Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 16

The

O reg O n O bserver

Thursday, May 12, 2016

Vol. 131, No. 45

Oregon, WI

ConnectOregonWI.com

$1

C O C S E REGISTRATION OPENING SOON! www.OregonSoccerClub.com N R O G E R O
C
O
C
S
E
REGISTRATION
OPENING SOON!
www.OregonSoccerClub.com
N
R
O
G
E
R
O
adno=466983-01
The O reg O n O bserver Thursday, May 12, 2016 • Vol. 131, No. 45

Safety Day

The Village of Oregon had its annual Safety Day Saturday, May 7, giving kids a chance to tour police cars, watch a MedFlight helicopter landing and try on drunk goggles. The event, held at Prairie View Elementary School, also featured a chance to meet Oregon police officers, the K-9 unit, firefighters and EMS personnel. Above, Trevor Schmidt, 5, of Oregon, points out a feature of the MedFlight helicopter to his mother Kelli shortly after its landing in the Prairie View Elementary School parking lot.

Photo by Scott Girard

On the Web

See more photos from Safety Day:

ConnectOregonWI.com

Sweet success

OHS DECA students earn top marks at competitions

SCOTT DE LARUELLE

Unified Newspaper Group

Oregon High School DECA students are hop - ing to be on their way to big things after graduation. If recent competitions are any example, they should have bright futures ahead of them. It started in mid-January, with the DECA District 3 event in Sun Prairie, where students garnered 61 med - als, with 15 students quali - fying for state competition in multiple business events – economics, finance, mar- keting/business, math and management. More than

100 business professionals

from around the area helped

judge the competitions. OHS DECA advisor John Curkovic said the role-play events at the competition related directly to a stu - dent’s interest in business and marketing. “Students had the oppor- tunity to choose from sev - eral different categories that matched their choice in business simulations,” he said. “Topics included busi- ness law, marketing man - agement, communications, hospitality and touris m … allowing students to apply

Turn to DECA/Page 4

National competitors

Student

Event

Meghan Sharkus

Entrepreneurship, Written Business

Ryan Detra

plan, Event (top 10) Hotel and Lodging Management

Matt Reisdorf

Series International Leadership conference

Anika Sande

International Leadership conference

Natalie Ganshert

International Leadership conference

Renee Sailor

Retail Merchandising Management

Maria Cisler

Series (made finals) Community service plan

Maddie Fitzgerald

Community service plan

Jessica Jacobs

Accounting application series event

Sydney Keiner

Sports and Entertainment Marketing

David Heim

Series Automotive Services marketing Series

Grayden Gruchow

Principals of Business Management

Village of Oregon

Old streets bring big spending

Roadwork could cost more than $2M in next two years

BILL LIVICK

Unified Newspaper Group

Village officials are con - sidering some major street impro vements this year and next. At the board’s May 2 meeting, President Steve Staton said the village spent more than $2 million on street improvements in 2011-15, and “anticipates spending an additional $900,000 in 2016.”

And if things go as planned, the village may be spending much more than that in 2017, as offi - cials contemplate extend - ing North Perry Parkway s outh to connect with

South Perry Parkway. That

project has an estimated cost of $1.4 million. Other expensive 2017 projects could include reconstructing Park Street (if a proposed hotel devel - opment takes place), reconstructing Jef fer - son Street from the rail - road bridge to Ash Street a t a cost to the village of

Turn to Streets/Page 7

Oregon School District

OASIS will move to OHS

Board approves construction for alternative school

SCOTT DE LARUELLE

Unified Newspaper Group

Oregon School District officials have been looking to eventually move its alter- native high school closer to Ore gon High School, and now it looks like that will happen sometime next year. Monday night, school board members approved moving the OASIS (Oregon Alternative School and Inte- grated Studies) program to OHS beginning in the 2017- 18 school year. The school is currently a tenant in the Oregon Community Sports Arena. OSD business manager, Andy Weiland said Tuesday in an email to the Observ - er that arena officials knew the district was interested in

moving OASIS closer to the high school, and said while the school was welcome to stay, another tenant is interested in the space if the school were to move. “The process has been

very friendly,” he said.

The school will remain at the ice center through the 2016-17 school year. OASIS has leased space at the arena since the dis - trict created the program in 2008 as a way to help some students with extra academ- ic needs graduate. In the future, it will be located in the northeast part of the high school, taking up about the same 3,500 square feet it uses currently. According to notes provided to board members, the design is in its fourth revision, and the OASIS staff was “delight- ed” with the latest plan. Director of instruction Leslie Bergstrom said the

Turn to OASIS/Page 13

The O reg O n O bserver Thursday, May 12, 2016 • Vol. 131, No. 45
The O reg O n O bserver Thursday, May 12, 2016 • Vol. 131, No. 45
The O reg O n O bserver Thursday, May 12, 2016 • Vol. 131, No. 45
SPRING IS HERE! 10% OFF YOUR ENTIRE ORDER! EXPIRES 5/31/16 (Some restrictions apply. Cannot be combined
SPRING IS HERE!
10% OFF
YOUR ENTIRE ORDER!
EXPIRES 5/31/16
(Some restrictions apply. Cannot be
combined with any other coupon)
5555 Irish Lane, Fitchburg • (608) 271-3230 • 7595 W. Mineral Point Rd., Madison • (608) 833-5244
www.kandagreenhouse.com • Mon.-Sat. 9-6; Sun. 9-5
adno=463807-01
  • 2 May 12, 2016

Oregon Observer

ConnectOregonWI.com

Oregon School District

May 12, 2016 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com Oregon School District Photo by Bill Livick U.S. Senate

Photo by Bill Livick

U.S. Senate candidate Russ Feingold addresses the crowd Friday during a meeting of the Oregon Area Progressives at the Firefly Coffeehouse.

With rematch looming, Feingold visits Oregon

Candidate calls election crucial to future U.S. Supreme Court makeup

BILL LIVICK

He called the Republicans’ approach a “reapportion - ment scam” that skews in their favor and has resulted in “right-wing control” of the House of Representatives. Feingold is considered a progressive Democrat and talked about Wisconsin’s

Unified Newspaper Group

“rich tradition” of progres -

U.S. Senate candidate Russ Feingold told a group of supporters Friday that voter turnout in November’s election is critical to the country’s future because it will determine the makeup of the U.S. Supreme Court. Feingold, a Democrat, faces a rematch in the November general election against Ron Johnson, who in 2010 defeated the then-in- cumbent, winning the seat F eingold had held since

sive politics. He said that tradition has been under attack from conservative activists such as Charles and David Koch, who Feingold charged with completing “a corporate takeover of Wis - consin.” “The y’ve ruined our Supreme Court, and yes, they want to continue to own this Senate seat I’m running for,” he alleged. “We have got to turn this around this year.” Feingold asserted, “We

  • 1993. will elect a Democratic gov- ernor in 2018. Then in 2020, w e will stop the reappor - tionment of districts in this state.” Feingold also spoke about the apparent Republican presidential candidate, Don- ald Trump. He said House of Rep - resentatives speaker Paul Ryan, who represents the state’s 1st Congressional

Feingold appeared at the Firefly Coffeehouse Friday night in an event organized by Oregon Area Progres - sives. He told a friendly crowd that filled the room that in addition to the Supreme Court’s future, the election will play a key role in how Congressional districts are reapportioned in 2020.

District, “even had a moment of what I like to call ‘Janesville common sense’ the other day” when Ryan said he wasn’t sure if he could support Trump’s cam - paign. Feingold stood out as a senator for working with Arizona Sen. John McCain in crafting the McCain-Fe - ingold Act, a major piece of campaign finance reform legislation. He recalled sitting in the Supreme Court when former Justice Sandra Day O’Con - nor voted to uphold the act. He also w as noteworthy for being the only member of the U.S. Senate to vote against the Patriot Act in 2001, following the attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon. On Friday, he charged that the U.S. Supreme Court “went crazy” when it ruled in the 2010 case that’s become known as Citizens United. The court held that the First Amendment prohibited the government from restricting independent political expen- ditures by a nonprofit corpo- ration, and extended the rul- ing to for-profit corporations, labor unions and other asso- ciations. Feingold said by allowing unlimited election spending by individuals and corpo - rations, the decision under- mined the McCain-Feingold Act. “Citizens United will be overturned easily if we do our jobs this November,” he said. “The answer isn’t to hope that the right-wingers stop voting, but to make sure

that we get out the vote for our side.”

Contact Bill Livick at bill. livick@wcinet.com

EMERALD INVESTMENTS MINI SToRAgE

5'x10' $38 Month 10'x10' $60 Month 10'x15' $65 Month 10'x20' $80 Month 10'x25' $90 Month

At Cleary Building Corp. 190 S. Paoli St., Verona WI (608) 845-9700

adno=445640-01

May 12, 2016 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com Oregon School District Photo by Bill Livick U.S. Senate

Prom set for May 14

Photo submitted

The 2016 Oregon High School prom court is, front row, from left: Molly Kleitsch, Kalli Choles, Julia Schmidt, Kendyl Ainsworth, Tessa Reilly, Abby Breitbach and Kami Yelk, back row, from left: Luke Hefty, Tony Akale, Luke Pearson, Sam Hakes, Sam Miess, Austin Bergemann and Bryce Johnson. This year’s prom will be held Saturday, May 14 at the Best Western Inn on the Park in downtown Madison. Students attending will be treated to refreshments, a chocolate fountain, professional pho- tographs and a photo booth. The theme is, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.”

May 12, 2016 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com Oregon School District Photo by Bill Livick U.S. Senate

Special entrance

Photo by Scott Girard

Oregon area Special Olympics athletes enter the Oregon High School stadium before the competition Saturday, May 7, with high fives from area emergency personnel, including Oregon Police Depart- ment officers.

adno=466255-01
adno=466255-01

You are cordially invited to attend our

Grand Open House

at Milestone Senior Living

Assisted Living Senior Apartments & Suites

2220 Lincoln Avenue · Stoughton, WI Thur sday, May 12, 2016 ~ 2:00 pm to 4:30 pm

You are cordially invited to attend our Grand Open House at Milestone Senior Living Assisted Living

Hors d’oeuvres & refreshments will be served.

