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INSIDE: Pirates Hack Shipping Company Website to Target Vessels 14

Celebrating Milestones in Maritime

Vol.1 No.1 | Feb-Mar 2016 | `100 | www.snmevents.com

RELAUNCH
EDITION!

What is the pace of


Indias shipping sector?

Can
Maritime
India
Make it?

Nitin Gadkari
Minister of Shipping
GOVERNMENT OF INDIA

No. 1 - Feb-Mar 2016

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

inside

08

12

What is the
pace of Indias
shipping sector?
Can Maritime
India Make it?

Hapag-Lloyd Shows
65 Percent Rise in
Incorrectly Declared
Dangerous Goods in
2015

The Maritime India Summit 2016 is all


set for its date on 14th April 2016

16

10
BCCI Holds
Make in India Role
of Maritime Industry
Conference
Mr. Nitin Gadkari, Minister of Shipping, GoI

High Speed Catamaran


ferry lends top luxury
to Andaman Islands
travel

Global trade enabler DP World has announced that it seeks opportunities in India worth over $1bn over the next few years

IMPRINT
Publisher & Editor-in-Chief
Sadanand Subramanian
Associate Editor
Arvind Subramanian
Dy. Editor
Lionel Alva

34
Ships to Soon Get
LNG Power at Port
of Hamburg
German Ministry Supports Becker Marine for
Alternative Supply of Energy

Correspondents
Thomas Anthony, Avick Sil
Head of Marketing
Noushad P. V.
Business Dev. Manager
Publication Coordinator
Publication Coordinator
Hanif Mukadm
Art Director
Sneha P.
Advertising & Promotions
E: marketing@snmevents.com
Subscriptions information:
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Surya Media Ventures
Within Mumbai: Rs. 750 for one
year (including couriering)
Outside Mumbai: Rs. 900 for one
year (including couriering)

47
37th Convocation
of NMIS Held
Amid a Galaxy of
Maritime Stars

Editorial and Production


Surya Media Ventures, 1004,
10th floor, Vashi I.T. Park
Premises, Plot No. 16,
Sector 30A, Vashi,
Navi Mumbai 400705.
Tel.: 91-22-64648048,
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Email: editor@snmevents.com,
marketing@snmevents.com

20
Simulation Technology for
Ports
Capt. Arun Karkare, Consultant to a
few Greenfield port projects in India...

44

50

Technical Seminar at
MANET Highlights Needed Shift to keep up with
changing times

Goodbye Sextant,
we are in the 21st century

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DP World to Invest USD 1 Billion in


Indian Shipping

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

19

Editorial
www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

Let us see what


the future
portends

e are happy to re-launch SNM Events


magazine renaming it as Shipping and
Maritime Events and we thank everyone
with whom we have been associated with
directly or indirectly all these years. We
want you to read Shipping and Marine Events magazine with
renewed interest and we promise to be much better than
before.

We are happy that


the Government
of India is all set
to hold its maiden
flagship event
Maritime India
Summit 2016. The
shipping ministry
and the regulatory
authorities are
breaking the ice with
the industry paving
the way for a good
two way dialogue

We have put in place systems and resources to cover the


developments and goings on in Indian shipping more
vigorously. This means we will look forward to you to share
the good things that you are doing for the benefit of the sector
with us. You are also welcome to share your concerns with
us. We can assure you that our editorial teams will find the
right dimensions and perspectives and reports and articles
will be presented in this magazine as well as our other media
channels, which will eventually serve the larger interests of
the community. We are hoping that an abundance of good
quality writing recording the growth of Indian shipping and
maritime finds its way for public access globally.
With South Korea as the partner country to Maritime
India Summit, the ministry plans to offer projects worth
$19 billion for investment. The event will showcase about
200 projects with an investment potential of USD 6 billion,
the governments communications claim.
Looking forward ambitiously, the shipping ministry is
targeting around 1.2 trillion in investment from the event.
And with the investments from the Summit, the shipping
sector reveals that this is going to create 40 lakh (four million)
direct and 60 lakh indirect jobs in various port sectors.
A top government official told us that projects are going to
be huge, and long term; government alone will never be
able to fund them. We are looking forward to partner with
investors within the country as well as overseas.
This edition features articles highlighting the important
projects and the developments envisaged over the next
decade. We also bring forth a number of brief reports dotting
the different communities of the shipping and maritime
sector. We hope our readers get a fair idea of what the future
portends.

Sadanand Subramanian
Publiser and Editor

Know about our


upcoming programs
Call us on:
91-22-40836565 or
Email us at:
by@classnk.or.jp

ClassNK is dedicated to ensuring the safety of life and property at sea, and the prevention of pollution of the marine
environment.
ClassNK focuses on the development of relevant rules, procedures and guidance, and maintains and develops its
commitment to scientific and technological research and development.
We invite Shipping companies and service providers to attend some of our forthcoming Academy Courses on some of
the most compelling maritime topics and attain the Class Effect at work. All the programs are short duration.
Classification Surveys during Construction (Hull)
Classification Survey during Construction (Machinery & Electrical Installations)
Materials and Welding
Classification Society and Statutory Issues
Damage (Hull)
Damage (Machinery)
Port State Control (PSC)
Safety Equipment
ISM Internal Audits
Incident Investigation & Analysis and Risk Management

For more information: Call us on: 91-22-40836565 or Email us at: by@classnk.or.jp

EVENT | MARITIME INDIA SUMMIT 2016

www.snmevents.com
snmevents.com / Feb-Mar
| Feb-Mar2016
2016

What is the pace of Indias shipping sector?

Can Maritime
India Make it?

The Maritime India Summit 2016 is all set for its date on 14th April 2016. A maiden
flagship initiative of Ministry of Shipping, Government of India will provide a unique
global platform for investors to explore potential business opportunities in the
Indian Maritime Sector.
By: SNM Events Team

IS 2016 is being
organized from
April
14-16,
2016 at Bombay
Convention and
Exhibition Centre, Goregaon,
Mumbai, India. The summit will
have a 2 day conference on April
14-15 and exhibition for 3 days
from April 14-16, 2016.

What turn is Indias shipping


sector taking?

Indias
Maritime
Export
Import trade has been growing
at a rate of ~4.5% year on year
(5 year volume CAGR) and
accounts for ~95% of total EXIM
trade volume for India. Indias
main trade commodities are
Crude and Petroleum products,

Does the maritime transport sector have reasons to cheer?





Crude consumption: 227MMTPA


Crude imports: 189MMTPA (85%)
Crude oil Imports expected to increase by: 90MMTPA by 2025-25
Refinery capacity expansions of: HPCL, IOCL & other petroleum companies, and increased
demand for fuel
Fleet capacity for Oil Companies required (2025 projections): 57mn dwt
Fleet capacity expansion required: 1.8 x 2025
Increase in exports from CSA and West Africa to the East have lead to an increase in
average haul distance which may provide further opportunities for ship operators
PSU refiners plan to add refining capacity in the next 10 years: 23 mn tonnes
Products exports from India to grow by: 20-25 mt by 2024
(key long haul export destinations: Australia, Latin America and Europe)
Indias imports of LNG growth in last decade: 12%
Momentum to be sustained with growth driven by power and fertilizer industries: 5-7% YoY
growth
LNG projects of approx. 300 MTPA under construction: 43
Will create demand for approx. 250 300 new vessels
Indian LPG import in previous decade grown rapidly
Expected to grow in the future
Increased LPG demand will be primarily driven by increasing penetration in rural
households
Exim container trade in India: app 10.7 mn TEU
Handled by 7 ports: 95%
To grow further: > 5% of GDP growth
Fuelled by imitatives like Make in India and higher consumption demand
Trans-shipment hubs being developed: Enayam (TN), and Vizhinjam (Kerala)
For cargo moving from US/Europe or Africa to the far east.
Plus
Local feeder and NVOCC market will remain attractive and will continue to grow

Bulk commodities such as Coal,


Iron Ore and Containerized
cargo. The growth in expected to
remain strong, with 5-10% CAGR
for most commodities over the
next 10 years.
Conferences and B2B Meets

The concurrent conference


aims to foster interaction between stakeholders through B2B
and G2B meetings; and will have
special sessions on investment
opportunities in Maritime Sector
with focus on ship building, ship
repair, ship recycling, dredger/
barge manufacturing, setting up
of new ports and capacity augmentation of existing ports, development of inland waterways
for cargo and passenger transportation, coastal shipping, passenger ferry services, lighthouse and
cruise tourism, island development and aquatic resources, maritime cluster development and
other services related to Indian
Maritime Sector. The conference
will also highlight investment
opportunities in the Indian Maritime States and Union Territories.
Republic of Korea is the partner
country for MIS 2016.
Source: MIS 2016

Planting the Coastal Root

MARITIME INDIA SUMMIT 2016 | EVENT

ndias economy has surged


ahead in recent years. The
pressures of a growing
economy have naturally pushed
its transport system to full
capacity. The movement of
bulk commodities is one of the
major responsibilities of Indias
transportation system. Thermal
coal alone accounts for around
61 percent of the freight volume
on the Indian Railways and 24
percent of the seaport freight mix

A comparison:
Rail to Coastal Shipping
BY RAIL
In 201314, nearly 740 MMTPA
of coal moved through the
country predominantly
through rail.
Costs INR 1.2 to 1.4 per tonne km
BY COASTAL SHIPPING
Only 23 MMTPA moved through
coastal shipping
Costs one-sixth that of rail cost
(INR 0.2 per tonne km
Water currently contributes
less than 10 percent to Indias
modal mix. China uses its inland waterways to transport
raw material and finished goods
between Eastern and Western
provinces; water contributes 24
percent to Chinas freight modal

mix. Australia carries 17 percent


of goods through coastal shipping. In Germany, 11 percent of
goods are moved through inland
waterways and coastal shipping. A strong economic case for
coastal movement can be made
for most of the key commodities
in our study.
Creating Coastal
Infrastructure

One major reason that coastal


shipping has been unable to pick
up in the country is due to the
lack of suitable infrastructure
that enables movement through
coast. Hence availability of dedicated infrastructure will go a long
way in promoting coastal ship-

ping as a mode of freight transportation. Infrastructure at ports


and supporting infrastructure
using rail/road to facilitate coastal movement are the immediate
imperatives.
Dedicated coastal shipping berths,

bunkering, storage at relevant ports

www.snmevents.com
snmevents.com / Feb-Mar
| Feb-Mar2016
2016

All for Coastal Shipping and Inland Waterways

Creation of supporting transport

infrastructure (e.g., Talcher-Paradip


railway line), slurry pipelines etc
Last mile connectivity projects with
industrial areas
Appropriate ship-repairing shiprepairing/ship-building facilities on key
ports; currently most of the ship repairs
happen outside the country
Dedicated capacity fleet under shipping
companies
Management of dedicated coastal
berths(if any) and their operations

Need to make the right moves, and right now


It is estimated that using the right infrastructure and institutional support, India can coastally move 155 to 160 MMTPA of coal,

and save around INR 6,500 Crores per annum, by 2020.


This will help to save 1 lakh rail-rake days that can be used for other commodities.
Since logistics contribute 30 to 35 percent of the cost of power generation, this initiative will also directly cut power costs by

50 paisa per unit for coastal power plants fed coal coastally.
More than 90 percent of the rail routes relevant to coal are running at over 100 percent utilization.
With the expected ramp-up in coal production by Coal India Limited, India may need to move 1,000 to 1,200 MMTPA coal

across the country by 2025, creating tremendous pressure on the already congested railways.
A similar comparison of logistics cost for plant to demand centre for five other key commoditiesPOL, steel, cement,

fertilizers, and food grains reveals a total potential of 70 to 80 MMTPA coastal movement
Potential savings of INR 4,500-5,600 Crores per annum for the above commodities
It is estimated that coastal shipping of about 180-200 MMTPA can be achieved from current and planned capacities across

coal, cement, iron and steel, food grains, fertilizers, POL by 2025.
This would translate into estimated INR 10,000-15,000 Crores saving annually.

Making a beginning Inland Waterways and Coastal Shipping to bear fruit soon
Speaking at a recent seminar Minister of Shipping, GoI, Mr. Nitin Gadkar emphasised upon the need to reduce logistics cost to

enable the success of Make in India initiative.


Among the initiatives already on are mechanization, modernisation and capacity addition in the port sector spurred by an

investment of Rs.80,000 crore. Mr. Gadkari apprised that an Indian Port Rail Company has been established with a thrust on
rail road connectivity.
The minister elaborated that 3 new ports i.e. Vadhavan (Maharashtra) with draft of 18 mtrs, Sagar (West Bengal) with draft of
14.5 mtrs and Kolachel (Tamil Nadu) with draft of 18.5 mtrs are being developed.
With a renewed focus on developing Inland Waterways which is globally recognized as fuel efficient, cost effective and
environment friendly mode of transport, the Shipping Ministry is building three multi-modal hubs at Varanasi in Uttar Pradesh,
Sahibganj in Jharkhand and Haldia in West Bengal, across river Ganga.
Mr. Gadkari informed that there is a proposal to build 2,000 water ports over the next 5 years. Also underway is the initiative
to use LNG as bunker fuel which would reduce the overall cost for the sector.

SHIPPING | EVENT

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

10

BCCI Holds
Make in India Role
of Maritime Industry
Conference
Bombay Chamber of Commerce and Industry (BCCI), organised the 9th Biennial
International Conference on Port, Shipping and Logistics on the topic of Make in India
Role of Maritime Industry for converting PMs vision of Make in India into a practical
level of reality within the community of trade and commerce.
By: SNM Events Team

Mr. Nitin Gadkari,


Minister of Shipping,
GoI

Main
Takeaways
Shipping must get

infrastructure status
Ease of doing

business necessary
for make in India
Make in India extends
to services sector too
Level Playing field
to all ports vis--vis
connectivity

r. Nitin Gadkari,
M i n i s t e r
for
Road
Transport,
Highways and
Shipping, Government of India,
Chief Guest, in his key note
address appealed to the corporate
sector to have a more direct and
continuous interaction with the

Panel Discussion-1

government for improving the


share of coastal shipping. He
stated that it is high time that
shipping gets the status of
infrastructure and accordingly
should receive fiscal incentives.
Underlining the link between
efficiency of logistics sector
and social welfare in terms of
poverty eradication, Mr. Gadkari
highlighted the importance of
Coastal shipping naming the
Sagarmala Project, and the
employment opportunities for
local youth and its economic
implications.
Ms.
Mireille
ROMBONILASSERRE, French Regional
Customs Counsellor, Asia/Pacific
mentioned that French Customs
have implemented a single
window systems, integrating
17 agencies and it was observed
that 93% custom clearances are
released in less than 5 minutes.
She informed the audience that

France is ranked no. 1 by World


Bank in Ease of Doing Business
for trading across borders based
on extensive simplification of
procedures.
Mr. Pascal Ollivier, DirectorCorporate Development, SOGET
S.A made a presentation on Next
Generation Port Community
Systems. He demonstrated that
optimization, collaboration and
automation are three pillars
of PCS for enhancing logistics
performance.
The panel discussion on Ease
of Doing Business was chaired by
Mr. Tushar Jani, Chairman, CSC
Group and the panel members
were: Ms. Mireille ROMBONILASSERRE, French Regional
Customs Counsellor, Asia/Pacific;
Mr. Pascal Ollivier, DirectorCorporate Development, SOGET
S.A; Mr. Kevin DSouza, Director,
Comm. & Business Development,
DP
World,
Subcontinent;

Panel Discussion-2

EVENT | SHIPPING

11

1st Suez
Canal Global
Conference
Held in Cairo

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

Mr. Jomy Jacob, Deputy


Commissioner of Customs,
JNCH; Mrs. Audrey Dolhen,
Managing Director, CMA CGM
India and Ms. Poroma Rebello,
Head Commercial, North &
Central Region, APL (India)
Pvt. Ltd.
Regarding Model Concession
Agreement (MCA), members
opined that current versions
are from landlord perspective
and it should have a partnership
perspective. Absence of rail
and coastal shipping forces
people to use roads. But there is
an atmosphere of change and
initiatives from Govt. such as
Sagarmala and Delhi Mumbai
Freight Corridor. Members
noted that Indian Customs
are making a lot of efforts
for enhancing ease of doing
business such as facilitation
meetings with presence of high
ranking officials, which is also
leading to inter-ministerial
coordination.
Mr. Rajeeva Sinha, Director,
Adani Ports & SEZ Ltd. chaired
the second session. The panel
members were: Mr. Neeraj
Bansal, IRS, Deputy Chairman,
JNPT; Capt. A. K. Singh, CEO,
Adani Dahej & Hazira Ports;
Mr. Umesh Grover, Advisor,
Allcargo Logistics Ltd.; Mr.
Farhad Sorabjee, Partner, J.
Sagar Associates; Mr. Vineet
Malhotra,
Director,
Kale
Logistics Solutions and Mr.
Kamal Jain, IRTS, CGM
Western Region, CONCOR.
The Guest of Honour at
the Valedictory Session, Dr.
Vishwapati
Trivedi,
IAS,
(Retd.), Chairman, National
Shipping Board, Ministry of
Shipping stressed that Ease of
Doing Business is a necessary
pre-requisite for Make in
India.
Mr. S. Hajara, Ex-CMD,
SCI Ltd. summarising the
proceedings highlighted that
Make in India is not applicable
to only manufacturing but
also to the service Industry.
He noted that a lot of capacity
additions were required in
Indian flags to manage the
existing exim cargo.

