOEEK MOSCUT NIDTAY Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE
Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. VOEEK MOSCUT NIDTAY Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE

NIDTAY

Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. VOEEK MOSCUT NIDTAY Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE
Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. VOEEK MOSCUT NIDTAY Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE
Content Agency, LLC All Rights Reserved. VOEEK MOSCUT NIDTAY Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE
Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app
Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

Now arrange the circled letters to form the surprise answer, as suggested by the above cartoon.

Answer here: (Answers tomorrow) Jumbles: EXPEL DRIFT DECEIT MUZZLE Yesterday’s Answer: His high credit card
Answer
here:
(Answers tomorrow)
Jumbles:
EXPEL DRIFT
DECEIT
MUZZLE
Yesterday’s
Answer:
His high credit card bill was a — “DUE-ZIE”
-
His high credit card bill was a — “DUE-ZIE” - REUTERS Handout photo of the mountain
His high credit card bill was a — “DUE-ZIE” - REUTERS Handout photo of the mountain

REUTERS

Handout photo of the mountain lion known as P-35 eating a kill in the Santa Susana Mountains in Southern California.

Florida man with Florida tattoo charged with burglary

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — A Florida man with a tattoo of Florida on his face is facing burglary charges. The Palm Beach Post reported Wednesday that 25-year-old Johnathan Hewett is jailed without bond. He has a map of Florida tattooed on his left fore- head and temple. The Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office said Hewett is seen on surveil- lance video prying open the door of a home last month. Officials say he took a gun and two watches. The homeowner identified him as the friend of a former roommate. Detectives say the video clearly shows Hewett’s tattoo spelling “red rum” on his neck. That’s “murder” spelled backward. He was released from prison last August after serving eight months for being a felon in possession of a gun.

Police:Man swallows stolen ring, needs surgery to remove it

WALNUT CREEK — Authorities in Northern California say a man charged with burglary needed surgery to remove a stolen ring that he had swallowed while fleeing police. The chase ended when the man, identi- fied as 36-year-old Joel Steffensen of Martinez crashed his car into a fence at a rapid transit station last Thursday. Walnut Creek police spokesman Lt. Lanny Edwards says a hospital X-ray

In other news

showed a ring lodged in his esophagus. The resident of the home that was bur- glarized later identified the gold wed- ding band. Prosecutors charged Steffensen with burglary, evasion of police officers and resisting arrest. It was not immediately known if Steffensen has an attorney.

Croatian police probe massive theft from its headquarters

ZAGREB, Croatia — Croatian police are investigating the reported theft of ($320,000 and t4.4 pounds of gold — all snatched from the headquarters of the Croatian police. Helena Biocic of the police media office confirmed Monday that the theft had taken place, but refused to reveal any details. The Jutarnji List newspaper, which reported what was taken, says the heist occurred late Sunday. The report says the thieves got in by the fire stairs and broke into the office of the organized crime department chief, Zeljko Dolacki. The daily says police found an over- turned, empty safe in the morning.

Third man arrested in Pence stolen scooter case

SAN FRANCISCO — A third suspect has been arrested on suspicion of steal- ing an autographed motorized scooter from San Francisco’s Make-A-Wish office that belonged to San Francisco Giants outfielder Hunter Pence.

The San Francisco Police Department says Pence’s scooter was recovered Monday after beat officers recognized two men in a surveillance video. Police say 37-year-old Judd Janke and 26-year- old Nicholas Tiller were arrested in the case. A third man, 35-year-old Jacques Manns was arrested Tuesday. Make-A-Wish Foundation spokes- woman Jen Wilson says San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee came to the city’s founda- tion office Tuesday morning to deliver the good news. A foundation donor paid $40,000 at an auction for the scooter and dinner for four with Pence last year. The scooter was being stored at the office. The nonprofit organization last year arranged 400 wishes for San Francisco Bay Area children with life-threatening medical conditions.

Burglars hit several Orange County pharmacies overnight

ANAHEIM — Authorities in Orange County are searching for burglars who broke into several pharmacies overnight and made off with drugs, lot- tery tickets and cough syrup. City News Service says the first break-in happened early Wednesday in Anaheim, where thieves smashed in the front door at a Pharmacy Plus store. Anaheim Police Officer Scott McManus says the suspects also hit pharmacies in Tustin, Villa Park and Garden Grove.

Lotto

April 6 Powerball 4 28 49 60 65 25 Powerball
April 6 Powerball
4
28 49
60 65
25
Powerball

April 5 Mega Millions

13 45 52 53 57 10 Mega number April 6 Super Lotto Plus 12 14
13
45 52
53
57 10
Mega number
April 6 Super Lotto Plus
12
14
22 32
45 18
Mega number

Fantasy Five

9
9
21
21
24
24
25
25
33
33

Daily Four

 
 
6
6
7
7
5
5
0
0

Daily three midday

 
5
5
3
3
6
6

Daily three evening

 
2
2
3
3
7
7
6 Daily three evening   2 3 7 The Daily Derby race winners areWinning Spirit, No.

The Daily Derby race winners areWinning Spirit, No. 9, in first place; California Classic, No. 5, in second place; and Solid Gold, No. 10, in third place.The race time was clocked at 1:41.33.

Local Weather Forecast

Thurs day : Mostly cloudy. Highs in the lower 60s. South winds 10 to 20 mph.

Thurs day ni g ht: Mostly cloudy. A slight chance of showers after midnight. Lows in the lower 50s. South winds 10 to

20

Fri day : Cloudy. A chance of showers.

Highs in the lower 60s. South winds 10 to

15 mph. Chance of showers 50 percent.

Fri day ni g ht: Cloudy. A chance of showers. Lows in the lower 50s. South winds 5 to 15 mph. Chance of showers 50

percent. Saturday : Cloudy. A chance of showers and a slight chance of thunderstorms. Highs in the lower 60s.

Saturday ni g ht: Mostly cloudy. A slight chance of thun- derstorms. Lows in the lower 50s.

A slight chance of thun- derstorms. Lows in the lower 50s. mph. The San Mateo Daily

mph.

The San Mateo Daily Journal

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

LOCAL

Thursday April 7, 2016

3

Underwater Burlingame pool hazard alleged

Man warns community against potential danger to swimmers

Police reports

Who let the dog out?

A large, white dog was seen running loose in the road near Hillsdale Avenue and Sister Cities Boulevard in South San Francisco before 4:09 p.m. Thursday, March 24.

SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO

Reckl es s dri v i ng. A vehicle was seen doing doughnuts near Castille and Dorado ways before 7:32 p.m. Thursday, March 24.

Acci dent. A Genentech bus hit a pedestrian near Baden Avenue and South Airport Boulevard before 3:02 p.m. Thursday, March

24.

Traffic hazard. Adisabled vehicle was seen blocking a lane of traffic on Westborough

Boulevard before 1:24 p.m. Thursday, March

24.

Narco ti cs . People were seen smoking mar- ijuana on Eighth Lane before 1:09 p.m. Thursday, March 24.

SAN MATEO

Sus pi ci o us ci rcums tances . A woman

returned home to find three people drinking in her house on Bahia Street before 11:15 p.m. Saturday, March 26.

was tampered

with on Park Place before 2:42 p.m. Saturday, March 26. Theft. Guests at a hotel on North Bayshore Boulevard reported that a jewelry box and other items were missing from their room before 12:04 p.m. Saturday, March 26. Burg l ary . Tools were stolen from a truck on Monte Diablo Avenue before 7:36 a.m. Saturday, March 26.

Vandal i s m. A vehicle’s lock

By Austin Walsh

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Ayoung swimmer sliced her foot on a piece of underwater equipment at the Burlingame Aquatic Center, claimed her father who is now questioning whether the pool is adequately safe. Victor Lam, of Millbrae, said his 12-year- old daughter required three stitches to close the gash that was opened in her foot after she accidentally kicked a sharp piece of exposed metal while swimming laps at the pool last month. The pool, located on the campus of Burlingame High School, is a shared commu- nity asset managed and operated by the city, San Mateo Union High School District and a nonprofit community organization. Injury liability is contingent on how the pool was being when the incident occurred, according to officials who offered few comments until a more thorough investigation could be com- pleted, other than offering assurance that the pool is safe for swimmers. The injury occurred Friday, March 25, when Lam’s daughter was doing an underwater turn during swim practice and her foot hit a metal tile guard hanging over the lip of the pool, he claimed, and he is concerned nothing has been done to mitigate the hazard. Lam remains uncertain whether he will file a lawsuit to recoup damages his family has suffered, but he is primarily interested in ensuring another swimmer is not injured, he said. “I just don’t want any innocent person to get hurt,” he said. “I just want them to know this is a dangerous condition that could hurt any kid.” The pool is operated by the nonprofit Burlingame Aquatic Club, while city and school district officials agreed in October on terms to share maintenance costs for the pool. Suze Gardner, executive director of the club,

said pool staff is looking into the incident, but feels confident the facility is not a danger to the public. “We were sorry to learn about the recent injury to a swimmer at the aquatic center. As is our practice, we are taking this opportunity to review all safety standards at the facility,” she said in an email. “It does not appear that this injury is the result of pool operations, and we are confident that all pool operations are safe.” San Mateo Union High School District officials are also investigating the incident, according to spokeswoman Sheri Costa- Batis. “We don’t yet have the full background and are undergoing a review of the situation to gather complete facts, so until we do our due diligence, it’s premature to comment at this time,” said Costa-Batis in an email. Until high school district officials have completed their investigation, Costa-Batis said she is uncertain which agency may be responsible for handling liability claims. “Every situation is different and so each sit- uation needs to be evaluated based on its own circumstances. We’re looking into the com- plete facts and background so a determination can be made,” she said. “Until fully explored, we can’t speculate.” Burlingame City Manager Lisa Goldman expressed a similar sentiment. “Who bears liability depends on the facts of the specific claim and whether it relates to facilities or operations,” she said, in an email. “We’re investigating this incident and have no comment on it at this time.” Lam said he is underwhelmed by the response of officials since the injury occurred, and would like to see more aware- ness spread regarding the potential underwa- ter threat. “I’m not satisfied with the manage- ment,” he said. “There might be poten- tial negligence, because there is no warn- ing sign and they are still allowing

swimmers to use the pool.” After hurting her foot, Lam’s daughter was taken to Mills-Peninsula Medical Center, where she was treated for what he character- ized as a deep cut. More than two weeks after the incident, his daughter is still experiencing difficulty walk- ing without crutches, said Lam. Lam said he returned to the pool Monday, March 28, to find the metal tile guards were still in place, and some were protruding under- water from the pool wall, making it more likely for swimmers to hit. The threat posed by the tile guards were known to the coach of his daughter’s swim team, Lam alleged, which caused him further confusion regarding why nothing was done to preemptively protect swimmers. “Why did they not stop the swim program? Or why did they not put a sign up, or whatev- er, because of the danger? I think this is com- mon sense,” he said. Lam said he has filed a claim requesting financial relief for the medical expenses incurred during treatment for his daughter, but said he likely does not have the assets neces- sary to engage in a long legal battle with the agencies operating and managing the pool. “I do not have the money to get an attor- ney,” he said. Lam said his primary concern is seeing the issue addressed, and ensuring no other swim- mers are exposed to the threat that harmed his daughter. “My main concern is that I do not want any innocent person to get hurt,” he said. “Because it seems like the management should have the authority to decide to stop the swim program while they fix it.”

“Because it seems like the management should have the authority to decide to stop the swim
“Because it seems like the management should have the authority to decide to stop the swim

4 Thursday April 7, 2016

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Apple shuttle bus catches fire on I-280

A shuttle bus carrying Apple employees from San Francisco to Cupertino caught fire Wednesday morning in unincorporated San Mateo County near Menlo Park, a California Highway Patrol spokesman said. The fire was reported at 6:40 a.m. on southbound Interstate 280 at Sand Hill Road, CHP Officer Art Montiel said. The rear left side of the bus caught fire. Montiel did not know what caused the fire. No one was injured. Two lanes of the highway were closed for more than an hour and reopened at about 8 a.m. No other vehicle was involved in the incident, Montiel said. The employees were transferred to a different bus following the fire.

Groups fighting GGNRA dog restrictions sue for data

Dog owners fighting proposed

Local briefs

limits on dog walking in the Golden Gate National Recreation Area have filed a federal lawsuit in San Francisco against the National Park Service seeking to force the agency to release data on dog walking and its impacts in the park. The Freedom of Information Act lawsuit filed Tuesday by Save Our Recreation and several dog owner groups alleges that the park serv- ice has been “slow walking” its response to the groups’ request for data until after the public comment period has closed on proposed changes to rules on dog walking in the GGNRA. The recreation area, which spans Marin, San Francisco and San Mateo counties, includes a number of popular dog walking areas including Ocean Beach, Fort Funston, Crissy Field, Muir Beach and Rancho Corral de Tierra. The National Park Service is proposing changes that would designate 22 locations for dog

walking within the GGNRA, seven of which would allow off- leash dogs. Park officials have described the plan as “dog-friend- ly,” and said it is intended to bal- ance the needs of different park users, protect natural and cultural resources including wildlife, and increase public safety.