Make Milestone Mome nts Throughout the Seasons

You are cordially invited to attend our Grand Open House at Milestone Senior Living Assisted Living

adno=463737-01

ConnectOregonWI.com

May 12, 2016

Oregon Observer

3

Village of Oregon

Commission favors tall lights at Jaycee

Ordinance change expected in June

SCOTT GIRARD

Unified Newspaper Group

Lighting for new athletic fields in Jaycee Park East that would require an ordi - nance change got support from the Planning Com - mission May 5. Commissioners v oted 6-1 to allow exceptions to the current lighting ordi - nances, which limit light -

ing to 25 feet. The athletic

f ields

plan, submitted by

the Oregon School District along with plans for the fields themselves, would include two 70-foot lights for a new varsity soccer field and two 35-foot lights in the parking lot. Commissioner John Bie - no, the lone “no” vote, said he w as opposed to mak - ing the exception for the 35-foot lights when the district could just add one more light and fall below the 25-foot limit. OSD business manager Andy Weiland explained the lot is going to be used for marching band prac - tice, and the light locations are the least disrupti ve for

that activity. The lighting will also require a change to the village’s ordinance, which

In other business

• Commission recommended approval for a new aw-

ning design for the Chocolate Caper

• Commission recommended approval for Beehive Homes to put a memory care facility in phase 1 of its project instead of simple senior housing

• Commission recommended approval of the final plat for the Oregon Parks Neighborhood, contingent on a set of recommendations detailed in the packet

does not allow an excep - tion to the height limit even through a conditional use permit. The Planning Com - mission and Village Board are expected to take up that change in June, and the board will likely vote on both the ordinance change and the proposed lighting at its June 6 meeting. The commission also approved the site plan for the concession stand, with a more detailed plan expected back next month. “This is a multifaceted approach over the next sev - eral meetings,” explained public works director Jeff Rau. The complex will even - tually include varsity and junior varsity soccer fields, a varsity baseball field and

two softball fields. Weiland told the commission that funding the construction has become an issue, so they are now planning the buildout in phases. The first phase includes both soccer fields and the baseball field. “We’re trying to figure out different ways to make this work,” Weiland said. The proposal calls for dugouts for the varsity soc - cer field that would dou - ble as part of the fencing required to surround the complex, which commis - sioners generally support - ed.

Contact Scott Girard at ungreporter@wcinet.com and follow him on Twitter

@sgirard9.

Aging Mastery Program® Join the adventure! The Fitchburg and Oregon Senior Centers will be co- sponsoring
Aging Mastery Program®
Join the adventure!
The Fitchburg and Oregon Senior Centers will be co-
sponsoring the Aging Mastery Program® soon!
The Aging Mastery Program® (AMP) encourages mastery—developing
behaviors across many dimensions that will lead to improved health,
stronger financial security, and overall well-being.
By participating in this ten week
program, you will:
Gain impactful changes in your health behaviors, financial well -
being and enrichment later in life.
Increase your knowledge in the following areas: exercise, sleep,
healthy eating and hydration, financial fitness, medication
management, advance planning, healthy relationships, fall
prevention and community engagement.
Get REAL incentives and rewards for taking small steps that
can improve your well-being.
Limited spots available: Sign up now!
AMP will launch on Wednesday, June 1 st .
Registration deadline is May 27 th .
It will take
place weekly at the Fitchburg Senior Center from 1:30 to 3:30 PM.
This program is valued at $100 but will only cost you $25.
Scholarships and transportation available. *Make checks
payable to the Fitchburg Senior Center
Please RSVP to the Fitchburg Senior Center at 270-
4290 or email at Jill.Mchone@fitchburgwi.gov Please
respond by May 27th if you are interested.
adno=465300-01

Residents question ‘Sanctuary’ plans

Commission vote planned for June 2

SCOTT GIRARD

Unified Newspaper Group

Eight residents spoke against plans for a new assisted living center that would replace the former Methodist Church on North Main Street at the May 5 Planning Commission meet- ing. The plan for The Sanctu - ary of Oregon, which would create 106 rooms for low-in- come seniors in a three- and four -story building at the 249 N. Main St. property, was up for a public hearing at the commission meeting. An oversight on the public notice will require the hear- ing to continue at the June 2 meeting before the com - mission can vote on a rec - ommendation to the Village Plan for the plan. Those who spoke were mostly concerned with the lack of parking for the facility’s residents, traffic and the lack of demand for senior housing already in Oregon. “A structure like this is only going to try and take business from the estab - lishments that we already have,” said village resident Denette Peyer. “If there is a projected need, I think this is definitely the wrong place to put it.”

The proposal calls for enough parking spots for only staff and visitors of res- idents. Representative Tim T rimble said the compa -

ny, which runs other senior

housing operations in other states, has found its resi - dents rarely have cars. Ev en if that’s accurate, which the residents ques - tioned, staff and visitors cre- ated enough traffic concerns on their own for those who spoke against the develop - ment. “My biggest concern is there’s already problems with traffic turning in and out of my driveway,” said Laura Gochberg, who lives across the street from the proposed facility. Trimble said “market research” has indicated the services are indeed needed in the area, despite reported- ly low occupancy in senior facilities already existing in the area. “There are a large number of seniors whose incomes

aren’t allowing them to get the services they need,” he said. The facility would be aimed at lower income seniors who would have the costs for living at the build- ing reimbursed by Med - icaid. Trimble explained that a high proportion of the residents would have to fall under that description because of the project’s financing through bonds and low-income tax credits. Commission members questioned some of the traffic plans, including how the building owners would enforce a “right turn only” rule onto Main Street, and the materials used for the building. The public hearing will

reopen at the June 2 meeting with a vote from the com - mission expected later that night.

Contact Scott Girard at ungreporter@wcinet.com and follow him on Twitter

@sgirard9.

You can trust your trees to our family of Certified Arborists. Sign up your Ash trees

You can trust your trees to our family of Certified Arborists.

Sign up your Ash trees for a2year treatment now.

adno=462856-01 adno=462856-01
adno=462856-01
adno=462856-01

Tim Andrews Horticulturist LLC

“Caring for our Green World since 1978”

www.tahort.com • tahort@gmail.com

608-795-9948

adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01
adno=466439-01

adno=466439-01

  • 4 May 12, 2016

Oregon Observer

ConnectOregonWI.com

May 12, 2016 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com Photo submitted Village of Oregon Public Works employees recently

Photo submitted

Village of Oregon Public Works employees recently put up new crossing stan- dards and lights are up and operational on South Perry Parkway across from Rome Corners Intermediate School. The project is a partnership between the village and Oregon School District to improve signage in the area, which had been problematic in the past.

Thursday, May 12, 2016 • Vol. 131, No. 45 USPS No. 411-300 Periodical Postage Paid, Oregon,

Thursday, May 12, 2016 • Vol. 131, No. 45

USPS No. 411-300

Periodical Postage Paid, Oregon, WI and additional offices. Published weekly on Thursday by the Unified Newspaper Group, A Division of Woodward Communications, Inc. POSTMASTER: Send Address Corrections to The Oregon Observer, PO Box 930427, Verona, WI 53593.

Office Location: 125 N. Main Street, Oregon, WI 53575 Phone: 608-835-6677 • FAX: 608-835-0130 e-mail: ungeditor@wcinet.com Circulation customer service: (800) 355-1892

ConnectOregonWI.com

This newspaper is printed on recycled paper.

General Manager

News

Lee Borkowski

Jim Ferolie

lborkowski@wcinet.com

ungeditor@wcinet.com

Advertising

Sports

Sandy Opsal

Jeremy Jones

oregonsales@wcinet.com

ungsportseditor@wcinet.com

Classifieds

Website

Diane Beaman ungclassified@wcinet.com

Kate Newton ungweb@wcinet.com

Circulation

Reporters

Carolyn Schultz

ungcirculation@wcinet.com

Samantha Christian, Bill Livick, Anthony Iozzo, Tom Alesia, Scott De Laruelle, Scott Girard

Unified Newspaper Group, a division of

W oodWard C ommuniCations ,i n C.

A dynamic, employee-owned media company Good People. Real Solutions. Shared Results.

Printed by Woodward Printing Services — Platteville

Printed by Woodward Printing Services — Platteville
Thursday, May 12, 2016 • Vol. 131, No. 45 USPS No. 411-300 Periodical Postage Paid, Oregon,

NATIONAL NEWSPAPER ASSOCIATION

SUBSCRIPTION RATES

One Year in Dane Co. & Rock

$ 37

One Year Elsewhere

$ 45

Oregon Observer Stoughton Courier Hub • Verona Press

May 12, 2016 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com Photo submitted Village of Oregon Public Works employees recently

Photo submitted

The following OHS DECA students participated in the state DECA competition in March. Front row, from left: Abby Breit- bach Sydney Keiner, Meghan Sharkus, Maria Cisler, Maddie Fitzgerald, Anika Sande and Jessica Jacobs; back row, from left: Natalie Ganshert, Ryan Detra, Dave Heim, Matt Reisdorf, Bryce Johnson and Renee Sailor.

DECA: 12 students advanced to national competition

Continued from page 4

different competencies from the classroom in a real-world set - ting.” In March, OHS mark eting and DECA chapter members earned the organization’s highest honors at the annual State Career Devel- opment Conference in Lake Gene- va, with 12 students moving on to DECA’s international competitive event, held earlier this month in Nashville, Tennessee. Curkovic said the OHS market- ing class and DECA helps prepare students for careers in marketing, finance, hospitality and manage - ment by providing programs that “integrate classroom instruction, apply learning while connecting to business activities and promote competition.” “These DECA and marketing

competitions are designed to sim -

ulate real-life business scenarios while testing students’ academic competence and skill develop - ment,” he said. “Within a 10- to 30-minute window students are expected to read, consider and solve problems in the area of human resource management, production and/or distribution, financial and business mathemati- cal issues, and develop advertising solutions to typical business prob- lems.” Much like the TV show “Shark Tank,” Curkovic said, another part of the competition has students prepare in advance write, prepare and present entrepreneurial ideas to judges. “Students have a limited time frame to articulate to a judge how they would solve the problem and manage the issue in the most expe- dient and efficient way while keep- ing in mind the benefits available to both consumers and businesses alike,” he said. “These case studies are then combined with students’ marketing, economic, business mathematical and statistical exams and averaged.”

