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GRD Journals- Global Research and Development Journal for Engineering | Volume 1 | Issue 4 | March 2016

ISSN: 2455-5703

Structural Behaviour of Concrete With Partial


Replacement Plastic Aggregate and Quarry Dust
with Coarse and Fine Aggregate
Mr. S. Southamirajan
Assistant Professor
Department of Civil Engineering
K.S.R College Of Engineering
Mr. S. Deenadhayalan
UG Student
Department of Civil Engineering
K.S.R College Of Engineering

Mr. A. Elangovan
UG Student
Department of Civil Engineering
K.S.R College Of Engineering

Mr. A. G. Natarajan
UG Student
Department of Civil Engineering
K.S.R College Of Engineering

Mr. S. Premkumar
UG Student
Department of Civil Engineering
K.S.R College Of Engineering

Abstract
In this experiment the studies, the strength characteristics of M30 grade concrete are using manufactured plastic coarse aggregate
as a replacement of natural coarse aggregate is conducted along with the use of quarry dust as a partial replacement of
conventional natural river sand. Mix design for plastic coarse aggregate concrete is done by calculating the specific gravity of the
manufactured plastic aggregate, fly ash and quarry dust. Cubes, beams and cylinders were casted by fly ash is 20% in cement,
partial replacement of quarry dust in sand and natural coarse aggregate by 5%, 10%, 15%, and 20% of manufactured plastic
coarse aggregate. The experimental studies give the final strength parameters such as compressive strength, flexural strength and
split tensile strength of the casted cubes, beams and cylinders were tested respectively.
Keywords- Quarry Dust, Fly Ash, Plastic Coarse Aggregate

I. INTRODUCTION
A. General
Concrete is a constitute made essentially of Portland cement, fine aggregates, coarse aggregates and water. The mixture of the
materials will undergo in a chemical reaction called hydration and this process will result in a change of mixture from plastic
state to a solid occurs over a period of time. By reducing the weight and cost of constituent's materials in concrete, the cost and
weight of concrete can be reduced.
B. Advantages
The cost reduction can be achieved by the usage of locally available alternative materials, instead of conventional materials and
the weight of the concrete can be reduced by using manufactured plastic coarse aggregate, fly ash instead of cement.
C. Future Need/Demand
The consumption of fine aggregate in concrete production is very high throughout the world , and several developing countries
have facing difficulties in meeting the supply of natural fine aggregate in order to satisfy the increasing needs of infrastructural
development in recent years. To the solution for the stress and demand for river fine aggregate, researches have being conducted
and an alternative materials such as fly ash, slag, limestone powder and siliceous stone powder is been made used.
D. Execution
The attempts for the replacement of river sand by quarry dust have been made in India. Quarry dust, the waste material that
causes disposal problem is made as a valuable resource by the successful utilization of this quarry dust as a fine aggregate and
this will also overcome the strain on supply of river sand as fine aggregate and also the cost will be reduced. To evaluate the
possibilities of replacement of plastic coarse aggregate with the replacement of quarry dust and flyash as a replacement of fine
aggregate and cement.

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Structural Behaviour of Concrete With Partial Replacement Plastic Aggregate and Quarry Dust with Coarse and Fine Aggregate
(GRDJE/ Volume 1 / Issue 4 / 006)

E. Curing
The compression, flexural and split strengths were found after 7 and 28 days of curing.

II. PROPERTIES OF MATERIALS


A. Cement
The cement used for this project work is KCP 53-grade Portland pozzolana cement. The various properties of cement are
tabulated in Table I.
Table 1: Properties of Cement
S. No.
Description
Value
1
Normal consistency
33%
2
Initial setting time
30min
3
Final setting time
420min
4
Specific gravity
3.18
5
Fineness
6%

B. Fly Ash
Fly ash used for this collected from Mettur thermal power plant.
Table 2: Properties of Fly Ash
S.No.
Properties
Value
1
Specific gravity 2.27
2
Fineness
6.79

C. Fine Aggregate
1) Sand: Sand collected from nearby river is used for this project. Natural sand was tested as per IS: 2386 (Part 1 and 3) - 1963
and IS: 383 1970.The properties of sand are tabulated in Table III.
2) Quarry dust: Quarry dust an alternative for sand is collected from nearby quarry. Quarry dust was tested as per IS: 2386
(Part 1 and 3) - 1963 and IS: 383 - 1970.The properties of quarry dust are tabulated in Table III.

