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The

Verona Press

Thursday, April 14, 2016

Vol. 51, No. 47

Verona, WI

Hometown USA

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Verona Area School District

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Exploring the world, from a VAHS library

Verona Area High School stu- dents took a field trip to the Galapa- gos Islands, explored the coral reefs and even saw the moon up close – all while in the K-Wing library. The school was among those in the Verona Area School District selected to try out “Google Expeditions,” a set of virtual trips around the world expe- rienced using a cardboard set of glass- es and a smart phone, on Wednesday, April 6. The expeditions are 360-degree photos of one of dozens of places

around the world – or beyond it, in the case of the moon. Users put on the glasses, with the phone attached in them, and a teacher or guide uses a tablet to choose their destination and can specify points of interest for fur- ther discussion. VAHS educational technology coordinator Rita Mortenson, who applied in the fall for the program to come to VAHS, said it’s still in its “beta” testing as Google travels around the country. Mortenson said the program had “unlimited potential”

in the future for teachers to tie into lesson plans. Mortenson commended the school’s teachers, who found time in their class curriculums to try out the expe- ditions on short notice, as she found out on the Friday of spring break that Google would be visiting. Stoner Prairie Elementary School and Savanna Oaks Middle School students also got to try out the expedi- tions last week.

– Scott Girard

2 seats, 11 applicants

Interviews April 18, decision May 2

SCOTT GIRARD

Unified Newspaper Group

Within a week of a high- turnout election, Verona Area School District resi- dents continued to show

their interest in board deci- sions – with 11 applicants for two remaining vacan- cies. As a result, the board is taking extra time to fill the seats. Nine of the applications are for Derrell Connor’s at-large seat, while three are for Joanne Gauthier’s seat covering areas out- side the cities of Fitchburg and Verona. One person applied for both seats.

A l s o a m o n g t h e

applicants was Charyn

Inside

Gorrell misses out on Ohio jobs

Page 3

Grandau, who ran for the open at-large seat in the April 5 election but lost decisively to Noah Rob- erts. With that list in mind, board president Dennis Beres said board members would set aside two hours for interviews April 18, the date they originally had planned to make the appointment, and instead vote two weeks later. That, he noted, would give Roberts, who won’t

Turn to Vacancies/Page 10

Setting a new stage

VACT prepares to break ground on new facility

KATE NEWTON

Unified Newspaper Group

When the Verona Area

C o m m u n i t y T h e a t e r moved into its first and current building on Bruce Street in 2005, its leaders never imagined that they’d outgrow that space in less than a decade.

t h o s e

D e s p i t e

limitations, the organiza- tion has managed to not only plan ahead for the next stage – raising more than $1 million toward the building – but has expand- ed and enhanced its pro- gramming along the way. As the organization pre- pares to break ground on its new rehearsal and per- formance venue within the next two months while juggling four upcoming productions with com- bined casts of about 400

Turn to VACT/Page 9

21 years down, one meeting to go as Behnke’s tenure ends

Longtime board member’s last meeting is April 18

SCOTT GIRARD

Unified Newspaper Group

When Ken Behnke entered kindergarten in 1954, the Verona Graded School had a “space issue.”

Sixty years and many buildings later, as Behnke gets ready to leave his seat on the Verona Area School Board after 21 years, he’s seen that space issue come full circle, allowing him to offer a broad perspec- tive on school board discus- sions during his tenure.

Behnke, 67, will take part in his final meeting Monday

Behnke, 67, will take part in his final meeting Monday Behnke night as the longest-serving board

Behnke

night as the longest-serving board member in VASD history. His long career of pub- lic service also includes 20 years on the Verona Joint Fire District board and eight years on the Town of Verona board before he joined VASB. “I was always interested in politics,” said Behnke, a retired post office manag- er who has been a Realtor for the last 13

Turn to Behnke/Page 8

Verona involvement

Retiring school board member Ken Behnke has been involved in the Verona community for most of his life, including the last 40 in some form of public service:

1954-67: Student in Verona schools 1966-75: Verona Press correspondent 1975-83: Town of Verona Board 1975-95: Fire District Commission 1995-2016: Verona Area School Board

District Commission 1995-2016: Verona Area School Board The Verona Press Peter, Paul and Mary “Now” A

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April 14, 2016 The Verona Press

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Verona Area School District

Verona Press ConnectVerona.com Verona Area School District Photos by Scott Girard Teacher Heidie Becker covers the

Photos by Scott Girard

Teacher Heidie Becker covers the eyes of Marisol Diaz and Anevaeh Gonzalez as they play tic-tac-toe.

Marisol Diaz and Anevaeh Gonzalez as they play tic-tac-toe. Annalise Cooper, right, who helped bring the

Annalise Cooper, right, who helped bring the project to her class, helps Rachel Miller try out her group’s “Storybook” project, which had different shapes on a piece of plastic and has the user identify what those shapes are with their eyes closed.

Access for others

Stoner Prairie students create braille keyboards, toys

SCOTT GIRARD

Unified Newspaper Group

Annalise Cooper overheard her teacher struggling to download a file to 3-D print in the Stoner Prairie Elementary School inno- vation lab. The SP fourth-grader told educational technology coordinator Karie Huttner she wanted to help with the project: 3-D print- ing a Rubik’s Cube for a young, visually impaired girl. Since it wasn’t working, Huttner asked Cooper if she’d like to bring the project back to her classmates in Elizabeth Jones’ class- room and come up with a solution. Weeks later, the students presented that Rubik’s Cube and much more to other

classrooms from around the school and their parents. The students had used the 3-D printer and plenty of Gorilla Glue to cre- ate the cube, which had different shapes for different sides to mirror the colors of a nor- mal Rubik’s Cube, a tic-tac-toe game with the “X” and “O” pieces 3-D for someone to touch and feel, and multiple designs of braille keyboards. “It sort of started and snowballed,” Huttner told the Press at the April 8 launch party. “The kids took it this way.” Cooper told the Press she hopes to do more projects like this in her future, mentioning an iPad keyboard with braille as an idea. “I just like to help people in need,” Cooper said. “(The girl) didn’t really have anything to play with.” Huttner said she was proud of Cooper and the rest of her class. “This is one of the most exciting projects I’ve ever been a part of,” she said. “This is more than I could have dreamed of.”

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Using different sequences of numbers, students type out their name in braille.

Survey seeks parent input on 2017-18 school calendar

A survey on the 2017-18 Verona Area School Dis- trict calendar is open until April 18. The district has convened a calendar committee each of the last two years to find more time for professional development and time for teachers to meet parents of incoming students. Those committees, though, were only able to make incre- mental changes. The committee for the 2016-17 calendar told dis- trict administrators that broader changes would take more time and require com- munity input. The committee for 2017- 18, which will meet ear- lier this year to consider those larger changes, will focus on five areas: Late Start Mondays; increasing time for staff professional

On the web

Take the survey on the 2017-18 school calendar:

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development; considering staff having a paid work day on Martin Luther King Jr. Day; establish a consis- tent week for spring break every year; and find more time for parent/teacher planning time to develop and review personalized learning plans. The survey, which can be found at verona.k12.wi.us in the “What’s Happening in the District?” menu. The deadline is Monday, April 18, at noon. – Scott Girard

ConnectVerona.com

April 14, 2016 The Verona Press

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Verona Area School District

Gorrell misses out on Ohio positions

SCOTT GIRARD

Unified Newspaper Group

Verona Area School Dis- trict superintendent Dean Gorrell was not selected for either of the Ohio super- intendent positions he was known as a finalist for. The New Albany-Plain Local Schools chose an internal candidate Tuesday

night after a two-hour exec- utive session. Gorrell was the only other candidate interviewed. The Beavercreek City School District, where Gor- rell was one of three final- ists, also chose another can- didate. Gorrell applied for at least three jobs in Ohio, where his wife is originally from.

Town of Verona

Annual meeting includes $3 million Town Hall

The Town of Verona annual meeting April 19 will include a vote to approve financing for the nearly $3 million Town Hall building. The agenda for the 7 p.m. meeting, which town admin- istrator Amanda Arnold said is “loose” because the meet- ing leaves any motions up to the electors in attendance,

includes a discussion of the new Town Hall and mainte- nance building. Town resident Ron Fisch- er told the Press some elec- tors plan to offer a motion to sell all of the land the town purchased to build the Town Hall on to stop con- struction of the new build- ing.

PD waits while Nine Mound continues

JIM FEROLIE

Verona Press editor

The spring segment of the Nine Mound Road reconstruction contin- ued over the weekend with a tem- porary closure of the road. But the planned realignment of the County Hwy. PD intersection continues to wait for land acquisition. The city had previously aimed at a mid-April start of construction on PD – a separate piece of the overall Nine Mound Road project with its own timeline that will shift the intersection northward and reconstruct PD from Woods Road to Shady Oak Lane. But that hinged on purchasing right-of- way, which has not yet happened, city engineer Jeffrey Montpas reported in his twice-monthly digest for alders. Montpas and city administrator Bill Burns told the Press this week the city is exploring the use of con- demnation – better known as eminent domain – to ensure the $12 million project to improve the Epic-afflicted traffic goes through. But that process can often takes six months, they said in a series of emails to the Press. And Montpas said the PD project can’t begin until every piece of right-of- way is purchased. “I don’t know yet if that means the intersection would not be completed this year, but that is a possibility,” Burns wrote. “If the full intersection reconstruction can’t be completed in

the full intersection reconstruction can’t be completed in Photo by Jim Ferolie Construction crews finished the

Photo by Jim Ferolie

Construction crews finished the new intersection at Northern Lights/Nine Mound and Cross Country Road over the winter, and road is being widened this spring.

2016, we’d look at what we can do to improve conditions in conjunction with the work being done to expand Northern Lights/Nine Mound until the full intersection reconstruction is completed.” Meanwhile, utility work started on the rest of Nine Mound in March after the city completed the shifting of the intersection with Cross Coun- try Road slightly to the north over the winter. That came complete with stop- lights and changed the traffic flow to north and south, with a default of

crossing Cross Country with a green

light, rather than forcing those exit- ing to turn left onto Nine Mound at

a stop sign. That also created a new

entrance to what will presumably be Campus 6 at the light. The city began work Monday on the PD intersection and third piece of

this puzzle – a new intersection along PD to a completely new road enter- ing the Epic campus from the north

– with a $275,000 agreement with

engineering firm AECOM to oversee those two projects.

Spring election

Roberts says big win shows ‘mandate for change’

Grandau appreciates community interest

SCOTT GIRARD

Unified Newspaper Group

Noah Roberts says there is a “mandate for change” after his big win in the April 5 election. Roberts, the newest Verona Area school board member-elect, defeated Charyn Grandau, a former board member, by a 2-to- 1 margin among the more than 8,000 votes cast in the election. “I believe that the citizens of the district have spoken with considerable author- ity,” Roberts wrote in an email Tuesday to the Press. “The community wants transparency and inclusion, and I am someone they trust to establish that.” Grandau acknowledged

Registrations, turnout bring long lines

City clerk Ellen Clark said her first general election went “well” overall, though she acknowledged some long wait times. Clark said the lines were the “biggest complaint” she received, and same- day registration, especially for young voters, was the main cause. “We expect a lot of registrants … but the school board race brought out a lot of 18-year-olds and first-time voters,” Clark told the Press. The school board race included 2015 Verona Area High School graduate Noah Roberts, who won by nearly 3,000 votes. The election also featured spirited primaries at the national

level. The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reported the statewide turnout of nearly 50 percent was the highest in a presidential primary since 1972. All told, 5,436 votes were cast in the City of Verona, Clark reported to the Common Council on Monday, and 633 people registered on Election Day. Another 810 voted early, requiring two people to spend the entire day entering absentee ballots. Clark said going forward she hopes to add a more laptops and inspectors at the registration table, break the poll books down by one more section of last names and add more greeters to guide people upon entering the polling place.

her disappointment in the big loss but said she found a silver lining in the high turnout, recalling that she

first ran in 2006 because she “read in the newspaper that no one was running.” “That somebody stepped

up and wanted to run for the board … and ideas were viewed and aired and the voters were engaged,

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that part of it was good,” Grandau said. “We’re not (used to) having that com- munity engagement, so we did this time.” Roberts agreed that the high level of engagement was a good sign. “My campaign was cen- tered around engaging with as many residents as pos- sible and allowing their voices to be heard and val- ued,” he said. “Our schools mean a lot to our commu- nity members, and I believe they displayed that with the high turnout.” Grandau is one of nine applicants for an open at- large seat, which the board is expected to appoint at its first May meeting. Roberts said in the email that it was important to recognize in the appoint- ment process that voters “want new members on the board,” given the election

results. He added that he plans to immediately address school climate, one of the top- ics he spoke to the board about in spring of 2015, when parents complained to the board about discipline issues and staff retention. Establishing “greater trans- parency and inclusion” are other priorities going for- ward, he said. “I am very excited to get to work and to collaborate and engage with commu- nity members,” he said.

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4 April 14, 2016 The Verona Press

Opinion

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Verona Press Oregon Observer • Stoughton Courier Hub

45 Verona Press Oregon Observer • Stoughton Courier Hub Community Voices Pro-life is more than protecting

Community Voices

Pro-life is more than protecting the unborn

T he presidential campaign has made its way through Wisconsin. All the candidates

tried to flatter us with their pro-

fessed love for our great state and the hard working people who live here. It’s part of the process, and I appreciate that we get a chance to see those who strive for the highest office in the land visit many of our cit- ies. It seems like

one of the first

issues reporters ask the candi- dates in every state they visit is their position on Roe v. Wade, or, more directly, whether they are pro-life or pro-choice. This is a valid line of questioning – especially with the recent passing of Antonin Scalia leaving a vacancy on the Supreme Court. The problem is that allowing politicians and judges to define life leads to many people taking a nar- row view of what being pro-life really means. When Chris Matthews of MSN- BC asked Donald Trump about his position on this topic in Janesville, his answer was embarrassing and confusing – and that’s being gener- ous. Trump initially indicated that a woman who gets an abortion should be “punished” in some way. He has since backpedaled on that answer, given the uproar from all sides of the political spectrum. The day he made that statement, I was asked to send a letter of rec- ommendation for a close friend of mine to be a volunteer counselor for Care Net Pregnancy Center. My wife and I are supporters of this ministry, and I was more than happy to make the recommendation

and I was more than happy to make the recommendation Peters for my friend. Care Net

Peters

for my friend. Care Net doesn’t try to bludgeon someone into choosing life, but offers a compassionate ear in a difficult situation, as well as practi- cal assistance to those who need a place to stay. I’m not sure how anyone could view this approach in anything other than but a positive light, but I will leave that for you to decide. And that brings us back to the meaning of the pro-life label. Many folks immediately think of it as only caring about outlawing abortion. However, a Biblical understanding of the pro-life position goes well beyond court rulings and demoniz- ing those who hold a different view. Jesus taught us that a “for life” position encompasses all of life. It recognizes that babies are created and important in the womb (Psalm 139:13), but it also upholds the dignity of every person throughout every stage of life regardless of disabilities (Psalm 139:13); caring for the orphans and widows (James 1:27); as well as the elderly (Acts

20:35).