Indias refinery programs in the private sector can now look


forward to service locations with limited or reduced refinery
capacity particularly in North West Europe via the Suez Canal.

he new deeper Suez


Canal will be a beneficiary of the One
Belt One Road initiative taken by Chinas
charismatic leader Xi Jinping,
especially when it comes to the
opening up of the Iranian market
following the lifting of international sanctions and the moving
into importance of the Indian refinery markets, according to Denis
Petropoulos, President of Braemar
Shipping Services Asia.
Speaking at the 1st Suez Canal
Global Conference in Cairo, Mr
Petropoulos said One Belt One
Road was not just about China but
reached into around 60 countries:
many with increasing energy
needs, and the Suez Canal playing
its very essential part.
Irans trading alliances in Asia
remain strong but with the lifting
of sanctions the opportunities for
Iran are opened further, with long
standing historical trading partners in Southern Europe and their
demand for Iranian crude oil, all
likely to be transported through
the Suez Canal and the Sumed
pipeline, said Mr Petropoulos.
In the 1970s and 1980s, the
trend for crude oil produced in
the Middle East was for Western
demand but by the turn of this
century the trend reversed with
Middle East producers supplying
the East. However Middle East
refineries are also producing products for the region and are now
exporting large amounts of products to global destinations as profitable trade, as well as a hedge to
reduction in OPEC crude quotas.
North East Asia is also producing
gasoil which will find itself in the

West. Major traders are fixing


new building aframaxes and suezmaxes to load cargos of gasoil
from refineries in Japan and Korea all transiting the Suez Canal,
he said.
As Mr Petropoulos stressed,
in addition, Indias refinery programmes in the private sector
have been very forward looking
and they now export products
with limited or reduced refinery
capacity, particularly in North
West Europe. Those cargoes will
transit the Suez Canal. With the
demand for power combined with
emissions, the LNG space is growing significantly and there has
been an increase in LNG transiting the Suez Canal in the last 10
years. Since the completion of the
new dual carriage, the new Suez
Canal will be able to handle almost
twice the traffic, he said. And
providing it remains commercially viable, this will lead to greater
numbers of vessels navigating at
both Suez and Port Said. In any
environment where there is increased traffic there is increased
risk of incident, he warned.

Since the completion of


the new dual carriage,
the new Suez Canal will
be able to handle almost
twice the traffic. Major
traders are fixing new
building aframaxes and
suezmaxes to load cargos
of gasoil from refineries
in Japan and Korea all
transiting the Suez Canal.
Mr. Denis Petropoulos
President,
Braemar Shipping
Services Asia

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

12

SHIPPING | GLOBAL IMPACT

IMO Releases
Infographic
on How the
Polar Code
Protects the
Environment

new IMO infographic


illustrating How the
Polar Code protects the
environment has been
launched in six languages. It depicts the various environmental requirements and recommendations of the Polar Code relating to oil,
sewage, garbage, chemicals and invasive species. Download the infographic in: Arabic, Chinese, English,French,
Russian and Spanish. This builds on a
previous infographic showing what
the Polar Code means for ship safety.
The International Code for Ships
Operating in Polar Waters (Polar Code)
will enter into force on 1 January 2017
and applies to ships operating in Arctic
and Antarctic waters. It provides for
safe ship operation and protects the
environment by addressing the unique
risks present in polar waters but not
covered by other treaties.

Hapag-Lloyd Shows
65 Percent Rise in
Incorrectly
Declared Dangerous
Goods in 2015

apag-Lloyd
reports having registered considerably
more incorrectly
declared dangerous goods last year, compared to
2014. The Watchdog program developed jointly by Hapag-Lloyds
IT and dangerous goods experts
a special safety software that
continuously checks cargo data
to identify anything conspicuous
identified 4,314 incorrectly declared dangerous goods cases last
year. This is an increase of 65 percent on the previous years figure
of 2,620 cases.
Hapag-Lloyds dangerous goods
experts looked into more than
236,000 suspicious cases picked
up by the safety software in 2015
(2014: more than 162,000) thats
equivalent to an increase of approximately 46 percent. Dangerous goods that are declared imprecisely, incorrectly or not at all
have the potential to pose a major
risk to crews, ships, other cargo
and the environment.
For Ken Rohlmann, head of
the dangerous goods depart-

ment at Hapag-Lloyd, there are


two reasons behind the sharp
increase: Firstly, the volume of
cargo shipped by Hapag-Lloyd
increased considerably last year
due to the companys merger
with CSAVs container business.
Secondly, there was a sharp rise
in Watchdog findings following
the devastating dangerous goods
explosion in the port of Tianjin
in mid-August, says Rohlmann.
Many ports drastically tightened
their dangerous goods guidelines
in the wake of the incident or
even prohibited dangerous goods
from being processed at all.
Hapag-Lloyd said that its
Watchdog has been subject to a
lot of interest from customs and
port authorities, police, as well
as from other shipping companies. Ken Rohlmann: With the
software, our industry can considerably reduce the risk posed
to crews, ships, cargo and the
environment. After all, its in the
interests of everyone involved
that the entire shipping system
should be made safer, emphasises
the dangerous goods expert.

SHIPPING | GLOBAL IMPACT

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

14

Pirates Hack Shipping


Company Website to
Target Vessels

Source: Tech Insider

ech-savvy pirates once


breached the servers of a
global shipping company to
locate the exact vessel and cargo
containers they wanted to plunder, according to a new report from
Verizons cybersecurity team.
Theyd board the vessel, locate
by bar code specific sought-after
crates containing valuables, steal
the contents of that crate and
that crate only and then depart
the vessel without further incident, says the report, Verizons
Data Breach Digest.
Verizon released the report detailing 18 case studies among hundreds its RISK Team (Research,
Investigations, Solutions, and
Knowledge) investigated ahead of

a talk at the RSA Conference, one


of the worlds largest information
security conferences.
While piracy is a common problem for global shipping, the unnamed company contacted RISK
after a group of pirates started
acting differently than in the past.
Usually, pirates would capture a
vessel, then hold its crew hostage
until a ransom was paid.
But this group instead would
board a ship and then leave soon
after, leaving the company suspicious. As usual, the pirates would
board the ship and herd the crew
into one area. But a few hours later, the crew would come out and
they would be gone, with only
certain cargo containers opened.
As Verizons investigation uncovered, the pirates had uploaded
malicious software onto the companys content management system, allowing them to access data
such as bills of lading for future
shipments. With this information,

the hackers would know exactly


where to look on the ships they
were after.
While more sophisticated than
your average pirates, they made
plenty of mistakes that ultimately made them easier to stop. The
pirates didnt use proxies to hide
their network address, and they
sent all of their commands over
the web in plain text, which allowed RISK to get a clear picture
of every command they had ever
issued.
These threat actors, while
given points for creativity, were
clearly not highly skilled, the report says. For instance, we found
numerous mistyped commands
and observed the threat actors
constantly struggled with the
compromised servers.
Once the pirates were figured
out, the company then shut down
the servers, changed passwords,
and blocked the attackers IP addresses.

Paris Climate Target Impossible Without


Curbing Shipping Emissions
Shipping could be responsible for 17% of global CO2 emissions in 2050 if left
unregulated, according to an EU study, placing climate action firmly at the top of the EU
commissioners and IMO secretary-generals agendas at their meet in Brussels.

he 1.5/2C warming limit


agreed at the Paris climate
summit will be impossible
to meet unless Europe and the
International Maritime Organisation (IMO) introduce measures
to cut shipping emissions, NGOs
Seas At Risk and Transport & Environment have warned. Having
escaped explicit mention in the
Paris climate deal, emissions from
shipping are the elephant in the
room and will jeopardise the efforts of other sectors making it
all but impossible to keep global
warming well below two degrees,
the groups said. The IMO, the UN
body tasked with tackling the climate impacts of shipping, has so
far failed to grasp the nettle on

shippings growing contribution to


greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.
Sotiris Raptis, shipping officer at
T&E, said: We welcome the new
IMO secretary-general, who is
coming to office at a key moment
following the Paris agreement. We
are sure Secretary-General Kitack
Lim fully understands the need
for the IMO to act now. The EU in
parallel needs to include shipping
in its 2030 reduction commitment
now and in the EU ETS or in an
EU climate fund from 2021.
John Maggs, senior policy advisor at Seas At Risk, said: There is
no reasonable excuse to continue
exempting the sector from the
global and EU climate policies.
That shipping needs to make its

fair share of cuts to keep global warming well below 2


degrees is not negotiable after Paris.
The European Parliaments study took into account
the IMOs own research which found that shipping
GHG emissions are up 70% since 1990 and are projected to grow by up to a further 250% by 2050. Shipping
currently accounts for nearly 3% of global CO2 emissions higher than those of Canada, Brazil, Indonesia,
Mexico, France or the United Kingdom.
Seas At Risk and T&E are members of the Clean
Shipping Coalition , which has observer status at the
IMO.

GLOBAL MARINE GROUP OF COMPANIES


Ship chandlers, Ship Repairs, Marine Contractors, & Marine Agency

Committed to Quality services


Global Marine Supply Company (GMSC) is a privileged
supplier to over 40 regular container vessels calling at
Nava Sheva Port (JNPT) and Mumbai Port. It has spread its
wings to offer reliable, efficent, and timely services around
the world. GMSC offers most of the technical and non
technical services in Ship chandelling

GMSC
Global Marine Supply Co.
Global Marine Engineering Co.
Global Marine Agency

ENABLING
EFFICIENCY
Global Marine Supply Company provides
best Ship Chandelling services to ships
during their stay at ports at fastest speed
and with highest quality

Services
Ship chandelling
Fresh and frozen provision, bonded stores suppliers
Ship Repairs:
Mechanical and Electrical and Marine Contractors
Tehnical Supply:
Engine and Deck stores, new and second hand spares
Ship cleaning and painting
Marine Agencies:
Owners Agent and Ship spares Clearing Agent

SW

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The Great Eastern Galleria, Unit No. 41/42, Ground Floor, Plot no. 20, Sector-4, Nerul West, Navi Mumbai - 400 706
Tel.:+91-22-2771 0820, +91-22-65168645 Fax: +91-22-27713103
Email:gmsc@vsnl.com, ajayjoseph@globalmarineindia.com Website: www.Globalmarineindia.com

inside pages.indd 47

10/07/2012 7:11:54

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

16

SHIPPING | SPECIAL FEATURE

High Speed Catamaran


ferry lends top luxury
to Andaman Islands
travel
Seven years since inception the ferry completes ferrying over 10 lakh. Reputed as one
of the fastest ferries, M.V. MAKRUZZ also offers exemplary comfort and a hassle-free
experience.
By: Mr. Mohamed Hashim Jadwet

ndias most remote destination, the Andaman and


Nicobar Islands situated
more than 1000kms off
the east coast in the middle of the Bay of Bengal, can be
described as nothing short of
an Island paradise. The 500 odd
specks of emerald green nestled
in the vast expanse of aquamarine blues of the Indian Ocean,
boasts of snow white beaches,
flourishing evergreen forests,
kaleidoscopic coral reefs and a
bustling aquatic life. Port Blair,
the capital city, is the major port
of entry for most visitors travel-

ling to the islands either through


flights or ferries..
The most celebrated of destinations within the islands is
Havelock, known for housing
Asias best beach. Flanked by
resorts, the mesmerizing locales
of Havelock can capture the
imagination of the most experienced of travelers. Neil Island
has increasingly also come into
the limelight for being the virgin
and more pristine counterpart of
Havelock. Although parts of the
archipelago still see few visitors,
the Andamans are now firmly
on the tourist circuit, with tour-

ists arrivals at an all time high of


300,000. This has indeed presented a host of opportunities in
the tourism sector and local businesses have rushed to derive the
first mover advantage.
MAK Logistics Commences
Operations

MAK Logistics Private Limited,


founded by influential local business persons Mr. Mohammed H
Jadwet, CS Ashok and Krishnendu Kundu, was floated on 27th
February 2003 as MAK Lines
and later converted to MAK
LOGISTICS (P) Ltd on 4th May
2007. The company commenced
operations with three cargo vessels ranging from 700DWT to
2000DWT in size, for the purpose of inter island trade. These
vessels regularly operated between Port Blair and Nicobar
group of islands carrying construction material, essential
commodities, petroleum products, heavy machinery, vehicles
and other miscellaneous items
for government departments as
well as private firms.
MAK Logistics Inducts M.V.
MAKRUZZ GOLD, catamaran
ferry built to global standards

With the success and grandeur acquired by M.V. MAKRUZZ, MAK Logistics Pvt Ltd in
its attempts to augment its services and in lieu of increasing
demands, has now acquired an-

A first of its kind from the Private Sector

As a means of diversification and to cater to the burgeoning tourism sector,


in the year 2009, the Company took a pioneering initiative to enter into the
field of passenger service by acquiring a high speed catamaran ferry from
Singapore, anointed M.V MAKRUZZ. It was the first of its kind from the
private sector in the islands, as prior to this, the passenger movement was
predominantly controlled by the Government.

other high speed catamaran passenger ferry. This ferry which


is at par with global standards,
also hails from Singapore, and
has been named M.V. MAKRUZZ GOLD, due to be pressed into
service in May this year.
Committed to High Standards of Excellence

MAK Logistics (P) Ltd. is focused on retaining its values and


business ethics in all of its up and
coming endeavors to ensure that
it maintains the goodwill that it
has acquired over the years. The
Company advocates high service
standards and will continue to
raise the bar in the coming years,
so as to set benchmarks for all
local entrepreneurs to mirror.
MAK is also committed to its
Corporate Social Responsibility
which is evidenced by its continued efforts for the holistic development of the islanders. The
company recognizes its inherent
dependence on Brand Andaman
and hence, vows to promote
and propagate a sustainable yet
thriving model of development
for the tourism sector in the islands.

This state-of-the-art craft was built in 2002 by Damen Shipyard, Singapore.


M.V. MAKRUZZ plies between the islands of Port Blair Havelock Neil,
with an increased frequency from a single sailing to five, in a day. The
Catamaran is a twin hull vessel which offers a plethora of advantages
ranging from speed, stability and space. The fully air conditioned vessel has 2
decks with passenger capacity of 280, split into three classes - Premium(208),
Deluxe(64) and Royal(8). While the maximum speed is 32 nautical miles,
the ferry is cruised at the average speed of 24 nautical miles covering the
distance between Port Blair and Havelock in an estimated 90 minutes. The
vessel also boasts of an inboard Kiosk which is well stocked and caters to all
age groups; huge transparent dark glass windows that run throughout the
entire length of the ships lower deck and upper deck seating area enables
even the passengers seated at the far end to have a personalized view of the
panorama. M.V MAKRUZZ personifies the beauty and friendliness of the
Dolphin, its mascot, and is synonymous to gracious hospitality, panoramic
view, plush interiors and unmatched speed.

4th Top Tourist Attraction in Andaman and Nicobar Islands

The introduction of this ferry was a pivotal moment for the tourism sector in
the island, paving the way for other entrepreneurs while setting superlative
standards of service, which is worth emulating. Seven years since inception
and the ferry can proudly lay claim to the fact that it has transported baffling
numbers of people- over 10 lakh. Being one of the fastest ferries in India
whilst offering exemplary comfort and a hassle-free experience, has herald
M.V MAKRUZZ from the 7th to the 4th position among the 36 attractions in
Andaman and Nicobar Islands as enumerated by TRIP ADVISOR.