Students share

Senior Meghan Sharkus, who served as Wisconsin DECA’s Vice President of Community Service from March 2015 to March 2016,

Badger Conference Dist. 3 DECA competitors

The Oregon DECA chapter members who participated at the DECA Regional Confer- ence earlier this year were:

Jessica Jacobs, Brianna Taran- tino, Andi McCorkle, Connor Branson, David Heim, Renee Lewandowski, Hadley Wendt, Anna Michalski, Joanna Rob- inson, Galia Hernandez, Abi- gail Fischer, Micayla Wallace, Emmie Wiedemann, Joseph Schwartz, Emily Lynch, Cianna Pieper, Meghan Sharkus, Ryan Detra, Madeline Fitzgerald, Mason Breitzke, Sara Shvec, Maria Cisler, Carolyn Christof- ferson, Brandon Michel, Anika Sande, Kimberly Gehrmann, Nathan Feest, Kevin Culles, Adam Heath, Bryce John- son, Matt Reisdorf, Gradyden Gruchow, Maia Beirne, Scar- let Egwuonwu, MacIe Cox, Sydney Roberts, Kevin Alvord, Duncan Morgan, Ian Ganshert, Riley Schultz, Carson Smed- ley, Amber Zahn, Alyssa Miller, Jordan Merry, Myah Corella, Marita McKnight, Renee Sailor, Karina Sande, Sydney Keiner, Andrew Christofferson, Willian Gerlach, Natalie Ganshert and Abby Breitbach

said being a state officer was an “amazing experience” she would recommend to any high school student “looking for a leadership role and the opportunity to grow and network as a business profes- sional.” “It was my responsibility to lead

On the web

Read first-person perspectives from a variety of Oregon High School DECA members:

ConnectOregonWI.com

a delegation of over 11,000 stu - dents in their efforts to better their communities and to run several statewide conferences with the oth- er five state officers,” she said. Also as part of her role, she helped DECA chapters in the state raise tens of thousands of dollars for a variety of charitable causes, improving the amounts of dona - tions over last year. “Working with students who share my passion for business as well as my drive and sense of humor, made my term an especial- ly memorable one,” she said. “I am a happier person and a more well rounded business profession- al.” Junior Ryan Detra, who joined DECA for the first time this school year, credited Curkovic and Sharkus with helping him eas- ily transition into the group. “Ov er the past few months DECA has helped me find what I am good at and is leading me down a career path that I find to be the best fit for me,” he said. “ DECA is something I would defi - nitely recommend to anyone who is interested or curious about it. It’s a great opportunity that I wish I had taken earlier.” Freshman Grayden Gruchow said the experience of going through the various DECA com - petitions will not only help in future years, but when it’s time to interview for jobs. “I will have a leg up on the com- petition, because I was in DECA,

but also because I have been in a

similar situation before,” he said. “I got to talk with my judge after, and he gave me tips for the future to be even more successful in future similar situations.”

Email Unified Newspaper Group reporter Scott De Laruelle at scott.delaruelle@wcinet.com.

Letters to the editor policy

Unified Newspaper Group is proud to offer a ven - ue for public debate and welcomes letters to the editor, provided they comply with our guidelines. Letters should be no longer than 400 words. They should also contain contact information – the writ - er’s full name, address, and phone number – so that the paper may conf irm authorship. Unsigned or anonymous letters will not be printed under any cir- cumstances.

T he editorial staff of Unified Newspaper Group reserves the right to edit letters for length, clar - ity and appropriateness. Letters with libelous or obscene content will not be printed.

This policy will be printed from time to time in an abbreviated form here and will be posted in its entirety on our websites.

ConnectOregonWI.com

May 12, 2016

Oregon Observer

5

OHS grad Racchini works with advanced helicopters

Just a few years after walking the halls of Oregon High School, Kiara Racchi - ni is now helping the Navy fly one of the world’s most advanced attack helicop - ters. The 2012 OHS graduate is an aviation electrician’s mate with the “Vipers” of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 48, a Florida-based squadron that operates the MH-60R Sea - hawk, the Navy’s next gen - eration submarine hunter helicopter. According to a Navy press release, the Sea - hawk is the “most capable mu lti-mission helicopter in the world,” designed to hunt and track enemy subma - rines, attack enemy ships, conduct drug interdictions, deliver supplies and support

the Navy’s special opera - tions forces. The Seahawk is nearly 65 feet long, can weigh up to 23,500 lbs. and can travel over 120 miles per hour for nearly 320 miles on a tank of gas. As an aviation electri - cian’s mate, Racchini is responsible for ensuring proper direct communi - cation within the aircraft, something she called “chal- lenging.” “I lik e the fact that this type of occupation is defi - nitely out of the realm for a 22-year-old female,” Rac - chini said. “This command is def initely a family type atmosphere. Everyone is willing to help one another achieve their professional goals.” According to the press release, 270 Navy men and

women keep all parts of the squadron running smoothly, doing everything from pro - cessing paperwork to han - dling weapons and flying the aircraft. Serving in the Na vy, Racchini is learning about being a more respectable leader, sailor and person through handling numerous responsibilities, according to the press release. “The Navy is very chal - lenging but rewarding at the same time,” she said. “It teaches perseverance that helps you succeed both pro - fessionally and personally.”

Email Unified Newspaper Group reporter Scott De Laruelle at scott. delaruelle@wcinet.com.

ConnectOregonWI.com May 12, 2016 Oregon Observer 5 OHS grad Racchini works with advanced helicopters Just a

Photo submitted

Kiara Racchini, 22, a 2012 Oregon High School graduate, is an aviation electrician’s mate with the “Vipers” of Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 48, a Florida-based squadron that operates the MH-60R Sea- hawk, the Navy’s next generation submarine hunter helicopter.

Village seeks input on ash tree plan in forum

Decisions on removal, treatment remain

SCOTT GIRARD

Unified Newspaper Group

Village of Oregon officials hope to gather community input on how to move for- ward with ash trees following the confirmation of an ash tree-killing beetle late last year. The village confirmed the presence of Emerald Ash Bor- er – an East Asian Beetle that kills ash trees – in December, though it was first confirmed in Dane County in 2014, and many anticipated the eventual confirmation. Earlier this year, Arbor Sys- tems completed an inventory that showed 200 ash trees on public land. Of those, 45 were considered “hazard” trees, and four have already been removed, public works direc- tor Jeff Rau wrote in a memo to the Public Works Commit- tee. The question is what to do next. Residents can weigh in on the plan at the May 16 Vil- lage Board meeting, set for 5:30 p.m. at Village Hall. Although the rest of the hazard trees are expected to be removed by the end of 2017 – pending room in the budget for the work – the vil- lage has to decide whether to treat ash trees at about $10 per diameter inch every two years or cut them down. The latter would dramatically change the landscape in some parts of the village like Jaycee Park. In his memo, Rau esti - mated it will cost it will cost $17,000 to $20,000 to remove just the hazard trees. That cost does not include disposal of the trees and grinding of the stumps. Treating the other 155 trees would cost about $23,000. If the village opted to treat only trees more than 10 inches in diameter, it would cost about $19,000 every two years. To remove all of the ash trees, Rau estimated the cost at about $60,000. “Our 2017 budget will need to address the added cost of implementation of our plan as approved by the Village Board,” Rau wrote in the memo. “Our 2016 budget does not have a significant amount of money for tree removal and replacement of

If You Go What: Public forum on ash tree plan When: 5 p.m. Monday, May 16
If You Go
What: Public forum on
ash tree plan
When:
5 p.m.
Monday,
May 16
Where: Village Hall, 117
Spring St.
Info: vil.oregon.wi.us

this scale.” Rau recommended in his memo to remove all hazard trees, plus the 49 healthy trees that are 10 inches or less in diameter, by the end of 2017. He also recommended work- ing with Arbor Systems and Village Forester to determine “high priority” larger trees to save, and begin treatment in 2017 and biannually in the future. Untreated trees would be removed “over time as nec- essary” and replaced with an acceptable variety of tree. In addition to the remov - al decisions, Rau wrote a separate memo to the public works committee about what to do with the excess wood. Options include selling it as firewood or to artists. “We will need to continue

to work together to determine how we will handle the wood we obtain and if there are

good secondary uses which can benefit our community and residents,” Rau wrote.

Building a new home? Shop around. We challenge you to find a better rate. Limited time

Building a new home?

Shop around. We challenge you to find a better rate.

Limited time offer. Hurry before we come to our senses! 1.95% with a 2.758% APR*
Limited time offer.
Hurry before we
come to our senses!
1.95%
with a
2.758%
APR*

Apply online today! w ww.ub-t.com

Click “New Home Construction Special”

www.ub-t.com
www.ub-t.com

Be ll ev ill e

Ja ne

sv ille

110

Gre enway Cross

1060 E US Hwy 14

608.424.1997

608.291.6108

Broo kly n

New G lar us

210

C ommercial St.

512 State Rd. 69

608.455.2311

608.527.5700

Evan sv ille

Oregon

2 Eas t M ain St.

883 North M ain St.

608.882.5200

608.835.2265

*Annual Percentage Rate (APR) is ef fective 2/18/16 and is subject to change. APR shown is based ona$250,000 loan. Interest- only payments based on amount drawn, due monthly. Subject to credit approval. General Contractors/Builders do not qualif y for stated rate.

adno=456949-01

All Friends, Colleagues, Past and Present, Students and Parents Save the Date! We are honoring those

All Friends, Colleagues, Past and Present, Students and Parents

Save the Date! We are honoring those retiring from the Oregon School District.

Please join us at the Brooklyn Elementary Commons.