Former Massachusetts U.S. Rep. Barney Frank helped me to better understand why many people view pro-life Christians (and others) as militant intruders in the private lives of woman they don’t know. He said, “You pro-lifers believe that life begins at conception and ends at birth.” Ouch! To some degree, Mr. Frank has a valid point. If we are to be truly pro- life as Jesus modeled and taught His followers, we must care for people at every stage of life, and we must back our words with our deeds. Jesus’ brother James wrote in his epistle: “Suppose you see a brother or sister who has no food or clothing, and you say, ‘Goodbye and good day; stay warm and eat well’ – but then you don’t give that person any food or clothing. What

good does that do?” (James 2:15- 16) Indeed. I have come to the conclusion that I can no longer “label” myself as pro-life, even though I strongly believe that life begins at concep- tion. The term has become so politi- cized that it becomes a non-starter in trying to show compassion for people with the love of Christ. I prefer to take the view that all life matters because all life mat- ters to God. He is both the author and redeemer of His image-bearers through Jesus Christ. Sanctity of life seems to be a more holistic way to approach the value of every person as precious in God’s eyes without trying to make political hay out of labeling people. The good people of Wisconsin have cast their votes in the prima- ries, as well as for the state Supreme Court and other local matters. I’m not sure how many voters in the Badger state made Roe v. Wade their top issue at the ballot box, but it has been a hot topic of debate since 1973 and is destined to remain that way for the foreseeable future. Meanwhile, my counselor friend might have the opportunity to make an impact on someone going through a very difficult decision process that has real implications for all involved. I am grateful for his willingness to get involved at a relational level, rather than simply shouting at a distance. Some of us might also decide to serve someone in our community who is in need no matter what their stage of life. Either way, making a positive impact on another person honors the sanctity of life as God ordained it and helps make Wisconsin a bet- ter place to call home no matter whom our next president might be. Amen.

Michael Peters is pastor of The Church in Verona.

be. Amen. Michael Peters is pastor of The Church in Verona. Get Connected Find updates and

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April 14, 2016 The Verona Press

5

Live Generous Verona series kicks off April 30

Those looking for ways to get involved locally and help a neighbor who needs assistance with yard work or outside home repair can sign up for scheduled volunteer activities through Live Gener- ous Verona. To mark its 30th year of community service, Bad- ger Prairie Needs Network, in partnership with Thri- vent Financial of Verona, is launching a series of pay-it- forward service days called Live Generous Verona. Each day of service will help others in the community and provide an opportunity for creating a more caring, giving and con- nected community. The first Live Generous Verona service day is on Sat- urday, April 30, with a com- munity-wide spring cleanup effort. Other upcoming events throughout the year will include a fall clean up and a year-long Flags 4 Food event. The spring cleanup day April 30 will begin at 8 a.m. with a continental breakfast in the community room at Bad- ger Prairie Needs Network. Volunteers will receive job assignments and head out into the community at 8:30 a.m. Those who bring nonperish- able food items for the food pantry will also receive a free Live Generous T-shirt. At 12:45 p.m., volunteers return to BPNN for the free commu- nity meal and event wrap-up. Event organizers are look- ing for volunteers to help local homeowners with tasks the homeowner may not be able to do on their own, such

If you go

What: Live Generous Verona spring cleanup When: 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Saturday, April 30 Where: Meet at Badger Prairie Needs Network, 1200 E. Verona Ave.

Sign up deadline: April

15

Info: BadgerPrairie Associates@Thrivent.com,

848-5150

as yard/garden cleanup or out- door home repairs other than painting. This is an opportu- nity for families, teams, work and church groups and ser- vice clubs to enjoy the spring weather while doing good. Anyone interested in help- ing with this community-wide effort (or Verona homeown- ers interested in having volun- teers help with outdoor tasks) should contact Kim Peder- son at 848-5150 or email BadgerPrairieAssociates@ Thrivent.com by April 15.

Flags 4 Food

Another opportunity through Live Generous Vero- na is Flags 4 Food, a patriotic service project inspired by the community. The project urges Verona and near west side Madison residents to purchase a year-long flag sub- scription for $50, which helps the BPNN food pantry. In exchange for the tax deductible subscription, a team of BPNN volunteers

the tax deductible subscription, a team of BPNN volunteers File photo by Samantha Christian Doug and

File photo by Samantha Christian

Doug and Barb Smith of Verona clean up old flower beds at a home along Thompson Street for a Live Generous Verona community ser- vice project last October.

will install a full size 3-by- 5-foot flag and pole set on four different days in 2016. Flag teams will install before 8 a.m. on Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day and Veterans Day with take down at sunset the same day. All subscription proceeds go to BPNN and allow for

the continuation of their goal to end the cycle of multigen- erational poverty within the community. Residents can fly the flag of patriotism and help fight hunger through Flags 4 Food. For information, contact Pederson.

– Samantha Christian

Kiwanis recognize FFA members

Norman wins leadership award

Verona FFA member Caroline Norman was recently honored for the 2016 Louis M. Sasman Leadership Award. The Kiwanis Club of Downtown Madison host- ed 76 FFA members and their advisers from 10 area high schools at its March 14 luncheon. An FFA student leader from each school received the award. Norman’s FFA advis- ers are Angie Midthun- Hensen and Jamie Morris. Sasman was Wis - consin’s Supervisor of Vocational Agriculture

Education from 1924- 1960. He was fondly known statewide as “Mis- ter Agriculture” for his tireless support of sec- ondary agriculture educa- tion and the FFA (Future Farmers of America). He was a longtime Downtown Kiwanian, and the Kiwan- is endowed these awards in his honor following his death in 1983. At the luncheon, mem- bers and guests also learned about “The Genet- ics of Yeast: Beer, Bread and Beyond” from Chris Todd Hittinger, assistant professor of genetics at the University of Wisconsin School of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

DCHS to offer discounted pet ID services next week

In conjunction with National Pet ID Week, Dane County Humane Society will be offering discounted ID tags and microchips the week of April 17-23. Prices, which include tax, are $6 for ID tags and $20 for microchips. Micro- chipping services will be offered on a walk-in basis from 1-7 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and

Friday, and from 1-5 p.m. Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday. DCHS, 5132 Voges Road, Madison, also offers the microchip and ID tag engraving services throughout the year at reg- ular prices. The costs are normally $8 and up for ID tags and $25/$40 for cat/ dog microchips. For information, call

838-0413.

Group to re-create popular ‘60s folk trio

Verona Area Performing Arts Series will present Peter, Paul and Mary “Now” on Sat- urday, April 30. The group pays tribute to the 1960s folk trio Peter, Paul and Mary, per- forming the original group’s biggest hits: “If I had a Ham- mer,” “Blowin’ in the Wind,” “Leaving on a Jet Plane,” “Puff the Magic Dragon” and “Lemon Tree,” among many others. Rick Lucchesi, formerly of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, performs as Peter Yarrow, while Trey Warner performs as Paul Stooky and Patti Smith sings the parts of the late Mary Travers. Their instrumentation and tight vocal harmonies are reminiscent of the origi- nal trio, with a message as

If you go

What: VAPAS presents Peter, Paul and Mary “Now” When: 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 30 Where: Verona Area High School Performing Arts Center Tickets: $30 adult; $28 seniors; $8 students 18 and under Tickets: vapas.org, the State Bank of Cross Plains-Verona, Capitol Bank-Verona, or call 848-2787

applicable in this generation as it was when the trio started their journey in 1962. Lucchesi has performed on many stages from Las Vegas to the Grand Ol’ Opry, and has opened for Kenny Rogers and others. Warner’s father, Al, was the band leader of the original Warner Broth- ers Band, and Warner has performed all over the world with the USO, as well as

nine-month tours of many Asian countries. He has also performed with many country music superstars. Smith was a child star and has performed

in many genres. Tickets are available at vapas.org, the State Bank of Cross Plains-Verona, Capi- tol Bank-Verona or by call- ing 848-2787. All seats are reserved. Prices are $30 adult; $28 senior over 65; $8 stu- dent 18 and under. The show is sponsored in part by J.P. Cullen & Sons, Inc., Rock- weiler Insulation, Holiday Inn Express and Mid-West Fam- ily Broadcasting.

– Bill Livick

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6

April 14, 2016 The Verona Press

ConnectVerona.com

Coming up

Birthday, anniversary party

Celebrate the month’s birthdays and anniversaries at the senior center’s monthly party from 11:45 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. Friday, April 15. Lunch will be served at 11:45 a.m. while entertainment provided by Bon- nie Francis and Bill Stevens begins at 12:30 p.m. Bill (fiddle/guitar) and Bon- nie (saxophone) play a variety of music, both covers and original material. To reserve a spot for lunch, call 845- 7471 by noon on Thursday, April 14.

STEM Fair

Kids can investigate topics in science, technology, engineering and math dur- ing a STEM Fair from 9:30 a.m. to noon Saturday, April 16 at the library. The fair, provided by Navigant, will include activities such as operat- ing Madison Gas and Electric’s pedal power generator to power various bulbs and devices; build a balloon car to gain knowledge of the effects of friction and drag on velocity; discover how clouds make rain; observe rocks and fos- sils from different regions of the U.S. and more. The fair is geared towards kids ages 5-10. For information, con- tact Mary Thony at 497-2338 or mary.

thony@navigant.com.

TRIAD presentation

Learn about Wisconsin’s Silver Alert program during a TRIAD presentation at 12:30 p.m. Monday, April 18 at the senior center. The Silver Alert goes out to law enforcement and the public to aid in the safe return of seniors who have wan- dered away from home due to dementia or other impairments. Kari Orn, a Silver Alert coordinator with the Wisconsin Department of Justice Division of Crim- inal Investigation will lead the presenta- tion. For information, call 845-7471.

Brat fry

The Verona Area Active Adults will

hold their “First Brat of the Season” brat fry from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Monday, April 18 at the senior center. There will be brats, hotdogs, chips, cookies and beverages to purchase, and walk-ins and phone orders are welcome. Takeout orders of 10-plus brats are due by noon on Friday, April 15. Takeout orders of 10 or less must be called into the senior center one hour in advance. For information or to order, call 845-

7471.

Microsoft Access class

Learn how to use Microsoft Access from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wednesday, April

20 at the library.

The class will explore the program and provide examples for use. Partici- pants will learn how to setup and use an Access database, as well as how to setup a basic form for data input. Training will be provided by John Harris from Har-

ris Multimedia and Computers. This program is free and open to the public. Registration is required and class size is limited. For information or to register, call 845-7180.

VACT teen show

The Verona Area Community Theater will present “Bring It On: The Musical” at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 21, Friday, April 22 and Saturday, April 23 at the Verona Area High School Performing Arts Center, 300 Richard St. The production features students in eighth through 12th grade with Lauren Smith, Cian Evans-Grayson and Nathan

Lucas in the main roles. Tickets are $15 for general admission, $10 for seniors

65 and older and $10 for children/stu-

dents through high school. For informa- tion or to purchase tickets, visit vact.org.

Community calendar

Thursday, April 14

• 6:30 p.m., VACT presents

“Dinosaurs Before Dark, Kids” ($3), VAHS PAC, 300 Richard St., vact. org

• 7:30 p.m., VACT presents “High

School Musical Jr.” ($5), VAHS PAC,

300 Richard St., vact.org

Friday, April 15

• 9:15-9:45 a.m., Sensory Friendly

Story Time (ages 3-5), library, 845-

7180

• 10:30-11 a.m., Baby Story Time

(ages 0-18 months), library, 845-

7180

• 6:30 p.m., VACT presents

“Dinosaurs Before Dark, Kids” ($3), VAHS PAC, 300 Richard St., vact. org

• 7:30 p.m., VACT presents “High

School Musical Jr.” ($5), VAHS PAC,

300 Richard St., vact.org

• 7 p.m., Krause Family Band, Tuvalu

Saturday, April 16

• 9:30 a.m., Grow into Spanish (ages

8 and under), library, 845-7180

• 9:30 a.m. to noon, Navigant STEM

Fair (ages 5-10), library, 497-2338

• 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Prairie

Kitchen free community meal, BPNN, bpnn.org

• 12:30 and 4 p.m., VACT presents

“Dinosaurs Before Dark, Kids” ($3), VAHS PAC, 300 Richard St., vact. org

• 1:30 and 5 p.m., VACT presents

“High School Musical Jr.” ($5), VAHS PAC, 300 Richard St., vact.org

• 7 p.m., Bill Liggett and Larry Sell, Tuvalu

Monday, April 18

• 9:30-10 a.m., Toddler Story Time (ages 1-2), library, 845-7180

• 10:30-11 a.m., Everybody Story

Time (ages 0-5), library, 845-7180

• 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., “First Brat of the

Season” brat fry, senior center, 845-

7471

• 12:30 p.m., TRIAD Presentation:

Silver Alert, senior center, 845-7471

• 6:30-8:30 p.m., Adult Coloring

Club, library, 845-7180

Tuesday, April 19

• 7 p.m., Town of Verona annual

meeting, town office, 335 N. Nine Mound Rd., 845-7187

Wednesday, April 20

• 4 p.m., Minecraft Club (grades 1-3), library, 845-7180

• 6:30-8:30 p.m., Microsoft Access

class (registration required), library,

845-7180

Thursday, April 21

• 9:30-10 a.m., Toddler Story Time

(ages 1-2), library, 845-7180

• 10 a.m., Conquering Cancer series:

“I Survived and Thrived!,” senior cen- ter, 845-7471

• 10:30-11 a.m., Preschool Story

Time (ages 3-5), library, 845-7180

• 4-5:30 p.m., Anime Club (grades

6-12), library, 845-7180

• 7:30 p.m., VACT presents “Bring

It On: The Musical” ($15 adults; $10 seniors 65 and older; $10 children/ students), VAHS PAC, 300 Richard St., vact.org

What’s on VHAT-98

Thursday, April 14

7 a.m. – How to Stay Young at Senior Center

8 a.m. Zumba Gold

9 a.m. Daily Exercise

10 a.m. – Edvard Grieg

Chorus at Senior Center

3 p.m. Daily Exercise

4 p.m. – John Duggleby at Senior Center

5 p.m. – Do Not Resuscitate at Senior Center

6 p.m. Salem Church Service

7 p.m. Rhapsody Arts at Senior Center

8 p.m. Daily Exercise

9 p.m. – Cough & Cold

Remedies at Senior Center

10 p.m. – Verona History at

Historical Society Friday, April 15

7 a.m. – John Duggleby at Senior Center

1 p.m. Cough and Cold

Remedies at Senior Center

3 p.m. – Self Defense at Senior Center

4 p.m. – Crossing Cultures at Senior Center

5 p.m. 2014 Wildcats Football

Cough & Cold

Remedies at Senior Center

10 p.m. 1988 Verona

Basketball

11 p.m. – Edvard Grieg

Chorus at Senior Center Saturday, April 16

8 a.m. Common Council from April 11

11 a.m. Self Defense at

8:30 p.m.

Senior Center

1 p.m. 2014 Wildcats Football

4:30 p.m. – Verona History

at Historical Society

6 p.m. – Common Council from April 11

9 p.m. Self Defence at

Senior Center

10 p.m. Verona History at

Historical Society

11 p.m. Edvard Grieg

Chorus at Senior Center

Sunday, April 17

7 a.m. Hindu Cultural Hour

9 a.m. – Resurrection

Church

10 a.m. Salem Church

Service Noon Common Council from April 11

3 p.m. Self Defense at Senior Center

4:30 p.m. Verona History at Historical Society

6 p.m. – Common Council from April 11

9 p.m. Self Defense at Senior Center

10 p.m. – Verona History at

Historical Society

11 p.m. Edvard Grieg

Chorus at Senior Center

Monday, April 18

7 a.m. – John Duggleby at

Senior Center

1 p.m. Cough & Cold

Remedies at Senior Center

3 p.m. Self Defense at

Senior Center

4 p.m. – Crossing Cultures

at Senior Center

5 p.m. 2014 Wildcats Football

9 p.m. Hindu Cultural Hour

10 p.m. – 1988 Verona

Basketball

11 p.m. – Edvard Grieg

Chorus at Senior Center Tuesday, April 19

7 a.m. – 1988 Verona Basketball

10 a.m. Zumba Gold

9 a.m. Daily Exercise

10 a.m. Edvard Grieg

Chorus at Senior Center

2 p.m. Zumba Gold

3 p.m. Daily Exercise

4 p.m. – John Duggleby at Senior Center

5 p.m. – Crossing Cultures at Senior Center

6 p.m. Resurrection Church

8 p.m. Rhapsody Arts at Senior Center

9 p.m. Cough & Cold

Remedies at Senior Center

10 p.m. Verona History at

Historical Society

Wednesday, April 20

7 a.m. – John Duggleby at Senior Center

1 p.m. Cough & Cold

Remedies at Senior Center

3 p.m. – Self Defense at

Senior Center

5 p.m. – Common Council

from April 11

7 p.m. Capital City Band

8 p.m. – Self Defense at Senior Center

10 p.m. 1988 Verona

Basketball

11 p.m. – Edvard Grieg

Chorus at Senior Center

Thursday, April 21

7 a.m. – 1988 Verona Basketball

8 a.m. Zumba Gold

9 a.m. Daily Exercise

10 a.m. – Edvard Grieg

Chorus at Senior Center

3 p.m. Daily Exercise

4 p.m. – John Duggleby at

Senior Center

5 p.m. – Crossing Cultures at Senior Center

6 p.m. Salem Church

Service

Rhapsody Arts at

Senior Center

7 p.m.

