Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 3

U

UTTIILLIIT AN
TIIEESS A ND UIILLD
D BBU DIIN
NGGC
CO DEESS W
OD WOOR
RKKSSH
HOOPP

PPO
OSST
T--M
MEEEET
TIIN
NGG FFO
OLLLLO
OWW--U
UPP
 
C
CO­SPONSOR RS: 
B
Building Code es Assistance Project 
C
Com Ed 
E
Edison Electri c Institute 
Illinois Clean EEnergy Comm munity Foundation 
Institute for EElectric Efficiency 
 
M
MEETING DE ETAILS: 
C
Com Ed Delive ery Operation ns Center, 3 LLincoln Center, Oakbrook TTerrace, IL 
July 30, 2009, 10 AM to 4 P PM 
 
 
A
ATTENDEES S: 
 
NAME ORG
GANIZAT
TION

Lowell Ungar  Alliance too Save Energy
Patrick Justiss  AmerenUEE 
Aleisha Khann  Building Co odes Assistan nce Project 
Vince Gutierrrez  ComEd 
Tim Melloch  ComEd 
Val Jensen  ComEd 
Mark Haman nn  ComEd 
Joe Tipton  ComEd 
Denise Muno oz  ComEd 
Michael McN Nalley  DTE Energyy 
Raiford Smith  Duke Energgy 
Becky Harsh  Edison Elecctric Institutee 
Doug Mahon ne  Heschong Mahone Grou up, Inc. 
Illinois Cleaan Energy Community 
Bob Romo  Foundation n 
Lisa Wood  Institute foor Electric Effiiciency 
Chris Mathiss  MC Squareed 
Kate Agasie  Metro Mayyors Caucus
Wendy Jaehn  Midwest Energy Efficien ncy Alliance 
Tom Coughliin  National G Grid 
Northeast Utilities Services 
Fred Wajcs  Company
Gary Fernstrrom  Pacific Gass & Electric 
Tom Moore  Vectren Co orporation 

 
 
SPEAKERS: 
Val Jensen– Com Ed 
Lisa Wood– Institute for Electric Efficiency 
Lowell Ungar– Alliance to Save Energy 
Gary Fernstrom – PG&E 
Fred Wajcs– Northeast Utilities Service Company 
Tom Coughlin– National Grid 
 
DISCUSSION TOPICS: 
Baseline – If the market is assumed to be performing at code level, this presents a problem for utilities since we 
know that average code compliance is around 55 percent.  This could be remedied if an actual baseline was used 
instead  of  an  assumed  baseline.    Utilities  could  also  get  credit  for  code  programs  based  on  activity  (vs.  baseline 
energy savings). 
Measurement  and  Evaluation  –  Utilities  could  develop  the  capability  to  measure  and  evaluate  compliance  with 
code  measures  while  they  are  measuring  the  savings  results  of  other  programs.    This  is  an  extremely  valuable 
service to the states, which all need to establish code compliance tracking systems.   
Role/Value  to  Utilities  –  Utilities  can  potentially  work  codes  into  a  comprehensive  cycle  of  activity  that  includes 
research, providing incentives for construction measures, and moving those measures into codes.  Utilities have a 
lot of data and can play a major role with the state in assessing compliance (see above).   
“Aligning  the  Planets”  –  Each  utility  will  have  a  different  set  of  elements,  or  “planets”,  that  need  to  be  aligned 
before code programs make sense.  Examples of these are the following:  state law (adopted codes; public benefits 
funds to use for energy efficiency), state policy (mandates to reduce green house gases), public utility commission 
policy (efficiency should be first in the loading order), utility goals (need to achieve large savings), utility incentives 
(decoupled  energy  efficiency  savings),  utility  programs  (cost‐effective  portfolio),  evaluation  protocols,  local 
governments (with advanced codes to lead). 
 
 
BARRIERS FOR UTILITIES: 
• Code Development Process 
− Archaic , convoluted, complicated process 
− Utilities haven’t been involved in the process 
− Lack of education/ information 
• Regulatory Framework 
− Outside the scope of utility  
− Lack of information/education on benefits 
− Savings aren’t easily quantifiable  
− Existing business models insufficient 
− Lack of a “true” baseline 
− No federal legislation supporting utilities receiving credit  
− Windfall credit 
 
 
ACTION AREAS FOR COLLABORATION: 
1. Develop messages for the public utility commissions and utility executives:  
a.  Policy  makers  need  information  on  the  true  value  of  utility  programs,  specifically  the  impact  on 
codes  that  result  from  utility  programs.    Utility  regulators  additionally  need  to  provide  credit  to 
utilities based on actual baseline performance of homes, not the assumed baseline.   
b. Develop a model that shows what states can accomplish if the baseline is more flexible.   
c. Evaluate studies that show where/why actual practice should be the baseline. 
d. Utility executives need information that shows how energy codes support their businesses. 
e.  Make  the  case  for  robust  measurement  and  verification  programs  to  show  the  trend  of  code 
compliance and lay claim to improvements. 
 
 
2. Contrribute to code e developme ent: 
a.. Utilities  have/can 
h get  information n  on  markett  practices  that 
t provide  guidance  on  o efficiency 
measures ready for inteegration into code.  Scopee out strategiees for an effeective markett assessment
– describin ng who you ttalk to and ho ow (such as eenvironmentaal groups, co ode groups, and builders), 
and what m messages and d values are important. 
b. Coach utiliities on particcipating in staate‐level codee developmen nt/review meeetings. 
c.. Provide  gu uidance  to  uttilities  on  using  market  data 
d and  proggram  experieence  to  proppose  national 
model cod de changes. 
3. Estim
mate the bene efits for delive
ering code‐re elated service es: 
a.. Promote e education and d training forr building offficials through h recommend dations and gguidelines to 
utilities. 
b. Lay out the e benefits to utilities of providing mateerials and reso ources to buillders and enggineers. 
c.. Develop a model measu urement prottocol (CA mod del) for calculating the imp pact. 
d. Quantify the cost for no ot meeting co odes (minimu um standard) – front line costs, etc. 
e.. Explore a  case study using the Chiccago Metro M Mayors Caucu us, which is w
working with  a utility and 
local found dation to pilo
ot code activitties. 
4. Condu uct outreach to natural alllies: 
a.. Identify  (consumer 
( p
protection  g
groups,  proggressive  builders.  enviro onmental  organizations, 
architects,, NGOs, local governmentss, code officiaals) 
b. Develop  in nformation  to o  teach  poteential  allies  ab
bout  the  impportant  role  of 
o utilities  an
nd  gain  their 
support. 
c.. Help utilitiies understan nd these ally ggroups … starrting with the usual opponents. 
 

NEXT STEPS
N S:
• Markeet Assessmen nt (EEI/IEE and BCAP) 
o Develop in ntelligence onn who to talk to about codes – allies, ad
dvocates, etc..  
• Educaation and Training  
o Develop w white paper on n benefits (IEE) 
o Work with h NARUC to geet issue on th he Annual Con nvention agennda, develop webinars, etc. (EEI/IEE) 
o Provide infformation to utilities on Code Officials (BCAP) 
• Measurement Prottocol (Doug M Mahone) 
o Identify/offfer case studdies on utility baseline stud
dies and markket assessments