Carol Bride – Admin Asst. – DO Laura Flood – Occupational Therapist – NKE Linda Gibbs – Admin Asst. – Accounts Payable Linda Glassmaker – Food Service – OMS Carol Herrmann – Receptionist – DO Pat Hetland – Music Teacher – RCI Sara Lubbers – Guidance Counselor – NKE Elizabeth McKenna – Reading Paraprofessional - BKE Amy Schleinz – 3rd Grade Teacher – PVE Randall Smith – Teacher – OASIS/OHS Luann Tober – Custodian – NKE Judy Wohlleber – Guidance Counselor – PVE Julie Vogel – Food Service – RCI

All Friends, Colleagues, Past and Present, Students and Parents Save the Date! We are honoring those

Thursday, May 26, 2016

3:45PM – 6:00PM

Program at 4:30

Brooklyn Elementary

204 Division Street

Please come and wish them well.

adno=467361-01

All Friends, Colleagues, Past and Present, Students and Parents Save the Date! We are honoring those
Enga E En gage ge e E Engagement m nt Engagement Eng g ent E em

Engage

Engage

Enga EEn gage gee

EEngagement m nt

Engagement

Eng g ent

E em nt

T he K noble f amil y

announces the engagement of Julie Knoble to Sean D'Orazio. Sean is the son of Steve and Donna D'Orazio of Oregon, WI. Julie is a 2011 graduate of Oregon High School. She achieved an Associate Degree of Graphic Design in 2013. Julie is employed at The Center for Oral and Maxillofacial Surger y in Madison, WI. Sean is a 2007 graduate of Oregon High School and is the Vice President at Max Creek Outdoors in Oregon,WI.

A June 11, 2016 wedding is planned in Oregon,WI where the couple resides.

adno=466459-01

St. John’s Lutheran Church Really Big Sale St. John’s Lutheran Church 625 E. Netherwood St., Oregon
St. John’s Lutheran Church
Really Big Sale
St. John’s Lutheran Church
625 E. Netherwood St., Oregon
Fundraising Event
Saturday, May 14
8:00 am-4:00 pm
Featuring: Favorite Garage Sale Items,
Infant & Children’s Clothing
LUNCH & BAKE SALE
adno=466354-01

-

- is now accepting applications adno=467121-01

is now accepting applications

adno=467121-01

  • 6 May 12, 2016

Oregon Observer

ConnectOregonWI.com

Coming up

Bike workshop

Get ready for spring and summer bike season and learn how to do a basic bike tune-up at 7 p.m. Thursday, May 12 at Oregon Bike and Skate, 156 N. Main St. Bring your bike and register in advance for the workshop at oregonsd. org/community. The cost to attend is

$12.

For information, call 835-4097.

Splash pad meeting

The Oregon-Brooklyn Optimists Club and Oregon Community Pool will hold a splash pad planning meeting at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, May 12 in the Oregon School District Meeting Room, 123 E. Grove St. The planning committee will discuss potential design options for the splash pad and take questions and suggestions. For information or to RSVP to the meeting, contact Margaret at oboptimists@gmail.com or Deb at dab@oregonsd.net.

Family biking

Discover Oregon’s newest bike trail during the Rotary Bike Trail Fami - ly Fun Day from 9-11 a.m. Saturday, May 14. Ride the Oregon Rotary Bike Trail (located at the corner of Cusick and Braun). Refreshments from OFroYo will be provided and there will be prize giveaways. Free bike inspections and helmet fittings will also be available.

For information, visit oregonrotary. org.

Family movie night

Take in dinner and a family-friend- ly film during Second Saturday movie night from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Saturday, May 14 at First Presbyterian Church, 408 Bergamont Blvd. Bring the whole family to watch the movie, rated G or PG, on the big screen. Pizza, popcorn and other snacks will be available for a donation. The movie is free and padded seating is available. Floor space is also open for blankets or sleeping bags, and sound will be played at a reasonable level. This is the last movie night before the summer hiatus; they will resume in September. For information or to get this month’s title, call 835-3082 or email fpcmovies@gmail.com.

Job Connect

Enhance your employability at a free WorkSmart Network Job Connect drop- in session from 10 a.m. to noon Monday, May 16 at the library. Those looking for a new career or changing careers can receive assistance with resume writing, interview practice, job search assistance and more. If you have a resume, bring it with you or send it to yourself in an email for access. The WorkSmart Network is admin- istered by the Workforce Development Bo ard of South Central Wisconsin.

Auxiliary aids are available upon request; additional workshops are sched- uled for June 20 and July 18. For information, call 835-3656.

Senior center anniversary

Celebrate the senior center’s 36th anniversary with standup comic Mitch Henck at 1 p.m. Wednesday, May 18. Henck, a radio personality and entertainer, hosts a daily talk show on 1310AM WIBA in Madison, and has memorable stories to tell about life. A speaker from Oregon Community Bank will kick off the celebration, and hot and cold hors d’oeuvres, as well as an anni- versary cake, will be available after the program. Registration is required. For information or to register, call

835-5801.

Sewing workshop

Beginners ages 9 and up can visit the library for its “Sew What?: Summer Market Bags” workshop from 6-7:45 p.m. Thursday, May 19. Participants should bring their own fabric and sewing machine if possi - ble; the library provides the pattern and instruction, plus a couple of sew - ing machines. This workshop is for be ginners ages 9 to adult; children 9-12 must have an adult helper. Space is limited, and registration is required. For information or to register, call 835-3656 or visit oregonlibrary.org.

Community calendar

Thursday, May 12

• 6-7:45 p.m., “Artists in Absentia” documentary screening and art reception, library, 835-3656

• 6:30-8 p.m., Joy of Living med - itation group, State Bank lower level, 744 N. Main St., 345-1597

• 7 p.m., Bike tune-up workshop ($12; register at oregonsd.org/ community), Oregon Bike and Skate, 156 N. Main St., 835-4097

• 7:30 p.m., Oregon Splash Pad planning meeting, Oregon School District Meeting Room, 123 E. Grove St., oboptimists@gmail. com

Saturday, May 14

• 9-11 a.m., Rotary Bike Trail Family Fun Day, Oregon Rotary Bike Trail (corner of Cusick and Braun), oregonrotary.org

• 6:30 p.m., Family movie night, First Presbyterian Church, 408 N. Bergamont Blvd., 835-3082

Monday, May 16

9 to adult), library, 835-3656

• 10 a.m. to noon, Job Connect free drop-in session, library, 835-

• 6:30 p.m., Thursday Night Street Drags, Madison International

  • 3656 Speedway, 1122 Sunrise Road,

• 6:30-7 p.m., Pajama Antics

835-9700

• 6:30 p.m., ““Healthy Mind: Opti -

(ages 6 and under), library, 835-

  • 3656 mize your Emotions with Essential Oils” workshop ($22; register at oregonsd.org/community), 835-

Wednesday, May 18

• 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., Computer Class: Introducing Windows 10 ($20), senior center, 835-5801

4097

Saturday, May 21

• 11:30 a.m., Brown Bag Book Group, library’s Sue Ames room, orelib@oregonlibrary.org

• 1 p.m., Senior center anniver- sary program, senior center, 835-

• 12:30-2:30 p.m., Board games (7 to adult), library, 835-3656

• 5:30-8:30 p.m., Kids Night Out ($25; register at oregonsd.org/ community), Rome Corners Inter-

• 6:30 p.m., Saturday Card Party ($3), senior center, 835-5801

Sunday, May 22

• 1 p.m., Sunday Movie: “Spot - light” (R, 129 min.), senior center,

835-5801

  • 5801 mediate School, 1111 S. Perry Pkwy., 835-4097

Thursday, May 19

• 1 p.m., Euchre Card Party ($3), senior center, 835-5801

• 6-7:45 p.m., “Sew What: Sum - mer Market Bags” workshop (reg - istration required; beginners ages

Community cable listings

Village of Oregon Cable Access TV channels:

WOW #983 & ORE #984 Phone: 291-0148 • Email: oregoncableaccess@charter.net Website: ocamedia.com • Facebook: ocamediawi New programs daily at 1 p.m. and repeats at 4, 7 and 10 p.m. and 1, 4, 7 and 10 a.m.

Thursday, May 12

WOW: “Russ Feingold” @ Open Mic. (of May 6) ORE: Oregon School Board Meeting (of May 9)

Friday, May 13

WOW: “R. Huntington and R. Kittleson” Music @ St. John’s (of May 5) ORE: “Safety Day and Special Olympics” Hilites (of May 7)

Monday, May 16

WOW:

5:00

pm—

LIVE—Oregon Village Board Meeting ORE: Oregon/Stough- ton Rugby vs. Southern Lakes (of April 29)

Tuesday, May 17

WOW: “Wild Turkeys in Wisconsin” ORE: RCI Orchestra Concert (of May 10)

Saturday, May 14

WOW: “Norse After- noon of Fun – 2016” ORE: OHS Girls Varsity Soccer vs. Stoughton (of April 21)

Sunday, May 15

WOW: Faith Evangeli- cal Lutheran Church Ser- vice ORE: OMS Orchestra Concert (of May 9)

Wednesday, May 18

WOW: “Backyard Well- ness: Vector-Borne Dis- eases” ORE: OHS Girls Varsity Soccer vs. Ft. Atkinson (of May 10)

Thursday, May 19

WOW: Oregon Village Board Meeting (of May

16)

ORE: Oregon/Stough- ton Rugby vs. Madison Westside (of May 9)

Senior center

Monday, May 16

Salisbury Steak

Brown Rice

Buttered Carrots Fruit Cocktail, Rye Bread VO: Salisbury Veggie Patty

Tuesday, May 17

*Brat on a Bun, Sauerkraut

Chunky Applesauce, Cookie VO: Veggie Dog

Wednesday, May 18

Pizza Casserole Buttered Italian Green Beans Apple Juice, Croissant Strawberry Short Cake Birthday Cake VO: Sliced Cheese

Thursday, May 19

Three-Cheese Lasagna Buttered California Mix Fresh Orange Bread Stick, Sherbet

SO: Chef’s Tuna Salad

Friday, May 20

Turkey Roast w/ Gravy Mashed Potato w/ Gravy Buttered Broccoli Fruit Cup, W.W. Bread Bar VO: Veggie Lasagna