8 p.m. Daily Exercise

9 p.m. – Cough & Cold

Remedies at Senior Center

10 p.m. – Verona History at

Historical Society

Support groups

• AA Meeting, senior cen-

ter, Thursdays at 1 p.m.

• Caregivers Support

Group, senior center, first

and third Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.

• Healthy Lifestyles

Group meeting, senior center, second Thursday from 10:30 a.m.

• Parkinson’s Group,

senior center, third

Friday at 10 a.m.

Churches

ALL SAINTS LUTHERAN CHURCH

2951 Chapel Valley Rd., Fitchburg

(608) 276-7729 allsaints-madison.org Pastor Rich Johnson Sunday: 8:30 & 10:45 a.m.

THE CHURCH IN FITCHBURG

2833 Raritan Rd., Fitchburg

(608) 271-2811 livelifetogether.com Sunday: 8 & 10:45 a.m.

THE CHURCH IN VERONA

Verona Business Center

535 Half Mile Rd. #7, Verona

(608) 271-2811 livelifetogether.com Sunday: 9 a.m.

FITCHBURG MEMORIAL UCC

5705 Lacy Rd., Fitchburg

(608) 273-1008 memorialucc.org Pastor Phil Haslanger Sunday: 8:15 and 10 a.m. Worship Sunday School: 10:15 a.m.

GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN CHURCH ELCA (608) 271-6633 Central: Raymond Road & Whitney Way, Madison Sunday: 8:15, 9:30 & 10:45 a.m. West: Corner of Hwy. PD & Nine Mound Road, Verona Sunday: 9 & 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m.

DAMASCUS ROAD CHURCH - WEST

The Verona Senior Center

108 Paoli St., Verona

(608) 819-6451 info@damascusroadchurch.com, damascusroadonline.org Pastor Justin Burge Sunday: 10 a.m.

MEMORIAL BAPTIST CHURCH

201 S. Main St., Verona

(608) 845-7125 MBCverona.org Lead Pastor Jeremy Scott Sunday: 10:15 a.m.

REDEEMER BIBLE FELLOWSHIP

130 N. Franklin St., Verona

(608) 848-1836 redeemerbiblefellowship.org Pastor Dwight R. Wise Sunday: 10 a.m. family worship

RESURRECTION LUTHERAN CHURCH-WELS

6705 Wesner Rd., Verona

(608) 848-4965 rlcverona.org Pastor Nathan Strutz and Assistant Pastor Eric Melso Thursday: 6:30 p.m. Sunday: 9 a.m.

ST. CHRISTOPHER CATHOLIC PARISH St. Andrew Church

301 N. Main St., Verona

St. William Church

1371 Hwy. PB, Paoli

(608) 845-6613 stchristopherverona.com Fr. William Vernon, pastor Saturday: 5 p.m., St. Andrew, Verona Sunday: 7:30 a.m., St. William, Paoli Sunday: 9 & 11 a.m., St. Andrew, Verona Daily Mass, Tuesday-Saturday: 8 a.m., St. Andrew, Verona

ST. JAMES EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH

427 S. Main St., Verona

(608) 845-6922 stjamesverona.org Pastors Kurt M. Billings and Peter Narum Office Hours: 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday; 8 a.m.- noon Wednesday Saturday Worship: 5 p.m. Sunday Worship: 8:30 and 10:45 a.m.

SALEM UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST

502 Mark Dr., Verona

(608) 845-7315 salemchurchverona.org Rev. Dr. Mark E. Yurs, Pastor Laura Kolden, Associate in Ministry Sunday School: 9 a.m. Sunday Worship: 10:15 a.m., staffed nursery available Fellowship Hour: 11:30 a.m.

SPRINGDALE LUTHERAN CHURCH-ELCA

2752 Town Hall Rd. (off Hwy ID),

Mount Horeb (608) 437-3493 springdalelutheran.org Pastor Jeff Jacobs

Sunday: 8:45 a.m. with communion

SUGAR RIVER

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH

415 W. Verona Ave., Verona

(608) 845-5855 sugar.river@sugarriverumc.org, sugar- riverumc.org Pastor Gary Holmes 9 & 10:30 a.m. contemporary wor- ship. Sunday School available during wor- ship. Refreshments and fellowship are between services.

WEST MADISON BIBLE CHURCH

2920 Hwy. M, Verona

Sunday Praise and Worship: 9:15 a.m. Nursery provided in morning. Sunday school (all ages): 10:45 a.m. Small group Bible study: 6 p.m.

ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Hwy. 92 & G, Mount Vernon (608) 832-6677 Pastor Brad Brookins Sunday: 10:15 a.m.

ZWINGLI UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST Hwy. 69 & PB, Paoli (608) 845-5641 Rev. Sara Thiessen

Sunday: 9:30 a.m. family worship

Being a Prophet A prophet is someone who hears the voice of God and tells
Being a Prophet
A prophet is someone who hears the voice of God and
tells others what God is saying, with words and deeds.
The prophet is frequently a social critic, because society
frequently goes against what God would have us do.
The prophet often gives very simple and straightforward
directives, like this statement from the prophet Micah:
“And what does the Lord require of you? To act justly and
to love mercy and to walk humbly with your God.” (Micah
6:8 NIV) The prophet sometimes gives more specific
directives, such as warning us about our treatment of the
poor or the widows and orphans in our midst: “Religion
that God our Father accepts as pure and faultless is this:
to look after orphans and widows in their distress and to
keep oneself from being polluted by the world.” (James
1:27 NIV) We are all called to be prophets, in our words
and in our deeds. One of the hallmarks of the Biblical
prophets was that their words were invariably in harmony
with their deeds, and their deeds were often symbolic
prophesies. We may not be a major prophet, like Isaiah
or Jeremiah, or even a minor one like Amos or Micah, but
we can still preach the good news to all we meet, without
saying a word.
– Christopher Simon, Metro News Service
“Show me your faith without deeds,
and I will show you my faith
by my deeds.”
—James 2:18 NIV
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ConnectVerona.com

April 14, 2016 The Verona Press

7

City of Verona

Kettle Creek apartment plan gets little support

JIM FEROLIE

Verona Press editor

The first proposed development in the newly planned north side of Verona could have some trouble matching the market to the city’s plans. Though alders and commissioners gave only feedback and no votes in separate meetings over the past eight days, they were, as a whole, loud and clear in oppos- ing the inclusion of apartments in the Ket- tle Creek North plan. Apartments have been popular propos- als all over the county since the end of the recession, and Verona has in recent years restricted the number of apartments that can be built, even instituting a policy that makes it easy to say no to more than 50 units per year. City planning director Adam Sayre’s staff report noted that including “mul- tifamily” units in Kettle Creek North – near Country View Elementary School – would require an amendment to the North Neighborhood Plan, passed only a year ago. The North plan strategically and deliberately placed apartments and other multifamily units near arterial roads like County Hwys. M and PD and as buffers

between commercial and single-family homes. Though the sentiment wasn’t entirely universal, nor was it the only concern raised, as the majority of alders and com- missioners said they couldn’t support apartments being built in what would eventually be the middle of the area between Cross Country Road and County Hwy. PD. “This is not the spot to put it,” Ald. Evan Touchett (Dist. 4) said, echoing the thoughts of Ald. Jack Linder (D-2), the Plan Commission representative. Ald. Brad Stiner (D-3) was even more direct, scolding developer Tony Heinrichs and asking if he’d even bothered to look at the city’s plans before coming up with his own ideas. “I’m tired of hearing people who want to build these homes tell us that they’re trying to meet the needs of a certain com- pany,” Stiner bellowed, referencing Hein- richs’ suggestions that the apartments were aimed at Epic employees. “We had input from those folks on the north end of town as we started writing this up … I wish people would follow it.” Heinrichs, of course, knew exactly what was in the plan, having built all over

Verona over the past couple of decades and employing the services of planner Ron Klaas, who also has spent his fair share of time presenting at city and town meetings in Verona. Heinrichs had also discussed the plan with both Sayre and Mayor Jon Hochkammer beforehand and was warned of the reaction he might get. But Heinrichs pointed out that the plan was merely a concept and that it was responding to the entire market, including Millennials and “people who live in Ket- tle Creek and want to move up” to bigger houses. Though Heinrichs had pointed out he could make changes, he was less enthu- siastic when Linder and Ald. Heather Reekie (D-4) asked if he could still make it work without the apartments or whether the plan would go to the “back burner.” “Good question,” he said. “I don’t have the answer as we stand here tonight.” Ald. Elizabeth Doyle (D-1) and Com- missioner Steve Heinzen disagreed with the majorities of their respective meet- ings, saying a more varied housing stock creates better neighborhoods. They and others suggested that a compromise could include small lots that also weren’t in the neighborhood plan.

Surveys sent out for park, open space plan

Some Verona residents can expect to see a park plan survey in their mail- boxes this week. Surveys were sent out Monday, April 11 to 600 households. Public feedback will help shape the 2016 update of the five-year Park and Open Space Plan. MSA Professional Services was selected to update the plan in the amount of $13,500. After the survey results are collected and reviewed at the Parks Commission meeting in May, there will be a public input meeting for those who did not receive a survey or who would like to comment in more detail. This year a task force will also be created so representatives from the Parks Commission and others who are more involved in various park uses can share their input and have their needs addressed more directly, said Dave Walker, park and urban forestry direc- tor. The goal is to have a draft of the update this summer, with the Common Council potentially adopting it in Sep- tember.

Matts house

City gives official OK for Rost plan

JIM FEROLIE

Verona Press editor

A local rehabilitation spe- cialist has the city’s go-ahead to purchase and rebuild the historic Matts house at Vero- na’s main intersection. Monday, the Common Council made official what the city’s Community Devel- opment Authority and a gath- ering of alders concluded last month – that Troy Rost’s pro- posal to purchase the prop- erty for $1 was the only real option. There were some mis- givings both last month and this week – mostly about the awkward way the home fits into downtown and the unfor- tunate inability to accommo- date the Verona Area His- torical Society – but alders agreed unanimously (7-0) to ratify the CDA’s recommen- dation. That CDA meeting includ- ed a quorum of the council, as well, so the issue had been worked over pretty well by the time it came to a decision, and comments were kept relatively short, with the dis- cussion finished in about 10 minutes. Alders commented that while Rost’s plan was the “safe” option to save the building, it doesn’t close the door on helping the Verona Area Historical Society find

a permanent home. They said

VAHS members – particu- larly Jesse Charles – deserved all the credit for preventing the 160-plus-year-old house from being razed. Three citizens spoke about

the project at the beginning of Monday’s meeting to express

a variety of thoughts about the

decision – generally accep- tance with some reservations. Charles, who has fought for the building’s preserva- tion since August – when the council openly stated it seemed a lost cause – again went on the record to state his and the historical society’s support for Rost’s plan and to lobby for a deed restriction and the right of first refusal to ensure the house is never torn down or moved. “Please do not move this house,” Charles said. “For people who like history, hav- ing something where it was is really important.” Longtime resident Lorlene Pulver said she was “disap- pointed” and complained that historical preservation isn’t getting enough support from the community, which Mayor Jon Hochkammer argued was “an unfair statement.” Ald. Brad Stiner (D-4) agreed with her that the city should help preserve its history and lob- bied for the use of Well No. 1 on Shuman when that out- dated brick building finally is

shut down. And Mike Hankard, who joined the historical society’s efforts with the perspective of someone with rehabilita- tion experience, supported Rost’s plan but said the cost for the city to preserve the house itself and keep control

of it would be “chicken feed” compared with its annual budget. “We buy front-end loaders that cost this much,” he said. Alders mainly reiterated comments they made during the combined CDA-Com- mittee of the Whole meet- ing March 21. Rost’s plan earned a recommendation in that meeting over a bolder one from Brandon Cook, whom staff had pointed out did not meet the city’s sub- mission requirements by the deadline. Cook’s plan would have moved the house off its original foundation and added another building, potentially solving some parking and traffic issues but diluting the historical preservation. Rost’s proposal included salvaging the foundation but likely would take a year or more after purchasing the home for $1. The official action Monday was a resolution to accept the proposal and begin working on a developer’s agreement and related documents.

Effigy mound speaker at historical society meeting

For thousands of years, effigy mounds have stood across Wisconsin, long before the land became a state. And people are invited to learn all about it on Saturday, when former state archaeologist and author Bob Birmingham will give a presentation about the meaning of Native American mounds. Birmingham will lead a discussion titled “Spirits of Earth: Effigy Mound Land- scape of Madison and the Four Lakes.” According to a press release from the Verona Area Historical Society, effi- gy mounds once numbered as

many as 20,000 in Wisconsin, though now only a few thou- sand remain. Last month, members enjoyed an “informative tour of the three buildings which make up the ‘Farm’ at Epic,” said VAHS president Ruth Jensen in an email to the Press. That part of the Epic campus was chosen, she said, because it housed photos of older farms in the area, but most importantly the Stewart farm upon which the compa- ny is located. “Our first stop was in a meeting room where Jesse (Charles) made a presentation

If you go

What: Verona Area Historical Society April meeting Where: Verona Senior Center, 108 Paoli St. When: 10 a.m. Saturday, April 16 Info: 845-7471

including projected pictures of the Stewart farm,” Jensen said. “Doreen Stewart con- tributed her first-hand insights which further brought the farm to life.”

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April 14, 2016 The Verona Press

ConnectVerona.com

Sugar River Euchre League

Hooterville-Express wins title

Hooterville-Express won the 2015-16 Sugar River Euchre League Champion- ship match beating Klee- man’s 388 to 382. Many of the Hooterville plays were inspired by Gary Pertz- born’s passion for euchre and for his teammates, although it appeared that John Scheidegger and Tracy Haag temporarily lost touch with that inspiration when they were skunked by Barb and Jerry Judd in the fifth round. Even with the skunk, John and Tracy weren’t low scor- ers for the evening. With an 89, that honor went to Klee- man’s Jeff Judd and Eldon Ace. Opie Taylor and Steve Hoffmaster (Hooterville- Express), the only couple to score 100 or more points, racked up 113 points for the high score.