Fig. 1: Quarry Dust


Table 3: Properties of Sand and Quarry Dust
S. No.
Properties
Sand
Quarry dust
1
Specific gravity
2.6
2.67
2
Fineness modulus
3.36
2.90
3

Sieve Analysis

Zone III

Zone III

D. Coarse Aggregate
1) Natural Coarse Aggregate (N.C.A.)
Natural coarse aggregate was tested as per IS: 2386 (Part 1and 3) 1963 and IS: 383 1970.The properties ofnatural coarse
aggregate are tabulated in Table IV.

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32

Structural Behaviour of Concrete With Partial Replacement Plastic Aggregate and Quarry Dust with Coarse and Fine Aggregate
(GRDJE/ Volume 1 / Issue 4 / 006)

2) Plastic Coarse Aggregate (P.C.A.)


Plastics collected from the disposal area were sorted to get the superior one. These were crushed into small fraction and washed
to remove the foreign particles. Then it was heated at a particular temperature so that the necessary brittleness was obtained.
After extrusion the molten plastic was cooled down and collected in boulders of 100 mm size approximately. These plastic
boulders were crushed down to the size of aggregates.
Plastic aggregate was tested as per IS: 2386 (Part 1and 3) 1963 and IS: 383 1970.The properties of plastic aggregate
are tabulated in Table IV.

Fig. 2: Plastic Coarse Aggregate


Table 4: Properties of Natural Aggregate and Plastic Aggregate
S. No.
Properties
N.C.A. P.C.A.
1

Specific gravity

2.80

0.93

Fineness modulus

2.65

2.59

Water absorption

1.5

Nil

Crushing value

6%

Nil

Impact value

35.9%

1%

E. Water
Water used for mixing and curing was clean and free from injurious amounts of oils, acids, alkalis, salts, sugar, organic materials
or other substances that are deleterious to concrete or steel. Potable water with pH value 7 is used for mixing and curing
throughout the experiment.

III. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS


A. Mix Proportioning
The M30 mix proportion used by weight and w/c ratio is fixed according to the slump of 25 to 50mm. For this concrete mix,
quarry dust is added for replacement of sand at 50%, fly ash replacement of cement 20% and plastic aggregate replacement in
natural coarse aggregate by step of 5%.
Table 5: Mix Proportions
Cement

Fly Ash

Mix

Kg/m3

Kg/m3

C.M

448.0

833

Mix 1
Mix 2
Mix 3
Mix 4

358.4
358.4
358.4
358.4

89.6
89.6
89.6
89.6

817
817
817
817

839
839
839
839

River sand
Kg/m3

Quarry dust
Kg/m3

N.C.A.

P.C.A.

WATER

Kg/m3

Kg/m3

Kg/m3

934

203

887
841
794
747

15.5
31.0
46.5
62.0

203
203
203
203

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33

Structural Behaviour of Concrete With Partial Replacement Plastic Aggregate and Quarry Dust with Coarse and Fine Aggregate
(GRDJE/ Volume 1 / Issue 4 / 006)

Table 6: Percentage of Replacement of Mixes


S. No

Mix

Fly Ash

Quarry
Dust

P.C.A.