First choice among tourists and locals

The professionalized service coupled with luxurious interiors and fastest


travel time has made M.V MAKRUZZ, a favorite and the first choice of
tourists and islanders alike, despite the presence of increased competition
over the years. On its initiation, the passenger ferry was dedicated to the
tourism industry by the then Honble Lt. Governor of Andaman & Nicobar
Islands, Lt. Gen (Retd) Bhopinder Singh, PVSM, AVSM. The owners and the
staff continue to dedicate immense efforts to improve user experience and
aid the growth of Brand Andaman. Today, M.V MAKRUZZ remains not only
a top attraction but also a vital infrastructure in the tourism industry of the
islands.

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

17

SPECIAL FEATURE | SHIPPING

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

18

SHIPPING | TRADE

Liquid Cargo
Handling
at Shallow
Draught
Berth of JNPT
Crosses 1 MMT
To ease out the congestion of
liquid cargo vessels at BPCL
liquid cargo jetty, JNPT had
permitted laying of pipeline
from Shallow draught berth
and connecting it to existing
pipeline infrastructure

he operations of liquid
cargo handling through
the
pipelines
commenced in November
2013. Liquid cargo handling at Shallow draught berth of
JNPT crossed 1.0 Million Metric Ton
mark last month. The pipeline work
was carried out by s Ganesh Benzoplast Ltd. on common user basis.
From November 13 to February 16, 1.0249 MMT liquid cargo
was handled through 234 vessels
berthed at Shallow draught berth.
The liquid cargo handling at Shallow draught berth has reduced the
pre-berthing waiting time of liquid
cargo ships from 2.12 days in 201314 to 1.43 days in 2015-16 so far.
Liquid cargo handling at Shallow
draught berth has helped industries to reduce their high demurrage
costs, the port said..

DP World to
Invest USD 1 Billion
in Indian Shipping
Global trade enabler DP World has announced that it seeks
opportunities in India worth over $1bn over the next few
years. The Group has already invested capital of $1.2bn and is
currently the only foreign operator with six port concessions
in the country with approximately 30% market share.

he announcement was
made during a visit to
New Delhi and Mumbai by His Highness
Sheikh
Mohammed
Bin Zayed Al Nahyan, Crown
Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the
Armed Forces of the United Arab
Emirates (UAE), and His Excellency Sultan Ahmed Bin Sulayem,
Group Chairman and CEO, DP
World. The visit follows a two-day
official trip by the Indian Prime

Minister Narendra Modi to the


UAE last August.
The DP World investments
could cover; expansion in brownfield container terminals, Long
term greenfield container concessions, Inland Container Depots
(ICDs), Expansion of existing inter-modal rail services for rolling
stock.
H.H. Sheikh Mohammad Bin
Zayed Al Nahyan, said: The UAE
and India enjoy historic bilateral relations and these potential

Indian Ports Perform


Better - 2nd to 4th
Quarter FY15

hese ports handled 447


million tonnes (mt) up to
December 2015 against
433 mt in the year-ago period.
While overall growth in traffic stood at 3.18 per cent during
the period under review, nine
ports witnessed positive growth
and three registered negative
growth.

The overall performance of the


major ports is measured by three
parameters average turnaround
time (ATT) of vessels on port (in
days), average pre-berthing time
on port (in hours), and average output per ship berth day (in tonnes).
Between April and December
2015, ATT reduced to 2.12 days
from 2.30 days a year ago. Be-

CEO,DP World, said: We are


reinforcing our commitment to
enabling Indias growth and economic development through our
operations in the country, where
we have invested over US $1 billion in the past supporting over
30% of Indias container trade.
Being one of the strongest
emerging economies in the world,
India offers immense potential
for growth in the maritime
sector. With Nhava Sheva (India)
Gateway Terminal, the new
330-metre berth, DP World will
contribute even more to Indias
growth offering our customers

the ability to grow and expand


their business.
Dubais non-oil foreign trade
with India has seen a striking 144
per cent growth from 2004 to
2014. By the end of 2014, trade between the two countries amounted to AED 109.34 billion, compared
to AED 44.87 billion in 2004.
India was Dubais second largest trading partner in 2015, with
bilateral trade of AED 73.86 billion during the first nine months
of 2015 comprising imports
of AED 41.73 billion; exports of
AED 14.54 billion and re-exports
of AED 17.59 billion.

DP World has
the biggest
portfolio along
the Indian coast
and is looking
to enhance its
presence there,
transferring the
UAEs experience
of infrastructure
development
in line with our
plans to enhance
the strategic
relations between
our countries and
to take them to a
higher level.

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

investments reinforce our confidence in the long term growth


of the Indian economy and our
desire to actively contribute to
the economic development of this
friendly nation. DP World has established a leading position in the
Indian market and is a pioneer
in the development of container
terminals. It has the biggest portfolio along the Indian coast and is
looking to enhance its presence
there, transferring the UAEs experience of infrastructure development in line with our plans to
enhance the strategic relations
between our countries and to
take them to a higher level.
In Mumbai, H.H. Sheikh Mohammad Bin Zayed Al Nahyan
and H.E. Sultan Ahmed Bin Sulayem, Group Chairman and CEO,
DP World also inaugurated the
new 330-metre berth at Nhava
Sheva (India) Gateway Terminal
(NSIGT), at Indias premier gateway port, Jawaharlal Nehru Port
(JNPT).
H.E. Sultan Ahmed Bin Sulayem, Group Chairman and

19

TRADE | SHIPPING

H.H. Sheikh
Mohammad Bin
Zayed Al Nahyan

Indias 12 major ports registered an overall improvement in the performance parameters


during the April-December 2015 period compared to the first nine months of FY15.
Source: Business Standard

sides, average pre-berthing time


fell to 3.97 hours from 5.55 hours.
Also, the average output per ship
berth day increased to 12,614
tonnes from 12,313 tonnes.
During 2014-15, ATT was 2.13
days against 2.32 days in 2013-14
an improvement of 0.19 days.
Likewise, an improvement of 1.89
hours was witnessed in average
pre-berthing time at 5.02 hours
in FY15, against 6.91 hours in
2013-14. Also, negligible reduction was noticed in the average
output per ship berth day from
12,468 tonnes in FY14 to 12,458
tonnes in FY15.
However, the performance of a
few major ports declined in the
above three parameters from
April to December 2015, compared to corresponding period of
last year.

Average
turnaround
time (ATT) of
vessels on
port (in days)

Between April and December 2015, ATT reduced to


2.12 days from 2.30 days a year ago.
During 2014-15, ATT was 2.13 days against 2.32 days
in 2013-14 an improvement of 0.19 days.
An improvement of 1.89 hours was witnessed in average pre-berthing time at 5.02 hours in FY15, against
6.91 hours in 2013-14.

Average
pre-berthing
time on port
(in hours)

Improvement in pre-berthing time

Average output per ship


berth day
(in tonnes)

In percentage terms, the average output per


ship berth day has come down the most at New
Mangalore Port

Haldia
Visakhapatnam
Chennai
Mormugao
JNPT
Kandla

JN Port
Cochin
New Mangalore
JNPT
Cochin.

Growth Rate

Mormugao Port: 27.73%


Visakhapatnam Port: 19.64%
Paradip Port: 14.85%

HIGHLIGHTS
These ports handled

447 million tonnes


(mt) up to December
2015 against 433
mt in the year-ago
period.
Overall growth in
traffic stood at 3.18
per cent during the
period under review
Nine ports witnessed
positive growth and
three registered
negative growth.

SHIPBUILDING, REPAIRS, & MARINE INFRA | TRANSFORMATIVE

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

20

Simulation Technology
for Ports

About the author:


Capt. Arun Karkare
is a maritime
consultant and
simulation expert. He
has been credited to
the creation of three
Green Field ports in
the country, Dhamra,
Kattupalli and Angre.
He can be contacted
at arunkarkare@vsnl.
com, karkarearun@
gmail.com.

HIGHLIGHTS
The most complex and
challenging was Dhamra
port project. The joint
owners were two top
corporate giants TATA
STEEL and L&T. Moreover
the commercial and
financial stakes were
very high and there was
substantial technical risk
in designing and planning
of 20 nautical miles long
Channel (Navigational
Connectivity between the
Port facility and Open Sea)
with a cost estimation
of Rs.700 crores. The
owners were looking
for a way to confirm
the port layout plan and
design of the water front
infrastructure.

Capt. Arun Karkare, Consultant to a few Greenfield port projects in India cites his experience
in the planning and designing of ports by adopting Simulation Technology. The author
emphasises on the many benefits the technology lends to the various stakeholders.

imulation
technology
has revolutionized mans
ability to plan complex
structures such as Ports
and Harbors and then use
it again for their safe and efficient
operations and management..
Among all the man- made structures of recent times nothing is
more awesome and challenging
than designing, planning and constructing a deep sea port to handle
mammoth Tankers and Container
Ships and finally commissioning
it to be able to operate safely and
efficiently. It is here that Simulation technology filled the void and
made the whole process almost
risk free in commercial, financial
and technological terms perhaps
in this logical order! Anyone who
is even remotely associated with
Port Industry would agree with
this point of view.
As a marine consultant for two
decades, I have hands on experience using this marvellous technological tool in three successive
Greenfield port projects where I
was involved from conception to
inception and finally commissioning of these ports by piloting and
berthing the first commercial ships
at berths.

Simulation Technology for


Greenfield Port Projects

The ports of Dhamra in Odisha, Kattupalli in Tamil Nadu and


Angre in Maharashtra have made
extensive use of Simulation Technology in port infrastructure planning, cargo operations and training
of port pilots. I have been associated with each of these ports as the
Chief Marine Consultant. I extensively used Simulation technology
to great advantage and saved precious funds for the owners as this
technology helped me immensely
to fine tune the water front infrastructure of the port.

Out of the three ports, the most


complex and challenging was
Dhamra port project. The joint
owners were two top corporate
giants TATA Steel and L&T. Moreover the commercial and financial
stakes were very high and there
was substantial technical risk in
designing and planning of 20 nautical miles long Channel (Navigational Connectivity between the
Port facility and Open Sea) with a
cost estimation of Rs.700 crores.
The owners were looking for a
way to confirm the port layout
plan and design of the water front
infrastructure. I joined Dhamra
port project team in the year 2005.
Dhamra Port Project Ushers
in Simulation Technology

Simulation technology was already in full use in the West European ports but it had not entered
the Indian Port market due to lack
of Greenfield Port Projects. Dham-

ra opened the doors for the entry


of this solution. On my advice,
the owners of Dhamra port conducted Simulation Studies of the
port channel which was the main
risk area of the project as the port
was designed to handle vessels of
1,80,000 dwt with 19 m. draught ! I
had to go to a UK based simulation
company, HR Wallingford who
had the necessary software and
equipment. Please refer to graphic pictures of Dhamra simulation
studies.
Let us see how the Simulation
technology works for port projects.
The port owner has to provide the
basic inputs such as preliminary
designs and engineering drawing
of port layout of jetties, berths,
docks, turning circles, basin, channels, size of ship, cargo handling
system, buoyage system, pilotage
system, manoeuver-details, training curriculum, prominent land

The Process

After receiving the technical


and engineering details the simulation engineer starts creating the
software that forms the basic design of the simulation picture and
creates virtual reality as if the port
is ready to receive the ships. In the
meantime the simulation company sends the videographers and
special photographers to the port
site to photograph and video graph
the entire panoramic as well as microscopic views as will be visible to
the pilot bringing the ship inside
the port. In simulation technology
two types of imagery are created
in the software specifically. One of
the two types is called static imagery which is the synchronized picture view of the port layout as seen
from the birds eye as well as from
the water front level. The second
type of imagery is called dynamic

which shows the movements of


the water, ships, buoys and other
crafts created for showing traffic
that may occur in the port in an
operational scenario when the
port is commissioned.
Stakeholder Benefits

The simulation report is sent


out in two parts. One part is a reporting on fixed layouts and it reflects the pros and cons of causing
changes and accordingly the port
owner is advised to correct, add
or omit or reorient the layouts. It
also lends more prior information
to banks, financial institutes and
other investors with the financial
and commercial implications of
the design before investing in actual construction. However, navigation simulation and consultancy
for training of port pilots is a very
important output from such studies. The full scale trial runs, free
running and captive model tests,
mathematical prediction and sim-

ulation of specialized manoeuvres


of large and complex vessels helps
to minimize future maritime disasters in the port. The real time ship
handling and manoeuvring simulator is widely used by pilots, ship
operators, naval architects and
port authorities to enable effective
training and to evaluate harbour
layouts at the planning stage.
The simulation system has a
wide range of high fidelity ship
models which can interact with
varied environmental conditions
specific to a port in question and
tugs to produce realistic behaviour.
Currently, in India quality simulation studies can be conducted
at centers situated at Mumbai and
Delhi where the author is attached
as simulation expert (BMT at
Mumbai and ARI at Delhi). Recently Indian Navy and JNPT have ordered simulation studies for their
projects with BMT.

Sagarmala Programme identifies over


150 port infrastructure projects
Source: PIB

ore than 150 projects have been


identified as part of the National
Perspective Plan (NPP) under
the ambitious Sagarmala Programme.
The projects will mobilize more than
Rs. 4 lac crore of investment and enable
creation of 1 crore new jobs, including 40
lac direct jobs, in the next 10 years. These
projects have been identified across the
areas of Port Modernization & New
Port Development, Port Connectivity
Enhancement,
Port-led
Industrial
Development and Coastal Community
Development.
The Sagarmala Programme of the
Government of India aims to promote
port-led development in the country
by harnessing Indias 7,500 km long
coastline, 14,500 km of potentially
navigable waterways and strategic
location on key international maritime
trade routes. A National Perspective
Plan has been developed under this
programme for the comprehensive
development of Indias coastline and
maritime sector.

Port Modernization & New Port


Development

To meet the future growth in cargo


volumes, 50 projects have been identified

to increase the port capacity from 1400


MMTPA to 2500 MMTPA by 2025, at an
investment of Rs. 1 lac crore. These projects include capacity augmentation at existing ports and development of 5-6 new
ports, including a trans-shipment hub. In
addition, 104 initiatives have been identified to improve major port efficiency.
Port Connectivity Enhancement

65 projects have been proposed at an


investment of more than Rs. 2 lac crores
to enhance the port-connectivity to the
countrys production and consumption
centers. This includes10,000 km of last
mile port-connectivity infrastructure, 12
new freight expressways, heavy haul rail
corridor to transport coal, new pipelines
for transporting crude and petroleum
products, development of prioritized
inland waterways and new multi-modal
logistics hubs.
Port-led Industrial Development

For promoting port-led industrial


development, 14 Coastal Economic Zones
covering all the Maritime States and
Union Territories have been proposed.
These include 13 port-based discrete
manufacturing clusters, in the labour
intensive sectors of electronics, apparel,
leather products, furniture and food-

processing, and 14 large coastal clusters


for basic input industries such as power,
refineries & petrochemicals, steel and
downstream industries (Shipbuilding,
Automotive), and cement. Setting up
infrastructure for these clusters will
require an investment of Rs. 1 lac crore
and will attract an additional Rs. 7 lac
crore of industrial investment. These
clusters are expected to boost Indias
merchandize exports by USD 110 Billion
by 2025.
Coastal Community Development

As part of Sagarmalas objective


of coastal community development,
skilling, fishermen and other community
development projects have also been
identified. Setting up of a Community
Development Fund is envisaged to
enable these coastal communities related
projects and initiatives.
All the above projects will be showcased
in the maiden Maritime India Summit
2016, for attracting potential investors
and their implementation will be taken
up starting FY 16-17. The Ministry of
Shipping is also conducting stakeholder
consultations with the Maritime States
and Central Ministries to finalize the NPP
by March 2016.

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

marks such as light houses, beacons and shore markings.