Season recap

With the 85th Sugar Riv- er Euchre League season in the record books, many are already looking forward to October 6, 2016 for the beginning of the next sea- son. Some highlights for this season – there were 2 couples with perfect scores, 8 couples skunked, the low score for the sea- son was a 62 and the high team score of 447 points was recorded by Hooter- ville-Mary’s. This year individual averages for

those that played at least 16 matches are:

Jeff Judd: 104.333

Dave Herfel: 103.571

L a t h m a n :

Barb Judd: 102.471

Dean Herfe: 102.389 Richard Losenegger:

102.294

102.611

R o d n e y

Tom Schlimgen: 102.000

Steve Sponem: 101.500 Tracy Haag: 101.412

Ferdie Schmitz: 101.083 Dana Darrow: 100.714 Jerry Judd: 100.563 Randy Skogen: 100.500

M arv in T h o m p so n :

100.333

Bruce Milestone: 100.294

Charlie Steinhauer:

100.250

Chad Kitsemble: 100.250 Dale Herfel: 100.125

J o h n S c h e i d e g g e r :

100.111

Opie Taylor: 100.000

H o f f m a s t e r :

Ed Chancellor: 99.882 Tom Magnuson: 99.875 George Eichelkraut:

S t e v e

100.000

99.833

Harold Schlimgen: 99.563 Bryan Buesser: 99.563 Chris Hook: 99.438 Janice Magnuson: 99.188 Dave Steinhauer: 99.118 Tracy Beutel: 99.111 Larry Losenegger: 98.667 Jerry Rotar: 98.467 Dean Disch: 98.308 Rick Skindrud: 98.278 Chuck Jones: 98.267

Ron Fargo: 98.250 Jeff Buesser: 97.889 Al Zimmerman: 97.833 Derek Skogen: 97.765 Jerome Krantz: 97.750

Stan Hook: 97.556 Pat Maclean: 97.438 Pat Palmer: 97.313 Mary Humphry: 97.231 Dave Hook: 97.176 Ernie Sarbacker: 96.882 Dave Losenegger: 96.833 Randy Schmid: 96.733 Harold Grabandt: 96.667 Frank Schwenn: 96.588 Leo Humphry: 96.583 Shawn Farrell: 96.438 Stan Novothny: 96.412 Jack Gehin: 96.231 Jim Gehin: 95.667 Neil Fargo: 95.500 Ed Wettach: 95.471 Jeff Ellingson: 95.438 John Blum: 95.278 Kendal Wenger: 95.278 Steve Vogt: 95.250 Mark Losenegger: 95.222 Chris Booth: 95.000

Ken Stamn: 94.778 Dan Palmer: 94.750 Giff Hoesly: 92.938 Paul Hodgson: 92.846 Harry Gehin: 92.167 Ed Miller: 91.556 Keith Wenger: 91.176 Greg Stutz: 89.500

Join the leage

If you are interested in forming a team for or wish to play on an existing team contact Stan Hook at 848- 9044 or email phook@tds. net for more information. – Stan Hook

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net for more information. – Stan Hook adno=460811-01 Photo submitted Ken Behnke, center, was recognized for

Photo submitted

Ken Behnke, center, was recognized for 20 years of service to the Verona Area School Board at the State Education Convention in January by state superintendent Tony Evers, left, and Wisconsin Association of School Boards executive director John Ashley.

Behnke: Involved in government for 40 years

Continued from page 1

years. “I’ve been going to public meetings … around 40 years.” Behnke, who served as the board’s clerk for all 21 years, began when the district’s enrollment was at 3,515, and before either Glacier Edge or Country View had been built. Plenty has changed in that time beyond the buildings in the district. Through a refer- endum recount, Act 10 and the more recent focus on personalizing learning, Behnke said his priority has remained the same: helping every student reach their maximum potential. Those who worked with him recognized that focus. “He’s just a child advocate,” said VASD superintendent Dean Gorrell, the fourth superintendent to work with Behnke. “He just wants the best for every single kid that’s in our schools.”

Not perfect

Behnke’s interest in politics began in sixth grade, he said, recalling a bulletin board he and friend Rick Fetherston made about the subject. That blossomed into reporting for The Verona Press in the 1960s, shortly after it was created, while he was still in high school. Behnke covered the same town and school board meetings at which he would eventually sit on the other side of the table. By the time he joined the school board in 1995, he had two daughters, which gave him the “perspective that the district wasn’t perfect,” he said. Even now, with both his daughters having attained master’s degrees and only his board member perspective remaining, the district still has room to improve. The key, he said, is high expectations. “You have to believe that all students can succeed to the best of their ability, or you’ll fail,” Behnke said. He mentioned all of balancing site-based management with having everyone work “toward the same objective,” solving the behavioral issues that have come up in the last year and continuing to perfect the imple- mentation of personalized learning as places the district can grow.

Recounts, recalls

While he learned the lesson most involved in politics do at some point – “You can’t please everyone” – the most interesting learning opportunities came from his role as clerk. Behnke had to oversee two recall elections during his tenure, and in 2000, he had to con- duct a recount of the referendum results for building Country View Elementary School. With a result in favor of the referendum, 2,360 to 2,263, every vote counted. “A vote can change just on technicali- ties,” Behnke recalled learning at Town Hall, where there were “a lot of observers.” Years later, another challenge would come in the “major event” of Act 10, the state law

Spousal sacrifice

Behnke made special mention of the people most responsible for his 21 years on the school board: his family. His wife Marsha was an understanding spouse, he said, who did not mind him spending so much time at or preparing for meetings. “Without her support, I could not have done it,” he said. It helped that Marsha was an employee at the Department of Public Instruction for many years, which gave Ken a perspective from a state level.

passed in 2011 that reduced collective bar- gaining rights for public employees, includ- ing teachers. That created an “unnecessary upheaval,” Behnke said, and plenty of politics on both sides of the discussion. But the district ulti- mately did a good job of going from bargain- ing to an employee handbook “given what we were handed,” he said. It reflected years of treating staff well, Behnke said, which was another point of pride.

Congeniality

When Behnke first joined the board, he recalled it was not a congenial group. More than two decades later, that’s most- ly changed, and he has appreciated that improved working relationship. Board presi- dent Dennis Beres, who has been on the board since 2002, said Behnke contributed to the improved atmosphere. “Ken is always willing to respectfully lis- ten to someone who doesn’t have the same viewpoint he has and offer his thoughts and come up with consensus,” Beres said. “Even though back in those days him and I disagreed strongly on many candidates, including one of my very best friends who Ken defeated in an election, I never once felt there was a problem between Ken and I that couldn’t be talked out.” Being a fifth-generation Veronan and former Verona High School valedictorian, Behnke’s historical knowledge will also be missed by the board members and adminis- tration. “Ken’s got not just the board’s history, but the community history being a lifelong resi- dent here,” Gorrell said. “It’s always funny to listen to him wax historic about various things. I’m going to miss that a lot.” While the district has made improvements that Behnke is glad to have been part of while on the board, he said the district needs to continue its move toward ensuring every student reaches their potential. “We’ve been largely successful, but still lots of work to do,” he said of the district’s future. “That’s not a static process.”

ConnectVerona.com

April 14, 2016 The Verona Press

9

VACT: Moved into current building in 2005

Continued from page 1

kids and adults, founder Dee Baldock and board of direc- tors president Terry Dvorak reflected on VACT’s efforts to deliver on its mission while firing on all cylinders towards a new facility. “I think our program- ming has just charged ahead through the whole process, and those of us who were involved in both program- ming and the (building proj- ect), we’ve worked really hard to be doing both things at the same time,” Baldock said. The final stages of the project are, at long last, charging ahead as well. Dvorak told the Press that VACT has finalized its decision to work with the Middleton-based 1848 Con- struction to build the 13,850 square-foot, prefabricated steel building, which will share a lot with the new fire station adjacent to the Mili- tary Ridge Trail. In addition to expanded rehearsal and breakout space, the facility will include a 150-seat the- ater, dance studio, expanded costuming and set-building workshops and storage, as well as meeting and event spaces for public use. While VACT will con- tinue to use the Verona Area High School Performing Arts Center for its larger productions, the new facil- ity’s smaller performance space will enable the orga- nization to add even more performance opportunities – especially for kids – to its schedule. “Twenty-five kids in this room, on a summer day, it’s just not ideal,” Dvorak said, gesturing inside the small room in the current building used as a rehearsal space. “That’s the thing I’m the most excited about, is the actual classes and camps that we can offer when we’re in that new space.”

Moving toward

construction

Construction on the new building is expected to take about nine months, and Dvorak said VACT is now looking to 1848 Construction to “move forward with per- mits” and hire subcontractors before officially breaking ground, tentatively in early June. The organization is also seeking in-kind donations for labor and material costs, and have already secured dis- counted flooring, landscap- ing and concrete. In the meantime, VACT will continue to raise funds through its matching gift challenge, and has raised

Two kids’ shows debut this week

KATE NEWTON

Unified Newspaper Group

The rapid growth of the children’s theater all but necessitated the move to a bigger building, accord- ing to Terry Dvorak. After debuting its first kids pro- duction in 2004 with a cast of 30 kids, the organization now puts on three shows in its spring season. This month, nearly 250 kids from Verona and surround- ing communities will per- form in “Dinosaurs Before Dark, Kids,” “High School Musical Jr.” and “Bring It On: The Musical.” “ D i n o s a u r s B e f o r e Dark,” based on the first book in the popular Magic Tree House series, includes 70 kids in kindergarten through second grade with Baldock directing. The four performances of the show will run at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 14 and Fri- day, April 15, and at 12:30 and 4 p.m. Saturday, April 16 at the VAHS PAC. Per- formances of “High School Musical Jr.” – featuring kids in third through sev- enth grade – will immedi- ately follow at 7:30 p.m. Thursday and Friday, and at 1:30 and 5 p.m. Satur- day. When it comes to direct- ing the kids, board of direc- tors vice-president elect Alyssa Dvorak said VACT has sought from the begin- ning to “never sacrifice (having fun)” in pursuit of perfection onstage. “We make sure the kids’ experience is com- ing before our vision or our ‘dream show,’” Alyssa, who is directing nearly 75 eighth through 12th graders in “Bring It On: The Musical,” added. “It’s about making sure that when they’re onstage – even if they’re on the complete wrong foot – if they’re smiling and having fun, that’s all that matters.” Terry, who is directing “High School Musical Jr.,” says the growth of the kids’ programming can be attrib- uted largely to “word of mouth” in the community, as well as the organiza- tion’s emphasis on treating kids not simply as partici- pants, but as major players in every aspect of perfor- mance. “The bottom line is, we’re trying to provide an interactive theatrical expe- rience for these kids in everything we do,” Terry explained. “We’re not try- ing to put on shows for kids, we’re trying to put on shows with kids.” Performers and their families have also been instrumental in raising

and their families have also been instrumental in raising Photos submitted Above, Lydia Benz, who plays

Photos submitted

Above, Lydia Benz, who plays Sharpay Evans, rehearses with members of the ensemble for Verona Area Community Theater’s production of “High School Musical Jr.”

Right, Morty Arnol and Olive Cary, pictured in the Magic Tree House, appear as Jack and Annie in the Verona Area Community Theater’s production of “Dinosaurs Before Dark, Kids.” Michael Pool and Natalie Popp will also appear in the main roles.

The shows debut Thursday, April 14, at the Verona Area High School Performing Arts Center. Additional shows are scheduled Friday, April 15, and Saturday, April 16.

funds for the new building. This season, the three casts have raised approximately $5,700 – contributions that will be increased through the organization’s match- ing grant challenge. “It’s been outstanding to see that these families all believe in the show they’re in so much that they’re will- ing to contribute that much to the ultimate building project,” Alyssa said, add- ing that being able to finally move towards the building stage could help re-engage potential donors who were waiting for that green light. Other major donors include the Madison Com- munity Foundation’s Com- munity Impact Fund, which gave VACT a $50,000 grant last year and linked it with the anonymous donor of the matching grant, Carl Miller

with the anonymous donor of the matching grant, Carl Miller If you go What: VACT presents

If you go

What: VACT presents “Dinosaur Before Dark, Kids” When: 6:30 p.m. Thursday, April 14 and Friday, April 15; 12:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. Saturday, April 16 Where: Verona Area High School Performing Arts Center, 300 Richard St. Tickets: $3 (purchase at the door or online at vact.org)

What: VACT presents “High School Musical Jr.” When: 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 14 and Friday, April 15; 1:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. Saturday, April 16 Where: Verona Area High School Performing Arts Center, 300 Richard St. Tickets: $5 (purchase at the door or online at vact.org)

of Miller and Sons Super- market and the Kehl School of Dance, which contrib- uted $25,000 towards the facility’s dance studio. To purchase tickets for

“Dinosaurs Before Dark, Kids” ($3) or “High School Musical Jr.” ($5), visit vact.org. Tickets can also be purchased at the door before each performance.

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Matching

grant

challenge

All donations to the Verona Area Community Theater’s fundraising campaign for its new building will be matched two-for- one through May 1. For every $2 raised, an anonymous donor will match that amount with a $1 gift up to $100,000. “If the campaign is successful, VACT will raise an additional $300,000 (and) be that much closer to its $1.6 million goal for the project,” according to the organization’s website. For more information on the matching grant challenge or to donate, visit vact.org/ donate-now.

about $160,000 of the $200,000 needed to receive a $100,000 grant. With that grant, they’ll have about $1.3 million of the $1.6 mil- lion goal initially set for the capital campaign, and will continue fundraising until the goal is met. The organization is also selling stars for $1,000, $5,000 or $10,000 that will appear on the new building’s lobby floor; notes for a musi- cal wall in the lobby for $250 and $500; and seat engrav- ings for $500. With a move to the new facility seeming closer than ever before, Baldock, Dvor- ak and VACT’s extensive group of volunteers will be hard-pressed to find idle time to celebrate: With a 150-per- son summer production of “Mary Poppins” and sold-out summer camps on the hori- zon, they’ll certainly stay busy. The controlled chaos that comes with working in the current building, though, doesn’t distract from the ultimate experience VACT seeks to provide its partici- pants. “If you come to the perfor- mance week and you come backstage and see the happi- ness of these kids, they are in heaven performing, and they could be the kid with the smallest part on the stage and they might as well be on Broadway,” Dvorak said. “If we could provide that experi- ence for even 10 or 20 more kids in the new facility, it would all be worth it.”

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April 14, 2016 The Verona Press

ConnectVerona.com

Vacancies: Past openings had few applicants

Continued from page 1

take office until April 25 by state statute, a chance to vote on the candidates. “That original timeline was assuming the usual rela- tive lack of interest in serv- ing on the board,” Beres said, citing the low interest in the other two instances of an appointment during his time on the board. “With the high degree of interest, we definitely need breath- ing space on something like this.” The board has found it tough even to recruit can- didates to run for election, Beres said. Gauthier has said she wanted to step down after her last term ended in 2015 before she was talked into continuing with no one else on the ballot. Tamera Stanley, adminis- trative assistant to superin- tendent Dean Gorrell, noted in an email that the list was not yet final, as any appli- cations postmarked before the deadline that arrive by Wednesday will also be con- sidered. The applicants for the at-large seat, as of Mon- day afternoon, were: Lynn Vilker, Russell King, Christopher Hopp, Janet Lalor, Mylinda Heil, Kris- tina Navaro-Haffner, Matt Kleber, Sarah Gaskell and Grandau. For Gauthier’s seat, the applicants were:

Meredith Stier Christensen, Kevin Wunder and Lalor. Each candidate will get about 10 minutes to answer questions from the board, Beres said. Roberts, who earned 67 percent of the vote in his election, will not be able to ask questions at that meet- ing, but Beres said he hopes

Timeline

March 20: Joanne Gauthier resignation, April 18 date chosen March 25: Derrell Connor resignation April 8: Deadline for applications for Gauthier’s seat April 11: Deadline for applications for Connor’s seat April 18: Interviews at board meeting April 25: Noah Roberts takes office May 2: Vote on appointments

the 2015 Verona Area High School graduate will be able to attend and hear the candi- dates’ answers so he can use that information in his May 2 vote. Board policy does not indicate the exact process for filling a vacancy, other than that “candidates for a vacancy on the board should be considered at an open meeting” unless “excep- tional reasons” require a closed session. An appoint- ment also requires a major- ity vote, according to the policy, which in this case is three of the five members. Each appointment will last until the April 2017 election. “I’m hoping that whoever is chosen will contemplate running next spring,” Beres said. Gauthier resigned from her seat effective March 20. In a letter to the board, she wrote that the time com- mitment had become “over- whelming” and she needed to focus more attention on her own four children. Less than a week lat- er, Connor resigned after acknowledging he had moved out of the district boundaries. Court records related to a divorce case indicate his address changed

Applicants

AT-LARGE

Lynn Vilker Russell King Christopher Hopp Janet Lalor Mylinda Heil Kristina Navaro-Haffner Matt Kleber Sarah Gaskell Charyn Grandau

OUTSIDE CITIES OF FITCHBURG, VERONA

Meredith Stier

Christensen

Kevin Wunder

Janet Lalor

in January. Beres said the high inter- est was “great,” especially at a time when the district is working on a potential refer- endum and growth issues. “I’m gratified there’s mul- tiple candidates,” he said. “Any people, we want them to be involved and interested and help us plan the future.”