BART shows off new cars

BART’s new, more spacious cars are undergoing testing in the East Bay and agency officials hope to get the first of them on tracks by the end of this year. The first car of the agency’s “Fleet of the Future” was shipped by truck last month from Plattsburgh, New York, where the Bombardier Transit Corp. is build- ing 775 train cars. After the first car is thoroughly tested, BART officials hope to have 10 in place by December. The replacement cars are sorely needed as a mysterious electrical spike along the Pittsburg/Bay Point line has been damaging cars and forcing them out of service. BART has been running shorter

forcing them out of service. BART has been running shorter SCOTT MORRIS BART’s new, more spacious

SCOTT MORRIS

BART’s new, more spacious cars are undergoing testing in the East Bay and agency officials hope to get the first of them on tracks by the end of this year.

trains along all its lines as a result. “This car represents that help is on the way,” BART director Robert Raburn said at the Hayward maintenance complex today as BART showed off the

new car to reporters. BART will poll riders on the first 10 cars and finalize the interi- or design, at which point it will begin mass-producing the remain- ing cars, putting all 775 in place by the end of 2021.

or design, at which point it will begin mass-producing the remain- ing cars, putting all 775

THE DAILY JOURNAL

NATION

Thursday April 7, 2016

5

Trump eyes shift to policy as convention fight looms

REUTERS Donald Trumpat a campaign event at Grumman Studios in Bethpage, N.Y. Odds of contested

REUTERS

Donald Trumpat a campaign event at Grumman Studios in Bethpage, N.Y.

Odds of contested convention increase

DEFINITION, PLEASE What’s a contested convention? It’s when the conven- tion opens without a presumptive nominee because no candidate has been able to lock up commitments from a majority of convention delegates.This year, the magic number for the Republicans is 1,237 — one del- egate more than half of the 2,472 convention delegates. TRUMP’S CHALLENGE Only Trump has a potential path to lock up enough del- egates before the convention,and it’s an extremely slim one. To claim the nomination by the end of the primar- ies on June 7, he’d have to win 57 percent of the remaining delegates. So far, he’s won just 46 percent. The delegate count so far:Trump,743;Cruz,517;John Ka-

sich,143.

WHY NOW? The likelihood of a contested convention has increased with the Republican Party shifting away from a winner- take-all strategy,in recent years,to a more proportional way of allocating delegates.Only nine states are award-

ing all their GOP delegates to the winner of their primary or caucuses this year.The once-large field of GOP can- didates in the 2016 race and Trump’s wildcard candidacy also feed into this year’s uncertainty. SIX-WEEK WINDOW

If the primary season ends with no presumptive nom-

inee, there are still six weeks before the convention opens in Cleveland on July 18,during which candidates

could try to cobble together a majority.If Trump is close

to the magic number, for example, he might be able to

scrounge up commitments from delegates in the five

states and territories that didn’t have statewide presi- dential preference votes during the primary season. He may also turn to delegates who backed candidates who have dropped out of the race,says Joshua Putnam,

a political science lecturer at the University of Georgia whose frontloading.blogspot.com explores the intrica- cies of the primaries. “Things can happen, particularly if someone is close,” says Putman. Even if a candidate can round up com-

mitments from unbound delegates, there’s really no way to know for sure how those delegates will vote. FIRST BALLOT When the convention opens in Cleveland,about 90 per- cent of the delegates will be bound to a particular

candidate on the first ballot,based on the results of the primaries and caucuses.If no one gets a majority of del- egates on that first vote, all bets are off: Nearly three-fourths of delegates won’t be bound on the sec- ond vote, and the percentage of unbound delegates keeps going up from there. SOMEONE ELSE?

If none of the candidates can get to 1,237, it’s conceiv-

able that delegates could turn to someone who didn’t run in the primaries. House Speaker Paul Ryan’s name keeps popping up as a possible alternative,though he’s said he’s not interested. Such a scenario could inflame all those voters who made their preferences known dur- ing the nominating season.Trump, for one, has talked about riots if he’s denied the nomination after arriving at the convention with the biggest share of delegates, even if he’s short of 1,237. RULES INTRIGUE Each convention adopts its own rules, and those rules

can have a lot to do with how the events play out.If this

year’s convention adopts the same rules as in 2012, a candidate would have to get support from a majority of delegates in eight states to be placed in nomination. ABOUT LAST TIME

The last time a Republican convention opened without

a clear nominee was 1976,when Gerald Ford led in del-

egates but lacked a majority coming into the convention. Ford beat back a challenge from Ronald Reagan and eked out the nomination on the first vote. BROKERED CONVENTION

There’s no such thing anymore, because there are no more party bosses and power brokers who can sway large chunks of delegates.You have to go back to 1952 for a true brokered convention.That’s when Democrats turned to Adlai Stevenson,who won on the third ballot.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Republican Donald Trump declared it’s “great to be home” at a massive rally in the New York City suburbs Wednesday, shrugging off a defeat in Wisconsin a day earlier and instead, predicting victory in his dele- gate-rich home state. “I love these peo- ple. These are my

home state. “I love these peo- ple. These are my Ted Cruz people,” he said to

Ted Cruz

people,” he said to

thunderous cheers. Dozens of police officers amassed outside the soundstage venue on Long Island as protesters chanted “your hats are made in China” and “dump Trump.” Trump supporters retaliated, declar- ing “socialism sucks!” and “leave this country!” The rally comes as the GOP front- runner signaled a shift toward “more meat on the bone” in his policy speeches amid new signs of campaign

discord after his stinging Wisconsin loss to rival Ted Cruz emboldened his critics and pushed the GOP closer to its first contested national convention in four decades. Former gubernatorial candidate Carl Paladino, one of Trump’s state co- chairs, said the campaign received 18,000 requests for Wednesday’s event, although the venue holds just 3,000 people. Said Paladino, a Buffalo-based busi- nessman: “We’ve seen people just

coming up saying, ‘Where has he been?’ Thank God he’s here.” As for possible friction in the cam- paign, Paladino said he’s had no prob- lems with Trump’s campaign manager. “They do have a small staff — prob- ably smaller than they should have — but these guys work 24/7,” he said.

they should have — but these guys work 24/7,” he said. REUTERS Wisconsin Gov.ScottWalker speaks during

REUTERS

Wisconsin Gov.ScottWalker speaks during Milwaukee County GOP’s‘Wisconsin Decides 2016’presidential candidate event at the American Serb Banquet Hall.

Wisconsin Gov.Scott Walker benefits from Cruz victory

By Scott Bauer

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MILWAUKEE — Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker has his mojo back, and he’s got Ted Cruz and Donald Trump to thank for it. Walker is re-emerging as a national political force six months after slipping into relative obscurity following his own short-lived, disappointing run for president. Walker helped deliver Wisconsin for Cruz in a 13-point victory on Tuesday on an election night where the gover- nor’s hand-picked state Supreme Court justice also won. Walker’s favorability ratings are also the highest they’ve been in a year, talk of him being on the vice presidential short list is increasing and he is now positioned to play a significant role in helping to deliver Wisconsin for a Republican presidential candidate for the first time in 32 years. “Anyone who doubts we’re not back and re-engaged in Wisconsin, they don’t doubt it after last night,” Walker said in an interview on WTMJ radio in Milwaukee on Wednesday. Walker said he “absolutely” had regained his mojo, say- ing Trump made a mistake by attacking his record as gover- nor while campaigning in the state. Trump blew into Wisconsin and immediately blasted the job Walker’s been doing as governor, even criticizing him for not raising taxes to avoid cutting education funding. “Wisconsin is doing very poorly,” Trump said.

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6 Thursday April 7, 2016

LOCAL/STATE

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Officials sign unusual pact to tear down hydroelectric dams

By Jonathan J. Cooper

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — Endangered salmon blocked for nearly a century from hundreds of miles of the Klamath River in Oregon and California are expected to return en masse under unusual agreements signed Wednesday to tear down four hydroelectric dams. U.S. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell, who signed agreements with the gov- ernors of both states, said the plan would bring about one of the largest river restoration projects in the his- tory of the U.S. The landmark deals also protect farmers and ranchers from rising power and water prices as the various interests work to end long-running water wars in the drought-stricken Klamath River basin. The dams now block fish from

Klamath River basin. The dams now block fish from “This is a huge exercise of humankind

“This is a huge exercise of humankind fixing some of the mistakes of the past.”

— Gov.Jerry Brown

migrating to their historic spawning grounds and also degrade water quali- ty, spreading fish diseases and algae blooms. Salmon are sacred to some Native American tribes that use them for subsistence and ceremony. “Our allocation of fish this year doesn’t meet half of our subsistence for our people,” said Yurok Tribe Vice Chairman David Gensaw. “This is a threat to our culture, our religion and the economic survival of our people.” The Klamath basin has been the site of tense disputes between tribes, environmentalists, farmers and ranchers for nearly two decades. In 2001, water deliveries to farmers

and ranchers were severely curtailed. Adult salmon suffered a major die-off a year later. Salmon harvests have been sharply reduced for the tribes as well as recreational and commercial fish- ers. The latest deal is spelled out in two agreements signed at the mouth of the river in Northern California in a cere- mony attended by Oregon Gov. Kate Brown, California Gov. Jerry Brown, federal officials, tribal leaders, con- servation groups, large-scale water users and dam-owner PacifiCorp. “This is a huge exercise of humankind fixing some of the mis- takes of the past,” Jerry Brown said.

On April 18 th , 2016, come join Friends of San Mateo Youth Hockey and
On April 18 th , 2016, come join Friends of San Mateo Youth Hockey
and others and put SPI Holdings in the Penalty Box for the following
behavior:
Penalty #1: In shuttering the San Mateo Ice Rink, SPI has deprived
the San Mateo community of an important recreational amenity for
nearly 3 years, all the while enjoying the substantial economic
benefits of operating the Bridgepointe Shopping Center;
Penalty #2: The Bridgepointe Master Plan calls for the inclusion of
the Ice Rink as a means of offsetting various environmental impacts
as set forth in the project’s EIR; however, SPI has brazenly ignored
this obligation and unilaterally shut down the Ice Rink;
Penalty #3: SPI does not have the right to provide for the recreational
amenity OFF SITE - the Bridgepointe Master Plan is crystal clear:
the Ice Rink (or alternative recreational amenity) must be provided
for in THE LOCATION OF THE CURRENT ICE RINK
Penalty #4: In offering the City $3 milion to demolish the Ice Rink,
SPI is attempting to pay $3 million for something that would cost 5x
times this amount to replicate.
Please show your support to block SPI Holdings attempt to
demolish San Mateo Ice Rink by attending the San Mateo City
Council meeting on April 18 th , 2016 at 7:00 pm

Around the state

Democrats win California Assembly seat in special election

SACRAMENTO — Democrats held onto a Fresno County seat in the California Assembly with a special election victo- ry in a critical race for the majority party that will be rehashed again in June and November. Emergency room doctor Joaquin Arambula received 52 per- cent of the 29,000 votes counted so far in Tuesday night’s contest, besting Republican Clint Olivier’s 42 percent and a small margin that went to a second Democratic candidate. Arambula, 38, of Kingsburg, will succeed moderate Democratic Assemblyman Henry Perea in the seat Arambula’s father held for six years. He is guaranteed the seat for only eight months — the remainder of Perea’s term — but Democrats have held the seat for 40 years and have a registration edge in the district.

California hospitals give $8.5 million to tax-hike measure

SACRAMENTO — A lobbying group for California hospi- tals is giving $8.5 million to an initiative campaign to extend a temporary tax increase on the wealthy. The political arm of the California Association of Hospitals and Health Systems reported the March 23rd donation on Wednesday. The ballot initiative would continue existing voter- approved income tax increases in Proposition 30 for 12 years beyond their scheduled expiration. It is one of two proposals approved to collect signatures to extend the tax-increase measure.

Cal State system and faculty union in talks to avert strike

SAN FRANCISCO — California State University officials and the union that represents campus faculty members are expressing optimism they will be able to reach a salary agree- ment that would prevent a five-day strike starting next week. The California Faculty Association said Wednesday that union and university negotiators have resumed talks and hope to announce a settlement to their long-running pay dispute on Friday.

Obituary

Paul Robert Bartolozzi

Paul Robert Bartolozzi, born July 6, 1964, died March 25, 2016.

He is forever remembered as a great dad to Isadora Petrovsky, a great uncle to Anthony Filereto and the best brother to Steve Bartolozzi and Susan (Leo) Filereto. He was a wonderful nurseryman and a great person who will be dearly missed. “Don’t Stop Believing!” Friends and family may visit between 8:30 a.m.- 9:30 a.m. Friday, April 8, at

Garden Chapel, 885 El Camino Real, in South San Francisco. A funeral mass will be 10 a.m. at St. Veronica Church, 434 Alida Way, in South San Francisco. Condolences may also be made at www.garden-

chapel885.com.

at St. Veronica Church, 434 Alida Way, in South San Francisco. Condolences may also be made
at St. Veronica Church, 434 Alida Way, in South San Francisco. Condolences may also be made

THE DAILY JOURNAL

STATE/NATION

Thursday April 7, 2016

7

THE DAILY JOURNAL STATE/NATION Thursday • April 7, 2016 7 REUTERS Merle Haggard performs at the

REUTERS

Merle Haggard performs at the 56th annual Grammy Awards in Los Angeles.