21

TRANSFORMATIVE | SHIPBUILDING, REPAIRS, & MARINE INFRA

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

22

SHIPBUILDING, REPAIRS, & MARINE INFRA | Class Act

ClassNK Amends Rules


for Construction of
Steel Ships
Responding to a large container ship casualty in June 2013, ClassNK established an
investigative panel on Large Container Ship Safety.

lassNK has announced


that it has released
amendments to its
Rules and Guidance
for the Survey and
Construction of Steel Ships which
includes structural strength requirements of container carriers.
In response to a large container ship casualty in June 2013,
ClassNK established The Investigative Panel on Large Container
Ship Safety, which comprised of
shipbuilders, shipping companies,

and people with relevant knowledge and experience, to investigate the possibility of casualty
occurrence and the structural
safety of large container carriers.
The results from the investigation
and ClassNKs action plan were released in the Investigation Report
on Structural Safety of Large Container Ships in September 2014.
On the other hand, Japans
Ministry of Land, Infrastructure,
Transport and Tourism (MLIT)
Committee on Large Container

Ship Safety released recommendations of requirements for large


container ships in its Final Report
in March 2015.
Furthermore, the International Association of Classification
Societies (IACS) adopted the new
Longitudinal Strength Standard
for Container Ships (Unified Requirement S11A) and Functional
Requirements on Load Cases for
Strength Assessment of Container
Ships by Finite Element Analysis
(Unified Requirement S34).

Koichi Fujiwara is now Chairman


and President, ClassNK
Noboru Ueda passes on the mantle after 8
years at the helm

HIGHLIGHTS
Points to note
The amendments also
include requirements
related to the following:
Propeller shaft and
stern tube shaft surveys
Welding procedures
and related specifications
Scope of application of
fire-resistant cables
Fire safety measures
for vehicle carriers
transporting motor
vehicles powered by
compressed hydrogen or
compressed natural gas

Current Executive Vice President Koichi Fujiwara


has been appointed as Chairman and President
as well as a Representative Director of leading
classification society ClassNK, effective 7 March
2016. Current Executive Vice Presidents Yasushi
Nakamura and Tetsuya Kinoshita will continue
in their present roles on the team, joined by
Junichiro Iida as Managing Director.
Noboru Ueda has stepped down as Representative
Director, Chairman and President. Current
Executive Vice President Tetsushi Agata has been
appointed as an Executive Auditor as part of the
Societys aim to strengthen its auditing system.
Speaking on the occasion, newly appointed
Chairman and President Koichi Fujiwara
said: Following the recent downturn of the
shipping and shipbuilding markets, the business
environment surrounding ClassNK has become
even more challenging. Under our new executive
team, we will work to ensure stable operations
and further enhance our corporate governance

Mr. Koichi Fujiwara

Mr. Noboru Ueda

as required of an independent third-party


organization so that the Society can continue
contributing to the development of the maritime
industry in the long term.
Koichi Fujiwara holds a Master of Naval
Architecture from the University of Tokyo, and
served in Japans Ministry of Transportation (now
Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and
Tourism). Throughout his role in government,
he served as an outstanding policy maker in the
maritime administration and assumed the role of
Director-General of the Maritime Bureau in 2006.
He joined ClassNK in 2007, and was appointed to
Managing Director in 2010, followed by Executive
Vice President in 2011. He has so far commanded
the expansion and development of the Societys
certification services.

Class Act | SHIPBUILDING, REPAIRS, & MARINE INFRA

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

23

ClassNK Releases New


Structural Design Support
System PrimeShip-HULL
ClassNK has announced the release of its new structural design support system
PrimeShip-HULL for Container Carriers to correspond with its latest rule amendments.

o promote container carrier safety, ClassNK released


amendments to its Rules
and Guidance for the Survey and
Construction of Steel Ships on
25 December 2015. The amendments, based on findings from
ClassNKs investigation into a

large container carrier casualty,


include updates to independent
longitudinal strength requirements and reflect the new IACS
Unified Requirements (UR) S11A
and S34. These amendments will
apply to container carriers contracted for construction on or

Key features of PrimeShip-HULL for Container


Carriers include:
Rule calculation software capable of quickly performing

longitudinal strength assessments on cross sections,


including the bench structures specific to container
carriers.
Such assessments may be performed on cargo holds,
engine rooms, and the fore and aft parts of the ship;
Direct strength calculation software capable of efficiently
performing yield strength and buckling strength
assessments of the analysis on holds.
With the aim of reducing man-hours, the system
can propose appropriate reinforcement plans based on
sensitivity analysis and has a strong data linkage function
with NAPAs 3D CAD ship design software NAPA Steel;
Direct strength calculation software that takes into
consideration the effects of whipping, sea pressure and
container loads in line with ClassNKs independent
longitudinal strength requirements.

after 1 April 2016, three months


before the application of the IACS
UR S11A and S34..
The powerful total design support tool further increases the
efficiency and quality of container carrier structural design
and was developed based on
PrimeShip-HULL (HCSR) which
supports the safe design of bulk
carriers and oil tankers compliant
with the IACS Common Structural Rules for Bulk Carriers and
Oil Tankers (CSR BC & OT). As a
non-profit society that is dedicated to supporting the advancement of the maritime industry,
ClassNK offers PrimeShip-HULL
for Container Carriers to all of its
clients completely free of charge.

As a non-profit
society that is
dedicated to
supporting the
advancement of the
maritime industry,
ClassNK offers
PrimeShip-HULL for
Container Carriers
to all of its clients
completely free of
charge.

LR Provides New Guidance for Ship Design in Digital Age


The first edition of LRs guidance to clients on cyber-enabled ships is the result of
detailed work and consultation with industry and academia.
What is a Cyber-enabled Ship?
A
cyber-enabled
ship
will
consist
of
multiple,
interconnected systems. Due
to the rapid pace of technology
development
prescriptive
approaches to risk management
are not suitable. Instead, a total
systems approach is required
taking into account all systems
on board and critically on

shore, how they are designed and


installed, how they connect, and
how they will be managed.
LR explains what is meant
by cyber systems and looks
at their impact on shipping.
The guidance describes six
key areas of risk that need to
be considered and addressed
in order to assure safety and
dependability: systems, human-

systems, software, network and


communications, data assurance,
and cyber-security.
Luis Benito, LRs Marine
Marketing Director, commented:
Today, leading manufacturers
and ship operators want to create
ships that can be accessed by
remote onshore services, anytime
and anywhere for safety and
performance benefits.

The guidance describes


six key areas of risk that
need to be considered
and addressed in order
to assure safety and
dependability: systems,
human-systems,
software, network and
communications, data
assurance, and cybersecurity.

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

24

SHIPBUILDING, REPAIRS, & MARINE INFRA | MAKE IN INDIA

IRClass Continues
its Contribution to
Make in India
Develops Rules for Indian Coast Guard Ships. While the Rules have been made simpler
and user friendly, the special requirements that are relevant to Coast Guard Ships
continue to be retained.

While the original Rules


for Coast Guard ships had
been based on the Rules
for Indian Naval noncombatant ships, the new
Rules are largely derived
from the IRS Rules for
High Speed Craft and
Light Craft which are
more appropriate for
application to patrol
vessels.

he Rules and Regulations for Construction


and Classification of
Indian Coast Guard
Ships, developed by
the Indian Register of Shipping
(IRS) were formally released by
the Director General Indian Coast
Guard, Vice Admiral HCS Bisht
AVSM at a ceremony held at the
Indian Coast Guard Headquarters,
New Delhi. The Chairman and
Managing Director of the Indian
Register of Shipping, Mr Arun
Sharma formally presented the
Rules for release.
Speaking on the occasion, Inspector General SK Goyal PTM
TM, Dy. Director General (Material and Maintenance), dwelt upon
the long association of the IRS
with the ICG, since the early 80s,
when the indigenous construction
of Coast Guard Offshore Patrol
Vessels commenced at Mazagon
Docks Ltd., at Mumbai. He stated
that the first IRS Rules for Construction and Classification of
Indian Coast Guard Ships were
initially published in 2008. Over
time, with gaining of experience in
their usage, it was realised that the
Rules required review and modifi-

cation to better suit the operating


conditions and requirements of
Coast Guard ships. He stated that
the Coast Guard had been closely
involved in the formulation of the
new Rules.
Mr. Arun Sharma responded by
stating while the original Rules
for Coast Guard ships had been
based on the Rules for Indian Naval non- combatant ships, the new
Rules are largely derived from the
IRS Rules for High Speed Craft and
Light Craft which are more appropriate for application to patrol
vessels. In addition, applicable features of the Rules for non-combatant Naval Ships have also been retained. Comments from shipyards
have also been incorporated, prior
to approval by the IRS Technical
Committee. Thus, while the Rules
have been made simpler and user
friendly, the special requirements
that are relevant to Coast Guard
Ships continue to be retained.
CMD IRS thanked the Coast
Guard for their active involvement during the formulation of
the Rules. He stated that the Rules
would be made available on the
IRS web site for downloading by
authorized external users and

would be periodically updated,


based on the experience and future technological developments.
He added that the release of the
Rules is very significant for the
national mission of developing indigenous capability in shipbuilding
for the Coast Guard.
Director General Indian Coast
Guard congratulated IRS on the
development of the rules and said
with emphasis on Make in India
by the government, these rules
will help in supporting indigenous
ship building in India, with prominence on excellence in design and
quality construction of ICG ships.
Additional DG, Rajender Singh
PTM TM, all Deputy Director Generals, all Principal Directors and
other senior officers of the Coast
Guard Headquarters were present
at the release. IRS Chairman was
accompanied by a team of senior
executives from IRS comprising
Vice Admiral BS Randhawa PVSM
AVSM VSM (retd), Principal Naval
Advisor, Mr Ravi Sachdeva, Chief
Surveyor and Senior Vice President, Mr N Girish, Head Research
& Development and Commander
KK Dhawan (retd), Head Defence
Services.

MAKE IN INDIA | SHIPBUILDING, REPAIRS, & MARINE INFRA

Cochin Shipyard to Build Engine


and Propulsion Competencies

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

25

ochin Shipyard will have


a containerised self-sufficient workshop within its
premises to cater primarily to propeller blade metallurgical repairs
and engine component repairs.
A recent MoU with Wartsila India would also enable it to have
comprehensive Engine Services,
Propulsion Services, and Electrical and Automation services for
its various requirements.
The MoU was signed by Mr.
Sunny Thomas, Director (Technical & Operations), Cochin Shipyard Limited and Mr. James Rajan, Director, Service Unit South
Asia, Wrtsil India in the presence of CMD, CSL and other senior officials of Cochin Shipyard
Limited and Wrtsil India.
With this MOU, CSL is expected
to attract more ship-repair business at its present facility. The
agreement also gives Wrtsil an
opportunity to set up an Original
Equipment Manufacturer centre
(OEM) at the Cochin Port Trust
Area in the future.
CSL had taken over the existing
ship-repair facility in the Cochin

Port Trust area through a lease


agreement. The yard is planning
to set up a new international ship
repair facility in the area with a
shiplift system. The existing facility in the area which so far had
been put to minimal use in the
past was revamped and put into
operation by CSL, with employees
being re-skilled and retrained.
Since then, the ship-repair facility has started to generate revenue in the last couple of years.
CSLs MOU with Wrtsil India is
expected to attract more business
opportunities.

We expect the combining of the


strengths of both companies
to be a significant event in the
Indian ship-repair sector.
Mr. Madhu S. Nair
CMD of CSL

This is a significant step for us


in India. As a next step, we are
looking forward to having a
full-fledged Original Equipment
Manufacturer (OEM) centre in
the upcoming ship-repair yard
at Cochin Port.
Mr. James Rajan, Director,
Wartsila India

Pipavav Defence becomes


Reliance Defence and
Engineering
Source: PTI

Anil Ambani

ipavav
Defence
and
Offshore
Engineering
Company
Ltd
is
now Reliance Defence and
Engineering Ltd (RDEL).
The company said in a
statement that RDEL has received

a certificate of change of name


from the office of the Registrar
of
Companies,
Ahmedabad,
certifying
the
change
of
name of Pipavav Defence and
Offshore Engineering Company
Ltd to Reliance Defence and
Engineering Ltd with effect from
March 3, 2016.
The
Anil
Group
group
company had announced plans
to acquire a controlling stake
in Pipavav Defence for up to Rs
2,082 crore last year. RDEL is
the first private sector company
in India to obtain the licence and

contract to build warships.


The facility houses the only
modular shipbuilding facility
with a capacity to build fully
fabricated and outfitted blocks,
the statement mentioned.
According to the release, the
fabrication facility is spread
over 2.1 million square feet.
The shipyard has a pre-erection
berth of 980 meters length and
40 meters width, and 2 Goliath
cranes with combined lifting
capacity of 1,200 tonnes, besides
outfitting berth length of 780
meters.

EQUIPMENT & TECHNOLOGY | SPECIAL FEATURE

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

26

DESMI Ocean Guard


A/S - Ballast water
treatment systems
DESMI Ocean Guard A/S has developed RayCleanTM - a type approved ballast water
treatment systems.
By: Mr. Angani Murthy

The author is
Country Head, India
DESMI Pumping
Technology
(India Laision Office)
E: amu@desmi.com
M: +91-9949339054

he system is designed
and developed with
the aim to provide
a system that meets
the IMO and USCG
requirements in all typical operational conditions, and at the lowest
total cost of ownership. Therefore
the system employ highly efficient
low pressure UV lamps with exceptionally long lifetime and low
power consumption. The system
is tested and approved for use in
all salinities and water temperatures, and is approved for operation in dirty water with very low
UV-Transmission.
The operation of the systems is
fully automatic and the systems
can be completely integrated into
existing ship automation systems.
The systems can be delivered in
modules for easy integration into
existing vessels with very limited
available space, or be delivered
skid mounted for easy and compact installation on new builds and
retrofits where the required space
is available.

WHY DESMI?
In all aspects of our business
we strive to make our customers
stronger. We do this by delivering
the right products that reliably
meet the IMO and USCG discharge
standards, with the lowest total
cost of ownership. In addition we
offer worldwide support through

the global DESMI organization


and our partners, all the way from
engineering and planning of installation of systems, to commissioning and service of systems in
operation. DESMI has more than
180 years of history and therefore
you can rely on us to be here for
you also in the future.

The RayCleanTM system is second to none in the industry.


This leadership is obtained for a number of reasons:
Performance: The demonstrated
performance of the RayCleanTM system
is second to none. The system has been
tested according to both IMO and USCG
requirements, at USCG approved test
facilities and under the supervision
of accredited USCG Independent
Laboratory, DNV GL. This ensures the
highest level of test independence and
scrutiny of all aspects of the system.
The RayCleanTM system has proven
its performance in all salinities (fresh,
brackish, and marine water) and down
to a record-level low UV-Transmission
of just 33%.
Operational costs: Everywhere
in the system we use high quality
components and materials in order
to ensure long lifetime and minimum
need for maintenance. As an example
we use highly efficient low-pressure
UV lamps with a staggering lifetime of
12,000 operating hours. This means you
will only have to replace the UV lamps
once or twice in the lifetime of a vessel!
In addition, the power consumption
is extremely low, just 21 kW per
300 m3/h flow when the water is dirty
and the system is running at max
power. In cleaner water conditions the

power consumption drops to 11 kW per


300 m3/h.
Safety: For us the safety is of
paramount importance. Both safety
for the crew, the vessel and the
environment. Therefore the system
utilizes or generates no chemicals
or active substances. Neither for
the treatment process, nor for the
cleaning of the system. In addition the
used low pressure UV lamps contains
no liquid mercury, but just amalgam
in solid form. This means that if you
accidentally break a low pressure UV
lamp, cleaning is simple and without
any risks. In comparison the widely
used medium pressure UV lamps
contains mercury in liquid form, which
imposes strict requirements to crew
education and safety equipment in case
a medium pressure UV lamp breaks
In fact we are so convinced about
the true market leadership of the
RayCleanTM system that we invite you
to compare the RayCleanTM system to
any other system.
Our BWTS can be offered from a Flow
rate of 100m3/hr to 3000m3/hr.