Verona Area School District

Glacier Edge teacher wins Kohl Fellowship

Recognized at luncheon this month

SCOTT GIRARD

Unified Newspaper Group

Glacier Edge Elemen- tary School kindergarten

teacher Jennifer Krantz is among a group of educa- tors recently recognized for their teaching. Krantz was selected to win one of

1 0 0

for their teaching. Krantz was selected to win one of 1 0 0 Krantz K o

Krantz

K o h l

Fellowships

in

and

ored

l u n c h e o n

last

She told the

Press she found out she was nominated last fall by her teaching teammates at GE, and after filling out some additional infor- mation, she had no idea until mid-March she was a recipient. “ T h e r e w a s a l u l l between the fall and (March 12) when I found out,” Krantz said in March. “It’s kind of been a whirl- wind since (March 12) with congratulations.” The Kohl Fellowship program “recognizes and supports teaching excel-

lence and innovation” in Wisconsin, according to the scholarship website. Fellows get $3,000 them- selves and a matching

March,

hon -

at

a

week.

Scholarship winner

Verona Area High School student Kunsang Dechen won an “initiative scholarship” last month from the Kohl Education Foundation. “Initiative Scholarship recipients, chosen by their schools, have demonstrated exceptional initiative in the classroom and have shown strong promise for succeeding in college and beyond, but have not yet received other academic-based scholarships,” a news release said.

Verona connection

Two others with a connection to Verona were among Kohl award recipients last month. Nathan Johnson, a teacher at Oregon High School who lives in Verona, was named a Kohl Fellowship winner and Steven Soeteber, a principal at Kromrey Middle School in Middleton who also lives in Verona, won a Leadership Award.

$3,000 grant for their school. “Fellowship recipients are educators who have been chosen for their supe- rior ability to inspire a love of learning in their stu- dents, their ability to moti- vate others, and their lead- ership and service within and outside the class- room,” a news release said. Krantz credited the “great group of educa- tors” she works with for the award, including the teammates who nominated her. She and the teaching team have students rotate among them so they teach their specific content areas, rather than generalizing in all subjects like many teachers do in younger grades. “That was a big part of

the innovate piece,” she said. “It really gives you the opportunity to fine-tune your craft and not necessar- ily be an expert at every- thing. I’m able to grow in the concept of math.” Krantz said the grant money will likely go toward more devices for kindergartners if the dis- trict does not get every grade to a 1-to-1 student- to-device ratio. “There are increased demands in kindergar- ten … and we’d just like to align quality apps and really move forward with the personalized learning that’s happening in our dis- trict,” she said. “We can take these apps and per- sonalize their iPad working with what scales they’re needing.”

POLICEREPORTS

All reports taken from the Verona Police Department log book.

Feb. 17 1:42 p.m. A woman noti- fied police that her dog had locked her out of her car in the 300 block of Glacier Ridge Trail, and that because the car was a 2015 model, it had no easy access to get inside. An officer transported her to her residence, where she had a spare set of keys. 3:50 p.m. A business on the 2100 block of Cty. Hwy. PB reported to police that a customer had observed what looked like drug deal take place between two men outside the business. He described them as driving a van and a Cadillac. Officers left a voicemail with the cus- tomer, and the business was able to provide a video of the alleged activity.

Feb. 18 6:57 a.m. Three tires were punctured on a car parked on the 200 block of Melody Lane. The owner of the car told police she suspected it was done by an ex boyfriend

currently attending college in Platteville. 1:40 p.m. A woman reporter her son was confronted by an adult at Valley View and South Main streets. The confronta- tion was allegedly in regard to the child bullying the adult’s own child. Police spoke with the adult, who admitted she had been “stern” but did not swear. Police warned her not to confront the child directly in the future.

Feb. 19 7:28 a.m. A woman told police her tooth was knocked loose after she was rear-end- ed by another woman at the intersection of East Verona Avenue and Maple Grove Drive. The woman said her front teeth struck the steering wheel after she was hit. The other driver was cited for inat- tentive driving. 9:34 a.m. Police responded to a fire alarm at Sugar Creek Elementary. The alarm was part of the school's monthly drill, but Principal Todd Brun- ner said the school forgot to notify the alarm company.

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The

11

Verona Press

For more sports coverage, visit:

ConnectVerona.com

Boys track and field

Off and running outdoors

JEREMY JONES

Sports editor

Verona head coach Joff Pedretti

told junior Jack Herkert before the season the only way he would let him do four events at conference is

if he could be a conference champ

in at least two and be a contender for All-Conference in the two oth- ers. Thursday night he looked to be on pace, winning all four of his events to help the Wildcats dominate Madison East, 119-18. Verona fell one point shy of the host Middleton Cardinals, though,

71-70.

Herkert continued to impress on a blustery evening. Competing in the long jump for the first time in five years, Herkert showed his explosiveness by winning with a leap of 21 feet, 9 ¾ inches. The mark was the fifth best in school history.

“Long jump is Jack’s fourth-best event,” Pedretti said. “It’s truly amazing what he is able to do.” Herkert continued to excel in the 110 hurdles as well, posting

a meet-best 14.8, which also the

fourth-fastest time in school his-

tory. The junior, who also could also

break the school high jump record this season, cleared 6-4 for first place. “We just need to see what the competition looks like as the sea- son develops and decide what we want to do with him,” Pedretti said. “Off the top of my head, I can’t think of any athlete in the Big 8 that has gone All-Confer- ence in four individual events in the same year. You might have

to go back over 10 years

maybe

longer.” Senior shot putter Reggie Cur- tis launched a three-foot PR to go over 50 feet in the team’s first out- door this meet against Middleton on a frigid Thursday night. The

this meet against Middleton on a frigid Thursday night. The Photos by Jeremy Jones Verona sprinter

Photos by Jeremy Jones

Verona sprinter Meja Maka (center) competes in the 100-meter dash Thursday at the Middleton triple dual. Maka finished sec- ond in 11.6 seconds. The Wildcats defeated 119-18, but fell 71-70 against the Cardinals.

50- feet 4 ½ feet effort helped him

become only the seventh thrower in school history to top 50 feet. “If Reggie can have that kind of performance on a cold night, I think he can go even bigger when we have a nice night,” Pedretti said. Senior Spencer Polk added the 300-intermediate hurdle title with a solid 43.2, while Corey Peder- sen took the 800 in 23.09 and T.J. Manning claimed the 3,200 in

9:59.9.

The Wildcats capped the eve- ning by taking the 4x400 relay (Meja Maka, Jacob Walton, Tim Soko and Lance Andrew) in 46.89.

Verona triple dual

Herkert cemented his legacy in the VAHS records books Tuesday evening at home against Janesville Craig and Madison La Follette.

On a night with sub 50 degree temperatures, Herkert bested VAHS alumni Andy Mussehl (2001) and Jason Tiedt (2011) by 1/4 of an inch and broke the 1974 Curtis Jones Field record set by Bill Pearson of McFarland at the Capital Conference meet. “Jack competed against four of the five top high jumpers at the West Relays and won it, so I think he’s starting to look more and more like a championship con- tender this season,” Pedretti said. Verona won both ends of the Big Eight triple dual, defeating Craig 82-64 and La Follette 90-56. Besides breaking the high jump record, Herkert added the 110- high hurdles in 15.25 and the triple jump with a leap of 43-1. Polk added the 300 hurdles in 43.12, while Hunter Bourne (115- 10) and Curtis (50 1 1/2) took the

discus and shot put, respectively. Josh Madalinski chipped in to the victory by claiming the pole vault with a height of 10-6. Manning went toe-to-toe with the state’s top two-miler (Finn

Gessner of La Follette) in the 800, finishing second with a huge 12 seconds PR (2:01.17) and later passed Gessner on the 4x400 relay anchor to help lead the team of Peter Barger, Polk and Ifediora to victory in a season-best 3:34.79. Austin Schwartz made the list for the first time in the shot put with a throw of 47-8, while Obi Ifediora moved up the VAHS all- time list in the 400 with a time of

51.07.

Verona travels to Madison Memorial’s Mansfield Stadium at 5 p.m. Monday for a triple dual with Madison West and Beloit Memorial.

Boys tennis

Verona serves up an upset against Eau Claire Memorial at invitational

JEREMY JONES

Sports editor

The Verona boys tennis team may

not have come home with the first- place trophy they were aiming for last weekend in Eau Claire, but the Wild- cats certainly served warning to the rest of the state. Verona played to a runner-up finish at the two-day Eau Claire Memorial tournament, knocking off the host and perennial powerhouse Old Abes, 4-3,

in the process. Anyone that hadn’t heard about

Will Tennison, son of Hitters

SportsPlex general manager and Hit- ters Tennis Club founder Joel Tenni- son, they were certainly served notice on Friday. Playing in just his second varsity match, the freshman took the best shot of Eau Claire Memorial senior Logan Pepperl – a seeded player at last year’s WIAA Division 1 indi- vidual state tennis tournament – and closed out the match 7-6 (4), 6-4. “When you have a kid like Will come in to your team the team always

gets noticed, especially knowing that we have Alex, Patrick and Vivek who are all great players at 2, 3 and

4 singles,” Wildcats head coach Rick

Engen said. Tennison went on to finish 2-1 on the day with his only loss of the tour- nament coming in the championship match, where he fell 6-3, 6-1 against Lakeville South’s Chase Roseth. Verona only picked up wins at No.

2 singles from Alex Pletta and from Luke Schoeberle and Chris Queoff at No. 3 doubles en route to a 5-2 loss in the championship match. Pletta gutted out a 6-4, 6-4 victory to help the Wildcats defeat the Old Abes and later took his match against Lakeville’s Hunter Roseth 3-6, 6-4,

6-3.

The Wildcats’ singles depth car- ried the team to victory, taking three of four flights against the Old Abes. Patrick Conley added a 6-4, 6-3 vic- tory against Ken Tanawattanacharoen 6-4, 6-3. “I think Will, Alex, Patrick and

Vivek and the work ethic they show on the court both in practice and play rubs off on the whole team,” Engen said. “I think it pushes all of the play- ers to perform at a higher level which they are all capable of. They all get

Turn to Tennis/Page 11

Girls track and field

Wildcats 4x400 races to third-place finish at Wisconsin State Indoor meet

JEREMY JONES

Sports editor

Junior sprinter Sie’anna Mitch- ell claimed the 100- and 200-meter dash Thursday as the Verona girls track and field team defeated Madi- son East 112-19 Thursday at the Middleton triple dual but fell one point shy of the Cardinals, 71-70.

Mitchell clocked a 12.66 in the

100 and a meet-best 26.28 in the

200.

Senior Grace Mueller added the 800 run title in 2:45.2. Verona’s lone field event victory came from freshman Ally Kunding- er, who reached 4 feet, 8 inches to win the high jump. The Wildcats all-senior 4x100

relay of Mandy Michuda, Cheyenne Trilling, Kristin Queoff and Julie Touchett posted a meet-best 53.76. Freshman Jori Walsh, sopho- more Kayla Johnson, Mueller and Kundinger closed out the meet by taking the 4x400 relay in 4:26.48

WTFA invite

Senior Lexi Alt, sophomore

Emelia Lichty, freshman Jori Walsh and junior Sie’anna Mitchell turned in the Wildcats top finish Saturday at the Wisconsin State Indoor track and field championships at UW- Whitewater. Needing a time of at least 4:35 to qualify for the prestigious invite,

Turn to Track/Page 12

Baseball

Big inning hurts in Big 8 loss

ANTHONY IOZZO

Assistant sports editor

The Verona Area High School baseball team trav- eled to Riverside Park to take on Big Eight Confer- ence rival Janesville Craig on Tuesday and fell 8-4. The Cougars scored six times in the bottom of the fifth after the Wildcats grabbed a 4-2 lead in the top half of the inning. Sophomore Stephen Lund (2-for-3) doubled home seniors Ben Rort- vedt and Keaton Knueppel (2-for-3), and Aaron Faga later singled home Lund to put the Wildcats up two. But that lead was short- lived as Janesville picked up four hits and added two runs an error. Brad Laufenberg took the loss. He allowed four

earned runs on eight hits in

4 1/3 innings, striking out three and walking five. Verona hosts Janesville Parker at 5 p.m. Thursday

at Stampfl Field and Madi- son West at 5 p.m. Friday in a make-up game from April

8 against Madison West. The Wildcats also host Beloit Memorial at 11 a.m. Saturday and travel to War- ner Park at 5 p.m. Tuesday, April 19, to take on Madi- son East.

Kaukauna DH (ppd.)

Verona’s doubleheader at Kaukauna was postponed Saturday due to snow being on the field. The Wild- cats were going to take on Kaukauna and Manitowoc, and those games have been moved to April 30.

Middleton 4, Verona 3

Verona traveled to Mid- dleton Monday in a makeup game from April 7 and fell

4-3.

Alan Roden (3-for-3) doubled home Ivan Mon- real in the bottom of the fifth, which proved to be the game-winner. Middleton led 3-0 in the top of the third, but Joey Bishop cleared the bases with a double to score Ben Rortvedt, Stephen Lund and Sam Favour to tie the game. Hunter Bindl pitched a 1-2-3 seventh to clinch the win for the Cardinals. He went two innings, striking out three and walking one. Alec Morrison picked up the win. He allowed three earned runs on seven hits in five innings, striking out seven and walking two. Keaton Knueppel (2-for- 4) took the loss for Vero- na. He allowed two earned runs on four hits in five innings, striking out seven and walking four. Reagan Klawiter pitched an inning in relief allowing a hit. He struck out one and walked one.

12

April 14, 2016 The Verona Press

ConnectVerona.com

Softball

Rudnicki leads Cats over Beloit

JEREMY JONES

Sports editor

Senior lead-off hitter Heather Rudnicki led off three times Tuesday evening, collecting a single, double and triple as the host Wildcats held off Big Eight rival Beloit Memorial, 5-4. “Beloit is always a battle and tonight was no exception,” Verona head coach Todd Ander- son said. Claire Evensen scored Rudnicki on a bunt in the first and later came home on Nicole Neit- zel’s double. Evensen then squeezed Rudnicki home in the third as she tripled. Rudnicki scored on a passed ball in the fifth. A Beloit Memorial error led to a second Verona run in the fifth and a 5-2 lead.

The Purple Knights clawed back with a run in the sixth and seventh before senior Alyssa Erdman shut the door. Coming off an injury, Erdman entered the game with the bases load- ed in the sixth and one out. Erdman only allowed one run to earn the save. Junior Quinn Nelson got the start and struck out four, while allowing two earned runs. Freshman Meghan Anderson tossed a 1/3 of a inning, but struggled with the zone. Neitzel finished 2-for-3 with a double, while teammate Taytum Geier also doubled.

Verona, Parker (ppd.)

Wet field conditions and cold temperatures led Thursday’s home opener against Janesville Parker to be rescheduled for April 22.