Working man’s poet, Merle Haggard lived his life in song

By Kristin M. Hall

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — Merle Haggard did- n’t just write great country songs, he lived them. His real life experiences of poverty as the son of Oklahoma migrants, an early stint in prison and a life lived on the road gave his songs true grit when others would just have to imagine those scenarios for inspiration. Haggard wrote songs for the American work- ing class to drink to, to dance to and to cry to. Haggard died Wednesday at his home in Palo Cedro, California on his 79th birthday, according to his manager. “We’ve lost one of the greatest writers and singers of all time,” said his friend Dolly Parton in a statement. “His heart was as ten- der as his love ballads. I loved him like a brother. Rest easy, Merle.” A masterful guitarist, fiddler, songwriter and singer, the Country Music Hall of Famer with the firm, direct baritone released dozens of albums and No. 1 hits over the decades. His music was rough yet sensitive, reflecting on childhood, marriage and daily

struggles, telling stories of shame and redemption, or just putting his foot down in “The Fightin’ Side of Me” and “I Think I’ll Just Stay Here and Drink.” General audiences knew him best for “Okie From Muskogee,” a patriotic anthem released in 1969 at the height of the Vietnam War. It quickly became a cultural touchstone for its anti-hippie lyrics pro- claiming “we don’t burn our draft cards down on Main Street; we like living right and being free.” The Byrds, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Grateful Dead, Emmylou Harris, Dwight Yoakam, Lucinda Williams and Reba McEntire all covered his songs, while others have paid tribute to the legitimacy he brought to coun- try music, such as Eric Church’s 2006 song “Pledge Allegiance to the Hag,” or the Dixie Chicks’ “Long Time Gone,” a criticism of Nashville trends in 2000. Haggard’s songwriting earned him com- parisons to folk songwriter Woody Guthrie because of his fascination with the common man, such as “If We Make it Through December.” But his most poignant songs were the most personal, like the migrant ballad “Hungry Eyes,” or the autobiograph- ical “Mama Tried.”

Eyes,” or the autobiograph- ical “Mama Tried.” Crowded ticket could ease path for Loretta Sanchez in

Crowded ticket could ease path for Loretta Sanchez in Senate bid

By Michael R. Blood

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Thirty-four candidates want to be California’s next U.S. senator. Beyond the leading Democrats, it’s a mostly unfamiliar and untested group that opens the way for possible surprises and could boost the chances of Rep. Loretta Sanchez in June’s primary election. The Orange County congresswoman is vying to get into a November showdown with fellow Democrat Kamala Harris, the state attorney general who’s been leading in polls and fundraising. Under California’s unusual election rules, only the top two vote-getters in the June 7 primary advance to the November election. With 12 little-known Republicans on the ballot, a fractured GOP vote would make it easier for two Democrats to claim the top spots. The Republican vote “will be spread all over the place” in a large field, if no strong candidate emerges, Republican consultant

Mike Madrid said. The list of candidates for the seat being vacated by retiring Sen. Barbara Boxer also includes five other Democrats and 15 candidates from minor political parties or those who listed no political affiliation. They will appear on a

single ballot, and voters can choose any candidate, regardless of party. In a year when the presidential contest has dominated headlines, California’s Senate race has been largely overlooked and many voters remain undecided. The leading Republicans, Duf Sundheim and Tom Del Beccaro, have been polling in single digits and have struggled to raise money. Ron Unz, a theoretical-physicist- turned-software-developer who entered the race last month, said in an email that he had donated $50,000 to his campaign.

the race last m onth, said in an email that he had donated $50,000 to his

Loretta

Sanchez

Expires 5/31/16
Expires 5/31/16

8 Thursday April 7, 2016

LOCAL/NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

White House:

$589M to go to fight Zika virus

By Andrew Taylor

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Federal money left over from the largely successful fight against Ebola will now go to combating the growing threat of the Zika virus, the Obama administration announced Wednesday. Most of the $589 million would be devoted to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for research on the virus and Zika- related birth defects, as well as the creation of response teams to limit its spread. The National Institutes of Health would contin-

ue research into a v accine and the U.S. Agency for International Development would intensify efforts to fight the virus overseas. Researchers fear Zika causes microcephaly, a serious birth defect in which a baby’s head is too small, as well as posing other threats to the children of pregnant women infected with it. President Barack Obama has asked for about $1.9 billion in emergency money to fight Zika but the request has stalled in the GOP-controlled Congress. White House budget chief Shaun Donovan and Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia M.

Donovan and Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia M. REUTERS A pair of Aedes albopictus mosquitoes

REUTERS

A pair of Aedes albopictus mosquitoes are seen during a mating ritual while the female feeds on a blood meal in a 2003 image from the Centers for Disease Control.

Burwell said on a conference call with reporters that the administra- tion still needs the full request to fight both Zika and maintain vigi- lance on Ebola. They said agencies would not be able to achieve a complete response to Zika without addition-

al funding. For instance, addition- al money must be approved to manufacture vaccines, purchase diagnostic tests, and undertake mosquito control throughout the rainy season in Central America and the Caribbean, among other activities.

Tennessee bill would allow counselors to deny services

By Sheila Burke

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — A bill that would allow mental health counselors to turn patients away based on the counselors’ religious beliefs and personal principles has passed in the House in Tennessee, the latest state to

introduce measures that oppo- nents say legalize discrimination against gays, bisexuals and trans- gender people. The Senate, which already passed the measure, still would have to approve an amendment adopted by the House. The bill passed 68-22 Wednesday following a rancorous

debate on the House floor. If it is signed into law, Tennessee would be the only state to allow coun- selors to refuse to treat patients based on the counselors’ own belief systems, said Art Terrazas, Director of Government Affairs for the American Counseling Association. The organization has called the bill an “unprecedented

attack” on the counseling profes- sion and government overreach. Opponents of the measure say it would allow therapists to discrim- inate against gays and other peo- ple who are at their most vulnera- ble and need therapy. Proponents say it takes into account the rights of everyone, including the thera- pists.

Local brief

Fatal rollover hit-and-run on Highway 101

A 58-year-old New Hampshire

man is dead after a hit-and-run, rollover collision in Redwood City Wednesday afternoon,

California Highway Patrol offi- cials said. The first report of the crash came in at 1 p.m. on northbound Highway 101 just south of Woodside Road.

It appeared that a 2000 light

brown Toyota Sienna clipped a 2006 silver Scion driven by the New Hampshire man. He lost control of the vehicle and rolled it in the center divide, CHP Officer Art Montiel said. The New Hampshire man had his seat belt on but suffered major injuries in the crash. He died at 1:50 p.m. at Stanford Hospital. Some witnesses told CHP offi- cers the driver of the Toyota was speeding, Montiel said. It’s not known yet whether drugs or alcohol played a part in the col- lision, Montiel said. No other vehicles were involved in the incident and no other pas- sengers were in the Scion. CHP officers are asking for help locating the driver of the Toyota, Montiel said. They do not yet have a description of the person. Anyone with information about the person or the collision is being asked to call the California Highway Patrol or 911.

Anyone with information about the person or the collision is being asked to call the California

THE DAILY JOURNAL

WORLD

Thursday April 7, 2016

9

THE DAILY JOURNAL WORLD Thursday • April 7, 2016 9 REUTERS Syrian refugee Ahmad al-Abboud,and his

REUTERS

Syrian refugee Ahmad al-Abboud,and his family members,who will be resettled in the United States as part of a refugee admissions program, walk to board their plane at the Queen Alia International Airport in Amman, Jordan.

First Syrians in the U.S.under surge resettlement program

By Khetam Malkawi

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

AMMAN, Jordan — The first Syrian fami- ly to be resettled in the U.S. under a speeded- up “surge operation” for refugees left Jordan on Wednesday for Kansas City, Missouri, to start a new life. Ahmad al-Abboud, who is being resettled with his wife and five children, said he is thankful to Jordan, where he has lived for three years after fleeing Syria’s civil war. But the 45-year-old from Homs, Syria, said he was ready to build a better life in the U.S. “I’m happy. America is the country of freedom and democracy, there are jobs opportunities, there is good education, and we are looking forward to having a good life over there,” al-Abboud said. They have been living in Mafraq, north of Amman. Al-Abboud was unable to find work, and the family was surviving on food coupons. “I am ready to integrate in the U.S. and start a new life,” he told the Associated Press in Amman’s airport before the family board- ed a flight to Kansas City. Al-Abboud said he wanted to learn English and find a job to support his family. Since October, 1,000 Syrian refugees have moved to the U.S. from Jordan. President Barack Obama has set a target of resettling 10,000 Syrian refugees by Sept. 30.

A resettlement center opened in Amman in February to help meet that goal, and about 600 people are interviewed every day at the center. The temporary processing center will run until April 28, said U.S. Ambassador Alice Wells, who was at the airport to see the al- Abboud family depart. Gina Kassem, the regional refugee coordi- nator at the U.S. Embassy in Amman, said that while the target of 10,000 applies to Syrian refugees living around the world, most will be resettled from Jordan. “The 10,000 (figure) is a floor and not a ceiling, and it is possible to increase the number,” Kassem told reporters. While the resettlement process usually takes 18 to 24 months, the surge operation will reduce the time to three months, Kassem said. The U.N. Refugee Agency prioritizes the most vulnerable cases for resettlement, and refers them to the U.S. to review, Kassem said. The priority is given to high-risk groups such as unaccompanied minors and victims of torture and gender-based violence, she said. “We do not have exclusions or look for families with certain education background, language skills or other socio-economic factors, and we do not cut family sizes,” she said.

factors, and we do not cut family sizes,” she said. Kerry breaks record for miles traveled

Kerry breaks record for miles traveled by secretary of state

By Btadley Klapper

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MANAMA, Bahrain — John Kerry is now the most traveled secretary of state in U.S. history, breaking the record as he arrived in the Middle East kingdom of Bahrain on Wednesday. The trip pushed Kerry past 1.06 million miles as America’s top diplomat, narrowly beating Condoleezza Rice by about 1,000 miles. Rice, who was secretary of state under President George W. Bush, held the previous mark with 1.059 million miles. Kerry eclipsed Hillary Clinton’s mileage tally in December. With 10 months left before a new presi- dent takes office, Kerry is showing no signs of tempering his hectic travel schedule. He flew to the Mideast on Tuesday from New York after attending an energy conference, stopping in Ireland to refuel. He plans to visit Japan later in the week. With no immediate plans to leave the State Department, Kerry could easily pad his new record by hundreds of thousands of miles before departing government. The former Massachusetts senator and for- mer Democratic presidential nominee has

spent more than 2,300 hours — or 96 days — in the air since becoming secretary of state in February 2013. He has spent parts of 467 differ- ent days on his well-worn government plane. One record eludes Kerry still: Clinton’s 112 countries visited on the

job. Having shuttled regularly between several favorite destinations — including Paris, London and Jerusalem — Kerry had only been to 80 countries. Bahrain makes 81. Kerry’s visit to the capital of Manama is the first by an American secretary of state since demonstrations by the kingdom’s Shiite majority in 2011. Saudi and Emirati troops helped put down the protests, though discontent continues. Human rights groups chastise Bahrain’s Sunni rulers for repres- sion and discrimination. Kerry will raise human rights concerns when he meets top officials from Bahrain and the Persian Gulf region’s other Sunni monarchies countries Thursday.

Gulf region’s other Sunni monarchies countries Thursday. John Kerry Johannsson to seek approval to become

John Kerry

Johannsson to seek approval to become Iceland’s next PM

REYKJAVIK, Iceland — Iceland’s fish- eries and agriculture minister Sigurdur Ingi Johannsson said Wednesday he will seek the president’s approval to become the coun- try’s next prime minister after the previous leader resigned because of revelations he had offshore accounts. Johannsson said Iceland’s center-right governing coalition remains intact despite the turmoil that started Sunday after a mas- sive leak of documents from a Panamanian law firm showed it created offshore accounts

Around the world

firm showed it created offshore accounts Around the world Sigurdur Johannsson for Prime Minister Sigmundur David

Sigurdur

Johannsson

for Prime Minister Sigmundur David Gunnlaugsson and his wife. Gunnlaugsson stepped down two days later. Johannsson is expected to meet President Olafur Ragnar Grimsson on Thursday, but the opposi- tion opposes the move

and is planning to pursue a vote of no confidence in parliament.