Mix 1

20%

50%

5%

Mix 2

20%

50%

10%

Mix 3

20%

50%

15%

Mix4

20%

50%

20%

B. Casting of Specimen
S. No.
1
2
3

Table 7: Properties of Specimen


Size
Specimen
No. of specimen
(mm)
Cube
150x150x150
30
Cylinder
150x300
30
Prism
500x100x100
30

IV. TESTING PROCEDURE


A. Compression Test
The cube specimen was tested for compressive strength at the end of 7 days and 28 days. The specimen was tested after the
surface gets dried. The load was applied on the smooth sides without shock and increased continuously till the specimen failed.
The mean compressive strength is calculated and tabulated in Table VIII.
Table 8: Mean Compressive Strength of Concrete
M30
Mix
7 days (Mpa) 28 days (Mpa)
Control Mix
21.3
33.1
Mix 1
21.7
33.2
Mix 2
24.3
38.3
Mix 3
21.4
33.7
Mix 4

18.5

29.5

Fig. 3: Variation in Compressive Strength of Concrete Cubes for Various Mix

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34

Structural Behaviour of Concrete With Partial Replacement Plastic Aggregate and Quarry Dust with Coarse and Fine Aggregate
(GRDJE/ Volume 1 / Issue 4 / 006)

Fig. 4: Test Setup for Compression Test

B. Split Tensile Test


Split tensile test is also referred as Brazilian Test. Placing a cylindrical specimen horizontally between the loading surfaces of
a compression-testing machine and the load is applied till the cylinder failed along the vertical diameter.
Tensile strength = 2W / ( DL)
The mean tensile strength is calculated and tabulated in Table IX.
Table 9: Mean Spilt Tensile Strength Of Concrete (Mpa)
M30
Mix
7 days (Mpa) 28 days (Mpa)
C.M
1.57
2.48
Mix 1
1.71
2.64
Mix 2
1.95
3.00
Mix 3
1.76
2.80
Mix 4
1.71
2.66

Fig. 5: Variation in Compressive Strength of Concrete Cylinders for Various Mix

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35

Structural Behaviour of Concrete With Partial Replacement Plastic Aggregate and Quarry Dust with Coarse and Fine Aggregate
(GRDJE/ Volume 1 / Issue 4 / 006)

Fig. 6: Test Setup for Split Tensile Test

C. Flexure Test
The flexural strength of the concrete was determined by using loading frame. The loading is done using hydraulic jack on the
beam and the load applied is measured using the proving ring. The span of the beam adopted is 400 mm and central concentrated
load was applied.
Flexural strength = Pl / bd2
The mean flexural strength is calculated and tabulated in Table X.
Table 10: Flexural Strength of Concrete (Mpa)
M30
Mix
7 days(Mpa) 28 days(Mpa)
C.M
4.27
5.96
Mix 1
5.00
7.12
Mix 2
5.84
7.96
Mix 3
5.68
7.76
Mix 4
4.92
6.96

Fig. 7: Variation in Flexural Strength of P.C.C Beam for Various Mix

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36

Structural Behaviour of Concrete With Partial Replacement Plastic Aggregate and Quarry Dust with Coarse and Fine Aggregate
(GRDJE/ Volume 1 / Issue 4 / 006)

Fig. 8: Test Setup for Flexural Strength Test

V. CONCLUSION
From the above discussion it is concluded that:
Concrete acquires maximum increase in compressive strength at 50 % sand by quarry dust, 20% of fly ash, plastic aggregate
of 10%. When compared with concrete with only river sand, the amount of increase in strength is 12% and 15.8% for 7 and
28 days respectively.
Split tensile strength is maximum at 50 % replacement of natural sand by quarry dust, 20% of fly ash, plastic aggregate of
10%. The percentage of increase with control concrete is 24.2% and 20% for 7 and 28 days respectively.
Maximum flexural strength is also at 10% replacement. The percentage of increase compared with control concrete is 36.8%
and 33.5% for 7 and 28 days respectively.

REFERENCES
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G.Balamurugan, Behaviour of concrete on the use of quarry dust to replace sand An experimental study, IRACST Engineering science and technology :
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