Boys golf

Wildcats finish ninth at Viking Invitational

ANTHONY IOZZO

Assistant sports editor

The Verona Area High School boys golf team finished ninth overall Monday at the Viking Invitational at Stoughton Country Club. The Wildcats were led by Will Zunker with an 86, while Nick Meland added an 87. Garhett Kaegi and Nick Buchert both shot 89s, while Steven Kellerman’s 94 was thrown out. Monroe’s Devon Boeck won the indi- vidual title with a 79, ahead of Stoughton’s Austin Kotlowski and McFarland’s Mat- thew Davidson (80). Milton’s AJ Gray, Ryan Nelson and Tucker Dunk all shot 81, and McFarland’s Zach Moore, Sauk Prairie’s Jordan Powell, DeForest’s Mason Brethower and Oregon’s Brandon Michek all shot 82s

to round out the top 10. Monroe (332) won the meet, while the purple Stoughton team was second with a 335. Milton was tied for third with DeForest, both shooting 336s, and McFarland was next with a 342. Verona travels to Maple Bluff Country Club at noon Monday for an invite and then hosts Beloit Memorial and Madison East in a Big Eight Conference triple dual at 2 p.m. Tuesday, April 19, at Edelweiss Golf Course.

Verona, La Follette

The Wildcats traveled to Yahara Golf Course on Tuesday to take on Madison La Follette in a Big Eight Conference dual but results were unavailable by the Verona Press’ Tuesday deadline. Look for results in next week’s paper and online at ConnectVerona.com.

Girls soccer

Cats fall to Panthers on late goal

ANTHONY IOZZO

Brien scored 47 seconds later

goal with an assist to junior

Assistant sports editor

to

lead the visiting Panthers

Kate Melin.

 

to

a 3-2 win.

Sophomore Rachel Nelson finished with three saves for Verona. Verona hosts Madison West at 7 p.m. Thursday at Reddan Soccer Park and travels to Middleton at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, April 19, at Firefighter’s Stadium/Airport Road.

The Verona Area High School girls soccer team looked like it was going to push the third-ranked Oregon Panthers to a tie Thursday at Reddan Soccer Park. Sophomore Chandler Bainbridge tied the game at 2 with less than four minutes to go, but Oregon senior Jen

Oregon junior Holly Kaboord later took a shot that was deflected to Brien. Kaboord was awarded an assist on the play. Senior Makena Fanning and junior Brittyn Flem-

ing added goals for Oregon. Verona senior Shelly Wing scored the Wildcats’ first

Tennis: Wildcats take second in Eau Claire

Continued from page 11

along so well that helps the rest of the team as well. This team seems to be a very tight- knit group.” Schoeberle and Queoff defeated Lakeville’s Cole Weitzel and Jack Zabel 7-5 7-5 to cap a perfect weekend. Verona’s No. 3 doubles team held off Memorial’s Christian

Sorenson and Avery Aultta 7-6 (1), 2-6, 10-3 and cruised against Menomonie. Matt Blessing and Jordan Hutchcroft forced a third set against Lakeville, but lost 6-2, 3-6, 6-2 at No. 1 doubles. The Wildcats return home to open the Big Eight Con- ference dual meet season at 4 p.m. Thursday against Madison West. Besides being

conference and sectional seed- ing implications. “If we continue to do that all of the other things will fall in place,” Engen said. “When we get to the point of confer- ence, subs and sectionals we will start preparing for that at that time. But for now I just want the guys to play well, play as a team and most of all have fun doing what they all

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Boys lacrosse

Verona lacrosse improves to 3-0 on season

The Verona boys lacrosse team defeated Sun Prairie 17-1 on April 7. Junior Jake Keyes led the Wildcats with five goals and five assists, while sophomore Ian Edward scored three goals and added two assists. Sophomore Graham Sticha chipped in two goals and a pair of assists and junior Pat- rick Stigsell scored once and set up another. Senior Noah Mauer also scored twice, while senior Peter Christian, senior Josh Novotny, senior Brycen Smith and junior Henry Smith each scored once. Sophomore Jake Doerfler

and freshman Logan Peter- son set up a goal. Senior Alex Jones made two saves and let in a goal, while Cameron Corless stopped the only shot he faced. Sticha and Novotny each scored four goals and assisted on another Saturday as the Wildcats defeated Appleton

17-1.

Junior Patrick Stigsell add- ed three goals and an assist. Junior Jake Keyes scored twice and chipped in a pair of assists Sophomore Ian Edwards posted a pair of goals and added an assist.

Senior Dominic Sabbarese and Smith each had a goal and an assist. Verona added a 15-6 win over Kettle Moraine on Sat- urday. Keyes scored four times and assisted on another, while Novonty scored four times. Sophomore Ian Edwards also posted three goals. Verona played Janesville Craig on Tuesday. Results will be in next week’s Vero- na Press. The Wildcats host the Madison West/Edgewood Regents at 5 p.m. Thursday, April 21.

Track: Sprinters lead the way in triple dual

Continued from page 11

the Wildcats were seeded fourth in the fastest heat of the day and went on to posted a time of 4 min- utes, 13.82 seconds to fin- ish third. Whitefish Bay (4:08.4) and Kaukauna (4:10.02) clocked the top two times. “To finish third out a meet which features 50 or 60 schools and all three divisions was pretty impres- sive,” Wildcats head coach Mark Happel said. Verona, which finished tied for 26 out of the 44 teams competing with sev- en points, saw its only other point come from senior Europa Christoffel, who

was the final long jump competitor to score, taking eighth place with her leap of 16 feet, 11 ½ inches.

Verona triple dual

Verona hosted Janesville Craig and Madison La Fol- lette in a Big 8 triple dual Tuesday and took both ends fairly easily. Led by 1-2-3 sweeps in the 100, 200 and 800, the Wildcats defeated Janes- ville Craig 87-55 and Madi- son La Follette 94-46. Mitchell led the way for Verona in the 100 (12.9) and 200 (26.6), while Walsh PRed with a time of 2:35.2 to lead the charge in the 800. Annika Larsen and Alt,

also PRed, adding the 300- low hurdle (52.7) and pole vault (9-6) titles, respec- tively. The Wildcats’ other win came via Kailey Olson, who won the high jump with a clearance of 5 feet. “I was very pleased with the performance. We’re getting better every day and progressing nicely as a team,” Happel said. Verona will be on the road for the rest of the sea- son now, starting with a triple dual against Madison West and Beloit Memorial at 5 p.m. next Monday. “Our sprinters are defi- nitely going to be pushed by Beloit and they are looking forward to it,” Happel said.

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ConnectVerona.com April 16, 2015 The Verona Press 13 Spring Sports Guide 2016
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April 16, 2015 The Verona Press
13
Spring Sports Guide 2016

Baseball

Experience puts Cats in contention

Verona returns 11 in quest to make third straight sectional final

ANTHONY IOZZO

Assistant sports editor

After finishing WIAA Divi- sion 1 sectional runner-up two straight seasons, the Verona Area High School baseball team looks to take one more step this season and make it back to state for the first time since 2011. “I believe our experience will help,” head coach Brad D’Orazio wrote in a questionnaire to the Press. “Last year we had one freshman and three sophomores contribute substantially.” Seniors Keaton Knuep - pel (pitcher) and Ben Rortvedt (catcher) – four-year starters and NCAA DI recruits – lead 11 returners for the Wildcats. Rortvedt hit .413 last season and collected five home runs and 25 RBIs. He was named first- team All-Big Eight Conference, first-team All-State and first-team Louisville Slugger All-American. Knueppel was 8-2 with a 1.26 ERA in 61 innings pitched, strik- ing out 78. He also hit .293 and collected seven doubles. Knuep- pel was first-team all-conference last season. Sophomore Stephen Lund is also back this season. He hit .333 with a home run, eight doubles and 14 RBIs as a second-team all- conference selection. Seniors Jason Frahm (.267 bat- ting average) and Sam Favour (.284 batting average) and juniors Tyler McClure (.243 batting average), Jacob Slonim (.371 batting average, three doubles, one triple) and Brad Laufenberg (1-2, 2.54 ERA, two saves, 30.1 innings pitched and 31 strikeouts) are also back. Also returning are Luis Acosta (outfielder), Jeff Bishop (pitch- er/infielder), Evan Fernandez (pitcher/outfielder) and Josh Hano (infielder). The newcomers to varsity are Reagen Klawiter (pitcher/

The newcomers to varsity are Reagen Klawiter (pitcher/ Photo by Brad D’Orazio The returning letterwinners for

Photo by Brad D’Orazio

The returning letterwinners for the Verona Area High School baseball team (front, from left) are: Ben Rortvedt, Keaton Knueppel and Sam Favour; (back) Brad Laufenberg, Evan Fernandez, Jacob Slonim, Luis Acosta, Josh Hano, Tyler McClure, Stephen Lund and Jason Frahm.

outfielder), Jared Grassman (catcher), RJ Woppert (infielder), Luke Frahm (infielder), Noah Anderson (outfielder) and Aaron Faga (infielder).

Conference preview

The Wildcats finished 17-11 overall (10-8 Big Eight Conference) last season, taking fourth in the con- ference behind Janesville Craig (17-1), Sun Prai- rie (13-5) and Janesville Parker (12-6). Despite losing first-team- ers Nick Blomgren (infielder), Alex Marro (pitcher), Kevin Brandt (infielder), McCauley Cox (infielder) and JT Smithback (DH), the Cougars are still picked to be at the top of the conference. In this year’s preseason picks, Verona was picked to take third

behind Sun Prairie and Janesville Craig, respectively, but D’Orazio said he hopes to contend for a conference title. The Cardinals’ top return- ers are Marquis Reuter (first- team infielder) and Ben Hauser (second-team utility), while Janesville Parker brings back Hunter Van Zan- dt (honorable mention pitcher). Janesville Craig’s top returner is Evan Spry (first-team infielder). Beloit Memorial (9-9) is led by Kevin Raisbeck (second- team infielder), while Madison East (1-17) has Cameron Cratic (first-team outfielder) and Dono- van Tomony (honorable mention infielder) back. Madison Memorial (8-10), M a d i s o n W e s t ( 8 - 1 0 ) a n d

Memorial (8-10), M a d i s o n W e s t ( 8 -

Middleton (7-11) were also in the middle of the pack last season and will be looking to move up the standings. Verona hosts Parker at 5 p.m. Thursday and travels to Riverside Park to take on Parker at 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 10. The Wildcats hosts Sun Prairie at 5 p.m. Tues- day, April 26, and travel to Sun Prairie at 5 p.m. Tuesday, May

24.

Verona hosts Janesville Craig at 11 a.m. Saturday, May 7. Some of the top non-conference games are against 2015 Bad- ger South champion Oregon at 5 p.m. Friday, April 29, at Stampfl Field, and at Hartland Arrowhead in a doubleheader at 11 a.m. Sat- urday, April 23. V e r o n a a l s o t r a v e l s t o Kaukauna for a doubleheader at 11 a.m. Saturday, April 30.

Boys tennis

Verona among favorites in its sectional

JEREMY JONES

Sports editor

With eight returning start-

ers and the addition of two

solid freshman, the Verona

boys tennis team figures to

be among the Big Eight Con-

ference

W I A A

Division 1

and

be among the Big Eight Con- ference W I A A Division 1 and M a

M

a d i s o n

M

e m o r i a l

sectional

favorites

this season.

The Wildcats finished

15-11 overall and 7-2 in the

Big Eight before going on to

place a disappointing seventh

at the Madison Memorial sec-

tional meet last year. Madison West won the

sectional on a tiebreaker over Madison Memorial and went

on

to lose 6-1 to Middleton in

the

quarterfinals at state.

The Regents will have an uphill battle if they wish to defend their sectional title

after graduating half of its sin- gles and doubles lineup. Madison Memorial returns one of the top No. 1 singles players in the conference in sophomore Colt Tegtmeir,

but

the strength of the rest of

the

singles lineup has yet to

be

determined. The Spartans

lost

their No. 3 singles player

and

No. 1 doubles team and

half

of the No. 2 team.

While Tegtmeir is the top

returning No. 1 singles player

in the Big Eight after Middle-

ton two-time state champion

Jake Van Emburgh left to attend the prestigious IMG Academy in Bradenton, Fla.,

Turn to Tennis/Page 16

Softball

Leadership, talent aim to carry Wildcats back to state

JEREMY JONES

Sports editor

Verona Area High School softball coach Todd Anderson, who has coached 14 sea- sons, including the last seven at Verona, col- lected his 200th coaching victory last season as the Wildcats played to an 18-8 record. The team failed to reach its ulti- mate goal of getting back to the WIAA Division 1 state tourna- ment, however, being stunned 6-1 by Madison East in the sectional quarterfinals. Center fielder and lead-hitter senior Heath- er Rudnicki is one of the unquestioned lead- ers of a Wildcats’ team looking to lead the Wildcats back to Goodman Diamond in June. Also a volleyball and girls basketball standout, Rudnicki helped lead both teams to state, including a state title for the Lady

Wildcats this past winter. One of the fastest girls on the team, Rud- nicki lead the team with 26 stolen bases (she was only caught twice). The speedy slap hit- ter posted a near .500 on base percentage and finished second on the team with 33 runs scored. Fellow senior Nicole Neitzel is a four-year starter, who split time behind the plate and at third base last season. Neitzel finished second on the team with 36 RBIs while batting .425 last year. With the graduation of standout Kori Keyes, now playing at the Uni- versity of Evansville, Neitzel is expected to move over to shortstop this season. “Nicole is extremely athletic, has defen- sive versatility and looks to improve as a power hitter this year,” Anderson said. A first-team all-conference player and

Turn to Softball/Page 16

all-conference player and Turn to Softball /Page 16 Photo by Jeremy Jones Returning letterwinners for the
all-conference player and Turn to Softball /Page 16 Photo by Jeremy Jones Returning letterwinners for the

Photo by Jeremy Jones

Returning letterwinners for the Verona Area High School softball team (front, from left) are: Quin Nelson, Savannah Rainey, Claire Nelson and Nicole Neitzel; (back) Taytum Geier, Emma Kleinsek, Heather Rudnicki, Alyssa Erdman and Emily Osiecki.

14 April 14, 2016 The Verona Press

Spring Sports Guide

ConnectVerona.com

Boys track and field

Cats return to the track in search of stronger finish than last season

JEREMY JONES

Sports editor

The Verona boys track and field cross country team returns a solid core from a year ago in just about every event. With that depth the Wildcats are hoping to contend atop the Big Eight Confer- ence. Leading the way for Verona once again should be junior high jumper, hurdler and triple jumper Jack Herkert. A year removed from tying for 17th- place at state in the high jump, Herkert moved up to second on the VAHS all- time at the Madison West Invitational, clearing 6-foot, 7-inches. Herkert is also a returning all-confer- ence athlete in the triple jump and a con- ference medalist in the 110 hurdles. The Wildcats return two Big Eight

hurdle medalists in Jared Biddle (100 hurdles) and Spencer Polk (110, 300 hur- dles). Both Herkert and Biddle have gotten off to strong starts already this season, topping Steve McKeon’s 16-year-old VAHS return in the 55-meter hurdles during the indoor season. Verona returns half of its 10th-place 4x200 state relay in brothers Chudi and Obi Ifediora. Both also return all-confer- ence athletes in the 4x400. Chudi, who moved up to third on the VAHS all-time 55-meter dash already during the indoor season, is a returning conference medalist in the 200, while earning all-conference honors on the 4x100. Obi earned a conference medal in the 400. Verona returns a pair of all-conference

Turn to Boys track/Page 17

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Girls track and field

• www.culvers.com adno=462048-01 Girls track and field Photo by Jeremy Jones Returning letterwinners for the

Photo by Jeremy Jones

Returning letterwinners for the Verona Area High School girls track team (front, from left) are: Emily Ford, Kayla Johnson, *Sarah Berry and Zoe Connor; (second row) Teeasia Hoye, Kirsten Queoff, Europa Christoffel, Emelia Lichty, Sie’anna Mitchell, Lexi Alt and Preston Ploc; (third row) Kylie Schmaltz, Kailey Olson, Cheyenne Trilling, Cassie Hei, Autumn Gaillard and Casilda Rojas-Bragg; (back) Brianna Mackesey, Carissa Witthuhn, Grace Mueller, Annika Larson, Grace Schraufnagel and *Tamara Schmook. *Did not letter last year.