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10 Thursday April 7, 2016

BUSINESS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Stocks rise as health care,energy companies soar

By Marley Jay

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — U.S. stocks broke a two-day losing streak Wednesday as investors bought up drugmakers and other health care companies. Energy compa- nies also jumped as the price of oil surged. Biotech drug companies, which have been mired in a long slide, made their biggest gains in almost five years. That came after Pfizer, one of the largest pharmaceutical companies in the world, gave up on a plan to buy Botox maker Allergan for $160 billion and investors wondered if it will look elsewhere. The gains were only enough to wipe out most of the market’s losses from a day earlier. Stocks wavered in recent weeks as investors wait for quarterly earn- ings to start pouring in, and many are bracing for another shaky quarter. Jack Ablin, chief investment officer of BMO Private Bank, said it’s going to be another weak earnings period, and the

DOW JONES INDUSTRIALS High : 17,723.55 Low : 17,542.54 Close : 17,603.32 Change : +112.73

DOW JONES INDUSTRIALS

High: 17,723.55

Low: 17,542.54

Close: 17,603.32

Change: +112.73

OTHER INDEXES

S&P 500:

2066.66

+21.49

NYSE Index:

10,159.84

+98.76

Nasdaq:

4920.72

+76.79

NYSE MKT:

2229.79

+11.01

Russell 2000:

1108.81

+12.96

Wilshire 5000:

21,264.28

+227.55

10-Yr Bond:

1.76

+0.03

Oil (per barrel):

37.75

Gold :

1,223.60

only way stocks will trade much higher is if companies are able to give optimistic projections for the rest of the year. “Without an improvement in earnings or a projection of earn- ings growth, our outlook is kind of tapped out,” he said. The Dow Jones industrial aver- age gained 112.73 points, or 0.6 percent, to 17,716.05. The Standard & Poor’s 500 index rose 21.49 points, or 1.1 percent, to

2,066.66. The Nasdaq composite index picked up 76.78 points, or 1.6 percent, to 4,920.72. Pfizer and Allergan confirmed Wednesday that they are walking away from their proposed merger after the U.S. Treasury Department announced new rules that made the deal, and others

like it, far less appealing. Pfizer rose $1.57, or 5 percent, to $32.93, its biggest gain since

2011.

Pfizer was ready to make one of the largest corporate deals in his- tory for Allergan as it tried to boost its sales and cut its tax bill. Biotechnology companies, which make complex and costly drugs, climbed higher. Celgene, which makes treatments for can- cer, gained $6.10, or 6 percent, to $108.22. Vertex Pharmaceuticals rose $7.15, or 8.5 percent, to $91.31.

Biotech stocks are facing pres-

sure from legislators over the price of their drugs, and investors fear that their ability to raise prices will be impeded. Energy companies gained ground as benchmark U.S. crude rose $1.86, or 5.2 percent, to close at $37.75 a barrel in New York. Brent crude, a benchmark for international oils, added $1.97, or 5.2 percent, to close at $39.84 a barrel in London. The price of oil has skidded in recent days before making small gains Tuesday. Chevron picked up $2.17, or 2.3 percent, to $94.84 and Exxon Mobil added $1.10, or 1.3 percent, to $83.31. Hess rose $2.74, or 5.3 percent, to $54. Oilfield services companies Halliburton and Baker Hughes also traded higher after the U.S. government sued to block them from combining. Halliburton had agreed to buy its rival for more than $34 billion in November 2014, after oil prices began to fall. Baker Hughes gained $3.47, or 8.8 percent, to $42.83. Halliburton climbed $2.04, or 5.9 percent, to $36.44.

A top haven for tax cheats that may surprise you:The U.S.

By Paul Wiseman and Marcy Gordon

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The U.S. lam- bastes and strong-arms countries that help drug lords and million- aire investors hide their money from tax collectors. Critics say it should look closer to home. America itself is emerging as a top tax haven alongside the likes of Switzerland, the Cayman

Islands and Panama, those seek- ing reform of the international tax system say. And states such as Delaware, Nevada, South Dakota and Wyoming, in particular, are competing with each other to pro- vide foreigners with the secrecy they crave. “There’s a big neon sign saying the U.S. is open to tax cheats,” says John Christensen, executive director of the Tax Justice Network. America’s openness to foreign

tax evaders is coming under new scrutiny after the leak this week of 11.5 million confidential docu- ments from a Panamanian law firm. The Panama Papers show how some of the world’s richest people hide assets in shell compa- nies to avoid paying taxes. Christensen’s group, which campaigns for a global crackdown on tax evaders, says the United States ranks third in the world in financial secrecy, behind Switzerland and Hong Kong but

ahead of notorious tax havens such as the Cayman Islands and Luxembourg. Under a 2010 law, passed after it was learned that the Swiss bank UBS helped thousands of Americans evade U.S. taxes, the United States demands that banks and other financial institutions disclose information on Americans abroad to make sure they pay their U.S. taxes. But the U.S. doesn’t automati- cally return the favor.

How stricter rules for brokers will affect retirement savers

By Marcy Gordon

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — High fees. Conflicts of interest. Inappropriate investments. The Obama administration is going after a host of perceived rip- offs with the new rules it’s unveil-

ing Wednesday for brokers who recommend investments for retire- ment savers. No longer will brokers who sell stocks, bonds, annuities and other products be required just to recom- mend investments that are “suit- able” for a client. They’ll now have to meet a stricter standard that

has long applied to registered advisers: They will be considered “fiduciaries” — trustees who must put their clients’ best interests above all. The new rules, which will be phased in starting a year from now, follow intense lobbying by both consumer advocates and the finan-

cial industry. Full compliance will be required by January 2018. At stake are about $4.5 trillion in 401(k) retirement accounts, plus $2 trillion in other defined- contribution plans such as federal employees’ plans and $7.3 trillion in IRAs, according to the Investment Company Institute.

Business brief

Facebook rearranging notification buttons to highlight video

MENLO PARK — Facebook is rearranging the notification panel on its mobile apps in an effort to widen the audience watching live video on its social network. The shift announced Wednesday is part of Facebook’s effort to turn its live video feature into a mar- quee attraction as more people use their smartphones to record and share snippets of their lives. Facebook is moving the button for its Messenger service so that the new video option can be highlighted on the notification panel. When pressed, the video button will show a directory of live streams from a user’s friends, as well as segments available to any- one on the world’s largest social network.

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LOCAL ROUNDUP: CAPUCHINO BASEBALL PUTS IT ALL TOGETHER TO PICK UP FIRST LEAGUE WIN >>
LOCAL ROUNDUP: CAPUCHINO BASEBALL PUTS IT ALL TOGETHER TO PICK UP FIRST LEAGUE WIN >> PAGE 12
<<< Page 12, Scots enjoying epic
spring break party baseball style
Thursday • April 7, 2016

South City softball downs rival El Camino

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The South City softball team came out swinging against its archrival. And even though a slew of at ‘em balls pre- vented the Lady Warriors from scoring after the second inning, they still held on for a 5- 3 win over El Camino Tuesday at South City’s home yard of Ponderosa Elementary School. The Warriors (3-0 in PAL Ocean, 3-6 over- all) broke through with four runs in the sec- ond, which proved to be enough to hold off El

in the sec- ond, which proved to be enough to hold off El Janessa Cayabyab Camino.

Janessa

Cayabyab

Camino. South City totaled eight hits — all singles — with Janessa Cayabyab, Shelby Baxter and Brianna Jimenez totaling two hits apiece. “Recently we’ve been

hitting every day instead of focusing on defense,” Cayabyab said. “It’s made a big difference. It’s helped everybody to

make good contact.”

difference. It’s helped everybody to make good contact.” Giovanna Cornejo With no seniors on roster, South

Giovanna

Cornejo

With no seniors on roster, South City has had to build from the ground up this year. After going winless through six nonleague games, the Warriors have won their first three games in Peninsula Athletic League Ocean Division play, which is shaping

up to be a three-team race between them, San Mateo and Terra Nova.

Hillsdale rallies for win

By Nathan Mollat

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

There was no one more relieved than Hillsdale’s Brett Wetteland when he came on to pitch in the bottom of the sixth inning to protect a lead against host Burlingame instead of coming in with the Knights trail- ing. Wetteland had ended the fourth inning by popping out with the bases loaded and his error in the bottom of frame led directly to Burlingame taking a 3-2 lead. But thanks to teammate David Badet’s two- run single in the top of the fifth, Wetteland came out from behind the plate to close down the Panthers. And close them down he did. Wetteland retired the final six batters of the game, strik- ing out four — including three in a row to end the game — and preserving a 4-3 victory. “I knew my team would back me up,” Wetteland said. “We were all bulldogs today, trying to get the win.” Wetteland’s save made a winner out of Trevor Bettis, who pitched the first five innings, allowing three runs on four hits. Bettis and his counterpart, Burlingame start- ing pitcher Alex Vina, hooked up in a pitch- er’s duel for the first half of the game. Neither guy is going to light up the radar gun, but both Bettis and Vina pitched their tails off to keep their teams in the game. Hillsdale had its opportunities to get Vina out of the game early. In his four innings of work, Vina allowed two runs on six hits, wig- gling out of trouble time and again. “It was a tough fought game, much as we expected,” said Hillsdale manager James Madison. “Our guys were pretty resilient.” Hillsdale (4-1 PAL Bay, 9-4-1 overall) jumped out to a quick 1-0 lead in the top of the first inning. With one out, Arjun Mahanty singled and Badet doubled to put runners on second and third. Wetteland fol- lowed with a groundout to second that enabled Mahanty to scamper home from third with the first run of the game. Mahanty, Badet and leadoff hitter Riki Urata paced the Knights’ attack by combin- ing to reach base 11 times on five hits and

See KNIGHTS, Page 16

base 11 times on five hits and See KNIGHTS , Page 16 NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL Hillsdale

NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

Hillsdale shortstop Arjun Mahanty fields a grounder during the Knights’4-3 win over Burlingame in a PAL Bay Division matchup Wednesday in Burlingame.

“It's been a lot of improvement since Day One,” South City head coach Noelle Nelson said. South City added another non-senior to its roster Tuesday in the person of junior Giovanna Cornejo. The middle infielder is a transfer from El Camino and had to sit out the first month of the season as per Central Coast Section transfer rules. It was pure happenstance Cornejo made her Warriors debut against her former squad. And

See SSF, Page 14

Big win sends Half Moon Bay into 1st place

L ook who leads the Peninsula

softball standings?

Athletic League’s Bay Division

None other than Half Moon Bay, which made a statement in a 6-0 win over Hillsdale, handing the Knights their first league loss and serv- ing notice it will be a player come the postseason. Half Moon Bay scored once in the bottom of the second inning and nursed that lead into the sixth when the Cougars broke the game open with five runs. Led by fresh- man Marissa Terra, who went 2 for 3 with three RBIs, the Cougars battered Hillsdale ace Eryn McCoy, touching her for nine hits. Sophomore Grace Garcia then shut down a potent Hillsdale order, holding the Knights to just three hits as she spun a complete game. With the victory, Half Moon Bay stands alone atop the Bay Division standings, with one-game leads over both Hillsdale and Carlmont. It’s clear what is leading the Cougars’ charge to 8- 1 this season: a young, talented squad that can rake at the plate and dominate in the pitcher’s circle. The Cougars start only three seniors, with the rest of the lineup filled out with three sophomores, two juniors and a freshman. As a team, they are batting .379 this season and are averaging more than seven runs per game. Pitching-wise, the Cougars have one of the best 1-2 rotations in the league, with Garcia and junior Ally Sarabia, who have combined to post a 1.06 ERA. Despite the 5-0 start, Half Moon Bay still has a ton of work ahead of it. The Cougars play three games this week, fol- lowed by the Cougar Classic tournament

ahead of it. The Cougars play three games this week, fol- lowed by the Cougar Classic

See LOUNGE, Page 16

Samardzija gets no-decision in Giants’ first loss of year

By Joe Totoraitis

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

— everything working except for his windup. Samardzija allowed Chris Carter’s first home run for Milwaukee, and the San Francisco Giants lost 4-3 to the Milwaukee Brewers Wednesday. Samardzija, making his Giants debut after signing a $90 million, five-year contract, allowed three runs and eight hits in 5 1-3

had

MILWAUKEE

Jeff

Samardzija

Brewers 4, Giants 3

in 5 1-3 had MILWAUKEE Jeff Samardzija Brewers 4, Giants 3 Jeff Samardzija innings, struck out

Jeff Samardzija

innings, struck out six and walked three. He is 0- 5 in 10 starts against Milwaukee. “I thought I was great out of the stretch,” he said. “Made some big outs. It was just out of the windup, man, falling behind in the count, put-

ting the leadoff runner on and just asking for a day of fighting out there when that happens.” Samardzija walked the first batter of the game, then a single before Ryan Braun’s RBI single. Domingo Santana had a run- scoring single in the second and Carter homered in the third, Samardzija settled down and retired seven of his last nine bat- ters. “He battled well,” Giants manager Bruce Bochy said. “He was off a little bit, but he

found a way to keep us in the game. He left the game, it was tied. Great job on his part. Battling with men on base. Pitching well in traffic.” Hunter Pence had two of the Giants’ six hits. “We came out and played hard,” he said. “Today didn’t end up working out for us. We were right there. Had a chance to win it. Guys wanted to win that game bad.” Carter’s third-inning home run was his

See GIANTS, Page 16

12 Thursday April 7, 2016

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Carlmont offense performing at remarkable clip