Marine & Offshore

Pumps & Pumping Solutions

Gre
Tech en
nolo
g

OptiSaveTM - Energy Saving System

Engine Room Pumps

Intelligent control of your cooling water system

High-efficiency pumps for every application


incl. DESMI 48 Fast Track delivery of pumps

IMO
DNV and
t
app ype
rove
d

RayCleanTM

Genuine Spare Parts Kits

For trouble-free, easy and simple maintenance


and overhaul of your pumps

Ballast Water Treatment Systems

MARINE & OFFSHORE

PROVEN TECHNOLOGY
www.desmi.com

INDUSTRY

OIL SPILL RESPONSE

DESMI Pumping Technology A/S


(India Liaison Office)
413, Aditya Trade Centre, Ameerpet
Hyderabad 500016
91- 8790122223
Email: srai@desmi.com

DEFENCE & FUEL

UTILITY

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

28

EQUIPMENT & TECHNOLOGY | BALLAST WATER

In 2010, ClassNK
published the first
edition of its Guidelines
on the Installation of
Ballast Water Treatment
Systems which contained
information related to
the selection of ballast
water treatment systems,
general requirements
and precautions
related to installation,
and a description of
the procedure for the
approval of ballast water
treatment systems the
Classification Society.

ClassNK Releases
Amendments to
Guidelines on BWTS
In particular, additional requirements for tankers carrying flammable liquids have been
laid out in order to improve onboard safety, protect the marine environment, and ensure
the structural strength and integrity of the ship.
By: SNM Events team

eading classification
society ClassN has released amendments to
its Guidelines on the
Installation of Ballast Water Treatment Systems
(BWTS). The latest Guidelines
include alterations to the application date of the ballast water
performance standard, additions
and modifications of definitions,
and a revision of standards for

installation of ballast water


treatment systems.
The IMO developed and adopted The International Convention
for the Control and Management
of Ships Ballast Water and Sediments, 2004 (BWM Convention)
with the aim of protecting the
marine environment from the
transfer of harmful aquatic organisms in ballast water carried
by ships.

In 2010, ClassNK published the


first edition of its Guidelines on
the Installation of Ballast Water
Treatment Systems which contained information related to the
selection of ballast water treatment systems, general requirements and precautions related to
installation, and a description of
the procedure for the approval of
ballast water treatment systems
the Classification Society.
In the latest edition of its
Guidelines, ClassNK has amended the application date of the ballast water performance standard
based on the revised implementation schedule adopted by IMO
Assembly resolution A.1088(28).
Requirements relating to standards for installation of ballast
water treatment systems have
also been expanded upon in
the latest edition of ClassNKs
Guidelines in response to the
IACS Unified Requirement (UR)
M74 Installation of Ballast Water Management Systems that
was adopted in September 2015.
In particular, additional requirements for tankers carrying flammable liquids have been laid out
in order to improve onboard
safety, protect the marine environment, and ensure the structural strength and integrity of
the ship.

BALLAST WATER | EQUIPMENT & TECHNOLOGY

29

Damens InvaSave Mobile


BWTS on Track to Obtain
IMO Type Approval

amens InvaSave mobile


ballast water discharge
technology is on track
to obtain IMO type approval
as it enters into the last phase
of certification by the Dutch
flagstate..
The InvaSave technology
has been successfully tested
in
various
representative
challenging water conditions
and the official land-based
testing was completed at the
MEA test institute in the
Netherlands in 2015. Damen has
announced that final shipboard
tests have commenced on board
the 800TEU container vessel

Henrike Schepers.
Test protocols are in line with
IMO BWMC test guidelines
and additional requirements
of the Dutch flagstate. Unlike
conventional on board ballast
water
treatment
systems,
InvaSave is a mobile discharge
technology for port services.
Therefore, during the shipboard
tests ballast water will be taken
in untreated and the efficacy of
the technology will be validated
upon discharge only. IMO
type approval is expected to
be obtained Q3 2016 and a patent
is pending.
Damen can deliver the

InvaSave technology in a selfsufficient


mobile
container,
which can be put onboard a
service barge or moved around
the port on a trailer or a pontoon.
A vessel needing to discharge
its ballast water can connect
to the InvaSave unit, which
then processes the water and
discharges it in the port in
compliance with the IMO D2
standard. For vessels with much
larger ballast water capacities,
it is possible to interconnect
several systems. If mobility
is not required, the InvaSave
containers can also be stacked
and interconnected on shore.

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

Damen can deliver the InvaSave technology in a self-sufficient


mobile container, which can be put onboard a service barge
or moved around the port on a trailer or a pontoon.

Final shipboard tests have


commenced on board
the 800TEU container
vessel Henrike Schepers.
Test protocols are in line
with IMO BWMC test
guidelines and additional
requirements of the
Dutch flagstate.

Cathelco to Seek USCG Type


Approval for its BWTS
IMO Type Approval and AMS Certification from the USCG enables the system to be used
on vessels for a period of up to five years, while the treatment system undergoes testing
to USCG standards.

athelco has submitted a


Letter of Intent to the U.S.
Coast Guard verifying
readiness to begin testing their
Ballast Water Treatment System
(BWTS) for Type Approval.
The tests will be carried out
under FDA/CMFDA methodology
where life forms are judged as
living/dead, the standard that the
U.S. Coast Guard insists must be
applied to ballast water treatment
systems.
The new IMO G8 guidelines
provide the assurance that the
system meets all the necessary
performance criteria, resulting
in publicly available data which

enables systems to be compared


more easily, said Peter Smith,
sales director of Cathelco.
The Cathelco BWT system
is based on a combination of
filtration and UV technology. In
order to maintain its effectiveness,
the system automatically adjusts
to different sea water qualities.
The Cathelco system uses a
UVT sensor to measure UV light
transmittance the amount of UV
radiation actually passing through
the seawater. This is a very
reliable parameter for calculating
the UV dose as well as ensuring
that power is used economically.
Other important features of

the system are stepless power


control, inlet manifolds designed
to make the water flow in a helix
to increase contact time during
irradiation, and a chemical free
cleaning system.
The most recent installation
of the system is on board the
Harvey Stone (Hull 234) an
offshore vessel built by the
Eastern Shipbuilding Group Inc.,
for Harvey Gulf International
Marine. The Rampage 6400
multi-purpose
field
support
vessel (MPFSV) with a length of
64.8m and an 18m beam is to be
installed with a Cathelco system
having a capacity of 150m3/hr.

Many ship owners are


still undecided about
which BWT systems
to purchase for their
vessels. Clearly, potential
customers will have
greater confidence in a
system that has attained
USCG Type Approval and
we are committed to
achieving this within the
next 12 months.
Peter Smith, Sales
Director, Cathelco

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

30

EQUIPMENT & TECHNOLOGY | FUELS & LUBES

Scrubber Ready
Notation from
DNV GL
GL has created a new class notation
to help shipowners prepare their
newbuildings for the installation of a
scrubber. SCRUBBER READY ensures
that the necessary preparations are in
place for a smooth and cost-efficient
scrubber retrofit at a later stage.

art of the new DNV GL rules for classification,


the SCRUBBER READY notation can be
awarded to ships that have planned and
partly prepared for the installation of an exhaust
gas cleaning system (EGCS) for the removal of SOx
at a later date.
There is no doubt that stricter emissions
regulations for sulphur oxides are here to stay, says
Knut rbeck-Nilssen, CEO at DNV GL Maritime.
This new SCRUBBER READY class notation gives
shipowners the flexibility to minimize their initial
investment when ordering a newbuilding, while
at the same time having the confidence that their
vessels are already on the track to easy compliance
with incoming emissions regulations, he adds.
The notation identifies the general type
and category of scrubber systems than can be
installed on the vessel. It also details the level
of scrubber readiness, with the minimum scope
attesting that the space available and future
installation arrangement meets class and statutory
requirements. This can be expanded to include
more extensive preparations, through to a complete
review of the scrubber documentation according
to main class rules, including the certification and
installation of piping and sub-systems.
For shipyards, working with the SCRUBBER
READY standard gives an easy framework within
which to offer future-ready ship designs to the
market, asserts DNV GL.

A few things to note


Ship managers have to factor in many considerations when
planning for a potential future scrubber installation, from space
and stability requirements, to fire safety, piping, corrosion
resistance, and the effect on the main engine. It is very important
to have an overview of the design and an understanding of how
the system will interact with the engines and auxiliary parts of
the machinery system. We also offer scrubber advisory services
to support our customers, from building the business case, to
risk assessment of the design, installation, commissioning,
hardware-in-the-loop testing of the control system, right
through to the system entering into operation
Mr. Hans Jacob Horgen, Engineer at DNV GL
for exhaust gas cleaning rules

VPS and DNV


GL Launch
New Fuel
Analytics
Solution

s part of DNV GLs ECO


Insight fleet performance
management portal, the
new analytics tool will enable
a systematic assessment of the
impact of fuel quality on vessel
performance, for the first time
ever. The Fuel Analytics solution
is the result of an ongoing close
cooperation between VPS and
DNV GL.
We have been the largest fuel
testing services provider since
our inception in 1981, says Gerard
Rohaan, CEO of VPS. And as a
result we have the worlds largest
fuel sampling database over
two million tested samples. By
extracting valuable information
from this extensive database
with state-of-the-art analytical
tools, we help our customers get
the best value from their bunker
purchases through fast, accurate
performance monitoring and
decision making.
The
new
fuel
analytics
solution is a powerful online
benchmarking tool that shipping
companies can use alongside ECO

Insights existing modules.


Fuel quality is calculated in
terms of four major benchmarks:
technical quality (meeting the
specifications of ISO standard
8217), financial quality (energy,
water
content),
statutory
compliance as well as reporting
quality (deviation from the bunker
delivery note). By providing
aggregated
and
comparable
benchmarks, ship operators can
easily assess ports and suppliers
globally on a common scale.
By integrating Fuel Analytics
within our ECO Insight solution,
shipping companies can now
get even more analytical depth
from the most comprehensive
fleet performance portal on
the market, says Dr. Torsten
Bssow, DNV GLs Head of Fleet
Performance Management. For
the first time, shipping companies
can now easily differentiate
between the efficiency loss due to
fuel quality, voyage performance,
and hull, propeller, engine and
systems degradation.

Benchmarks and the benefits of the tool


Fuel quality is calculated in terms of four major benchmarks: technical
quality (meeting the specifications of ISO standard 8217), financial quality
(energy, water content), statutory compliance as well as reporting quality
(deviation from the bunker delivery note). By providing aggregated and
comparable benchmarks, ship operators can easily assess ports and
suppliers globally on a common scale.
By integrating Fuel Analytics within our ECO Insight solution, shipping
companies can now get even more analytical depth from the most
comprehensive fleet performance portal on the market, according to Dr.
Torsten Bssow, DNV GLs Head of Fleet Performance Management. It is
possible for shipping companies to now easily differentiate between the
efficiency loss due to fuel quality, voyage performance, and hull, propeller,
engine and systems degradation, he said.

SPECIAL FEATURE | EQUIPMENT & TECHNOLOGY

ll diesel engines
have a primary
lube
oil
filter
which is installed
between
the
engine oil pump and the engine
components. This is always a
barrier cartridge type filter rated
at 40 to 80 microns to stop the
larger size particles going to the
engine components. (see fig 1).
Filtek Centrifugal Oil Cleaner
fitted in the bypass lube oil
circuit of the engine has been
found to be extremely effective
in removing carbon soot, wear
metal particles, inorganic and
organic particles down to 1
micron without affecting the
oil pressure or flow of oil to the
engine (see fig 2).
Recently in the past 10 years
engine
manufacturers
have

started to realise that the wear and


tear of friction components of the
engine such as bearings, piston
rings and liners, turbo bearings
valve guides etc happens due to
the smaller particles less than 5
microns.(see fig 3)
The only way to capture these
tiny particles between 1 and
5 microns is with a very high
centrifugal force, nearly 2000G.
The dirty oil enters the centrifuge
under engine operating pressure,
enters the rotor chamber, is
expelled via the 2 nozzles at the
centrifuge base to eventually
return through the crankcase
into the lube oil sump. The action
of oil exiting through the nozzles
gives the rotor a reverse spin
directly proportional to the inlet
pressure. Speeds to 6000 RPM can
be achieved creating tremendous
centrifugal force on the particle
to separate contaminants from

the oil, on the inside rotor wall.


(see fig 4).
The Filtek Centrifugal Oil
Cleaner is installed on the
crankcase cover of the engine.
Only 10% of the oil flow capacity
of the pump, is taken from the oil
cooler inlet or the lube oil filter
assembly and sent to the oil sump
via the centrifuge. (see fig 5)
Advantages of fitting a Filtek
centrifuge are:
Removal of contaminant to 1
micron will increase Engine oil
life by min 50%.
Fully cleanable unit so no
consumable costs to enduser.
Environment friendly as
contaminant is bio degradable.
Increase in engine life by at least
25%.
One time cost effective
investment for life of the engine.
ROI considering the above is less
than 3 months.

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

Source: Filtek India

31

FILTEK CENTRIFUGAL BYPASS


LUBE OIL FILTRATION SYSTEM

The engine-mount centrifugal


bypass filter is effective
in controlling lube oil
contamination of the engine
being operated. In particular,
in the batch treatment system,
since circulation purification of
lube oil is not conducted during
engine operation, equipment of
the centrifugal bypass filter is
indispensable.
Yanmar Marine

Centrifuge is a bypass filter:

FIG 1

FIG 4

FIG 2

Removing contamination.increased oil usage

Particle size distribution of centrifuge deposits

FIG 3

Removing contamination.increased oil usage

Bypass oil
centrifuges
extend oil filter
change periods.
They mount
on the side of
the engine and
can be cleaned
with the engine
running.
Caterpillar

FIG 5

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

32

EQUIPMENT & TECHNOLOGY | PROPULSION

Wartsila Conducts
Research on Singing
Propellers
Singing occurs as a strong tonal noise originating from the propeller, thus causing a
negative effect to onboard comfort levels.

Our research has


shown that the singing
phenomenon can be
controlled by selecting
the main parameters of
the propeller blades, by
careful attention to the
flexural modes of the
propeller blades, and by
careful attention to the
specific geometry at the
trailing edge of
the blades.
Mr. Arto Lehtinen,
Vice President,
Propulsion, Wrtsil
Marine Solutions

Main Points
Current research
indicates that there
is more complexity
and sensitiveness to
the hypothesis that
the frequency of the
propeller blades vibration
mode coincides with
the frequency of the
hydrodynamic excitation
forces at the trailing edge
of the blades.
Finite Element Method
(FEM) analysis tools
have been used in the
identifying of the risk
indicators related to the
main propeller design
parameters.
Avoidance of singing
has now been added as a
standard Wrtsil design
feature

joint
research
project carried out
by Wrtsil and
City
University
London
has
succeeded in identifying the
specific
design
parameters
that create the risk of singing
propellers.
Singing occurs as a strong
tonal noise originating from
the propeller, thus causing a
negative effect to on board
comfort levels. The problem
has long been recognised in
the marine industry. While the
general perception has been that
the frequency of the propeller
blades vibration mode coincides
with the frequency of the
hydrodynamic excitation forces
at the trailing edge of the blades,
the current research indicates
that there is more complexity and
sensitiveness to this hypothesis.

The
research
programme
reached its conclusions in
December 2015.
Our research has shown that
the singing phenomenon can be
controlled by selecting the main
parameters of the propeller blades,
by careful attention to the flexural
modes of the propeller blades, and
by careful attention to the specific
geometry at the trailing edge
of the blades. It has shown that
all these aspects are interacting
and can prevent the singing of
propellers, says Arto Lehtinen,
Vice
President,
Propulsion,
Wrtsil Marine Solutions.
Citys Professor of Marine
Engineering, Professor John
Carlton said: This has been an
extremely successful project
in dealing with an important
propeller design issue. As an
industry, we thought we had
discovered a pragmatic solution

to the singing propeller problem


many years ago. However,
some recent advanced propeller
designs did not respond to the
conventional treatment. As
such, this research has now led
to a method enabling designers
to assess the singing potential of
a propeller at the design stage.
Finite Element Method (FEM)
analysis tools have been used
in the identifying of the risk
indicators related to the main
propeller design parameters.
By correctly adjusting these
parameters, the response side
risks can be minimised. Similarly,
Computational Fluid Dynamic
(CFD) technology was used to
analyse the vortex shedding
behaviour of the trailing edge
design. The results indicate that
a proper design of the trailing
edge details reduces the shedding
and, therefore, also the excitation
forces. Wrtsil has used CFD
in its hydrodynamic design
processes for some 20 years.
Vessels at risk for singing are
identified in the design process.
Along with the existing Wrtsil
propeller design features, notably
optimum efficiency, strength,
and limited cavitation and
pressure pulses, the avoidance
of singing has now been
added as a standard Wrtsil
design feature. Furthermore,
the findings from the research
project have been incorporated
into the companys OPTI-Design,
which was introduced as a new
state-of-the-art design concept
in 2014. That design offers
fuel savings of up to 4 per cent
and highly reliable full scale
performance predictions.