Sprint relays enter season with lofty goals

JEREMY JONES

Sports editor

Sprint relays were undoubtedly the strong point of the Verona

girls track and field team last year, reaching the WIAA Division 1 state meet in both the 4x100- and 4x200-meter relays. Seniors Lexy Alt and Kylie Schmaltz return from a ninth-place finish in the 4x100 along with junior

Sie’anna Mitchell. The threesome is also back for the 4x200 where they combined for a 19th-place finish. The Wildcats graduated state qualifier Shannon Kerrigan from both relays. Sophomore Emelia Lichty has looked strong, stepping in to replace Kerrigan so far this season. Sophomore sprinters Zoe

Connor and Julia Rimkus should also add depth this year. Alt, who also contributes in the pole vault, joined Lichty and Cheyenne Trilling to finish fifth at section- als in the 4x400 last year. Vero- na will have to go without mid- dle distance runner and 4x400 teammate Kristi Larsen, however. Larsen finished one spot shy of state in the 400 last season. Sophomore distance runner Kayla John- son finished a little more than three sec- onds off the state-qualifying time in the 1,600 run last year, taking fourth place. Junior high jumper Kailey Olson missed state by two inches last season, finishing fourth at sectionals. She enters this season with her focus on reaching the state meet in

Turn to Girls track/Page 17

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Spring Sports Guide

April 14, 2016 The Verona Press

15

Girls soccer

Boys golf

April 14, 2016 The Verona Press 15 Girls soccer Boys golf Photo by Jen Faulkner The

Photo by Jen Faulkner

The returning letterwinners for the Verona Area High School girls soccer team (front, from left) are:

Bella Genova, Emily Krogman, Kate Melin, Rachel Knoebl, Anna Heizen and Bobo Zaugg; (middle) Shelly Wing, Jill Ybanez, Lauren Hahn and Rachel Nelson; (back) Ellery Rourke, Chandler Bainbridge, Makenna McGilvray and Dani Gilboy.

Experience rules the pitch for Verona

ANTHONY IOZZO

Assistant sports editor

The Verona Area High School girls soccer team

looks to move up the standings in 2016 with 18 returning letterwin- ners – including seniors Shelly Wing (forward/

m i d f i e l d e r ) ,

Ellery Rourke (forward), Bobo Zaugg (forward), Bella Genova (mid- fielder), Emily Krogman

(midfielder, second-team),

M a k e n n a M c G i l v r a y

(defender) and Alexandria Ortgiesen (forward/mid- fielder). Also back are juniors Camille Dalma (goalie), Rachel Knoebl (midfield- er), Dani Gilboy (mid- fielder/defender), Kate Melin (forward/midfielder, honorable mention) and Jillian Ybanez (midfielder, defender); and sophomores Rachel Nelson (goalie), Megan Krogman (mid- fielder/defender), Anna Heizen (defender, second- team), Alejandra Tlahuel (forward/midfielder), Chandler Bainbridge (for- ward/midfielder) and Lau- ryn Hahn (forward/mid- fielder). Sophomore Ashley Hof- stetter and freshmen Julia

Gilboy and Nicole Thomas are newcomers to varsity this season. “We have added some strong new players to our roster and expect big things from them,” head coach Jennifer Faulkner wrote in a questionnaire to the Press. “We

have a versatile group of players, and many of them play in multiple positions on our field. The team is training hard and has high expectations for the upcoming season.” Emily Krogman led the Wildcats with 13 goals and three assists last season, while Melin had 12 goals and three assists. Wing added four goals and an assist, while Dani Gilboy and Bainbridge picked up three goals and three assists each. Graduated from last sea- son are Ari Makuch (hon- orable mention forward), Erica Higgins (midfielder) and Teeghan Tvedt (first- team midfielder/defender). Tvedt had seven goals and six assists last season, while Makuch finished with five goals and two assists.

Conference preview

Faulkner said the Big

and two assists. Conference preview Faulkner said the Big Eight Conference is going to be as

Eight Conference is going to be as tough as ever this season, as even the teams that lose players usually have replacements ready to go in the program. Verona (5-3-1) finished with 16 points to take fifth behind co-champions Madison Memorial (8-1, 24 points) and Middleton (8-1, 24 points), Madison West (7-1-1, 22 points) and Sun Prairie (6-3, 18 points). In the Big Eight, a win is worth three points, while a tie is worth one. Madison Memorial’s top returners are senior sec- ond-team defender Maya Gomez, and senior sec- ond-team goalie Sydney Stroud. The Spartans lose first- team forward Gabriel Lemkuil, first-team mid- fielder Carly Wilson and first-team defender Shalla Moy. Middleton’s top return- ers are junior first-team forward Kristen Reikers- dorfer and senior second- team midfielder Grace Douglas.

Turn to Soccer/Page 17

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Photo by Jon Rebholz

The returning letterwinners for the Verona Area High School boys golf team (from left) are: Nick Meland, Will Zunker, Garrett Kaegi and Steven Kellerman.

Cats look to better in 2016 with four back

ANTHONY IOZZO

Assistant sports editor

The Verona Area High School boys golf team looks to have a better sea- son in the Big Eight Con- ference and in the sec- tional this year with four returners from last year’s team. Senior Nick Meland (low-80s average), juniors Will Zunker (mid-80s average) and Steven Kellerman (mid-80s average) and sophomore Garrett Kaegi (mid-80s aver- age) are all back with valuable experience. “As usual much will depend on

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The Wildcats’ lone loss to graduation was Big Eight Conference honorable men- tion Austin Lois. Lois was the lone Wildcat to make sectionals last season.

Lois was the lone Wildcat to make sectionals last season. m u c h Conference preview

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Conference preview

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Spring Sports Guide

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Tennis: Cats look to top Middleton for first time in Big 8

Continued from page 13

the Wildcats hope to also be in that discussion regardless of who ends up playing No. 1 singles. Senior Alex Pletta, who played No. 1 singles last year, just missed the state tournament last year, falling to Oregon’s Calvin Schnei- der. Pletta will move down a spot to No. 2 singles with the addition of freshman Will Tennison at No. 1 singles. Senior Patrick Conley has improved over each of the last three seasons. The Wild- cats’ No. 2 singles player last year, what happens atop the singles lineup could push Conley down the lineup over to the doubles side. Sophomore Vivek Swami- nath continues to get better and should round out a very talented singles line-up at No. 4 singles. Senior Jonah Gerrits played No. 4 singles last year, but he and Matt Happel start this season on JV as the 11th and 12th players. “They will play JV dur- ing the dual meets, but travel with the varsity team for tournaments,” Engen said. “Their roles are to be pre- pared to step into a varsity role if needed.” Mitch Kealy and Luke Schoeberle return as sea- soned varsity doubles players as does sophomore Jordan Hutchcroft. “Mitch is a steady player, who wants to finish strong in his senior year, and Luke

Softball: Verona looks to top Madison East, Janesville Craig in Big 8

Continued from page 13

honorable mention, All- District selection, Neitzel will continue her career at UW-Whitewater following graduation. Savanna Rainey split time between third and catcher with Neitzel last season. Rainey earned sec- ond-team all-conference honors. Looking to continue her playing days after high school, she has drawn the interest of several of the nation’s top collegiate soft- ball programs. Neitzel and Rainey are the only returning starters for the Wildcats’ infield following the graduation of Steph Keryluk and Keyes. How Verona fares this season has a lot to do with how quickly the team can come together and fill in for those missing pieces. Still, the biggest key to success for the Wildcats could be the development of senior pitcher Alyssa Erdman and junior Quin Nelson. Erdman, who may play collegiately at St. Thom- as following this season, earned a first-team all- conference nod last season. She led the team with a 2.64 ERA and a 14-4 record last season.

led the team with a 2.64 ERA and a 14-4 record last season. Photo by Jeremy

Photo by Jeremy Jones

Returning letterwinners for the Verona boys tennis team (front, from left) are: Luke Schoeberle, Vivek Swaminath, Jonah Gerrits and Mitch Kealy; (back) Matt Blessing, Alex Pletta, Connor Melzer, Patrick Conley and Jordan Hutchcroft.

will be a strong doubles part- ner no matter who he plays with this year,” Wildcats head coach Rick Engen said. “Jordan is a very talented young player who continues to improve.” Doubles player Matt Blessing is also back. Freshman Chris Queoff figures to break into the var- sity line-up this year. Class- mate Kevin Fan could pos- sibly play his way into some

varsity action. “We have a lot of play- ers who will vie for a var- sity spot this year and will continue to push their team- mates, which will make us even stronger,” Engen said. While Middleton has dominated the Big Eight, and even though the Cardinals return their No. 1 and 2 dou- bles teams, they graduated three-fourths of their singles lineup.

Verona has never beaten Middleton since moving to the Big Eight. “I think we line up with them very well and have a good chance at taking that match. I think our singles line up is good enough to win at least three out of four flights and doubles should be set to take two out of the three,” Engen said of Mid- dleton. “We see them soon so it will be fun.”

Nelson posted a 2.96 ERA in spot starts. Sophomore Emma Klein- sek is the Wildcats other returning starter in the out- field. Kleinsek came out of nowhere last season to lead the team in triples on her way to first-team all-confer- ence honors and honorable mention all-district honors. As a freshman, she fin- ished second on the team with a .476 batting average, 5.21 on-base percentage and seven home runs. She was one of 26 final- ists last summer in Major League Baseball’s Pitch, Hit and Run contest and competed at the MLB All- Star game festivities in Cin- cinnati. F r e s h m a n M o l l y McChesney looks to keep the Wildcats’ streak of tal- ented underclassmen start- ers contributing on varsity right away alive and well, working her way into the lineup at either third base or shortstop. While just how good Verona can be is a long way from decided, Madison East will likely be strong, while Janesville Craig may challenge for the top spot behind good pitching from all-district first-team starter Jenna Brandt, Anderson said.

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Spring Sports Guide

April 14, 2016 The Verona Press 17

Boys track: Depth to be an asset for Verona this season

Continued from page 14

medalists in Reggie Curtis (shot put) and Hunter Bourne (discus). Curtis already went 50 feet in the team’s first outdoor this meet against Middleton on a frigid night. Other returning letterwin- ners for the Wildcats are Brady Traeder (distance), T.J. Man- ning (distance), Tony Was- chbusch (distance), Austin Schwartz (sprints), Lance Andrew (sprints), Clayton Jan- nusch (sprints), Robbie Freitag (throws), Josh Madalinski (pole vault), Karlis Kalnins (high jump) and Paul Kalifatidi (hur- dles). Verona graduated several tal- ented athletes following last sea- son that will need to be replaced, including two-time 3,200 state runner-up Ryan Nameth, who is now running at UW-Madison. Also gone are graduated state qualifiers Noah Roberts (shot

Also gone are graduated state qualifiers Noah Roberts (shot Photo by Jeremy Jones Returning letterwinners for

Photo by Jeremy Jones

Returning letterwinners for the Verona boys track and field team (front, from left) are: Austin Schwartz, Lance Andrew, Josh Madalinski, Brady Traeder and Karlis Kalnins; (middle) Corey Pedersen, Tony Waschbusch, Chudi Ifediora, Jared Biddle, Spencer Polk, Peter Barger and Obi Ifediora; (back) Reggie Curtis, Robbie Freitag, TJ Manning, Paul Kalifatidi and Jack Herkert.

put and discus) as well Cameron Tindall (100, 4x400) and Jacob Auman (4x400).

Sprinter Carson Parks did not return this spring, choosing rather to focus on powerlifting

competitions. Hurdler Luquant Singh also didn’t return.

Girls track: Cats look to be in upper half of Big Eight Conference

Continued from page 14

this season with her focus on reaching the state meet in La Crosse in June. Senior Europa Christoffel finished sev- enth at sectionals in the triple jump last season and seventh in the 100 hurdles at regionals. She missed sectionals by one spot, taking fifth in the long jump at regionals. Senior thrower Carissa Witthuhn

returns as the Wildcats’ top shot put and discus athlete. Junior Grace Schraufnagel and senior Julia Ver Voort should add depth. Senior Grace Mueller (middle dis- tance), Mitchell, Trilling and Schraufna- gel return off a state-champion girls bas- ketball season. Other returning letterwinners include senior Kirsten Queoff (pole vault), senior Autumn Gaillard (jumps) and sophomore

Annika Larson (high jump). Verona finished 7-2 in the dual meet season, placing third in the Big Eight. Sun Prairie, Beloit Memorial and Mid- dleton are the teams to beat this season, Wildcats head coach Mark Happel said. “Hopefully we can finish in the upper half at the conference meet,” Happel said. “We have a lot of girls on the team with a strong core of senior athletes to lead the team.”

Soccer: Cats look to compete in tough Big 8 Conference

Continued from page 15

The Cardinals lose second-team for- ward Macey Kalscheur, first-team mid- fielder Megan Sullivan, honorable men- tion midfielder Emily Krueger, first- team defender Ashley Stahnke, second- team defender Maddy Schachte and hon- orable mention defender Lia Passini. Madison West’s top returners are sophomore first-team forward Claire Mooney, senior honorable mention for- ward Anali Osorio, senior first-team midfielder Patty Grimmer, senior sec- ond-team midfielder Laura Kiernan, senior honorable mention midfielder Simo Bambi and sophomore honorable mention defender Sophia Reddan. The Regents lose first-team defender Mika Miyamoto and honorable mention defender Josie Person. Sun Prairie’s top returners are junior honorable mention forward Hannah Zacher, junior second-team midfielder Lydia Jacobson, junior honorable men- tion midfielder Anja Von Klopp, senior first-team defender Sophia Salvatore and junior honorable mention defender Mad- eline Schellpfeffer. The Cardinals didn’t graduate anyone named to the all-conference list. Verona hosts Madison West at 7 p.m. Thursday at Reddan Soccer Park and travels to Middleton at 7:30 p.m. Tues- day, April 19, at Firefighter’s Park/Air- port Road. The Wildcats host Sun Prairie at 7 p.m. Tuesday, May 17, and Madison Memorial at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 19.

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NOTICE

The City of Verona Plan Commission will hold Public Hearings on Monday May 2, 2016 at City Hall, 111 Lincoln Street, for the following planning and zoning mat-

ters: 1) Conditional Use Permit for a pro- posed Indoor Commercial Entertainment land use, known as Arby’s Restaurant, to be located at 631 Hometown Circle. 2) Conditional Use Permit for a pro- posed 9,400 square foot group daycare center to be located at 200 Keenan Court. 3) Conditional use permit for a pro- posed 147-unit personal storage facility to be located at 1010 Solar Court. Interested persons may comment on these planning and zoning matters during the public hearings at the May 2nd Plan Commission meeting. The Plan Commission will make recommendations for these matters, which will then be re- viewed by the Common Council for final decisions on Monday, May 9th. Contact Adam Sayre, Director of Planning and Development, at 608-848- 9941 for more information on these items or to receive copies of the submittals. Ellen Clark City Clerk Published: April 14 and 21, 2016 WNAXLP

* * *

CITY OF VERONA MINUTES COMMON COUNCIL MARCH 14, 2016 VERONA CITY HALL

1. Council President Doyle called the

meeting to order at 7:04 p.m.

Pledge of Allegiance Roll call: Alderpersons L. Diaz, J.

Linder, M. McGilvray, H. Reekie, B. Stiner and E. Touchett present. Alderperson D. Yurs and Mayor Hochkammer absent and excused. Also in attendance: City Administrator B. Burns, City Engineer J.

2.

3.

Montpas, City Planner A. Sayre, City At- torney Brian Kleinmaier, Parks Director D. Walker and City Clerk E. Clark.