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Now that is the way baseball rats party for spring break. With Carlmont on vacation this week for spring break, the Scots baseball team decid- ed to play its best ball of the year. And that’s really saying something, considering the reigning Peninsula Athletic League Bay Division champs are off to a 14-2 start, including a 6-0 record in league play. With four nonleague games scheduled this week, the Scots have won the first two by a combined score of 31-2, banging out 40 hits in the process. The outpouring of offense started Monday with a 12-0 shutout of Woodside. Then on Tuesday the Scots ran up a 19-2 victory over Half Moon Bay. Carlmont’s 19-run performance was the program’s best single-game run total since 2009 when the Scots won 20-4 at South City. And it is the most runs the Scots have scored at home in manager Rich Vallero’s 11 years at the helm. The last time they scored as much at Carlmont was in 2005 under for- mer skipper Norman Hayes in a 19-2 victo- ry over Menlo. “What’s going on right now, it’s special,”

Menlo. “What’s going on right now, it’s special,” Vallero said. “I can’t even put my finger

Vallero said. “I can’t even put my finger on it. There’s no way I thought we could sur- pass what we did last year. … I knew we’d

we could sur- pass what we did last year. … I knew we’d COURTESY OF RICH

COURTESY OF RICH CROSS

Left: Carlmont’s Jordan Brandenburg is leading the PAL Bay Division in each of the triple-crown catagories this season. Above: Senior Connor Loucks is one of five Scots batting above the .400 mark.

have a bull’s-eye on our back. But the team has responded.” What’s more is the relative youth of the

roster. Carlmont is relying on seven sophomores, including its leading hitter Jordan Brandenburg, who is pacing the PAL Bay Division in each of the triple- crown categories. But the offensive potency has been a top-to-bottom effort throughout the Scots lineup. In Tuesday’s 23-hit performance, 14 different Carlmont batters tabbed hits, with Brandenburg and senior Connor Loucks leading the way with three hits apiece. As a team, Carlmont is currently hitting for a remarkable .377 batting average. Last year in posting an overall record of 24-8, the Scots — who prided themselves on dom- inant pitching and etched a staff ERA of 1.91 — hit just .262 as a team. In fact, the team hasn’t finished a season hitting above the .300 mark since 2013 when it tabbed a .303 average. The only time the Scots have done better during Vallero’s tenure was in 2009 with a whop- ping .334 season average, and that was two years prior to the regulation use of the less- potent composite bats now mandatory throughout today’s amateur ranks.

See SCOTS, Page 14

Local sports roundup

Baseball

Capuchino 7, Sacred Heart Prep 0

The Mustangs put together arguably their best effort of the season in shuttting down the Gators and earning their first win of the season in Peninsula Athletic League Bay Division play. Aiden Yarwood was stellar on the mound for Capuchino (1-4 PAL Bay, 6-9 overall), limiting SHP (2-4, 4-12) to just three hits. Offensively, the Mustangs were paced by Trey Zahursky, who went 2 for 3 with three

RBIs. Jakob Uriarte and Brendan Downes each had one RBI apiece. The seven runs scored ties a season high for the Mustangs and snaps a two-game los- ing streak.

Softball

Half Moon Bay 13, Burlingame 1

The Cougars had little trouble in running their overall record to 9-1 on the season with a non-league win over the Panthers as part of the PAL tournament, that was mostly rained out last month. Angela Brazil paced the offense for Half Moon Bay, going 3 for 4 with four RBIs.

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Ally Sarabia filled the stat line, picking up a pair of hits (including a double), drove in two runs and scored twice. Helen Sewart and Lily Moffitt each had a triple and scored two runs apiece. Grace Garcia picked up the win and her second no-hitter of the season, striking out seven.

Boys’ golf

San Mateo 218, Hillsdale 219

One doesn’t usually find a barnburner on the golf course, but the Bearcats and Knights accomplished just that Wednesday. With the win, San Mateo (10-0) wrapped

up the PAL Ocean Division championship.

were

The

Bearcats

led

by

Joseph

Katansky, who fired a 3-over 39. Jacob Katansky shot a 42 and Ryan Howe finished with a 44 for San Mateo.

Girls’ lacrosse

Sacred Heart Prep 13, Menlo School 12

The Gators got six goals from Cameron Gordon to edge the rival Knights in a West Bay Athletic League meeting. Libby Muir and Alison Carter each added three goals for SHP, while goaltender Emma Briger finished with nine saves.

Libby Muir and Alison Carter each added three goals for SHP, while goaltender Emma Briger finished
Libby Muir and Alison Carter each added three goals for SHP, while goaltender Emma Briger finished
Libby Muir and Alison Carter each added three goals for SHP, while goaltender Emma Briger finished

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Thursday April 7, 2016

13

Sports briefs

Maeda homers as Dodgers shut out Padres — again

SAN DIEGO — Japanese pitcher Kenta Maeda homered in the second at-bat of his major league debut with the Los Angeles Dodgers on Wednesday night and beat the Padres 7- 0, making San Diego the first team in major league history to be shut out in its first three games. The Padres were outscored 25-0 in the opening series against the Dodgers. They set the MLB mark with 27 straight scoreless innings to open a season. The old mark was 26 by the 1943 St. Louis Browns, according to STATS. With one out in the fourth, Maeda drove an 0-2 pitch from Andrew Cashner (0-1) into the seats in left field. Maeda (1-0) waved to the crowd as he rounded third base and then got the silent treatment in the dugout from his teammates, who then mobbed him.

Miesha Tate to defend title belt vs Amanda Nunes at UFC 200

LOS ANGELES — UFC bantamweight champion Miesha Tate will make her first title defense against Amanda Nunes at UFC 200 on July 9. The mixed martial arts promotion added the matchup to its milestone show Wednesday night. Tate (18-5) claimed the women’s 135-pound belt with a dra- matic fifth-round submission of Holly Holm at UFC 196 last month. Tate has won five consecutive fights since her second loss to former champion Ronda Rousey in December 2013. Holm took Rousey’s belt last year with a stunning knockout victory. Rousey isn’t expected to return to the octagon until late this year. Nunes (12-4) is a Brazilian contender who has won five of her six UFC fights, losing only to former title contender Cat Zingano.UFC 200 will be headlinedby Nate Diaz vs. Conor McGregor.

200 will be headlinedby Nate Diaz vs. Conor McGregor. Gray debuts to lead A’s to first
200 will be headlinedby Nate Diaz vs. Conor McGregor. Gray debuts to lead A’s to first
200 will be headlinedby Nate Diaz vs. Conor McGregor. Gray debuts to lead A’s to first

Gray debuts to lead A’s to first win

By Rick Eymer

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

OAKLAND — Sonny Gray overcame lingering effects of a stomach flu and managed a quality start his team needed. Gray pitched seven strong innings, Mark Canha homered and the A’s beat the Chicago White Sox 2-1 Wednesday night to avoid at three-game sweep. Gray, scratched from an opening-day start because of the illness, gave up a run and three hits, walking four and striking out five. “I felt OK,” Gray said. “I still feel a lit- tle beat but I wanted to go out and try to make pitches. This was a pretty impor- tant game. You don’t want to start 0-3.” Gray began to drag a bit after record- ing the first out of the seventh, but maintained just enough to get three groundouts in the inning. “We’ve seen him pitch that type of game often,” A’s manager Bob Melvin said. “After a couple of losses, he gets more inspired to go out and work deep into games. It took a little out of him but he stepped up.” According to White Sox catcher Alex Avila, Gray didn’t look tired. “Damn good pitcher. I asked him today, ‘How you feeling?’ and he goes ‘Not too good,”’ Avila said. “It didn’t

he goes ‘Not too good,”’ Avila said. “It didn’t Sonny Gray seem that way. He’s got

Sonny Gray

seem that way. He’s got a lot of confi- dence in everything he throws. It’s a hang-with-him type

of day. You try to sur- vive against guys like that.”

Axford

pitched a scoreless

eighth and Ryan Madsen got the final three outs for his first save. Madsen’s last four saves have come against the White Sox. Chicago starter Carlos Rodon gave up two runs and seven hits over seven innings. He walked one and stuck out six. Jed Lowrie also had an RBI for the A’s and Jimmy Rollins drove in a run for Chicago.

Adam Eaton singled twice and walked, reaching base safely in 25 consecutive games dating to last Sept. 9. Billy Burns had two hits for the A’s.

What a relief

Madsen, who recorded just his fourth save since 2011, said the challenge of finishing a close game gave him a boost. “In spring training, I breezed through it,” Madsen said. “This was probably

John

the first challenge I’ve had. My arm came alive out there.” Madsen recorded 32 saves for the Philadelphia Phillies in 2011 and was out of baseball until joining the Kansas City Royals last season. He threw a 3-2 changeup for the final out. “I’ve done it a bunch, but in a new league, it’s probably not as recogniza- ble now,” he said. “It was the right pitch at the right time and it was available.”

Mound happy

RHP Henderson Alvarez threw 25 pitches in a simulated game Wednesday, facing hitters for the first time since undergoing shoulder surgery. Alvarez, expected to return in late May, will pitch live batting practice at Single-A Stockton on Sunday as he looks to pitch in the majors for the first time since last May 22. Trainer’s room LHP Eric Surkamp will be recalled after Thursday’s game and start for the A’s on Friday in Seattle’s home opener. Surkamp appeared in 35 games, out of the bullpen, with the White Sox in 2014. “He’s got a nice, easy delivery,” Ventura said. “He came in and did good work for

us.”

in Oakland to continue rehabbing.

INF Eric Sogard (neck) will stay

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14 Thursday April 7, 2016

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Soccer brief

Swiss police raid UEFA over TV deal with indicted executives

GENEVA— UEFAwas raidedby Swiss police on Wednesday and handed over evidence of a Champions League television rights contract with an offshore marketing agency implicated in the FIFAbribery scandal. The Swiss attorney general’s office saidit requestedraids on the European soccer body and “another enterprise” for suspected criminal mismanagement and misappropriation linked to deal- ings with Cross Trading, an offshore registered agency. Cross Trading is owned by two men indicted last year by American fed- eral prosecutors who are working with Swiss counterparts to investigate suspected corruption in international soccer. UEFA and its Champions League marketing agency — TEAM Marketing basedin Lucerne, Switzerland— made a $111,000 deal with Cross Trading in 2006 for three seasons of broadcasting in Ecuador. The 2006 contract, co-signed by current FIFAPresident Gianni Infantino when he was UEFA legal director, was leaked from the database of Panama-based law firm Mossack Fonseca. Swiss prosecutors said“for the time being, no specific individ- ual is being targeted by these proceedings” which focused on the “acquisition of television rights.” They have already targeted Infantino’s former boss, UEFA President Michel Platini, and his predecessor as FIFA president, Sepp Blatter. The Swiss criminal proceeding against Blatter includes suspected mismanagement of undersold World Cup TV rights for the Caribbean region.

of undersold World Cup TV rights for the Caribbean region. SSF Continued from page 11 even

SSF

Continued from page 11

even though the second baseman recorded the final putout of the game on a nice running catch on a popup into shallow right field, it still pained her to go up against her old team. “It was really awkward, especially since the other team didn’t even acknowledge me,” Cornejo said. “It was a bitter- sweet feeling. I miss them.” Cayabyab had the breakout day at the plate though. The second-year varsity junior has batted predominantly in the middle of the order throughout her career. In light of a recent slump, however, she was bumped up to the leadoff spot Tuesday. The results were sterling, as Cayabyab singled in each of the first two innings. “My last few games, I have not been hitting,” Cayabyab said. “I’ve been striking out. But today … I went up there thinking I can make contact. I didn’t let the negative thoughts overwhelm me.” After El Camino (1-3, 2-5) scored in the top of the first on an RBI single by cleanup hitter Sierra Sotelo, Cayabyab sparked a rally in the bottom of the frame with a solid lead- off single to left; she later scored on an RBI single by Baxter to tie it 1-1. In the second inning, El Camino jumped back ahead when Kayla Cayago scored from second base on a combination passed ball-throwing error. The Colts let a golden opportu- nity slip away though, loading the bases with only one out, but stranding them full as South City pitcher Naty Cercedes ended the threat with one of her 10 strikeouts on the day. The Warriors seized the momentum from there, rallying for four runs in the bottom of the inning. Jimenez opened the frame with a single and moved around to third on a one-out knock by Karlee Crespo. Then Cayabyab delivered an RBI single to tie it. Cercedes fol- lowed with her lone hit of the day, an infield single to push

home Crespo. Cayabyab then scored on an RBI groundout by freshman No. 3 hitter Karizma Bergesen. The Warriors scored their final run of the inning when the El Camino out- field dropped a routine fly ball, allowing Cercedes to cross the plate to give South City a 5-2 lead. El Camino starting pitcher Taylor Smith soldiered through

to earn the complete game though. A left-handed freshman,

Smith is the Colts’ only pitcher. And she’s a work in progress at that. The southpaw had never pitched previous to this year, but stepped into the circle in lieu of El Camino having no pitching on roster to start the season.

“She’s learning,” El Camino assistant coach Jim Henderson said. “But today against the crosstown rival, I think she pitched her best game of the season.”

Smith exhibited a spree of good luck in the later innings.