Monday, May 16

9:00 CLUB, Rubber Stamping

9:00 Caregivers Support 10:00 Dominoes 1:00 Get Fit

1:30 Bridge 2:00 Mind over Matter 4:00 Weight Loss Support

Tuesday, May 17

8:30 Zumba Gold 11:30 Silver Threads 12:30 Sheepshead 12:30 Stoughton Shopping

6:30 Pickleball at Oak St. Courts

Wednesday, May 18

9:00 CLUB, Wellness Walk 9:00 Full COA Meeting 11:00 Windows 10 Class

11:45 May Birthday Lunch 1:00 Anniversary Party, Euchre

Thursday, May 19

8:30 Zumba Gold 9:00 Pool Players 12:30 Shopping at Bill’s

1:00 Cribbage, Card Party

Friday, May 20

9:00 Club 9:30 Blood Pressure 9:45 Gentle Yoga 11:00 Chair Yoga 1:00 Get Fit

*Contains Pork

Churches

All Saints Lutheran Church

  • 2951 Chapel Valley Rd., Fitchburg

(608) 276-7729 Pastor Rich Johnson SUNDAY 8:30 a.m. classic service 10:45 a.m. new song service

Brooklyn Lutheran Church
101

Second Street, Brooklyn

(608) 455-3852 Pastor Rebecca Ninke

SUNDAY 9 a.m. Holy Communion

  • 10 a.m. Fellowship Community of Life Lutheran Church

PO Box 233, Oregon (608) 286-3121, office@ communityoflife.us Pastor Jim McCoid SUNDAY

  • 10 a.m. Worship at 1111 S. Perry

Parkway, Oregon

Community United Methodist Church

  • 201 Church Street, Brooklyn

(608) 455-3344 Pastor Aaron Alfred SUNDAY 9:30 a.m. Worship

Faith Evangelical Lutheran Church

  • 143 Washington Street, Oregon

(608) 835-3554 Pastor Karl Hermanson SUNDAY - 9 a.m. Worship Holy Communion 2nd & last Sundays

First Presbyterian Church
408

N. Bergamont Blvd. (north of CC)

Oregon, WI

(608) 835-3082 - fpcoregonwi.org Pastor Bob Vetter SUNDAY

10

a.m. Service

10:15 a.m. Sunday School

11

a.m. Fellowship

11:15 a.m. Adult Education

 

Fitchburg Memorial UCC

5705

Lacy Road, Fitchburg

(608) 273-1008, www.memorialucc.org Pastor: Phil Haslanger Associate Pastor Twink Jan-McMahon SUNDAY 8:15 and 10 a.m. Worship

Good Shepherd Lutheran Church ECLA

Central Campus: Raymond Road

and Whitney Way

SATURDAY - 5 p.m. Worship SUNDAY - 8:15, 9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship West Campus: Corner of Hwy. PD and Nine Mound Road, Verona SUNDAY - 9 & 10:15 a.m., 6 p.m. Worship (608) 271-6633

Hillcrest Bible Church

  • 752 E. Netherwood, Oregon

Eric Vander Ploeg, Lead Pastor (608) 835-7972, www.hbclife.com SUNDAY

8:30 a.m. worship at Oregon High

School PAC and 10:15 a.m. worship with Children’s ministries, birth - fourth grade

Holy Mother of Consolation Catholic Church

  • 651 N. Main Street, Oregon

Pastor: Fr. Gary Wankerl

(608) 835-5763 holymotherchurch.weconnect.com SATURDAY: 5 p.m. Worship SUNDAY: 8 and 10:15 a.m. Worship

People’s United Methodist

Church

  • 103 North Alpine Parkway, Oregon

Pastor Jason Mahnke (608) 835-3755, www.peoplesumc. org Communion is the 1st & 3rd weekend

SATURDAY - 5 p.m. Worship

SUNDAY - 9 a.m. Worship and Sunday school; 10:30 a.m. Worship

St. John’s Lutheran Church

  • 625 E. Netherwood, Oregon

Pastor Paul Markquart (Lead Pastor)

(608) 835-3154

SATURDAY - 5 p.m. Worship SUNDAY - 8 and 10:30 a.m. Worship 9:15-10:15 a.m. Education Hour

Vineyard Community Church

Oregon Community Bank & Trust,

  • 105 S. Alpine Parkway, Oregon -

Bob Groth, Pastor (608) 513-3435, welcometovineyard.com

SUNDAY - 10 a.m. Worship

Zwingli United Church of Christ – Paoli

At the Intersection of Hwy. 69 & PB Rev. Sara Thiessen (608) 845-5641 SUNDAY - 9:30 a.m. Family Worship

Support groups

• Alcoholics Anonymous meeting, First Presbyterian Church, every Monday and Friday at 7 p.m.

• Caregiver Support Group, Oregon Area Senior Center, third Monday of each month at 9 a.m.

• Diabetes Support Group, Oregon Area Senior Center, second Thursday of each month at 1:30 p.m.

• Parents Supporting Parents, LakeView Church, Stoughton, third Tuesday of every month from 6:30-8 p.m.

• Relationship & Divorce Support Group, State Bank of Cross Plains, every other Monday at 6:30 p.m.

• Veterans’ Group, Oregon Area Senior Center, every second Wednesday at 9 a.m.

• Weight-Loss Support Group, Oregon Area Senior Center, every Monday at 3:30 p.m.

• Navigating Life Elder Support Group, People’s United Methodist Church, 103 N. Alpine Pkwy., every first Monday at 7 p.m.

Be A Good Soldier

All work is honorable if it is performed honorably and with diligence. There is an interesting passage in the Gospel of Luke where tax collectors and soldiers are asking John the Baptist what they should do. He tells them, in essence,to be honest tax collectors and soldiers:“Don’t collect any more than you are required to,” and to the soldiers he advised, “Don’t extort money and don’t accuse people falsely—be content with your pay.”(Luke 3:13-14 NIV) These tax collectors and soldiers must have been wondering if their occupations were morally acceptable—under- standable since they were in effect working for the Roman occupiers of Judea. John the Baptist tells them that these occupations are permissible as long as one does them honestly. There are lots of occu- pations that one might have these worries about, but with very few exceptions, most occupations can be done honorably. – Christopher Simon, Metro News Service

“In the same way, let your light shine before others, that they may see your good deeds and glorify your Father in heaven.” —Matthew 5:16 NIV

ConnectOregonWI.com May 12, 2016 Oregon Observer 7 Streets: Village may connect North Perry, South Perry parkways
ConnectOregonWI.com
May 12, 2016
Oregon Observer
7
Streets: Village may connect North Perry, South Perry parkways in 2017
Continued from page 1
at a cost to the village of
$140,000 and rebuilding a
section of North Burr Oak
Avenue, where it crosses
Badfish Creek.
The Jefferson Street proj -
ect would involve cost shar-
ing with Dane County, which
owns the street. The county
also owns Janesville Street
and North Main Street.
“The village is working on
a plan that would transfer the
ownership of these streets to
the village after Dane County
repairs them,” Staton noted.
Village administrator Mike
Gracz said the transfer of all
three streets is likely to hap-
pen before 2020.
In the rest of 2016, the vil-
lage is planning the recon -
struction of Elm Street, from
South Main Street to Janes -
ville Street, and South Main
Street from Elm Street to
State Street.
The work will include the
replacement and upgrades to
water and sewer utilities.
“We’re going to be doing
a lot of utility replacement,
particularly water mains and
laterals on Elm and State,
where the lead services are
going to be replaced,” Gracz
told the Observer.
The South Main Street
work is estimated to cost
$201,000; reconstruction of
Elm Street comes with an
estimated cost of $140,000.
Gracz said after the village
completes the streets sched -
uled for improvement this
yea r, “the goal is to tackle
Washington Street and State
Street.”
The village is also looking
to spend another $211,000
on annual mill and overlay
projects, in which the street
surface is pulverized and
repaved with asphalt.
Jefferson Street improve -
ments have been the subject
of village negotiations with
Dane County. Gracz said that
project will probably be done
in 2017 unless the county
objects.
North Burr Oak is another
road project on the village’s
radar.
“We kind of pulled back
on that this year because
we’re trying to determine if
we can do something with
the height of the culvert that
goes under North Burr Oak,”
Gracz explained. “We’re try-
ing to prevent street flooding
when we have a heavy down-
pour.
“It may require raising
the elevation of the street,”
he added, “but when you do
Upcoming work
Project
Year
Cost
South Main Street
Elm Street
Mill and Overlay
Jefferson Street
North Burr Oak
Perry Parkway
2016
$200,000
2016
$140,000
2016
$211,000
2017
$140,000*
2017
$425,000
2017
$1.4 million
*Village portion of combined project
that, you start pushing water
downstream quicker. It’s
complicated.”
He and Staton said they
hear periodic grumbling
from residents about the con-
dition of local streets, but
most complaints are about
streets the village doesn’t yet
own. They doubt residents
would want their tax dollars
spent on streets owned by the
county.
“I think that once we do
Jefferson Street – that’s real-
ly the last bad street – some
of this will calm do wn,”
Gracz said. “That’s going to
be a major project.”
Photo by Jim Ferolie
Contact Bill Livick at bill.
livick@wcinet.com
Village officials have been plan-
ning to connect North Perry
Parkway (here in this 2014 file
photo) to South Perry Parkway
for many years.
T HINK LOCAL F IRST ! Spa Manicure/Spa Pedicure Package 787 N. Main, Oregon (Next to

T HINK LOCAL F IRST !