PROPULSION | EQUIPMENT & TECHNOLOGY

O&G Sector Vessels to Receive


Advanced Propulsion Systems

specialized vessels require an


advanced propulsion and power
generation system to perform
its operation. The new Azipod D
will provide to vessels millimetre
precision at open sea.
The solutions we are providing

About the technology


The Azipod D is the latest generation of ABBs award winning podded electric propulsion
system. The vessels will each feature two 4.2 megawatt units. A hybrid cooling system using
a combination of direct seawater cooling and internal air cooling increases electric motor
performance by up to 45 percent. Overall, the Azipod units will have a substantial impact on
the ships fuel efficiency. Manoeuvrability and station keeping is the key for the vessels and the
Azipodpropulsors 360 degree steerable propeller makes it ideal for their requirements.
The Onboard DC Grid will cut fuel consumption by up to 27%. It allows the ships four 3600kW
generators, also supplied by ABB, to operate at variable and optimum speed. The vessel is
also equipped with batteries, which will further optimize use of the power plant and reduce
energy consumption

will
make
these
ships
incredibly
flexible and
efficient
to
operate, says
Juha Koskela, Managing Director
of BU Marine and Ports. The
Azipod D, On board DC Grid and
energy storage are cutting edge
technologies for the offshore
sector.
The ships will also be equipped
with ABBs Remote Diagnostic
Service. This system will connect
the vessels to ABBs shore side
technical support centers where
the technicians can monitor the
performance of the vessel and
ensure necessary support.

The solutions we are


providing will make
these ships incredibly
flexible and efficient
to operate. The Azipod
D, On board DC Grid
and energy storage
are cutting edge
technologies which
match the demanding
conditions often
experienced in the
offshore sector.
Mr. Juha Koskela,
Managing Director,
BU Marine and Ports

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

BB will supply the


power, propulsion
and
energy
storage
solution
for two of the most
innovative vessels operating in
the offshore Oil & Gas sector. The

33

ABBs award winning Azipod D Propulsion Systems will provide


substantial impact on two vessels each featuring 4.2 megawatt units
and provide them substantial fuel efficiency.

EQUIPMENT & TECHNOLOGY | ALTERNATIVE POWER / COMMUNICATION

Ships to Soon Get LNG Power at


Port of Hamburg
www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

34

German Ministry Supports


Becker Marine for
Alternative Supply of Energy

r. Enak Ferlemann,
Parliamentary
Secretary
at
the
German
Federal
Ministry
of
Transport
and
Digital
Infrastructure presented Becker
Marine Systems GmbH&Co. KG
a grant notification for funding
of an overall concept for the
alternative supply of energy to
ships at ports.
The award would make it
possible for the worlds first
special containers of their kind

(LNG PowerPacs) to be deployed


aboard container ships. The
grant is being provided within
the framework of the Mobility
and Fuel Strategy of the German
Federal Government, with the
use of liquefied natural gas (LNG)
being fostered as an alternative
fuel for maritime applications.
The LNG PowerPac is a compact unit the size of two 40-foot
containers, intelligently combining a gas-powered generator with
an output of 1.5 Megawatts and
an LNG tank in a limited amount
of space. Once a container ship is
moored, the first thing is to place
the LNG PowerPac on board
via the port terminals locally

The LNG PowerPac is a compact unit the size of two 40-foot


containers, intelligently combining a gas-powered generator with
an output of 1.5 Megawatts and an LNG tank in a limited amount of
space. Once a container ship is moored, the first thing is to place the
LNG PowerPac on board via the port terminals locally available,
standardised loading equipment (such as gantry cranes, ship-to-shore
cranes, van carriers) to provide energy to the onboard power supply
during the vessels layover at port.

available, standardised loading


equipment (such as gantry cranes,
ship-to-shore cranes, van carriers)
to provide energy to the onboard
power supply during the vessels
layover at port. Compared to operation of the ships auxiliary engines, this represents a decisive
reduction. As part of the planned
pilot project, for the first time
ever container ships will be supplied power by LNG PowerPacs
during layovers at the Port of
Hamburg.
For ships spending a longer time
at port in Hamburg there is a cascading option, i.e. two tank containers arranged on top of each
other for each LNG PowerPac.
This ensures a continuous supply of power for up to 60 hours.
However, two LNG PowerPacs
can also be operated in tandem on
board a ship. Tandem operation
means that two LNG PowerPacs
arranged side by side are able to
supply up to 3 Megawatts of power to ships with a greater demand
for power.

A Cloud Based Software to Improve


Communication Efficiency
As part of a pilot test, Hapag-Lloyd will use innovative, cloud-based stowage-planning
software developed by the US supplier XVELA.

H
The more transparency there
is throughout the transport
chain, the more efficiently
everyone involved can
make plans for and employ
their assets and resources.
Cloud-based solutions such
as XVELA can provide us with
real-time data, making it
possible for us to considerably
improve the exchange of
information with terminals.
Mr. Jrn Springer
Head of Hapag-Lloyd Fleet
Support Center

apag-Lloyd has signed a


cooperation
agreement
with XVELA based in
Oakland, California. As a result,
stowage-planning and cargo data
of the individual ships in ports will
be available in real-time for both
the shipping company and the

terminal by means of the software.


The more transparency there
is throughout the transport chain,
the more efficiently everyone involved can make plans for and
employ their assets and resources.
We anticipate that this new software will give us important opera-

How does this software help?


The shipping company will be able to see the progress of loading and unloading operations on
an on-going basis and can deploy its ships more efficiently. For terminals, on the other hand,
there will be continual transparency regarding the state of stowage planning for an expected
ship, which will allow them to allot equipment and staff in a timely and reliable fashion.
The aim is to reduce unexpected changes at short notice in the coastal schedule as well as
unnecessary waiting times for both sides.
Hapag-Lloyds Fleet Support Center has existed since 2013. Located in Hamburg, where
the shipping company is headquartered, it keeps an eye on the entire fleet of both owned
and chartered vessels. In recent years, the Fleet Support Centers 10-person team and the
technology employed there have been able to achieve considerable savings, particularly in
vessel fuel consumption, reports the company.

tive advantages. Cloud-based solutions such as XVELA can provide


us with real-time data, making
it possible for us to considerably
improve the exchange of information with terminals, said Jrn
Springer, head of Hapag-Lloyds
Fleet Support Center. So were
excited about the pilot test and the
advantages it can open up to us.
We are continually searching for additional possibilities for
optimizing the processes of the
fleet while at sea and in ports.
We hope that the innovative approach in stowage planning will
provide fresh impetus particularly regarding times in port,
Springer added.

COMMUNICATION | EQUIPMENT & TECHNOLOGY

he disclosure demonstrates
how the decision made
by IMO administrations
requiring all ships of more than
300 gross tons to be fitted with
a Global Maritime Distress and
Safety System (GMDSS) remains
pivotal in protecting lives at sea.
Inmarsat is the only safety services
provider in the world approved to
deliver GMDSS under the rigorous
International Convention for the
Safety of Life At Sea requirements.

Ronald
Spithout,
Inmarsat
Maritime President, commented:
Over its lifetime, GMDSS has made
the biggest single contribution
to maritime safety since the
advent of radio in 1899. We are
immensely proud of Inmarsat
Cs unparalleled contribution
to GMDSS in the last 25 years.
Thousands of lives have been
saved and countless ships rescued
as a result. Since its inception
by the International Maritime
Organization (IMO) in 1979,
Inmarsats stated mission has been
to protect the lives of seafarers
globally by providing them and
their vessels with an essential free
of charge communication lifeline
in case of collision, grounding, fire,
bad weather and piracy.
The Inmarsat C service provides
a critical link between vessels
in distress and Maritime Rescue
Coordination Centres (MRCCs)

around the world. With proven


availability of 99.9%, Inmarsat C
always prioritises seafarer distress
alerts to MRCCs and to nearby
ships.
Today,
approximately
100,000 vessels rely on Inmarsat
C to provide vital communications,
at the press of a button.
Inmarsat continues to invest,
innovate and develop vital safety
services. Inmarsat C and Mini C
terminals also support safety NET,
the satellite-based global maritime
broadcast
service
providing
meteorological and navigation
warnings, plus search and rescue
broadcasts; the imminent launch
of SafetyNET II will also provide
enhanced functionality available
to maritime safety information
providers to broadcast safety
messages.

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

Inmarsat has marked


the 25th anniversary of
Inmarsat C by revealing
that more than 600 distress
alerts from vessels
in urgent need were
broadcast over the service
in 2015.

35

Inmarsat C Celebrates
25 Years of Safety
Provision Services

Over its lifetime, GMDSS


has made the biggest
single contribution to
maritime safety since the
advent of radio in 1899.
In 2020 we expect to
launch latest generation
satellite constellation
Inmarsat-6; continuing
our 35+ year commitment
to L-band and safety
services.
Ronald Spithout,
Inmarsat Maritime
President

New NSC Satellite to Help Track Ships


Efficiently
When launched in late April, a new satellite operated by the Norwegian Space Centre
(NSC) will include a payload that will improve the identification and tracking of ships
anywhere on the seas.

odays maritime traffic is


controlled via radio links,
which is limited to coastal
areas and even near to shore
there can still be gaps in coverage.
Satellites overcome this problem.
The ships identity and position
contained in AIS messages are
picked up by low-orbit satellites
then sent to ground stations for
processing and distribution..
The Norwegian satellite, NORSAT-1, will be carrying two Novel
SAT-AIS (NAIS) receivers developed by Kongsberg Seatex AS with
the support of ESA under the ARTES programme. The new units
were developed using commercial
off-the-shelf components, efficient qualification schemes, and

advanced technological solutions.


The approach has been applied
without compromising performance or functionality.
Handover of the recently-shipped NAIS units was
marked on two occasions, the
first after ESAs Joint Communications Board meeting on 16 September 2015 and the second on 17
December 2015 at ESA HQ with
ESA, NSC and KONGSBERG executives present.
With our closeness to the
Arctic and vast areas to monitor, satellite-based observation
is increasingly important for
Norway, says Bo Andersen, Director General of the Norwegian
Space Centre. We are therefore

deploying a range of dedicated


small satellites to provide us with
additional information for this
purpose. Besides these challenges it is also impressive to see the
enthusiasm and interest from the
Norwegian space industry to provide solutions for these missions.
The NORSAT-1 AIS receivers
are a direct response to the increased focus on cost/benefit in
todays space programmes. says
Magali Vaissiere, ESAs Director of Telecommunications and
Integrated Applications. Its a
great example of how ESA can
support the fundamental change
now taking place in how satellite
equipment is manufactured in an
efficient and timely way.

With our closeness to


the Arctic and vast areas
to monitor, satellitebased observation is
increasingly important
for Norway. We are
therefore deploying a
range of dedicated small
satellites to provide
us with additional
information for this
purpose.
Bo Andersen,
Director General of
the Norwegian Space
Centre

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

36

MANAGEMENT & HR | COMPLIANCE

SSI Reports Shipping


Making Steady Progress
The Sustainable Shipping Initiative highlights key areas of positive development within the
shipping industry, as well as the challenges to come, as it launches its Progress Report to
the end of 2015.
The report also
acknowledges the
significant challenges
that lie ahead in the
short-term such as
the requirement for
a strong regulatory
framework designed and
implemented by the IMO
supporting the reduction
of CO2 emissions, and
delivery of the UNFCCCs
target of less than two
degrees warming, as
agreed at the recent COP
21 meeting

he Sustainable Shipping
Initiative
(SSI)

a
pioneering coalition of
companies from across the global
shipping
industry
launched
its Progress Report to 2015,
which highlights the positive
developments that are being made
to drive shippings sustainability,
as well as the significant challenges
that lie ahead.
The Progress Report details the
key achievements, as well as the
significant body of work that has
been conducted by SSI members
to actively engage with, drive debate and inspire change within

This includes:
The development and use

of clean technologies, and


facilitating access to finance
for their implementation
through the SSIs innovative
Save as you Sail (SAYS)
financial concept, which
demonstrates how charterers,
owners and financiers can
model return on investment
and profits from more
efficient vessels

shipping. This is in conjunction


to a number of key initiatives that
have been led, and implemented
by SSI members to deliver tangible
solutions to make shipping a more
sustainable and prosperous industry by 2040.
In particular, the report highlights the developments in the
SSIs key work streams, where
members have worked collectively across the core areas that serve
to advance SSIs Vision.
While positive developments
have been made, the Progress Report also acknowledges the significant challenges that lie ahead in

the short-term. Specifically, the


requirement for a strong regulatory framework designed and
implemented by the International Maritime Organisation (IMO)
that supports the reduction of
CO2 emissions, and delivery of
the UNFCCCs target of less than
two degrees warming, as agreed
at the recent COP 21 meeting. It
also shows the need for continued
improvements in energy efficiency standards, as well as driving
further debate and change in relation to ocean governance and the
sustainable and equitable use of
ocean resources.

Facilitating action and debate

analysing attitudes to life at


sea, and what can be done
to make shipping a more
attractive place to work and
develop a career
The
development of a
Roadmap to be launched
in Q1 2016 a live tool that
sets out the key milestones
and critical areas that must be
addressed to chart a path to
success by 2040.

with key industry stakeholders


to address the challenges of
responsible ship recycling
Improving the transparent
exchange
of
information
to educate and drive better
decision-making through the
launch of a knowledge sharing
platform on the future of
shipping through the Futures
Centre
Conducting
research
and

COMPLIANCE | MANAGEMENT & HR

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

37

IMO gives ship owners


more time to liaise with
ECDIS manufacturers over new
IHO Standards
By extending the time available for shipping companies to upgrade their ECDIS software to
the new IHO Presentation Library edition 4.0 the imminent pressure on the ship owner and
overall supply chain is alleviated to some extent.

he IMO sub-committee on Navigation,


Communications and
Search and Rescue
(NCSR) has extended
the transition period for software
updates to existing ECDIS for one
year to 31 Aug 2017.
The NCSR accepted the IHOs
proposal to give all ship owners
using ECDIS more time to be able
to obtain the correct software
updates to the new IHO -52 presentation library and thus ensure
compliance with the guidelines on
Maintenance of ECDIS software
contained in IMO MSC 1.circ 1503.
The latest IHO Presentation
Library (version 4.0) addresses the
number one complaint levelled at
ECDIS; constant audible alarms.
By providing clear guidance to
ECDIS manufacturers on ENC
objects that will raise an alarm,
the IHO has tackled the issue of

alarm fatigue on the bridge. Also,


information such as fairway and
anchorage area names now appear
on screen, with landmarks, lights
and buoys viewable via a hoverover function. Both initiatives
reduce the time-consuming need
to find information buried in a
pick report.
In practice this extension means
the current IHO Presentation
Library edition 3.4 in use on
serving ECDIS will remain valid
until 31st Aug 2017. From 1st
September all vessels will be
expected to have upgraded their
ECDIS software to the IHO
Presentation Library edition 4.0
in order to remain compliant.
Tom Mellor, Chairman of the
IHOs ENC Working Group and
also the UKHO Head of Original
Equipment Manufacturer (OEM)
Support & Digital Standards
stated:

By extending the time available for shipping companies to


upgrade their ECDIS software to
the new IHO Presentation Library
edition 4.0 we have been able to
alleviate the imminent pressure
on the ship owner and the overall
supply chain.
Ship owners are encouraged
to contact their ECDIS manufacturer to start the transition to the
updated ECDIS Standards, in order to ensure a smooth switchover and to take advantage of the
benefits that the new editions will
bring to the bridge.
Whilst there is more time
available, the upgrade requirements will vary between different ECDIS makes and models, so
it is important that owners work
together with their ECDIS manufacturers to identify the steps that
need to be taken for all ECDIS systems across their fleet.