In the fifth, South City got two on with no outs. But Smith

induced a popup on a 3-0 pitch for the first out of the inning. Then after issuing a walk to load the bases, Smith yielded a frozen rope off the bat of Jimenez — also on a 3-0 pitch — that found the glove of shortstop Mikaela Pelesauma, who

nabbed the liner and threw behind the runner at third for an inning-ending double play. Sotelo was a bright spot out of the cleanup spot for El Camino. The senior was 3 for 4 with an RBI and a run scored. Jim Henderson said Sotelo has an unorthodox approach at the plate, though it's tough to argue with a three-hit day. “She … makes contact constantly,” Jim Henderson said. “And she makes hard contact. So, it works. We’re trying to get some kinks out. But it works.” Jim Henderson knows about unorthodox approaches. Having previously served as the head coach at Mercy- Burlingame for 11 years, he spent plenty of time trying to get the kinks out of the swing of his daughter Cristina Henderson, who is now the head coach at El Camino. South City and El Camino rematch April 5 at the Colts’ home field of Terrabay School. The Warriors have won the last seven recorded games — though results previous to that are unavailable — between the archrivals.

SCOTS

Continued from page 12

This year’s secret weapon has been the addition of new hit- ting coach Brian Vogel. A former third-base coach at College of San Mateo, Vogel has brought a more aggressive approach to the Scots’lineup. The buzz phrase around the Carlmont bat- ting cage these days is “hunting fastballs.” In this sense, Vogel is encouraging Carlmont hitters to be marksmen. “The addition of Brian Vogel as an assistant coach has helped change our mentality,” Vallero said. “We’re hunting stuff early in the count. We’re not being passive. And we’re getting stuff to hit.” Vogel has been immersed in Carlmont culture for the past three years. As an officer of the Belmont Police Department, he has worked as Carlmont’s School Resource Officer for the past three years. His partner Milana Jordan, also an SRO, has worked as an assistant coach with the Carlmont softball team for several years. This season, after being out of the game since leaving CSM in 2012, Vogel decided to follow in his partner’s footsteps. “They’re a talented group,” Vogel said of the Scots offense. “So it’s being able to get them to get a little bit more mature

understanding of how to hit. … It’s more than wanting to be aggressive. It’s about wanting to get hits more than being afraid of making outs.” The outstanding balance throughout the order currently has eight qualifying players hitting above the .300 mark. Of those eight, four are hitting above .400, including Brandenburg who is leading the Bay Division with a .510 average.

“We’ve talked to our guys about not getting so caught up with where they’re hitting in the lineup and to just have qual- ity at-bats,” Vallero said. Carlmont has benefitted from two Serra transfers in juniors Sean Prozell, a pitcher, and Nick Bugbee. The latter is batting

a skosh below the team average at .359; senior Spencer

Stewart is batting .350; senior Tyler Brandenburg, .345; and Vinny Bologna, .314. Those hitting above .400 are Loucks at .425; sophomore Zane Van Arsdel, .438; senior Andy Cross, .440; and Jordan Brandenburg, .510. Jordan Brandenburg is tied for the PAL Bay Division home run lead with three, along with Bologna. Brandenburg’s 19 RBIs lead the league, as does his .843 slugging percentage — this in his first year as a varsity player. “He’s just super, super talented,” Vallero said. “The guy can just roll out of bed and he can hit.” Carlmont rounds out its spring break baseball party with a game Thursday against Lynbrook-San Jose before hosting Palo Alto Saturday at 2 p.m.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

SPORTS

Thursday April 7, 2016

15

WHATS ON TAP

THURSDAY Baseball Aragon at El Camino, South City at Mills, King's Academy at Menlo School, 4 p.m. Softball St. Francis at Notre Dame-Belmont, Burlingame at Aragon,Mills at Half Moon Bay,Capuchino at Hills- dale,4 p.m. Swimming Serra/Notre Dame-Belmont at St. Francis, 3 p.m.; Burlingame at Aragon, Capuchino at El Camino, Mills at Half Moon Bay, 3:30 p.m. Boys' tennis Mitty vs. Serra at CSM, 3 p.m.; Crystal Springs at Harker,Menlo School at Priory,3:30 p.m.;San Mateo at Half Moon Bay, Aragon at Burlingame, 4 p.m. Track and field Aragon at Mills, Burlingame at San Mateo, Ca- puchino at Hillsdale, 3 p.m. Boys' lacrosse Sacred Heart Cathedral at Serra,5 p.m.;Burligname at Aragon, 5:30 p.m. Boys' volleyball Sacred Heart Cathedral at Serra, 6:30 p.m.

FRIDAY Baseball Sacred Heart Cathedral at Serra,Burlingame at Hills- dale, Capuchino at Sacred Heart Prep, 4 p.m. Boys' volleyball Hillsdale at Capuchino,San Mateo at Aragon,6 p.m. Boys' tennis Sacred Heart Prep at Menlo School, 3:30 p.m. Softball Alma Heights at Crystal Springs, 4 p.m.

TRANSACTIONS

BASEBALL American League CHICAGO WHITE SOX — Agreed to terms with C Chris O’Dowd on a minor league contract. SEATTLE MARINERS — Assigned C Rob Brantly outright to Tacoma (PCL). TAMPA BAY RAYS — Claimed OF Jake Goebbert off waivers from Pittsburgh and optioned him to Durham (IL). TEXAS RANGERS — Traded LHP Sam Freeman to Milwaukee for cash. National League ARIZONA DIAMONDBACKS — Optioned RHP Sil- vino Bracho to Reno (PCL).Selected the contract of RHP Kyle Drabek from Reno.Transferred OF A.J.Pol- lock from the 15- to the 60-day DL. MILWAUKEE BREWERS — Designated RHP Ariel Pena for assignment. WASHINGTON NATIONALS — Placed OF Ben Re- vere on the 15-day DL,retroactive to April 5.Recalled OF Matt den Dekker from Syracuse (IL).

NHL GLANCE

EASTERN CONFERENCE

 

Atlantic Division

 
 

GP

W

L

OT Pts GF

GA

y-Florida

80

46

25 9

101233 198

x-Tampa Bay

80

45

30 5

95

221 194

Detroit

80

41

28 11

93

207 216

Boston

80

41

30 9

91

234 222

Ottawa

80

36

35 9

81

227 245

Buffalo

80

34

35 11 79

196 215

Montreal

80

36

38 6

78

212 232

Toronto

80

28

41 11 67

193 238

Metropolitan Division

z-Washington

79

55

17 7

117244 186

x-Pittsburgh

80

47

25 8

102240 197

x-N.Y. Rangers

80

45

26 9

99

232 211

x-N.Y. Islanders

79

44

26 9

97

223 206

Philadelphia

79

39

27 13

91

203 211

Carolina

80

35

29 16

86

194 217

New Jersey

80

37

35 8

82

177 203

Columbus

80

32

40 8

72

210 247

WESTERN CONFERENCE

 

Central Division

 

x-Dallas

80

48

23 9

105260 226

x-St. Louis

80

48

23 9

105221 195

x-Chicago

80

47

26 7

101230 202

x-Nashville

80

40

26 14

94

223 210

x-Minnesota

81

38

32 11

87

215 204

Colorado

80

39

37 4

82

211 231

Winnipeg

80

33

39 8

74

206 232

Pacific Division

x-Anaheim

79

44

24 11 99

210 187

x-Los Angeles

80

47

28 5

99

220 190

x-Sharks

80

45

29 6

96 236 205

Arizona

80

35

38 7

77 207 241

Calgary

80

33

40 7

73 222 256

Vancouver

80

30

37 13 73

184 233

Edmonton

81

31

43 7

69

200 241

x-clinched playoff spot; z-clinched conference

Wednesday’s Games Columbus 5,Toronto 1 Edmonton 6,Vancouver 2 Detroit 3, Philadelphia 0 Thursday’s Games Detroit at Boston, 4 p.m. Tampa Bay at New Jersey, 4 p.m. N.Y. Islanders at N.Y. Rangers, 4 p.m. Toronto at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Pittsburgh at Washington, 4 p.m. Montreal at Carolina, 4 p.m. Florida at Ottawa, 4:30 p.m. Arizona at Nashville, 5 p.m. St. Louis at Chicago, 5:30 p.m. Colorado at Dallas, 5:30 p.m. Vancouver at Calgary, 6 p.m.

NBA GLANCE

EASTERN CONFERENCE

 

Atlantic Division

 

W

L

Pct

GB

y-Toronto

52

25

.675

x-Boston

46

32

.590

6 1/2

New York

31

48

.392

22

Brooklyn

21

57

.269

31 1/2

Philadelphia

10

68

.128

42 1/2

Southeast Division

x-Atlanta

46

32

.590

x-Miami

45

32

.584

1/2

x-Charlotte

45

33

.577

1

Washington

38

40

.487

8

Orlando

33

45

.423

13

Central Division

y-Cleveland

56

23

.709

Indiana

42

36

.538

13 1/2

Detroit

42

37

.532

14

Chicago

39

39

.500

16 1/2

Milwaukee

32

46

.410

23 1/2

WESTERN CONFERENCE

 

Southwest Division

y-San Antonio

65

12

.844

Memphis

42

36

.538

23 1/2

Dallas

40

38

.513

25 1/2

Houston

38

40

.487

27 1/2

New Orleans

29

49

.372

36 1/2

Northwest Division

y-Oklahoma City

54

25

.684

x-Portland

43

37

.538

11 1/2

Utah

39

39

.500

14 1/2

Denver

32

47

.405

22

Minnesota

26

52

.333

27 1/2

Pacific Division

y-Warriors

69

8

.896

x-L.A. Clippers

50

28

.641

19

Sacramento

31

47

.397

38

Phoenix

20

58

.256

49

L.A. Lakers

16

62

.205

53

x-clinched playoff spot; y-clinched division

Wednesday’s Games Indiana 123,Cleveland 109 Detroit 108,Orlando 104 Washington 121,Brooklyn 103 Boston 104, New Orleans 97 Charlotte 111, New York 97 Dallas 88, Houston 86 Portland 120,Oklahoma City 115 L.A. Clippers 91, L.A. Lakers 81 Thursday’s Games Phoenix at Houston, 5 p.m. Chicago at Miami, 5 p.m. Toronto at Atlanta, 5 p.m. Minnesota at Sacramento, 7 p.m. San Antonio at Golden State, 7:30 p.m. Friday’s Games New York at Philadelphia, 4 p.m. Miami at Orlando, 4 p.m.

Jets to sign former Raiders wide receiver Jeremy Ross

NEW YORK — A person familiar with the deal says the New York Jets will sign former Oakland Raiders wide receiver-kick returner Jeremy Ross, pending a physical. The person spoke Wednesday night to The AP on condition of anonymity because the team did not announce the agreement, which was first reported by ESPN. Ross was not tendered by

NFL brief

Oakland this offseason as a restrict- ed free agent. He has 39 career receptions for 469 yards and two touchdowns, and has also returned a kickoff and a punt for scores. Ross was signed by New England as an undrafted free agent out of Cal in 2011. He has also spent time with Indianapolis, Green Bay, Detroit and Baltimore. Ross spent a month on the Ravens’ active roster last year.

AMERICAN LEAGUE

EAST DIVISION

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Baltimore

2

0

1.000 —

Tampa Bay

2

2

.500

1

Toronto

2

2

.500

1

Boston

1

1

.500

1

New York

1

1

.500

1

CENTRAL DIVISION

 

Detroit

2

0

1.000 —

Chicago

2

1

.667

1/2

Cleveland

1

1

.500

1

Kansas City

1

1

.500

1

Minnesota

0

2

.000

2

WEST DIVISION

Seattle

2

1

.667

Houston

1

1

.500

1/2

A’s

1

2

.333

1

Texas

1

2

.333

1

Angels

0

2

.000

1 1/2

Wednesday’s Games Tampa Bay 5,Toronto 3 Seattle 9,Texas 5 Detroit 7, Miami 3 Cleveland 7, Boston 6 N.Y.Yankees 16,Houston 6 Baltimore 4, Minnesota 2 Oakland 2, Chicago White Sox 1 Thursday’s Games CWS (Latos 0-0) at A’s (Graveman 0-0), 12:35 p.m. Houston (Fiers 0-0) at Yanks (Eovaldi 0-0),1:05 p.m. Boston (Kelly 0-0) at Indians (Salazar 0-0),3:10 p.m. Twins (Hughes 0-0) at O’s (Jimenez 0-0), 4:05 p.m. Texas (Holland 0-0) at Angels (Santiago 0-0),7:05 p.m.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

EAST DIVISION

 

W

L

Pct

GB

Washington

2

0

1.000 —

New York

1

1

.500

1

Atlanta

0

2

.000

2

Miami

0

2

.000

2

Philadelphia

0

2

.000

2

CENTRAL DIVISION

 

Pittsburgh

3

0

1.000 —

Chicago

2

0

1.000

1/2

Cincinnati

2

0

1.000

1/2

Milwaukee

1

2

.333

2

St.Louis

0

3

.000

3

WEST DIVISION

Los Angeles

3

0

1.000 —

Colorado

2

1

.667

1

Giants

2

1

.667

1

Arizona

1

2

.333

2

San Diego

0

3

.000

3

Wednesday’s Games Milwaukee 4, San Francisco 3 Colorado 4, Arizona 3 Detroit 7, Miami 3 Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis 1 Cincinnati 3, Philadelphia 2 Washington 3, Atlanta 1 L.A. Dodgers 7, San Diego 0 Thursday’s Games Phils (Morton 0-0) at Reds (Stephenson 0-0),9:35 a.m. Miami (Conley 0-0) at Nats (Roark 0-0), 1:05 p.m. Dodgers (A.Wood 0-0) at SF (Peavy 0-0), 1:35 p.m. Cubs (Lackey 0-0) at Arizona (De La Rosa 0-0),6:40 p.m.