T HINK LOCAL F IRST ! Spa Manicure/Spa Pedicure Package 787 N. Main, Oregon (Next to
T HINK LOCAL F IRST ! Spa Manicure/Spa Pedicure Package 787 N. Main, Oregon (Next to
T HINK LOCAL F IRST ! Spa Manicure/Spa Pedicure Package 787 N. Main, Oregon (Next to
T HINK LOCAL F IRST ! Spa Manicure/Spa Pedicure Package 787 N. Main, Oregon (Next to
Spa Manicure/Spa Pedicure Package 787 N. Main, Oregon (Next to Bill’s Foods) www.cuttingedgehairetc.com 835-3666 $ 59
Spa Manicure/Spa
Pedicure Package
787 N. Main, Oregon (Next to Bill’s Foods)
www.cuttingedgehairetc.com
835-3666
$ 59
adno=465051-01
Mon., Fri. & Sat. appointment only Tues. & Thur. 10am-6pm, Wed. 12pm-6pm • Vinyl • Wood
Mon., Fri. & Sat. appointment only
Tues. & Thur. 10am-6pm, Wed. 12pm-6pm
• Vinyl • Wood
Buy Local
• Residential & Commercial Installation
• Carpet • Ceramic • Laminate
Call for an appointment today!
adno=465052-01
Support Your Hometown Businesses
Gerlach
Wholesale Flooring
112 Janesville Street, Oregon, WI 53575
Phone: 835-8276 • Fax: 835-8277
r Apparel & More Je welr y Scar ves d G io ti u n e
r
Apparel
& More
Je welr y
Scar ves
d
G
io
ti
u
n
e
n
s
a
ua
R
n
adno=465044-01
i
s
o
n
s
i
c
i
n
c
s
a
d
g
il
P
y
F
m
W
de
for your Spring and Summer Gatherings!
We have Fun Fashions
Featuring
Wisconsin
& Oregon
Items
Accessories
If you would like to see your ad in this spot, contact Sandy Opsal at 835-6677
If you would like to see your
ad in this spot, contact
Sandy Opsal at
835-6677 or
oregonsales@wcinet.com

Main Street, Oregon (608) 835-3939

Main Street, Oregon • (608) 835-3939 Meat • Produce • Deli • Bakery Groceries • Frozen

Meat Produce Deli Bakery Groceries Frozen Dairy Organic Beer Liquor Wine

right down

Main Street, Oregon • (608) 835-3939 Meat • Produce • Deli • Bakery Groceries • Frozen

Full service

Main Street, Oregon • (608) 835-3939 Meat • Produce • Deli • Bakery Groceries • Frozen

the street!

grocery

Locally Owned

store

Since 1978

adno=465046-01

Y OUR L OCAL B USINESSES T HANK Y OU ! adno=358365-01
Y OUR L OCAL B USINESSES T HANK Y OU !
adno=358365-01
  • 8 May 12, 2016

Oregon Observer

ConnectOregonWI.com

May 12, 2016 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com OMS holds Fine Arts Night Oregon Middle School held

OMS holds Fine Arts Night

Oregon Middle School held a student art show and reception in the school’s library on Thursday, April 21. Orchestra students provided music during the reception.

Above, Renee Martell and her children, Ryan and Megan, check out drawings at the art show.

Photo by Samantha Christian

On the Web

See more photos from the art show:

ConnectOregonWI.com

The furniture is timeless; the prices, however, are not ... All Furniture on Sale ! TAKE
The furniture is timeless;
the prices, however, are not ...
All
Furniture
on Sale !
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF 2015 PRICES
SALE IN PROGRESS!
BEFORE STICKLEY’S NATIONAL PRICE INCREASE EFFECTIVE JUNE 6, 2016
Bring this ad in for an
opportunity to win a
Stickley 2016 Limited
Edition Collector’s Piece.
5356 King James Way Fitchburg, WI 53719
608-238-3375 • www.stevensdesign.net
adno=466245-01

Bluebirds are back

Spring migratory birds make Oregon appearance

The spring mornings have been filled with chipper chirpers like robins and car- dinals, but bluebird sight - ings are also on the rise. Anna Pidgeon, associate professor with the Depart - ment of Forest and Wildlife Ecology at Uni versity of Wisconsin-Madison, said bluebirds are migrants that are among the earliest birds to return, and they are often back in the area by mid- March. “Among migrant birds, there is a strong drive to return to their breeding range and establish their territory as early as possi - ble,” she wrote in an email to the Observ er. “This seems to be due to the ben - efit, in terms of ability to raise young successfully, of getting the ‘best’ spots before they are taken by others.” To spot bluebirds, look for open, grassy areas. Pid - geon said this is the type of environment bluebirds need to forage for insects. She said bluebirds need a cavity (natural or provided by humans) to nest in. Since they cannot create their own cavity, they “rely on other species, such as woodpeck - ers, to create cavities that

May 12, 2016 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com OMS holds Fine Arts Night Oregon Middle School held

Photo submitted

Ed Brognano took this photo of an Eastern bluebird in his backyard along South Burr Oak Avenue on April 12.

On the Web

To learn more about bluebirds, visit:

nabluebirdsociety.org

they then use.” People can also help by not using pesticides on their lawn and by putting out nest boxes (homemade or pur - chased) away from where a cavity competitor, the house sparrow, is abundant.

Pidgeon said the nest box should be the correct dimensions that can be opened for cleaning out, “and to do it in such a way that the nest box won’t

become a trap that pred -

ators have easy access to (because) house sparrows sometimes kill bluebirds in the nest box.” For information about bluebirds and nesting, visit the North American

B l u e b i r d S o c i e t y a t nabluebirdsociety.org.

– Samantha Christian

Ke ep L earn ing LIFE LEAS E apartment homes at O akwood suit your changing
Ke ep L earn ing
LIFE LEAS E apartment homes at O akwood suit
your changing needs with time to learn, to evolve, to
grow. O ur responsibility is to help you pursue passions
and interests you never had time to, before now.
6205 Mineral Point Road Madison, WI 53705
608-230-4266 • www.oakwoodvillage.net
adno=461286-01

Jeremy Jones, sports editor

845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com Follow @jonesjere on Twitter

Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports editor

845-9559 x237 • sportsreporter@wcinet.com Follow @UNG_AIozzo on Twitter

Fax: 845-9550

SportS

Thursday, May 12 2016

9

T he O reg O n O bserver

For more sports coverage, visit:

ConnectOregonWI.com

Boys tennis

Jeremy Jones, sports editor 845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com Follow @jonesjere on Twitter Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports

Photo by Jeremy Jones

Junior Charles Donovan hits a game-winner Thursday against Stoughton’s Levi Robbins. Donovan stepped up to No. 1 singles and cruised 6-2, 6-1. Oregon won the Bad- ger South Conference dual 7-0.

Panthers claim Stoughton invite

JEREMY JONES

Sports editor

The Oregon High School ten - nis team won six of seven flights Saturday to claim the Stoughton Invitational title with 40 points. Sauk Prairie (28) and Milton (20) rounded out the top three. Junior Calvin Schneider only dropped one game in three match- es, cruising to the No. 1 singles title with a 6-1, 6-0 win over Mil- ton’s Jackson Van den Huevel. Fellow junior Charles Donovan was nearly as dominant at No. 2 singles. Donovan cruised to a

6-1, 6-0 win over Big Foot’s Liam

McCarthy before he blanked Sam

Robinson of Milton in the second round. He capped the tournament, knocking off Sauk Prairie’s Jarrett Frosch 6-1, 6-0 in the champion - ship match. Sean Bycho wski helped the Panthers claim three of the four singles flights, taking the No. 4 singles title with a 6-1, 6-3 win over Sauk Prairie’s Alec Ander - son. Sam Schaeffer had dropped just two games in his first two No. 3 singles matches before drop - ping a heartbreaking 1-6, 6-3 (5)

championship match ag ainst Sauk Prairie’s Grant Kirner. Matt Reisdorf and Drew Chris - tofferson had one of Oregon’s most competitive runs to the No. 1 doubles championship. They held off Milton 6-4, 6-2 in the second round before defeating Sauk Prai - rie’s Ben Kraus and TJ Pfaff 6-1,

6-4.

Log an Piper and Spencer Kres - bach dominated the No. 2 doubles brack et, losing just four games on the day en route to a 6-0, 6-2 tournament-winning victory over Robby Boden and Neil Garcia of Milton.

Oregon faced Sauk Prairie for the fourth and final time in the No. 3 doubles championship match, defeating the Eagles team of Sean Harvantine and Grant Kosharek 6-3, 4-6 (9). The Panthers hosted the sin - gles portion of the tournament, wh ile the doubles teams played in Stoughton.

Oregon 7, Stoughton 0

Oregon switched up its line - up Friday, but still rolled 7-0 in a Badger South Conference dual

Turn to Tennis/Page 12

Boys track & field

Oregon ties for second at Stoughton Invitational

JEREMY JONES

Sports editor

Senior Alex Duff was part of two victories Friday at

the Stoughton Invitational as Oregon tied Madison La Fol- lette for second place with 92 points – 15 behind first place Sun Prairie. Waunakee took fourth with 81.5 points. Duff led a 1-2 finish by the Panthers in the 400, lead- ing teammate Logan Meier (51.64) to the finish line in

49.67.

He was then joined by junior Logan Meier, senior Jonas Temte and freshman Dylan DiMaggio to take the 4x400 relay .23 seconds ahead of Dodgeville/Mineral Point in 3:27.66. Sophomore Jon Auer finished six inches shy of Stoughton senior Adam Krumholz (20-8) in the long jump with a leap of 20-2. Chris Cutter and Hudson Kugel took fourth and fifth in the 1,600 in 4:29.93 and 4:31.6, respectively. Kugel bested Cutter in the 800, fin- ishing second to Madison La Follette senior Trevor Legg (1:58.56) with his time of 1:58.66. Cutter placed third in 1:59.22. Sophomore Kardel Phil - lips dropped nearly .6 of a second from his preliminary time to finish fourth over- all in the 110 hurdles with a time of 16.47. He matched the finish in the 300 hurdles in 41.96. Sophomore Jalil Turner, senior Sam Anders, senior Elloit Jacobs and junior Gregory DeBroux finished fifth in the 4x200 relay

(1:35.5).

Turn to Boys track/Page 12

Girls track and field

Panthers finish fourth at Stoughton Invitational

JEREMY JONES

Sports editor

The Oregon High School girls track and field team won three events Friday at the Stoughton Invitational and finished fourth overall with 73.5 points. Sun Prairie posted a meet-best 105 points, while the host Vikings (81) finished runner-up. DeForest rounded out the top three teams with 78.5 points. Panther sophomore Alexis Jackson won the 100-meter dash in 15.85 and senior Jessica Forster finished fourth in 17.33. Freshman Scarlet Egwuonwu cut .13 seconds from her preliminary time but ended up taking second to McFarland

senior Brittanny Broome (12.83) in the

100 dash with a time of 12.93. Junior Dan -

ica Keisling added a fifth-place finish in

13.47.

Egwuonwu sealed the deal in the 200, however, taking the event in 25.86. Seniors Morgan Yaun and Jillian Moss were joined by Keisling and Egwuonwu to claim the 4x200 relay in 1:47.54.