Whilst there is more time


available, the upgrade
requirements will vary
between different ECDIS
makes and models, so it
is important that owners
work together with their
ECDIS manufacturers to
identify the steps that need
to be taken for all ECDIS
systems across their fleet.
Tom Mellor
Chairman of the IHOs
ENC Working Group

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MANAGEMENT & HR | welfare

APM Terminals Mumbai Opens


Medical Center for Truckers
38

More than 18,000 drivers can benefit annually from the health center says the Terminal.
Source: APM Terminal

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

s part of the
companys
ongoing commitment
to
Indias
increasingly
important
trade
and
transportation industry, and the
people of the local community,
APM Terminals Mumbai has
opened a Drivers Health Center

We hope to lead
by example. We
estimate more than
18,000 drivers can
benefit annually from
the health center. If
replicated elsewhere
in India, the program
will have a significant
impact on Indias supply
chain by promoting
an awareness of
the profession, and
addressing the issue of
shortage of tractortrailer drivers faced by
the industry.
Mr. Pradip Agrawal,
APM Terminals
Mumbai CEO

Travelling long
distances on difficult
road infrastructure
makes these drivers
susceptible to
professional hazards,
while poor working
conditions and long
hours only worsen
the situation; we are
hopeful of bringing
a positive change by
helping the drivers
maintain a healthy
body and sound mind
behind the wheel, and
encouraging safe and
responsible driving.
Mr. Ravi Gaitonde,
APM Terminals
Mumbai COO

dedicated to the health and


welfare of the tractor-trailer
drivers serving the entire Nhava
Sheva complex at the Jawaharlal
Nehru Port (JNP), near Mumbai.
The purpose of the new
medical facility is to provide the
trucking community with free
access to basic hygiene, health
and sanitation facilities as part
of an overall effort to improve
safety and the basic living
and working conditions of the
trucking community who play
an integral part of Indias logistics
supply chain.
At the formal opening of the
inauguration of the health center
on January 29, Mr. Yash Vardhan,
Director, Container Corporation
of India (CONCOR), representing
the Board of Directors at APM
Terminals Mumbai commented,
This initiative will help in
strengthening the most crucial
link impacting Indias logistics
chain and the society at large.
APM Terminals Mumbai CEO,
Pradip Agrawal added, We hope
to lead by example. We estimate
more than 18,000 drivers can

benefit annually from the health


center. If replicated elsewhere
in India, the program will have
a significant impact on Indias
supply chain by promoting an
awareness of the profession, and
addressing the issue of shortage
of tractor-trailer drivers faced by
the industry.
Travelling
long
distances
on difficult road infrastructure
makes these drivers susceptible
to professional hazards, while
poor working conditions and long
hours only worsen the situation;
we are hopeful of bringing a
positive change by helping the
drivers maintain a healthy body
and sound mind behind the
wheel, and encouraging safe and
responsible driving said APM
Terminals Mumbai COO, Ravi
Gaitonde.
APM Terminals Mumbai said
that they planned to adopt several
other initiatives which will be
rolled out in a phased manner to
cultivate safer, improved working
and physical conditions for the
industrys truck drivers, serving
as an example for the rest of
Indias expanding logistics supply
chain.

APM Terminals Handle 2,200 Drivers Each Day


India, with a population of 1.25 billion, and the worlds third-largest economy, calculated by
Purchasing Power Parity, has partly through trade-enabled economic development, seen a
reduction in the national poverty level from 41.6% of the population in 2005, to 23.6% of the
population in 2012, according to the World Banks Global Monitoring Report for 2014-15 on the
Millennium Development Goals.
Located near the village of Jaskar, Uran, in Maharashtra State, at the entry of the dedicated
access road to APM Terminals Mumbai, the clinics services are available to all truck drivers
serving the four JNP terminals, including APM Terminals Mumbai, the busiest container
terminal at the port complex, handling 1.91 million TEUs in 2015, and representing 42.6% of
the record-setting cumulative 4.47 million TEUs handled by the port in 2015.
APM Terminals Mumbai works with approximately 2,200 truck drivers each day, or about
66,000 drivers per month, who deliver and pick up cargo and containers to and from the
terminal. Drawn from segments of the community with limited access to medical treatment,
many of the drivers suffer from oral hygiene and other health issues, some of which require
urgent attention.

40

Data Dissemination and


Stakeholder Empowerment Key
to Water Management

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

MANAGEMENT & HR | SPECIAL REPORT

Expert maintains that


governments role in water
management must be
limited to that of a facilitator.
Must make available clear
data on water resources to
enable farmers and others
take informed decision on
using ground-water.

Dr. Mihir Shah being felicated by


Mr. Vijay Kalantri

Water crisis has raised


its ugly head not only
in the agrarian sector
but also in the urban
sector. This is the time
to cast our minds and
reflect why we need
a paradigm shift in
water management.
The first part of the
paradigm shift is the
efficient management
of command areas of
water.
Dr. Mihir Shah
Former Member
of the Planning
Commission, GoI

elivering the keynote address at the


recently held seminar Water Matters: Water for All
jointly organised by World Trade
Centre, Mumbai and Maharashtra Water Resources Regulatory
Authority (MWRRA), Dr. Mihir
Shah, former Member of the Planning Commission, Government of
held that the country must learn

from the effective command area


management models implemented in Gujarat, Andhra Pradesh,
and Madhya Pradesh. Also, we
must address the last mile connectivity to ensure that the water
stored in dams reach farmers, he
stressed.
Going forward from Dr. Shahs
emphasis on the facilitating role
of government, Mr. Nikhilesh
Jha, IAS, Additional Secretary
& Mission Director, National
Water Mission, Government of
India opined that the state governments must empower water
users associations encourage
participatory water management
and community-led command
area development. He pointed out
that Israel with its very meagre
rainfall meets its water demand
effectively by means of recycling
of waste water and de-salination
of sea water.
Mr. Manish Kumar, Sr. Institutional Development Specialist,
Water and Sanitation Programme,
The World Bank also called for
greater community action rather
than government intervention.
Mr. Kumar said There is a need
for social response to water and
sanitation issues.
Mr. Ravi B. Budhiraja I.A.S.
(Retd.), Chairman, MWRRA highlighted that urban water management had much to catch up
on. According to him the biggest
threat for water security is the
discharge of untreated sewage
water in rivers and other water
bodies. At a time when the population in urban areas is rising rapidly, there is a dire need to evolve
effective solutions for urban water management and regulation,

Main Takeaways
India receives on an average more than 1100 mm of rainfall every year compared to only 600 mm
of rainfall in Israel. Israel meets its water demand effectively through recycling of waste water and
de-salination of sea water.
Only 19% of sewage water in India is treated before it is released into the sea and other water bodies.
There is an urgent need to take note of the issue of water quality
Maharashtra has set an example for other states by setting up a regulatory organization in the
water sector.

he stated.
Referring to the severity of water crisis, Mrs. Malini Shankar,
I.A.S., Additional Chief Secretary
- Environment, Government of
Maharashtra empahsised, we
have forgotten the issue of water quality amidst the uproar
for building and saving water
resources. She stressed that the
issue of food security and water
security is rightly highlighted, but
the issue of water quality has not
received enough attention.
Mrs. Shankar mentioned that
the allocation of 25% of the capital budget of the pollution control
board to environment infrastructure would gradually contribute
to water safety and quality.
Earlier in his welcome address, Mr. Vijay Kalantri, Vice
Chairman World Trade Centre
Mumbai and President- All India
Association of Industries (AIAI)
remarked exploring business opportunities in water management
not only addresses water crisis,
but also generates employment
opportunities and overall growth
of the economy.
Setting up an accountability mechanism

Communities and local government bodies must take responsibility to repair the innumerable
leaking pipes, dredging of sewages, deepening of lakes and so on.
Also, government must set up an
effective accountability mechanism to ensure that the ambitious
schemes are implemented in a
time-bound manner.
The construction and infrastructure sector can benefit from
the various government schemes
like Ganga Rejuvenation plan,
flood management programmes,
and Pradhan Mantri Krishi Sinchayee Yojana. More importantly,
the Government of Indias Swachh Bharat Campaign and Smart
Cities Project offers considerable
opportunity for companies in
sewage treatment infrastructure
and waste water recycling.

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consultant, Researcher, Businessperson, Teacher, Career
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Delegates will measure themselves on 6 important


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TRANSFORMATIVE | In Brief

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

42

Lessons from Emma


Maersk Flooding
February 2013
On the evening of 1 February 2013, the containership EMMA MRSK, loaded with about
14,000 containers, was about to pass southbound through the Suez Canal. While in the
convoy, a severe ingress of seawater occurred into the shaft tunnel, the flooding continued
and extended to the engine room. Within two hours, about 14,000 m of seawater had
entered the engine room flooding it up to a level equivalent to the outside draft of 15.1 m.
The main engine got submerged to the cylinder head level. Mr. Chilukuri Maheshwar traces
the steps taken to understand the causes of the incident, and puts forth the learning in brief.
How the ship was saved

The author a member of


Faculty- Engineering at
Anglo Eastern Maritime
Academy, Karjat.
Mr Chilukuri
Maheshwar

The ship was taken off the


convoy and was steered on its
own power to the Suez Canal
Container Terminal to be finally
moored with the help of five tugs.
During the mooring activity, the
ship lost propulsion power and
subsequently, even the electrical
power was lost. During the
mooring operation, the shipside
suffered minor indentations.
Various Contributory
Factors:

1. Failure of
forward stern
thruster
2. Failure of watertight integrity between engine room and
tunnel
3. Failure of cable penetrations
leading from tunnel and engine room
4. Improperly Designed Bilge
Piping System

5. Improperly Designed Emergency Bilge Suction System


6. Failure to isolate the seawater
pump from the other cooling
water pumps.
7. Poor maintenance of emergency bilge suction valve
8. Ventilation duct valves in the
watertight bulkhead
Lessons Learnt

1. For any rotating system,


replacing one broken blade is
insufficient. The entire set of
blades has to be replaced.
2. Dynamic balancing after
replacing components of a
rotating system is important.
3. Lack of standardization in
design and manufacturing
techniques
among
components can lead to
undesirable consequences.
4. If hydraulic valves are required
to be fitted to ventilation pipes

passing through a bulkhead


separating two watertight
compartments, they should
be provided with local
operational controls.
5. Cable penetration wherever
used should be tested to
withstand
the
required
hydrostatic
pressure
equivalent to the outside
water level.
6. Cable penetration installation
is a critical task and training
should be imparted to new
employees; older employees
need
to
be
re-trained
periodically.
7.
The gap between Class
approval process and ship
construction process can play
a critical role.
8. When the cable penetration
system is approved as a whole,
individual components should
also be approved separately.
9. Provision should be made to
isolate the tunnel bilge system
from outside the tunnel
without having to enter the
tunnel.
10. Inlet area and the height
beneath the emergency bilge
suction inlet pipe should be
designed to allow sufficient
water flow in case of
emergencies.
11. When using the emergency
bilge suction, coolers should
be bypassed to reduce back
pressure.
12. The emergency bilge suction
valve should be operated

crew to be adequately trained


for such situations where
leadership and presence of
mind are put to test.
Conclusions

Despite the breakdowns and


weaknesses,
the
shipboard
organization managed to contain
the emergency situation and bring
the ship alongside. The events
of the accident did not result in

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

regularly under controlled


conditions
and
regular
greasing and maintenance
should be carried out.
13. It is better to keep the
machinery submerged in sea
water until complete repair
systems are in place. Exposure
to air will, after being in
contact
with
seawater,
accelerate corrosion.
14. It is important for a ships

more severe consequences due


to the behavior of the crew who
managed to adapt to the situation
and prioritize the recovery effort
to meet the unfolding events.
Furthermore, the outcome was
favored by the ships position
close to the Suez Canal Container
Terminal.
It is beneficial that all new big
sized container vessels have
engine rooms located in the mid
ship. Following this concept was
providentially good for EMMA
MAERSK as its engine room was
not in the aft of the ship as is
the case with many tankers and
smaller ships. If the additional
weight of 14000 m3 of seawater
had been added at the aft of the
ship in the engine room and the
ship had been light, the ship
would have developed a trim
which could have lifted the bow
above the waterline.
In this situation the ship would
have broken into two parts at
midship very much like the
TITANIC did.

43

In Brief | TRANSFORMATIVE

READ THE COMPLETE


REPORT IN THE
APRIL-MAY 2016
EDITION ALONG
WITH EXPERT
COMMENTS FROM
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Repairers, Ship Equipment manufacturers, suppliers
and service providers, Classification Societies, Marine
finance and insurance firms, Shipping and maritime bodies
and associations, Maritime regulators and government
departments, Maritime Academies, Ports, Terminals and
Infrastructure companies, Professionals and intellectuals, and
the peripheral users of the Shipping and Maritime industry.

A Monthly shipping and Maritime Magazine


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44

EDUCATION & TRAINING | EVENT

Technical Seminar
at MANET Highlights
Needed Shift to keep up
with changing times
The purpose of these seminars is to understand the ever changing Shipping industry
requirements and swiftly adapt to it. The 4th seminar in the series explored all possibilities
of bridging the gap between the requirements of the shipping industry and the cadets of
various Maritime institutes.
A Glowing Start

HIGHLIGHTS
The guests speakers who graced the
seminar included Capt.Indrajit Roy,
Mr. Satyendra Singh, Mr. Sanjeev Wazir,
Mr. Amit Khare, Mr. Atul Raizada, Mr. Satya
Prakash and Mr. Sainath Aidoor, who
spoke very effectively on various topics like
Situational awareness at sea , Basics of
Marine Insurance, Developments in Marine
Lubricants , Oil water Treatment, Repairs
of Marine Machinery, Ballast water
Treatment system and finally Placement
opportunities in Merchant Navy. The
seminar was divided into three sessions
and was chaired by Capt.Shashank
Jahagirdar, Head of MAERSK Crewing India,
Cmde. Ajay Chitnis, Strategic Consultant of
GOL Offshore Ltd. and Mr..Ashok Chitnis,
Former Chief Surveyor, Indian Register of
Shipping.

aharashtra
A c a d e m y
of
Naval
Education
and Training
(MANET) organized a national
level Seminar onMARITIME
TRENDS-2016, for the 4th time
in succession, in collaboration
with IMEI (Institute of Marine
Engineers of India), Pune
branch and Company of Master
Mariners of India (CMMI), Pune
Chapter, on Saturday, 20th
February, 2016. .
The
Seminar
saw
the
participation
of
esteemed
stalwarts from shipping industry
who shared their experience as
guest speakers of the event. The
audience consisted of esteemed
invitees from the shipping
fraternity, Marine and nonmarine faculty from MANET
and other Maritime colleges, and

Well represented Seminar

a select group of bright young


and ambitious cadets from
MANET.
Future directly hinged on
essential competencies

Chief Guest of the seminar,


Prof.(Dr.) Gaurishanker Parasher,
Pro-Vice-Chancellor of Indian
Maritime University, in his
address stressed very strongly
the need for active partnership
between the Shipping Industry
and IMU through value added
processing
Prof.
Parasher
lauded
MANET for its efforts towards
continuous skill development
and upgradation of maritime
knowledge through its technical
seminar series. He stated that the
future of the industry is directly
linked to the knowledge and
skills base created by maritime
institutions.
In a direct reference to

Bridging the gap between


theory and practice

Earlier making his welcome


speech, Mr. SubodhDevgaonkar,
Principal, MANET, said that the
need for such technical seminars
has arisen from the fact that
MANET has been making efforts
to impart to its cadets, a very
comprehensive and full-fledged
training to make them acceptable
in the shipping industry. He felt
that holding of such seminars
and interaction of students with
experienced professionals from
the shipping industry, bridges
the gap between theoretical
studies and practical working.

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

students, Prof. Parasher stressed


upon the importance of positive
attitude, 100% class room
attendance and Physical fitness
along with a healthy mind in
the Maritime profession. He
also shared with the audience
information about proposals he
has put forward to IMU regarding
revision of syllabi and admitting
foreign students over and above
the existing capacity in affiliated
Maritime institutes of IMU. The
Shipping industry has strongly
represented to IMU to revise
relevant portions in the Marine
Engineering
and
Nautical
Science courses in order to adapt
to the current technological
changes taking place. They
stress that the need of the hour
is to generate Cadets who would
grasp and deliver as per industry
requirements successfully and
safely. The present Marine
Engineering syllabus was found
to lack the additions of STCW
2010 requirements.