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SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

GIANTS

Continued from page 11

fourth off Samardzija, the most the big right-hander has allowed. He left Houston to sign with the Brewers after hitting 90 homers during three years with Houston. “We lost the first game by nine. The game yesterday was a lot closer,” Carter said. “So, to come out and win today was good for us going forward, knowing we can beat a team like this.” The Giants won 12-3 on Monday and 2-1 on Tuesday before Carter helped the Brewers avoid the sweep. With the score 3-all, Javier Lopez (0-1) walked Scooter Gennett leading off the sev- enth. Braun’s single off Cory Gearrin and Buster Posey’s passed ball advanced the run- ners, and Carter’s fly to center helped the Brewers beat the Giants for the second time in their past 12 meetings. “I was just trying to get it out there far enough to get Scooter in,” Carter said. “We don’t have to worry about those first couple of games. We’re past that now.”

about those first couple of games. We’re past that now.” BENNY SIEU/USA TODAY SPORTS Matt Duffy

BENNY SIEU/USA TODAY SPORTS

Matt Duffy crushes a solo home run for the Giants in the second inning, his second of the year.

Tyler Thornburg (1-0) pitched a one-hit seventh, and Jeremy Jeffress threw a perfect ninth for his first save. Angel Pagan, who played with two sore

knees for most of last season, showed he can still run. The 34-year-old doubled and scored in the first, then tripled off Chris Capuano in the sixth and tied the score 3-all

on Posey’s sacrifice fly off Blaine Boyer. Matt Duffy, who hit a two-run homer in Monday’s 12-3 win, led off the second with

a solo drive that sailed over a TV camera in

deep left-center. It was his third home run at Miller Park in six games.

Milwaukee’s Taylor Jungmann allowed two runs — one earned — and three hits in five innings, leaving with a 3-2 lead. He singled and scored in the second. Jeremy Jeffress converted his second

career save and first since April 13, 2011, as

a member of the Kansas City Royals against Minnesota.

Trainer’s room

Gi ants : CF Denard Span wasn’t feeling

well at the start of the game, but pinch hit in

The

Giants were one of three teams to begin the season with no players on the disabled list. The other two are in the AL, Chicago and Minnesota.

Up next

Giants: RHP Jake Peavy is to start in San Francisco’s home opener Thursday against the Dodgers. Peavy is 14-3 with a 2.38 ERA in 29 starts against Los Angeles.

the seventh for George

KNIGHTS

Continued from page 11

four walks. Urata reached on an error and Mahanty a fielder’s choice. They also com- bined to score twice and drive in three runs. “The top (of the lineup) has come through in big RBI situations,” Madison said. It was a short-lived lead, however, as Burlingame (2-3, 7-4) quickly tied the game during its first at-bat. Carlo Lopiccolo led off and singled on the first pitch from Bettis and then promptly stole second. He went to third on a groundout and scored on a Kaleb Keelean

sacrifice fly to left. After that, both Vina and Bettis settled down as they both followed rocky starts with three innings of scoreless ball. In the top of the fourth, Hillsdale re-took the lead with a two-out rally, with help from the Burlingame defense, which committed an error that led to the unearned run. With two outs, Jaxson Skidmore doubled down the left-

field line on a full count. Urata followed with

a chopper that caught the Burlingame third

baseman on the in-between hop and Urata was safe on an error to extend the inning. Badet came to the plate and singled to center to drive in Skidmore to give the Knights a 2- 1 lead.

Once again, Burlingame answered in its

next at-bat, scoring twice to take a 3-2 lead. Gray Goodman led off the inning with a sin- gle and went around to third when Cooper Gindraux slashed a hit to third base after fak- ing a bunt, which was booted. Tyler Gannon followed and put down a perfect safety squeeze up the first-base line to plate Goodman with the tying run. Then, with Alex Waldsmith at the plate, Gindraux — who had moved to second on the bunt — broke for third. Wetteland, seeing he had no chance to get Gindraux at third, tried to stop his throw, but the ball came out of his hand and rolled up the third-base line in foul territory. Gindraux hit third and never stopped, motoring home with the go-ahead run.

Will Brownlow came on in relief of Vina to start the fifth and got a 5-4-3 double play to get out of the inning unscathed. He was not so fortunate in the sixth. With one out, Skidmore singled to left. Urata fol- lowed with an infield hit and Mahanty was walked to load the bases, to bring Badet to the plate for an RBI opportunity. He did not disappoint. After working the count full, he flared an offering just over the shortstop’s head and into shallow left field to drive in both Skidmore and Urata to give the Knights a 4-3 lead. Wetteland then did the rest. “I was just looking for something to drive,” Badet said. “This was a huge team win. This is a huge confidence boost.”

LOUNGE

Continued from page 11

the following two weekends. Between those, there is the little matter of facing perennial contender Carlmont April 19. *** The College of San Mateo softball team still has seven games remaining in the reg- ular season, but by virtue of its eight- inning, 12-9 win over rival Ohlone, the

Bulldogs captured their fifth straight Coast Conference North title and the 10th confer- ence title since 2000. The Bulldogs (10-1 Coast Conference North, 29-3 overall), the top-ranked team

in the state, got involved in a rare slugfest

against the Renegades (7-4, 15-12-1). CSM jumped out to a 7-0 lead after two innings, scoring six runs in the second inning. But Ohlone battled back, eventually tying the game at 8 in the bottom of the seventh.

The Bulldogs, however, pushed across

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four runs in the top of the eighth for a 12-8 lead. Samantha Dean picked up the win for CSM, pitching 3 2/3 innings of relief. Harlee Donovan hit her Nor Cal-leading 12th home run of the season with a grand slam in the second inning. *** Anthony Berkovatz, a three-sport stand- out and 2010 graduate of Mills, was named the California Community College Athletic Association 2015 Male Scholar Athlete Year following a two-year football career at Sacramento City College.

A defensive lineman for the Panthers, Berkovatz earned two associate of arts degrees in his time at SCC and graduated in the spring of 2015 with highest honors and a 4.0 GPA. Since graduating from SCC, Berkovatz was accepted into the Colma police acade- my and in January, was sworn in as an offi- cer.

Nathan Mollat can be reached by email:

nathan@smdailyjournal.com, or by phone: 344- 5200 ext. 117. You can follow him on Twitter @CheckkThissOut.

by email: nathan@smdailyjournal.com, or by phone: 344- 5200 ext. 117. You can follow him on Twitter

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SUBURBAN LIVING

Thursday April 7, 2016

17

Gardening with less water: Try low-tech irrigation

By Dean Fosdick

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Lingering drought and restrictive water-use rules don’t mean you have to give up garden- ing. Instead, try some down-to-earth approaches like planting in smaller areas, using containers, buying fast-growing plants, applying mulch and compost and installing efficient irrigation systems. Any of these can help produce labor-saving and cost-effective harvests, even in arid regions, said David Bainbridge, author of “Gardening With Less Water” (Storey Publishing, 2015). “Low-tech, low-cost irrigation is all about saving time in the garden, growing healthier plants and doing less weeding,” he said. “It’s optimizing the food you can get from a small plot of land.” Bainbridge subscribes to the “water on demand” school of gardening, or using sim- ple things like terra cotta pots and pipe buried in the ground to irrigate vegetables, ornamentals and fruit trees. “This will save 90 percent of the water commonly used with surface irrigation, which also encourages weeds and all too frequently evaporates,” he said. “It’s directed more closely just to the plants you want to water.” Buried clay pots or “pitcher irrigation” is thought to have originated in China thou- sands of years ago, Bainbridge said. “Filled with water, a buried, unglazed porous pot of clay provides controlled irrigation by capil- lary flow to plants planted near it.” Pores outside the pots dry as the soil dries out around them, he said. “The sticky water molecules quickly refill the empty pores, and the water inside is drawn out for the plant to use.” “Getting water directly to the crops mini-

mizes weed growth, making it time-saving,” Bainbridge said. “You don’t have to do any weeding, and you can wait a week before refilling the pots. It’s perfect for container gardening or people without any land space.” Lucy Warren, co-author of “The Drought- Defying California Garden” (Timber Press, 2016), believes that emulating nature by using drought-tolerant plants is the produc- tive way to grow, especially in Mediterranean climates. “Go with plants that are adapted,” she said. “They have a very specific ecology that lets them thrive in this (Southern California) area.” Most vegetable crops require 1 inch of water or more per week during the growing season, equaling three-quarters of a gallon of water per plant, a University of California- Davis/Marin Master Gardeners fact sheet says. Here are some additional methods the fact sheet suggests for reducing water use or col- lecting it:

• Plant small. Grow only what’s needed.

• Locate gardens away from prevailing winds, and use fences or tall plants as wind- breaks.

• Group plants with similar water, soil, sun and root needs. Go native.

• Design your layout in blocks, not rows, to shade roots and reduce evaporation.

• Choose fast-maturing edibles — 50 to 60

days — and dwarf cultivars that use less water.

• Cultivate high producers like chard, salad greens and strawberries.

• Build swales and berms for water collec-

tion. Add rainwater catchment systems. Use gray water.

• Fertilize less. Use mulch and compost.

• Know the signs of water and heat stress, and irrigate only when needed.

of water and heat stress, and irrigate only when needed. Most vegetable crops require 1 inch
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18 Thursday April 7, 2016

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

CSUS

Continued from page 1

specifications a week earlier. Concerns centered around the nonprofit’s tax-exempt status and its projected traffic impacts to the already crowded Ralston Avenue, where several schools are already established nearby. Some opponents suggested the city should have done more to encourage a busi- ness tenant as a variety of special and school districts would miss out on property tax revenue if CSUS constructed its multi- million dollar campus. Local employees who work nearby also expressed frustration with congestion along Davis Drive, noting parents drop- ping off or picking up kids frequently clog the streets. But proponents pleased with CSUS’ pro- posal also spoke up advocating for more educational options and a community part- ner. CSUS officials worked with staff and returned with a proposal that includes a

comprehensive traffic demand management program to reduce vehicle trips and paying for the installation of a new traffic signal touted to ease congestion. In lieu of proper- ty taxes, CSUS would pay $250,000 a year to the city as well as $30,000 a year to sup- port the local school district, both of which would be adjusted with inflation. It is also offering Belmont a one-time payment of $1 million. While traffic along Ralston Avenue, the city’s main east-to-west thoroughfare, is a point of contention for many in Belmont, planners emphasized it’s an existing prob- lem that needs to be addressed by the city as a whole. One change will include start times for the various schools — including CSUS, Ralston Middle School and Carlmont High School — being staggered to reduce morn- ing and afternoon congestion, according to the city and CSUS. CSUS has sought to mitigate its impacts by strictly enforcing its traffic management plan requiring the vast majority of students to carpool or take its private shuttle and is paying for traffic improvements outlined in the city’s ongoing plans for Ralston. “I think we would be hard pressed to find a

better partner to help solve problems that are already there,” said Commissioner Kerry MacDonald. In considering whether to recommend the council approve a slew of entitlements from amending the general plan to certifying an environmental report, the commission noted the alternatives to CSUS could be far more impactful. The site is currently occupied by 80,000 square feet of office space and is entitled to support nearly 127,000 square feet to accommodate more than 400 employees. The CSUS campus would include 60,000 square feet of building space, a soccer field and sports court, pool and vegetable gar- dens. “The thing that tips the balance to me is the alternative scenarios. If CSUS’ project does not happen the most likely scenario is that that site will be acquired by a tech company or developer,” said Commission Chair Thomas McCune, who works at corporate campuses and noted an increasing density of workers being crammed into office spaces. Based on what the site is entitled for, he projected “in real world terms, not hypothetical, 500 cars. That’s what you’re talking

about as the alternative.” His fellow commissioners agreed, prais- ing CSUS’ proposal to mitigate fire hazards in the canyon, preserve open space and replant 100 trees after removing 77. “I think that Belmont should be excited about this relationship, it’s not just a devel- opment that will not be integrated into the community,” said Commissioner Amy Goldfarb. “It provides community benefits, it’s attractive [and] it’s a lighter footprint.” But as the public comment over the site has included those staunchly against the proposal, it’s expected to attract more debate when considered at a future City Council meeting. Jill Grossman, a CSUS board member, said she’s thrilled to be proceeding after years of planning and the school remains committed to addressing feedback from the community. “We have listened very carefully to the voices in Belmont and we believe our proj- ect demonstrates our long-term commit- ment to be a part of the community, improve the quality of life and build a school that Belmont residents will be proud to have in their city,” Grossman said in an email.