Sophomore Jenna Igl, junior Madelyn St. Clair, sophomore Taylor Schmidt and senior Maddie LeBrun finished runner-up to DeForest (4:09.92) in 4:10.3. Sophomore Abigail Fischer, Yaun, Moss and Keisling added a third-place finish in

Turn to Girls track/Page 11

Jeremy Jones, sports editor 845-9559 x226 • ungsportseditor@wcinet.com Follow @jonesjere on Twitter Anthony Iozzo, assistant sports

Photo by Anthony Iozzo

Sophomore Alexis Jackson clears the final hurdle in the 100-meter high hurdles Friday in the Stough- ton Invitational. Jackson won the event in 15.85 seconds.

10

May 12, 2016 Oregon Observer

ConnectOregonWI.com

Softball

Panthers win two at Mount Horeb tournament

JEREMY JONES

Sports editor

A six-run second inning by the visiting Fort Atkinson softball team proved to be Oregon’s undo - ing in a 12-4 loss Friday. Mor gan Dunkelberger went 4-for-4 with two RBIs for the Blackhawks while Hebbe Kastyn added a bases clearing triple for Fort Atkinson. Katelyn Gladem, Taylor Allard, Natalie Bosch, Courtney Dunkel - berger and Tess Baker each drove in a run. Jenna Gratz took the loss for Oregon, allowing six earned runs in 1 1/3 innings. She walked five and struck out two. Hanna Chris- tensen gave up two earned runs. Lace y Fluckiger threw 3 2/3 innings and didn’t allow a run. Oregon collected four hits and committed two errors in the loss.

Mount Horeb tournament

Oregon traveled to Mount Horeb on Saturday for a tourna - ment and defeated Dodgeville and the host Vikings. The Panthers opened the tour- nament with a 5-0 shut out of Dodge ville and then outlast - ed Mount Horeb 11-8. Cailyn Schmidt and Ka te Spierings each homered over the weekend. “I thought it was our two more complete games back-to-back this season,” Oregon head coach Syd - nee Wyss said. “I never had an question mark about our hitting. We just need to put everything together in the other two aspects

May 12, 2016 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com Softball Panthers win two at Mount Horeb tournament JEREMY JONES

Jeremy Jones/ Sports editor

Sophomore Hanna Christensen delivers a fifth-inning strike Monday evening against Janesville Craig. The host Panthers lost the non-conference game 13-3 in

Team

Wins

Losses

Stoughton

8

1

Monroe

7

2

Fort Atkinson

6

2

Monona Grove

3

5

Milton

1

5

Edgewood

1

5

Oregon

0

8

Badger South standings

in order to play a complete game.” Spierings blasted a solo home run to lead off the fifth inning against Dodgeville and Schmidt, Zander and Gratz each added an RBI. Oregon rallied from a three-run deficit with six runs in the fifth inning against Mount Horeb. Zander finished 3-for-3 in the nightcap with three RBIs and Julia Schmidt drove in two runs Schmidt had a solo home run to lead-off the third inning and an RBI single in the fifth. The host Vikings sent 14 batters to the plate in the second inning as Mount Horeb jumped out to a 7-2 lead in the second. “Lacey and Hanna both threw really well over the weekend,” Wyss said.

Craig 13, Oregon 3 (5 inn.)

Oregon hit the ball hard to start Monday evening’s non-con - ference game against Janesville Craig – an honorable mention on

the Division 1 state poll. The Panthers were unable to keep pace with the Cou - gars though, falling 13-3 in five innings. Craig sent seven batters to the plate in the first, including Jenna Brandt, who hammered a 3-run home run to right field. Han - nah Halverson singled and Kay - la Kaufman walked to start the inning. Jayme Zander hit a 2-run ground rule double with one out in the bottom of the inning to pull the Panthers within a run, but that would be as close as Oregon would get. “We knew Craig was a good team that would score runs,” Wyss said. “I thought we hit the ball well throughout the game, we just hit it right at them several times.” Craig’s Kaufman added a 2-run triple in the second and Laura Heilman and Morgan Oren each

Turn to Softball/Page 12 five innings.

adno=467730-01
adno=467730-01

ConnectOregonWI.com

May 12, 2016 Oregon Observer

11

Boys lacrosse

Boys golf

Panthers take seventh at Morgan Stanley Shootout

ANTHONY IOZZO

Assistant sports editor

The Oregon High School boys golf team traveled to the University Ridge Golf Course Wednesday and Thursday for the Morgan Stanley Shootout and fin - ished seventh overall with a 660 (338-322). Sophomore Ryan Candell shot a 159 (81-78), while freshman Jiohn Klus fin - ished with a 164 (85-79). Se niors Brandon Michek (87-83) and Matt Riss - er (85-85) both shot 170s. Senior Bran don Rogers fin - ished with a 172 (90-82). Rogers’ day one school

wasn’t counted toward the

team score and Risser’s day

2 score was thrown out. Middleton finished first with a 600 (303-297), while Madison Edgewood was runner-up with a 626 (319- 307). Madison Memorial rounded out the top three with a 331 (317-314). Madison Memorial’s Jacob O’Laughlin won a two-hole playoff over Mid - dleton’s Brady Thomas to tak e medalist honors. O’Laughlin (73-74) and Thomas (77-70) both fin - ished with 147s. Waunakee’s Max Forseth was third with a 149

Turn to Boys golf/Page 12

Girls lacrosse

Oregon drops two games last week

ANTHONY IOZZO

Assistant sports editor

The Oregon High School girls lacrosse dropped two games last week and is now 3-3 overall (2-3 Madison Area Lacrosse Association white division).

Waunakee 7, Oregon 4

The Panthers hosted Waunakee (10-1, 3-0) on May 3 and lost 7-4. Junior Lexie Knudtson had two goals, while junior Brianna Tarantino collected three assists. Sophomore

Samantha Armstrong and

freshman Autumn Copus

both added a goal. Sophomore Caitlin Curtis finished with 12 saves.

Sun Prairie 13, Oregon 6

Junior Gianna Barberino (two goals) and Armstrong (two goals, assist) led Ore - gon on May 5, but it wasn’t enough in a 13-6 loss. Junior Yesenia Valdez (goal) and Knudtson (goal, assist) also chipped in points. Curtis had 10 saves.

Girls track: Conference meet at Fort Atkinson Tuesday

Continued from page 9

the 400 relay, posting a time of 53.07. Freshman Alexis Karls and sophomore Breanna Bas - tian joined Igl and Fischer to finish third in the frosh/soph 1,600 sprint relay in 4:42.16. LeBrun added a fifth-place finish in the 400 (59.56). Or egon hosts its annual Tom Mueller Invitational at 4:30 p.m. Friday at P anther Stadium. The Badger South Conference meet is at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 17, at Fort Atkinson.

Panthers split games last week

ANTHONY IOZZO

Assistant sports editor

The Oregon High School boys lacrosse team split games between Sauk Prairie and Baraboo last week, moving to 5-3 overall (5-3 Madison Area Lacrosse Association white division).

Sauk Prairie 9, Oregon 7

Senior Trent Ricker picked up three goals and four assists on May 6 but the Panthers lost 9-7 to Sauk

Prairie (5-2).

Sophomore Harrison Kessenich

added a goal and two assists and junior Parker Ehn-Howland, sopho - more Sawyer Hughes and freshman Matt Strassmen all had a goal. Sophomore Rile y Fischl finished with 14 saves.

Oregon 15, Baraboo 1

Oregon traveled to Baraboo on Monday and won 15-1. Ricker picked up six goals and four assists, while sophomore Sam

Collins added four goals. Kessenich had two goals and two assists and

sophomore Derek Brellenthin col - lected a goal and two assists. Freshman Hog a n S c h u l z chipped in two goals. Sophomore Nathan Nipple, Hughes (goal) and Ehn-Howland (goal) all contributed points.

Dawson

Trautsch and Fischl fin -

ished with four saves each. Ore gon hosts Stoughton at 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 17.

Girls soccer

Brakob scores in 1-1 tie with Madison West

ANTHONY IOZZO

Assistant sports editor

The Oregon High School girls soc - cer team hosted Big Eight power - house Madison West on Saturday and ended in a 1-1 tie. Junior forward Meagan Brakob scored with an assist to freshman defender Sydney McKee to tie the game in the second half. Rachel

Peaslee scored the Regents’ goal with an assist to Simo Bambi.

Junior goalie Abby Breitbach fin - ished with two saves, while Giselle Monette had four for West. Oregon travels to non-conference Mount Horeb at 7 p.m. Friday.

Oregon, Fort Atkinson (ppd)

The Panthers were supposed to host Fort Atkinson in a Badger South

Conference game Tuesday, but steady rainfall all day forced the game to be postponed. There was no make-up date by the Observer’s deadline. Oregon is 3-0 with six points, behind Monona Grove (4-0, eight points) and Milton (4-1, eight points). Stoughton is behind the Panthers (1-3, two points).

Baseball

Oregon travels to Miller Park, drops close one to Madison East

ANTHONY IOZZO

Assistant sports editor

T h e O r e g o n H i g h School baseball team trav - eled to the Milwaukee Bre wers’ Miller Park on Thursday to face non-con - ference Madison East and lost 3-2. Ea st pitcher Cameron Cratic held off Oregon’s seventh-inning rally for a complete-game win. Cratic allowed two earned runs on nine hits, striking out seven and walking three. P a t S o m m e r s t o o k the loss. He allowed no earned runs on one hit in two innings, striking out three and walking one. Ian Schildgen started for the Panthers. He allowed an earned run on one hit in four innings, walking three and striking out one. Steven Davis (2-for- 3, double), Sam Mueller (2-for-2), Ben Weiland (2-for-2) and Connor Zagrodnik (double) led the offense for Oregon.

Fort Atkinson 4, Oregon 3

The

Panthers

lost

a

tough

4-3

game to

Fort

A t k i n s o n

o n

F r i d a y,

Badger South Team W-L Fort Atkinson 5-2 Madison Edgewood 6-3 Monroe 5-3 Stoughton 5-3 Oregon 4-4
Badger South
Team
W-L
Fort Atkinson
5-2
Madison Edgewood
6-3
Monroe
5-3
Stoughton
5-3
Oregon
4-4
Milton
3-5
Monona Grove
0-8

O r e g o n h o s t s r iva l

Stoughton at 4:30 p .m.