45

EVENT | EDUCATION & TRAINING

Dignitaries on stage

Commitment to quality
education

Prof (Dr) Mangesh Karad,


Executive
Director
and
Secretary of MAEERs MIT
Group of Institutions, in his
address highlighted the need
for arranging many more of
such interactive seminars in
the coming years. He said that
MANET was committed to
providing quality education.
He also informed that all
achievements
by
MANETs
cadets were the results of its core
values. Commitment to quality
education and skill development
of cadets was a prerogative in a
service based industry like the
shipping industry.
Effective
implementation of industry
requirements
have
helped

Section of audience

MANET
towards
positive
growth over the years, Prof.
Karad stressed.
Indian seafarers must
maintain their high
standards to remain
employable

Mr.Sanjay Kelkar, Managing


Director, ASP Ship Management,
Guest of Honour of the
seminar, acknowledged in his
address that Indian seafarers
have earned their reputation
over
the
years
through
their
technical
knowledge,
hard work and dedication in
International
Shipping.
He
appealed to the cadets to carry
the legacy forward, so that
Indian seafarers continue to
get placement opportunities in
the International market. He
was impressed by the training
facilities provided by MANET
and asked the cadets to utilize it,
to its optimum levels.
Rear Admiral P.D.Sharma,
Founder President, Life Saving
India, Guest of Honour, in his
address stressed the need to
follow safety in every walk of
life.
The Seminar ended on a very
lively note as top Shipping
Industry representatives shared
ideas with speakers and their
peers over a Question answer
session at the conclusion of each
lecture.

Chief Guests
words of wisdom
to young cadets
High level of
professionalism,
and commitment
towards profession
Positive attitude at
all times
Physical fitness
along with a
healthy mind
100% class room
attendance

EDUCATION & TRAINING | EVENT

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

46

AEMA Marks Yet another


Milestone

Learning never stops


and cadets must work
safely and sincerely while
on board and imbibe
good qualities from their
seniors. Uphold rules
and regulations at all
times and stay away
from harmful habits such
as any kind of drugs.
Punishments for offences
are severe and career
threatening.
Capt. Pradeep Chawla,
Managing Director
(Anglo Eastern Group
QHSE & Training)

DNS cadet Akshat Rajput and GME Cadet Mayank Singhal adjudged The Best All Round
Cadets in their respective streams. Chief Guest Mr. Amitabh Kumar calls upon cadets to
value the importance of co-operation and sincere help one to another on board ships.

t a recent function, Anglo Eastern


Maritime
Academy
announced
the passing out of
1223 Deck Cadets and 800 Engineering cadets so far since the inception of the Academy near the
pristine hills of Karjat, about 60
kms from Mumbai. To the proud
credit of the institute whereas
197 cadets have already become
officers, 691 of them are already
sailing on various Anglo Eastern
managed ships.
Chief Guest Mr. Amitabh Kumar, Jt Director General of Shipping congratulating them on
their success said that the cadets
parents deserved equal applause
for their roles in making this possible. He wished the cadets the
very best in their career.
Guest of Honour Mr. Cawsi
Lilauwala, Fleet Director (Tech.)
of AESM Hong Kong, encouraged

students to become tough to take


on the challenges on board ships.
He urged them to ask many questions to their seniors on ships in
order to learn and carry out their
shipboard tasks well. He also assured the cadets that working
with AESM would enrich their
sea experience.
Mr. Amitabh Kumar called
upon the cadets to become true
ambassadors of the nation and
to co-operate and help one another towards a fulfilling and
successful career at sea. He also
assured that the offices of the
Directorate General of Shipping
were working towards bringing
all services on-line and to provide
e-learning training material. He
disclosed that steps were taken
to introduce online-exam system
for trainees soon.
In his address to the cadets,
Managing Director (Group QHSE
& Training) Capt. Pradeep Chaw-

la said that learning never stops


and exhorted cadets to work safely and sincerely while on board
and to imbibe good qualities from
their seniors. He advised them to
uphold rules and regulations at
all times and to stay away from
harmful habits such as any kind
of drugs. He warned the graduates that punishments for offences were severe and career threatening.
DNS cadet Akshat Rajput and
GME Cadet Mayank Singhal were
adjudged The Best All Round Cadets in their respective streams.
Course report for DNS batch was
read out by Capt. Sarat Kumar
and course report for GME batch
was presented by Ch. Engr. Mr.
T.S.Bhamra. The program was
smoothly coordinated by Master
of ceremony Ch Engr Mr. C. Maheshwar, The function also witnessed a refreshing and enjoyable
cultural show by cadets.

Capt. Pradeep Chawla,


with Mr. Amitabh Kumar

The workshop.
All spic and
span.

Excited.
Beginning of a
fresh journey

EVENT | EDUCATION & TRAINING

NMIS AWARDS

Mr. R.S. Cooper,


Founder Member of NMIS
Capt. R.D. Kohli,
Former Chairman of NMIS

NMIS FELICITATES
Off to a ceremonial beginning-LR-Capt. Sinha, Mr. Shetty, Mr. Bevis, Capt. Saggi

37th Convocation
of NMIS Held Amid
a Galaxy of
Maritime Stars

arottam Morarjee Institute


of Shipping (NMIS) held
its 37th Convocation and
Prize Distribution Ceremony at
the Auditorium of Shipping House
of The Shipping Corporation
of India Ltd., Mumbai recently.
Mr. Deepak Shetty, IRS, Director
General of Shipping & Additional
Secretary to the Govt. of India was
the Chief Guest. Mr. Julian Bevis,
Senior Director Group Relations
South Asia, The Maersk Group
was the Guest of Honour and
Capt. B.B. Sinha, CMD SCI and
Chairman of NMIS presided over
the function.
Lauding the services NMIS
lent to the shipping industry for
nearly four decades, Mr. Deepak
Shetty, DGS remarked that India
must continue to produce quality
shipping personnel to meet the
needs of the global shipping and

maritime industry for both the


sea going as well as the expanding on shore sectors. He stressed
the Directorate under the shipping ministry was in the process
of bringing measures and reforms
to aid more efficient shipping and
maritime activity in the country.
He noted that the directorate was
already in its way to provide 100%
on line access to information by
2017 and this would spur rapid
action leading to high scale developments.
The ceremony further witnessed the presentation of medals,
and cash prizes awards to meritorious students. Students who completed their two years diplomas
successfully were conferred their
certificates.
The event was graced by a galaxy of eminent personalities from
the maritime industry.

Honorary Fellowship of NMIS for their


outstanding contribution to the shipping
industry
Mr. Ajay Reshamwala
Dr. (Mrs.) Sujata Naik Tolani
Mr. Shashi Kiran Shetty, CMD,
All Cargo Logistics

MEMENTOS

For distinguished academic contribution


to the institution
Capt. Prakash Jog,
Faculty Member of NMIS
For generously supporting the deserving
students with financial help
D.L. Shah Trust
Seahorse Trust founded by Capt.
Avinash Batra and Capt. Somesh Batra,
Prerana Trust of SCI Executives
wives
A.S. Moloobhoy P.Ltd.
For developing and imparting short
courses and skill based training for
shipping and logistics professionals.
Capt. Vivek Singh Anand, President
of MANSA
Mr. Vivek Kele, President of AMTOI

Life Time
Achievement
Award to
Capt.R.D. Kohli

Presenting
Mememto to
Capt.Avinash
Batra

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

47

Life Time Achievement Award: For


their vision, guidance and overall
support to the Shipping industry for
several decades

EDUCATION & TRAINING | COMPETENCE

How important are Behavioral


Skills for seafarers?
www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

48

The 2010 amendment to STCW convention for the first time brought in the competence
requirement of resource management, leadership, teamwork and managerial skills. These
skills must be taught right from the pre-sea training level, say experts.

It has been seen that


when there are more
pairs of eyes monitoring
and there is teamwork
and synergy, errors are
picked up quickly and
rectified before they lead
to an incident.
Capt. K.N. Deboo

hen we contacted a few


well known maritime
academies, we found
that there is a bias towards
installing more behavioral skills
coaching to help enable a mariner
handle different tricky situations
they have to come across on a day
to day basis on a ship..
Capt. K.N.Deboo, Director
of Anglo Eastern Maritime
Training
Center
observes,
Being technically sound is not
enough. One needs to work
with superiors, subordinates and
peers in a harmonious way, such
that work gets done in the time
allotted and to the required level
of quality. Highlighting his point
he states, when investigations
of accidents revealed that more
often than not it was the human
factors that lead to the accident
and not technical failures, the
shipping world woke up to the
fact that behavioural skills were
as much important if not more.
According to Mr. Surendra
Kumar, Principal, Sir Derek

Mr. Surender Kumar

Bibby
Maritime
Training
Centre, recent research across
several industries suggests that
behavioural skills contribute to
develop competent employees.
This is equally applicable to the
maritime industry also.
Mr.
Kumar
insists
that
successful seafarers in addition
to having good technical skills
are also expected to have good
interpersonal skills.
Earlier
the behavioural skills used to be
considered to be good to have
but now most shipping companies
would rate it as a pre requisite.
Capt. Bhavin Gohil, Nautical
Faculty at Samundra Institute
of Maritime Studies says that

Capt. Bhavin Gohil

among the most important


qualities for a seafarer is the
ability to remain calm during
adversities.
Seafarers face
many adversities at sea, such as
homesickness, irregular work
timings and pressure, and rough
weather conditions which may
directly affect the behaviour and
attitude of a seafarer. He should
be mentally and physically fit
to recognize and accept these
challenges in a positive manner.
He also rates serenity- humility
as very high attributes to have.
Dont let your ego restrict you
Safety of the crew and the vessel
is paramount. Keep yourself open
to acceptance and learning.

Check our all new magazine.


There are more interesting
features to follow
Shipping and Marine Events is a bi-monthly maritime magazine covering
developments in the various aspects of owning and operating ships, and the
communities involved in its utilisation and services.
Watch out for new features:
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STAKES n LADDERS Business partnerships, tie ups, and career moves
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COMPANY / ADVERTISER | INDEX

Harvey Gulf International Marine. . . . . . . . . . . . 29


IMO. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 29, 35, 36
Indian Coast Guard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24
Indian Maritime University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Indian Register of Shipping. . . . . . . . . . . 24, 44, 47
Inmarsat. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .35
Institute of Marine Engineers of India. . . . . . . . 44
IACS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
J. sagar Associates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
MLIT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
JNPT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 18, 21, 37
Kale Logistics solutions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Katupalli Port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Lloyds Register . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
Maersk Crewing India. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
MANET. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
MAK Logistics Private Limited. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16
MANSA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
NAPA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23
NMIS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
NSIGT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19
Norwegian Space Centre (NSC). . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
Port of Hamburg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
Prerana Trust . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
RDEL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
SIMS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Sea Horse Trust. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
SCI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 47
Sir Derek Bibby Maritime Training Center . . . . 48
SOGET S.A. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Suez Canal. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11, 42
Sustainable Shipping Initiative. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36
The Maersk Group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
University of Tokyo. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22
US Coast Guard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Verizon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14
Wartsila. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25, 32
World Trade Center, Mumbai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
XVELA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34

Jobs
for all

categories
and
levels

Akshay Systems &


Controls P. Ltd.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Anglo Eastern Maritime
Training Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39
Bernhard Schulte. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3
ClassNK. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
DESMI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27
Global Marine Supply Co. . . . . . . . 15
IRS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Mak Logistics P. Ltd. . . . . . . . . . . . 13
MIS 2016. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
NK Academy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Stars & Stripes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

49

A.S. Moloobhoy P. Ltd.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47


ABB. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Adani Ports & SEZ Ltd.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
AIAI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40
Allcargo Logistics Ltd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
AMTOI. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
AEMA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
AEMTC. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48, 50
Angre Port. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
APL (India). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
APM Terminals. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
ARI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
ASP Ship Management. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45
BCCI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
Becker Marine Systems. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
BMT. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21
Braemar shipping services Asia . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
BU Marine and Ports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33
Cathelco. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
City University London. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
ClassNK. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22, 23, 28
CMA CGM. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11
Cochin Port Trust. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Cochin Shipyard Ltd. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25
Company of Master Mariners of India. . . . . . . . 44
CONCOR. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37
CSC Group. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
D.L. Shah Trust. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
Damen Shipyard. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17, 29
DESMI India. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26
Dhamra Port. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
Directorate General of Shipping. . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
DNV GL. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30
DP World. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10, 18, 19
Eastern Shipbuilding Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29
Filtek India. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31
Ganesh Benzoplast Ltd. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18
GOL Offshore Ltd.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44
Hapag Lloyd. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12, 34

Advertiser
Index

www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

Company Index

Subscriptions Form. . . . . . . . . . . . 43
TASK Forums. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

STARS &
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www.snmevents.com | Feb-Mar 2016

50

Goodbye
Sextant,
we are in the
21st century
By Capt. Suneel Sule

The author is Senior Faculty


and Program Head, at Anglo
Eastern Maritime Training
Center, Mumbai. The views
expressed are his own and
in his individual capacity.
Capt. Suneel Sule

teach celestial navigation to earn a


living. I have taken pride in taking
star sights, noon sights and even
ex-meridian observations during the
25 years that I sailed. I studied the
principles of navigation in greater details,
to the point of deriving complicated formulas and equations, while studying for
my extra masters exam. I have been to
Greenwich Observatory in the spirit of
a pilgrim. My heart goes out to the men
who sailed the seas in the pre-chronometer days and got lost and died of starvation or scurvy or shipwrecked on rocks; all
because they could not calculate their longitude. Humanity in that era, Galileo and
Newton included, did not know a way of
finding the longitude of a ship on the high
seas. The more I know about the great men
like Kepler, Napier, Harrison brothers and
others who devoted their lives to understanding the behavior of heavenly bodies
and making navigation at sea more and
more accurate, the smaller I feel in my
own eyes. To put it in short, I am proud to
be a marine navigator and I am proud of
the rich heritage that goes with it. The sextant that I used at sea, holds a place of pride
in my home and yet today, with a heavy
heart, I am saying these words, Goodbye
sextant, we are in the 21st century.
Early steamships which set out to cross
the Atlantic, steamed for a few days and
then sailed for the rest of the voyage by
putting up their tried and tested sails that
they had trusted for centuries. No one
had expected the steam engine to take a
ship across the ocean. Even later, when
such engines were built, many ships had
the masts of a square-rigger and carried a
full set of sails, Just in case. Much closer
in time, today our industry is once again
showing that mindset when it comes to
accepting electronic charts. We have not
yet learnt to trust electronic charts completely and many ships are still carrying
a load of paper charts Just in case. An-

other such Just in case remnant of the


past century that we carry onboard our
ships, is the equipment and the expertise
required to fix the ships position using
heavenly bodies, Just in case someone
tampers with the Global Navigation Satellite System.
The fear is genuine. Satellites can be destroyed, or easier still, their transmissions
can be jammed during times of hostilities.
The accuracy of positions can be diluted by the service provider or spoofed by
some miscreant. This has been done in
the past on some occasion. However if
we consider last 30 years of Satellite dependence; how many ships, for how long
were without a satellite-derived positions?
If we consider this statistics vis--vis the
number of ship-hours sailed, the figure
will be infinitesimally small. What is the
worst that can happen if suddenly all satellite derived position-fixing systems are
disabled concurrently? Ships will continue sailing on D.R., then make a landfall
and then fix their positions by radar and
visual observations until the situation improves. We did exactly that when Mother
Nature routinely jammed our celestial
position fixing system by throwing a cover of clouds over us. It was a matter of discomfort at best, certainly not a disaster.
All said and done, celestial navigation
cannot be a substitute to GNSS. The alternative will have to be comparable in
sophistication and accuracy, independent
of user skills and widely available. Inertial
navigation system is completely independent of support from any external source.
Some land-based navigation systems like
E-Loran may be developed and integrated with the satellite systems as aviation
industry is already doing. What we need
is a firm decision by the policy-makers to
expressly state that celestial navigation is
not an alternative to GNSS. Hence this is
an appeal to the people who can make a
difference.

We have not
yet learnt
to trust
electronic
charts
completely
and many
ships are still
carrying a
load of paper
charts Just in
case. Another
such Just in
case remnant
of the past
century that
we carry
onboard our
ships, is the
equipment and
the expertise
required to
fix the ships
position using
heavenly
bodies, Just in
case someone
tampers with
the Global
Navigation
Satellite
System.