VESTA

Continued from page 1

fect the pizza. Peter’s father had a wood-fired stove in his backyard and the couple practiced using it for at least a year. It took a while to per- fect the dough and they had their critics along the way. They almost gave up, in fact. Vesta serves small plates because the Barrones like sharing food.

When it first opened four years ago, Vesta only really served pizza and downtown Redwood City was still a bit sleepy. Now the restaurant serves all kinds of vegetable dishes, cauliflower is a big hit, and salads made all with organic ingredi- ents. Downtown is also bustling and the lunchtime crowd has picked up quite a bit as more office workers stroll the area. Peter spent his childhood in the neigh- borhood as his family operated Cafe Barrone at 2022 Broadway since 1979. He used to bus tables for $1. One thing he and his wife have done dif- ferently, however, is to only open the

wife have done dif- ferently, however, is to only open the restaurant five days a week.

restaurant five days a week. His parents worked seven days a week and they were so busy, he said. The couple just welcomed their first child into the world, Theo, who is 5 months old. The whole family was at Vesta Tuesday dur- ing a packed lunch service. The goal is to keep Vesta running nice and smooth while the two mull whether to open another restaurant, preferably in Redwood City, with perhaps a different con- cept. In the meantime, all the attention is on Vesta’s food including its popular sausage and honey pizza with red sauce and green

olive white pie.

Pizza prices range from $12 for the mari- nara red pie to $23 for the carbonara white pie. Small plates range from $9 for the grilled carrots to $15 for its charcuterie plate. Salads range from $6 to $12. It also mainly serves beer and wine from California.

was Michelin Bib Gourmand list. Vesta is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.

Vesta

also

named

to

the

2014

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is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Vesta also named to the

THE DAILY JOURNAL

SUBURBAN LIVING

Thursday April 7, 2016

19

The breakfast nook has been updated

By Melissa Rayworth

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The term “breakfast nook” sounds hope- lessly trapped in the 1970s, but modern homeowners are embracing the style and practicality of built-in seating in the kitchen. “The idea of the built-in, with the kids piled in it and the pillows” can bring the casual fun of a beach house or farmhouse to any home, says Massachusetts-based interior designer Kristina Crestin, featured this season on “This Old House.” Maxwell Ryan, founder of ApartmentTherapy.com, says built-in kitchen seating can maximize space in small- er kitchens and highlight a great window view. It can even become the most distinctive design element in your home. “People, especially children, will gravitate toward it,” Ryan says. “Who doesn’t like to get a booth at the diner over a table?”

PRACTICAL AND PRETTY

For homeowners with an open-plan kitchen, built-in seating creates a cozy gath- ering place that functions like a formal din- ing room but is right in the heart of the cook- ing and socializing. In smaller kitchens, a nook allows the din- ing table to be positioned along a wall or in a corner without looking as if it were stuffed awkwardly out of the way. Built-ins also offer lots of space for stor- age. “The space underneath a built-in banquette is ripe with possibilities,” says stylist and crafter Marianne Canada, host of the “HGTV Crafternoon” web series. Closed cabinets can be designed to match your existing cabinetry,

cabinets can be designed to match your existing cabinetry, A breakfast nook allows the dining table

A breakfast nook allows the dining table to be positioned along a wall or in a corner without looking as if it were stuffed awkwardly out of the way.

or you can add open shelving, she says, to “add texture with baskets, show off your cookbook collection, even use it to store large ceramic bowls that take up too much cabinet space.” Just be sure the design of the built-in seat- ing area matches the architecture of the rest of the house, says Crestin. Sketch out what you want and plan carefully before starting con- struction. If the breakfast nook will include a window, she says, consider the height of the sill and whether it will hit the backs of peo- ple seated along the wall. Also, be sure to use a pedestal table so you’re not bumping into table legs when

sliding into the seats.

COOL VARIATIONS

If you can’t commit to a fully built-in breakfast area — or if you worry your kitchen will look too much like a roadside diner — Canada suggests adding a banquette to just one side of the kitchen dining area. “This gives you the best of both worlds,” she says, “an architectural feature that pro- vides storage and easy seating, and the opportunity to mix things up with chairs.” This approach is cheaper to build and easi- er to remove if you want something different later.

One popular option: Extend the bench the entire length of one wall, installing open or closed storage underneath. “Atable at one end for kitchen dining, gen- eral seating for those times when everyone ends up in the kitchen, and a sp ace near the door that serves as a landing area for shoes, backpacks and jackets,” Canada says. “Add some hooks above the bench, and baskets below, and you’ll find that clutter disappears effortlessly.”

FABRICS

One big draw of built-in kitchen seating is the softness and color of the cushions and pillows. A tip from Crestin: Invest in high- quality fabric in a pattern and colors that are neutral enough you can love them for years to come. Then get really creative with fabrics for loose pillows, spending a bit less so you can swap those out seasonally for new ones when the urge strikes. To highlight the fabrics you’ve chosen, Ryan painting the backrest area behind the seating in a coordinating color. “You can easily swap out the fabric on the seat or the paint on the backrest anytime you want to shake up your kitchen decor,” he says. And here’s a secret: If you love this look but want to avoid the commitment and cost of real built-in seating, you can create a faux version. Ryan suggests installing a large upholstered bench along one wall and paint- ing the wall around it with semi-gloss paint (easily wiped clean) to highlight the space. Add pillows and you’ve got a perfectly cozy space where guests can lean back and enjoy your kitchen.

the space. Add pillows and you’ve got a perfectly cozy space where guests can lean back
the space. Add pillows and you’ve got a perfectly cozy space where guests can lean back
the space. Add pillows and you’ve got a perfectly cozy space where guests can lean back
the space. Add pillows and you’ve got a perfectly cozy space where guests can lean back
the space. Add pillows and you’ve got a perfectly cozy space where guests can lean back
the space. Add pillows and you’ve got a perfectly cozy space where guests can lean back

20 Thursday April 7, 2016

DATEBOOK

THE DAILY JOURNAL

DAVIS

Continued from page 1

The Millbrae City Council appoint- ed Maureen Davis, a Realtor at the company owned by Oliva, to the Planning Commission during a special meeting Tuesday, March 29. With two members of the Marshall Realty team now on voting bodies charged with shaping the future of Millbrae, some have questioned whether adequate diversity of opinion exists among officials. The council should have waited for a regularly scheduled meeting to discuss the appointment of the next commis- sioner, said resident Doug Radtke, who expressed concerns whether the coun- cil’s selection of Davis was influenced by her relationship with Oliva, whose father founded Marshall Realty. “There are a lot of transparency issues that are finally creeping out to the public,” said Radtke, a former can- didate for City Council. “Not every- thing going on in Millbrae seems above water to me.” Davis received the necessary three votes from Oliva, Vice Mayor Reuben Holober and Councilman Wayne Lee to fill the vacancy on the commission left by the resignation of Lorrie Kalos- Gunn. Councilwoman Ann Schneider voted for Janet Kraetsch and Councilwoman Gina Papan voted for Rob DuCote. With colleagues in place on the Planning Commission and City Council, Radtke said he fears the vision of the two groups may be too closely aligned. “With a close group of folks, there

too closely aligned. “With a close group of folks, there Comment on or share this story

Comment on or share this story at www.smdailyjournal.com

could be a conflict of interest between what the council and the Planning Commission wants,” he said. “The Planning Commission should be a buffer. But if the two are walking in lockstep, I don’t even see the point of having a Planning Commission.” Radtke said many Millbrae residents are upset with having colleagues in place on two of the city’s most influ- ential voting bodies. “People in the community are out- right mad,” he said. Requests for comment to Oliva and Davis were not returned. Former mayor Marge Colapietro expressed concerns similar to Radtke, and said she too would have liked to see the city do more outreach to adver- tise the vacancy on the commission, in an attempt to inspire more residents to get involved. “If there was more communitywide outreach and noticing of the availabil- ity of the seat, there may have been more community members interested in applying for the position,” said Colapietro. “It’s important because there are people in the community who come from different walks of life, who have different perspectives and out- looks about service on the Planning Commission, and there may have been talented people with professional backgrounds that would have added a variety of composition to the commis- sion.” She said the lack of outreach to make the vacancy widely known runs in con-

flict with the council’s stated mission of being transparent.

“The council is always talking about transparency and outreach to the com- munity and getting more of the com- munity involved,” she said. “And in this situation, I don’t think the goals of the council have been achieved.”

should

have been more engaged in advertising the opportunity to join the Planning Commission.

“We can improve on how we let the people know about vacancies on boards and commissions,” she said.

The appointment should have been discussed during a regularly scheduled council meeting, said Schneider, who added she would have appreciated the selection process being broadcast on Millbrae Community Television.

Schneider said she

believed Davis would be a capable member of the commission. “I think Maureen is well qualified. I think she is engaged. I think she will be a great planning commissioner,” she said. But Schneider added she believes the council should review its policies for appointing new members to the city’s boards and commissions, to address the transparency concerns. “We should look at our existing set of guidelines for conflict of interest, and we should discuss what the guide- lines should be for appointments to all boards and commissions,” she said. Regardless of whether such a con- flict exists, Schneider said officials should consider the concerns of resi- dents. “If there is a perception of bias, we need to be cognizant of how it looks to the community,” she said.

Schneider agreed the city

For her part,

GILEAD

Continued from page 1

This week’s meeting is a study ses- sion and a formal hearing will be scheduled at a later date. If planners approve the details for the new 231,000-square-foot building, the company’s expansion into its large campus near the Bay would be nearly 66 percent complete, according to city documents. “They’ve done a really nice job with the campus and Gilead is a great partner with Foster City,” said Community Development Director Curtis Banks. “It’s nice to see those buildings mod- ernized and that Gilead is really com- mitted to making Foster City their home.” The biotech company earned the city’s approval for the Gilead Sciences Master Plan in 2013, after acquiring the North Campus formerly occupied by Electronics for Imaging and merg- ing it with its South Campus.

But as the company continues to make astronomical strides in its array of therapeutics — including its revolu- tionary development of drugs shown to reduce the risks of developing HIV, as well as a high-priced drug touted to cure hepatitis C — it’s also investing in its real estate portfolio. In September, Gilead spent about $120 million to purchase the nearby 12-acre Chess-Hatch office complex, which could eventually be redeveloped into nearly 800,000 square feet of building space. The company has yet to submit plans to redevelop the site, which is currently occupied by 190,000 square feet of space spread between several single-story build- ings. This recent land acquisition brought Gilead’s assets up to nearly 100 acres spread across Foster City. The company has nearly 7,500 employees across the world and antici- pates the Foster City campus could host up to 5,000 new employees. “The Bay Area has long served as a center of excellence for the biophar- maceutical industry, and we remain committed to maintaining our pres-

ence in Foster City,” a Gilead spokes- woman wrote in an email. “As Gilead’s business continues to grow, we are always evaluating needs to expand the Foster City campus with regard to both laboratory and office space to assist in our mission of delivering life-saving medicines to patients worldwide.” That mission has landed big gains for the company and its investors with Gilead reporting its 2015 earnings last month. According to the company, it sold $32.2 billion worth of products, up 31 percent from the previous year. In the coming years, Gilead will soon have a new biotech neighbor also expanding in the Bayfront com- munity. BioMed Realty Trust and Illumina Inc., a global gene-sequencing firm, received city approvals last year to proceed with a $149 million biotech campus on a more than 20-acre site near State Route 92. Based on a deal negotiated between city officials and BioMed, Foster City could receive nearly $50 million in sales and prop- erty taxes over the course of Illumina’s 26-year lease. Banks noted Gilead’s suc- cess and land acquisition may have contributed to other companies like Illumina set- ting sights on the city. “I’m sure it was a factor, their seeing that campus and Foster City becoming a little bit of a biotech hub,” Banks said. “I’m sure that influ- enced them and they were seeing activity take place in Foster City. So they saw it wasn’t just a plan taking place, it was businesses mak- ing an investment in the city. That tends to be impor- tant when other businesses are looking at opportuni- ties.”

The

Planning

Commission’s study session will be held immediately after its regularly scheduled meeting that begins 7 p.m. at City Hall, 620 Foster City Blvd. Visit fostercity.org for more information.

Foster City Blvd. Visit fostercity.org for more information. Calendar THURSDAY, APRIL 7 Free Tax Help: AARP

Calendar

THURSDAY, APRIL 7 Free Tax Help: AARP Volunteer Tax Assistance. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. San Carlos Library, 610 Elm St., San Carlos. For more information call 591-0341 ext. 237.

ESL Conversation Club. 10 a.m. to 11 a.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Drop into this relaxed setting to practice speaking and reading English. For more information email belmont@smcl.org.

Senior Peer Counseling Open House. 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Peninsula Family Service Main Office, 24 Second Ave., San Mateo. Learn about volunteering opportu- nities and receive free training in active listening skills to support older adults who are socially isolat- ed, lonely or depressed. For more information call 403-4300.

Pecha Kucha Basics for high school students. 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. San Mateo County History Museum. Free. Explore the creative Pecha Kucha technique and process, and generate ideas through a gallery tour. Register a week in advance by visiting historysmc.org.