4. Public Comment:

None

5. Approval of Minutes from the Feb-

ruary 22, 2016 Common Council Meeting:

Motion by Reekie, seconded by Diaz, to

approve the minutes of the February 22, 2016 Common Council meeting. Motion carried 6-0.

6. Mayor’s Business:

None

7. Administrator’s Report:

A. The State Senate is meeting for

the last session day this year on march 15, 2016.

B. The city has received two propos-

als for rehabilitation of the Matt’s House property.

C. Alderperson Dale Yurs has re-

signed from the Common Council, as he

is moving from out of the city.

8. Engineer’s Report:

9. Committee Reports:

A. Planning Commission

(1) Discussion and Possible Action Re: Resolution R-16-004 Approving a Conditional Use Permit for a 7,182 Square Foot Multi-Tenant Building to be Located at

631 Hometown Circle that will Include a Drive-up Window and an Outdoor Patio. Motion by Linder, seconded by Reekie,

to approve a Conditional Use Permit for

a 7,182 Square Foot Multi-Tenant Build-

ing to be Located at 631 Hometown Circle that will Include a Drive-up Window and an Outdoor Patio. Motion carried 6-1. (2) Discussion and Possible Action Re: Ordinance 16-870 Amending Section

13-2-5© of the Code of Ordinances, City

of Verona, Wisconsin to modify the City’s

Floodplain Zoning Ordinance for Flood

Insurance Study Maps. Motion by Linder, seconded by McGilvray, to approve Ordi-

nance 16-870 Amending Section 13-2-5(c)

of the Code of Ordinances, City of Vero-

na, Wisconsin to Modify the City’s Flood- plain Zoning Ordinance for Flood Insur- ance Study Maps. Motion carried 6-0.

B. Finance Committee (1) Discussion and Possible Action Re: Payment of Bills. Motion by McGil-

vray, seconded by Linder, to pay the bills in the amount of $911,088.78. Motion car-

ried 6-0. (2) Discussion and Possible Action Re: Resolution R-16-005 Approving a First Addendum to the Commercial Lease Agreement with the Redeemer Bible Fel- lowship for the Property Located at 130

North Franklin Street. Motion by McGil- vray, seconded by Linder, to approve a

First Addendum to the Commercial Lease

Agreement with the Redeemer Bible Fel- lowship for the Property Located at 130 North Franklin Street. Motion carried 6-0.

C. Public Works/Sewer and Water

Committee (1) Discussion and Possible Action

Re: Approval of a Contract for the 2016 Street Rehabilitation Project. Motion by

Touchett, seconded by McGilvray, to ap-

prove a Contract for the 2016 Street Re-

habilitation Project. The committee rec-

ommends awarding the contract to the low bidder, Raymond P. Catell, Inc., in the amount of $633,675. Motion carried 6-0. (2) Discussion and Possible Action Re: Resolution ^-16-006 approving the Release of Development Agreements Between Anorev, LLC and the City of Verona. Motion by Touchett, seconded by McGilvray, to approve the Release of

Development Agreements Between An-

orev, LLC and the City of Verona. Motion carried 6-0. Council President Doyle requested unanimous consent of the Council to

take Agenda Item C.(3) out of order. There were no members objecting.

D. Park, Recreation and Forestry

Commission (1) Discussion and Possible Action Re: An Application for Verona to Become an Ice Age Trail Community. Motion by Reekie, seconded by Stiner, to approve

An Application for Verona to Become an Ice Age Trail Community. Motion carried

6-0. C. Public Works/Sewer and Water

Committee (3) Discussion and Possible Action Re: Negotiating Strategy for a Pre-Annex- ation Agreement for Property Located in the City’s North Neighborhood Area. Mo- tion by Touchett, seconded by McGilvray, to go into closed session as authorized by Section 19.85(1)(e) of the Wisconsin Statutes for the purpose of deliberating or negotiating the purchase of public

properties, the investing of public funds, or conducting other specified business, whenever competitive or bargaining reasons require a closed session. The Common Council may reconvene in open session. The Council convened in closed session at 7:27 p.m. The Council recon-

vened in open session. No action was taken in closed session.

10. New Business

A. Discussion and Possible Action

Re: Approval of Operator Licenses. Mo- tion by Touchett, seconded by McGilvray, to approve the Operator Licenses for Jack O’Bryan at Treads, Lucas Foley at Grays Tied House, Samuel Vanderbush

at Francois Oil, Paul Tourdof at Kwik Trip #456, and Abby Jakowski & Mikaela Eh- rke at Toot & Kates. Motion carried 6-0.

11. Announcements:

A. Clerk Clark clarified that the Mark

Tuescher, d/b/a Treads, “Class B” liquor license is not a Reserve license, but a regular “Class B” liquor license.

B. Alderperson Stiner stated that

winter parking regulations are still in place, and congratulated the Verona Area

School District’s girls’ basketball team for winning the state basketball tourna- ment.

C. Council President Doyle thanked

Alderperson Yurs for his years of service on the Council, and wished him well.

12.

Adjournment:

Motion by Touchett, seconded by Reekie, to adjourn at 8:20 p.m. Motion carried 6-0.

City Clerk

Ellen Clark

Published: April 14, 2016 WNAXLP

* * *

CITY OF VERONA MINUTES COMMON COUNCIL MARCH 28, 2016 VERONA CITY HALL

1. Mayor Hochkammer called the meeting to order at 7:04 p.m.

2. Pledge of Allegiance

3. Roll call: Alderpersons L. Diaz, L.

Doyle, J. Linder, H. Reekie and B. Stiner present. Alderpersons M. McGilvray and

E. Touchett absent and excused. Alder-

manic District 2 seat vacant. Also in at- tendance: B. Burns, City Administrator;

J. Montpas, City Engineer; and E. Clark,

City Clerk.

4. Public Comment:

None

5. Approval of Minutes from the March 14, 2016 Common Council Meet- ing: Motion by Reekie, seconded by

Doyle, to approve the minutes of the March 14, 2016 Common Council meet- ing. Motion carried 5-0.

6. Mayor’s Business:

None

7. Administrator’s Report:

A. Mr. Burns stated that he has given

his resignation as City Administrator for the City of Verona, and has taken a po-

sition as Finance Director for the City of

Middleton.

8. Engineer’s Report:

9. Committee Reports:

A. Finance Committee

(1) Discussion and Action Re: Pay- ment of Bills. Motion by Doyle, seconded

by Linder, to pay the bills in the amount

of $243,666.16. Motion carried. (2) Discussion and Action Re: Pro-

posal from Public Administration Asso-

ciates (PAA) for the City of Verona Ad- ministrator Recruitment Process. Mayor Hochkammer has received a proposal from Public Administration Associates (PAA) to conduct a recruitment process for the City Administrator position, for a cost of $7,500 plus expenses. Motion by

Doyle, seconded by Linder, to approve a proposal from Public Administration As- sociates (PAA) to conduct a recruitment process for the City Administrator posi-

tion, for a cost of $7,500 plus expenses, and that the Personnel Committee work with the Mayor to expedite the process. Motion Carried 5-0.

10. New Business:

A. Discussion and Action Re: Pro-

cess for Filling the City Council Vacancy.

The council seat for District 2, formerly held by Dale Yurs, is vacant. An appoint-

ment can be made for the vacant seat, or

a special election can be held in Novem- ber, 2016. In either case, the seat will be

up for consideration of election in April,

2017. Mayor Hochkammer stated it is im-

portant that the District 2 seat not remain

open for an extended period of time, and asked any interested parties to contact him with a letter of interest. Motion by Linder, seconded by Doyle, to approve the Mayor, Council President and the other District 2 Alderperson to interview candidates for the vacant Alderperson

seat, and make a recommendation to the

Common Council. Motion carried 5-0.

B. Discussion and Possible Action

Re: Approval of Operator Licenses. Mo-

tion by Reekie, seconded by Doyle, to ap- prove operator licenses as read by City Clerk Clark.

11. Announcements:

A. The annual organizational meet-

ing will be held on April 19, 2016 at 7:00

p.m. 12. Adjournment:

by

Reekie, to adjourn at 7:24 p.m. Motion carried 5-0.

Ellen Clark

City Clerk

Published: April 14, 2016 WNAXLP

Motion

by

Linder,

seconded

* * *

18

April 14, 2016 The Verona Press

ConnectVerona.com

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342 Boats & accessories

FOR SALE!! Sylvan Profisherman Boat 16 feet 1990. 60HP Johnson Motor, Shorelander Trailer, Trolling Motor/cover, Water Skiing equipment included. Good Condition/Very Clean $8,200 Phone

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355 recreational Vehicles

FOR SALE!!! 2002 Four Seasons Motorhome. 29 Feet long. 58233 miles. New tires/awning/trailer hitch. Many other Extras!!! Good Condition/very clean $22,500 Phone 1-608-291-0088

402 help Wanted, General

DISHWASHER, COOK, WAITRESS, & DELI STAFF WANTED. Applications available at Sugar & Spice Eatery. 317 Nora St. Stoughton.

EXCLUSIVELY ROSES is seeking driv- ers for Mother's Day deliveries May 5th 6th and 7th. Routes go to Chicagoland. $200/route + gas. Drivers must use their own vehicle. STRICTLY LIMITED to min- ivans and cargo vans. For further inqui- ries, please contact us at 608-877-8879. FEED DEPARTMENT Position. Full operations support of nutrition, sales, service, and delivery. Excellent comput- er, communications and organizational skills required. Full time with benefits. E-mail resume to mfcoop@chorus.net or mail to Middleton Cooperative Attn:

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PART TIME SCHOOL BUS Driver 3-4 times per week, for sporting events. CDL preferred, but will train. Excellent pay. 608-669-2618

434 health care, human serVices & child care

COMFORT KEEPERS IN MADISON Seeking caregivers to provide care to seniors in their homes. Valid DL/ Dependable Vehicle required. FT & PT positions available. Flexible scheduling. $1000 Sign-On Bonus! Call 608-442-1898 FULL-TIME HELPING hand/CNA Ore- gon Manor a 5 star facility is committed to providing a work environment where passionate people have the knowl- edge, tools, opportunity and freedom to make the difference in the lives of our residents. Duties include assisting with feeding, passing/linens/water and mak- ing beds. We offer competive wages/ benefits. Come join cuir growing team of professional caregivers. Apply on line at www.oregonmanor.biz EOE

436 office administration & clerical

ORDER ENTRY Clerk/Receptionist needed. Skills required: friendly, cour- teous, people/detail orientated, pleas- ant telephone demeanor, comfortable with Microsoft Word/Excel, 10,000kph. Approx. 35 hours. Respond to Jenny or Todd L & L Foods, Inc. 608.848.6727 RECEPTIONIST (PART-TIME): 3-4 hours in the afternoon, Monday thought Friday. This is a job sharing position and would have flexibility to take days off in exchange for filling full day shifts for their counterpart. Job duties would include answering the phone, greeting guest and light administrative work. Naviant is look- ing for a friendly professional with admin- istrative experience but will also train the right person. If you are interested, please email Tricia Shields@ tshields@naviant. com or call at 608-848-0894

440 hotel, food & BeVeraGe

MARIA'S PIZZA IS HIRING! Wait Staff (age: 18+) Evening & weekend Come in and fill out an application today! 134 S Main St, Oregon

DORNACKER AUCTION & EQUIPMENT ANNUAL CONSIGNMENT AUCTION

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449 driVer, shippinG

& WarehousinG

LOOKING FOR Experienced CDL semi- driver. Our business has expanded. We are adding new equipment. Must be professional, courteous and have clean MVR. Runs from Madison area to Ari- zona and S. California. No touch freight, paid mileage and insurance. Serious inquries only. 608-516-9697 TRUCK DRIVER/LABORER: Madison area paving company accepting applica- tions for CDL drivers and laborers. Full time May thru October. for more informa- tion call 608-842-1676

452 General

OFFICE CLEANING in Stoughton Mon-Fri 4 hours/night. Visit our website:

www.capitalcityclean.com or call our office: 608-831-8850

508 child care & nurseries

K&K CUDDLES DayCare in Stoughton accepting all ages of children. Open 6am-6pm. M-F Call 608-877-9647

516 cleaninG serVices

RELIABLE HOUSE CLEANER. Insured, References available. Free Evaluations! Call 608-719-2876

548 home improVement

A&B ENTERPRISES Light Construction Remodeling No job too small

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554 landscapinG, laWn, tree & Garden Work

AMS LAWN AND LANDSCAPE Proudy serving the local community for 5 years. Call us today for all your lawncare and landscaping needs. Free your time! Call 608-807-3320

ART'S LAWNCARE: Mowing, trimming, roto-tilling. Garden maintenance available.608-235-4389 CLASSIFIEDS, 873-6671 or 835-6677. It pays to read the fine print.

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HELP WANTED- TRUCK DRIVER TanTara Transportation is hiring Company Drivers and Owner Operators for Flatbed, Van, or Tank. Excellent equipment, pay, benefits, home weekly. Call 800-650-0292 or apply www. tantara.us (CNOW) WEEKLY HOMETIME CHOOSE the TOTAL PACKAGE Regional Runs Available AUTO DETENTION PAY AFTER 1 HR! TOP PAY, BENEFI TS; Mthl y BONUSES & more! CDL-A, 6 mos. Exp Req’d EEOE/AAP 866-322-4039 www.drive4marten. com (CNOW) Marten Transport. NOW HIRING DRIVERS FOR DEDICATED & REGIONAL RUNS! Dedicated Fleet, Top Pay, New Assigned Equipment, Monthly Bonuses. WEEKLY HOMETIME! CDL-A, 6mos. OTR exp Req’d EEOE/AAP LIMITED POSITIONS! APPLY TODAY! 866-370-4476 www.dri ve4mar ten.com (CNOW)

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LAWN MOWING Residential & Commercial Fully Insured. 608-873-7038 or 608-669-0025 MAGIC LAWN CARE. Residential, com- mercial, lawn-mowing, trim bushes, dethatching, aeration, and spring clean- ups. Over 21 years experience. Fully Insured. Call Phil 608-235-9479. phillin- nerud@gmail.com. RIGHT HAND MAN Services: Spring lawn mowing & trimming, cleaning, etc. Over 17 years experience. Call Jer 608-

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602 antiques & collectiBles

COLUMBUS ANTIQUE MALL & CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS MUSEUM "Wisconsin's Largest Antique Mall" Customer Appreciation Week! May 2-8. 20% Discount! Enter daily 8am-4pm 78,000 SF 200 Dealers in 400 Booths Third floor furniture, locked cases Location: 239 Whitney St Columbus, WI 53925

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604 appliances

AMANA WASHER, GAS DRYER 1YR old. $650 total 262-960-4225

652 GaraGe sales

STOUGHTON- 310 E Washington St, First Lutheran Church Annual Rummage and Bake Sale Saturday, April 16, 8am- 12 noon, in Fellowship Hall. Please use the carport entrance. Proceeds from the sale go toward confirmation camp. Enjoy free coffee and tasty treats for sale while you shop. Thank you for supporting our youth! STOUGHTON- 462 Highland Drive Friday 8-4, Saturday 8-11. Household items, decorations, crafts, womens shoes and clothes, boat sandbox, horse tack and more.

696 Wanted to Buy

WE BUY Junk Cars and Trucks. We sell used parts. Monday thru Friday 8am-5:30pm.

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705 rentals

514 S ACADEMY, Stoughton. Large 3-bedroom. Lower of 2-flat. Hardwoods, large deck, washer/dryer in unit. AC. Large backyard. Cats/dogs ok. $1230, inc. heat and electric. Call Jim: 608-

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GREENWOOD APARTMENTS Apartments for Seniors 55+, currently has 1 & 2 bedroom units available starting at $750 per month, includes heat, water, and sewer. 608-835-6717 Located at:

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New Century School (NCS) Director Special Education Supervisor