Thursday in a game with huge conference implica - tions. The P anthers host Sauk Prairie in a Badger cross - over at 5 p.m. Friday and travel to Waunakee High School for the Badger Challenge Saturday. Oregon travels to Mil - ton in another huge Bad - ger South clash at 5 p.m. Tuesday, May 17.

dropping Oregon behind four teams in the Badger South. Oregon scored three times off of Matt Romens in the top of the seventh to tie the Blackhawks at 3-3, but Fort Atkinson got a walk-off hit in the bottom of the inning. Josh Gomoll doubled home Jordan Helmkamp and Mueller (2-for-3) sin - gled home Davis (2-for- 4) with tw o outs. On the Mueller single, Nik Richardson scored on the throw to tie the game. The Blackhawks also had two-out magic, how - ever, as Romens redeemed himself with w alk-off game-winning single that brought home Tanner Reidl. Fort Atkinson scored

three times in the first. Ben Weiland added two hits for Oregon. Adam Heath took the loss. He allowed four earned runs on eight hits in 6 2/3 innings, striking out three and walking two. Romens picked up the win. He allowed three earned runs on four hits in one inning, striking out two and walking one. Cole Ehrke started for Fort Atkinson. He allowed four hits and two walks in six innings, striking out eight. The loss dropped the Panthers to 4-4 in the Badger South. Fort Atkin - son (5-2) leads Madison Edge wood (6-3) for first place. Stoughton and Monroe are both tied for second at

5-3.

Oregon, Edgewood (ppd)

The Panthers were sup - posed to host Madison Edge wood Tuesday but rain forced the game to be postponed. No makeup date was chosen before the Observ - er’s Tuesday deadline.

Diane Sliter Chris Reese Agent Agent Troy Spilde Licensed Office Manager dsliter@amfam.com creese@amfam.com tspild2@amfam.com Diane Sliter
Diane Sliter
Chris Reese
Agent
Agent
Troy Spilde
Licensed Office Manager
dsliter@amfam.com
creese@amfam.com
tspild2@amfam.com
Diane Sliter Agency, Inc.
850 Janesville Street • Oregon, WI •(608) 835-5100
006441 - 5/16
adno=467277-01
Dr ess It Up Fo r Syttende Mai! 20% OFF: Ornamental Container Trees B&B Serviceberry Trees
Dr ess It Up Fo r
Syttende Mai!
20% OFF:
Ornamental
Container Trees
B&B Serviceberry
Trees and Clumps
Fruiting Container
Trees and Plants
B&B Magnolia Trees
NOW through M AY 17th
Plus $3 off/yard ALL in-stock Bulk Materials
Op en 7-days
Monday- Fr id
ay..8
am -5p m
with de liv ery
available !
Saturdays 8am-4pm ..............
Sundays 10am-4pm ...................
936 Starr School Rd, Stough to n
(608) 873-9141
www.moye rs inc.net
adno=465481-01

12

May 12, 2016 Oregon Observer

ConnectOregonWI.com

May 12, 2016 Oregon Observer ConnectOregonWI.com Photo by Anthony Iozzo Senior Chris Cutter races to third

Photo by Anthony Iozzo

Senior Chris Cutter races to third place in the 800 Friday in the Stoughton Invitational. Cutter finished behind teammate Hudson Kugel (1:58.88) in a time of 1 minute, 59.22 seconds.

Boys track: Tom Mueller invite set for Friday

Continued from page 9

Seniors Jonas Temte and Lucas Mathews were joined by Turner and Anders to take in the 400 relay in 45.2. Mathews added a fourth-place finish in the 200 with his time of 23.37 and a fifth-place finish in the high jump with a clearance 5-6. Oregon hosts its annual Tom Mueller Invitational at 4:30 p.m. Friday at Panther Stadium. The Badger South Con- ference meet is at 3:30 p.m. Tuesday. May 17, at Fort Atkin- son.

Home Talent League

Riffle pitches 10 strong innings in opening day loss

ANTHONY IOZZO

Assistant sports editor

Despite not fielding a full team Sunday, the Oregon Home Talent team battled Mount Horeb/Pine Bluff for 11 innings before falling 3-2 in the Western Section opener. Ben Riffle allowed one earned run on 10 hits in 10 innings, striking out five, walking three and hitting one batter. But despite those strong numbers, he ended up with the loss as a rally in the bottom of the 11th inning fell short. “Riffle threw 10 brilliant innings and then pulled a hamstring which took him out of the game,” catcher Ryan Hoodjer said. “They are a good hitting team. Cole Payne

will probably lead the league

in hitting and has multiple

years, so I think it is a good first run.” Riffle (3-for-4) also helped out his own cause at the plate. He reached on a one-out infield single in the eighth and got to second on an error on Payne after a sac bunt. Logan Laski walked to load the bases and a passed ball brought Riffle home to tie the game 1-1. Will Reinicke and Eric Engler both struck out to end the threat, however. Oregon had a chance to win in the bottom of the 10th. Rif- fle singled with one-out again and was sacrificed to second. Laski then lined a shot to right field, but a diving catch saved the potential game-win- ning run.

“We did a lot of little things well. We bunted well. We did miss a couple of steals. There were a couple of opportuni- ties to get guys around that we weren’t able to take advantage of,” Hoodjer said. “They made a couple of diving catches that cost us runs, so it was just one of those days.” Mount Horeb scored twice in the 11th to take a 3-1 lead, but the Orioles continued to try and fight back. Reinicke reached on an infield single, Engler was hit by a pitch and Jeff Spiwak bunted safely to load the bases with no outs. Sam Schretenthaler fol - lowed with a sacrifice fly RBI to score Reinicke, but Hood- jer and Parker Debroux both popped out to end the game. “We have some kids that

are still at college too, so we had some guys playing out of position,” Hoodjer said. “That was a lineup we will not nor- mally run out there, so to be competitive with a good team like Mount Horeb – a playoff team last year – is something we can build on for the rest of the season.” The Bluffers loaded the bases twice and also stranded runners on first and third in the first three innings before finally scoring in the top of the fourth. Payne picked up the win for the Bluffers. He allowed two earned runs on five hits in 10 innings, striking out eight and walking two. The Orioles travel to Blanchardville at 1 p.m. Sun- day.

Boys golf

Continued from page 11

(75-74).

The Panthers travel to Yahara Golf Course at 3:30 p.m. Thursday to take on Madison Edgewood and to Monroe Country Club at 3:30 p.m. Friday to face the Cheesemakers. Oregon fin - ishes the regular season at noon Monday, May 16, in an invite at Blackhawk Country

Club.

The Badger South Con - ference meet is at 9 a.m. Wednesday, May 18, at the House on the Rock Resort.

Oregon, Milton (ppd.)

The Panthers were sup - posed to travel to Oak Ridge Golf Course on Tuesday for a Badger South dual at Mil - ton but rain forced the match to be postponed to May 11.

Sports shorts

Rugby Club a win from state

The Oregon-Stoughton rugby team (4-1) has a good chance of making the state playoffs for the second time in the club’s history. After suffering a 28-19 loss to Southern Lakes, the club bounced back with wins over Kenosha and Madison West- side.

Tries were scored by:

Tristan Williams (Oregon), Key Cook (Stoughton), John- ny Schmitt (Oregon). Multi- ple tries scored by: Henrickus Echols (three, Madison East), Tommy Tobias (two, Stough- ton), The team’s next home game is 5:30 p.m. Wednes- day, May 18, against Wauke- sha at Oregon Middle School. This game will decide if the club heads to state.

BREITBACH CHIROPRACTIC Serving the Community Since 1961 16 7 N. M ain St., Oregon HOURS: Monday,
BREITBACH
CHIROPRACTIC
Serving the Community Since 1961
16 7 N. M ain St., Oregon
HOURS:
Monday, Tuesday and Friday
8
am-12 noon; 1:30 pm-6 pm
Wednesday
8
am-12 noon; 1:30 pm-5 pm; 7-9 pm
Saturday 8 am-11 am
Dr. John E. Breitbach
835-5353
www.breitbachchiropractic.com
adno=465063-01

Softball: Tuesday’s game is postponed

Continued from page 10

singled home another Janesville capped the 10-run rule victory with three runs in the fourth and two more in the fifth. Fluckiger threw the first four

innings, allowing 11 earned runs on

12 hits and four walks. Christensen tossed the final inning, allowing one earned run on two hits.

Oregon, Edgewood (ppd.)

Tuesday’s at Goodman Park against the conference rival Madison Edge - wood Crusaders was rained out. No mak e-up date had been announced as the Observer went to press Tuesday evening.

Tennis: Oregon blanks Stoughton and Baraboo

Continued from page 9

meet at Stoughton. Donovan stepped up to No. 1 singles with Schnei - der sitting the match out and cruised 6-2, 6-1 against Levi Robbins. Bychowski rolled 6-0, 6-0 over Adam McCune at No. 3 singles, while Schaef- fer and

Garrett Schultz capped

the blowout 6-0, 6-3 and 6-1, 6-4 at No. 2 and 4 sin - gles, respectively. Ore gon cruised through - out the doubles lineup, dropping a combined three games. Reisdorf and Christof - ferson blew out Mitchell Ace and Stef an Butterbrodt 6-0, 6-1 at No. 1 doubles,

while Sam Ast and Spencer Krebsbach blanked John - athon Blaikie and Graham Beebe 6-0, 6-0 at 2 doubles. K yle Rehrauer and Nate Ironmonger capped the match with a 6-1, 6-1 win at No. 3 doubles.

Oregon 7, Baraboo 0

The Panthers made up a Badger Conference cross - over against Baraboo earli - er in the week, and blanked another team, shutting out the Thunderbirds 7-0 on

Wednesday. Donovan and Schaef - fer cruised 6-0, 6-0 atop the singles lineup, while Christofferson and Reisdorf matched the score at No. 1 doubles. Bychowski and Ironmon - ger rolled 6-2, 6-0 and 6-1, 6-0 at No. 3 and 4 singles, respectively. Krebsbach and Piper add - ed a 6-0, 6-1 win at No. 2 doubles and Ast and Reh - raurer cruised 6-1, 6-0 at No. 3 doubles.

New Pa tients Always We lcome

New Pa tients Always We lcome C aring D entistry for the e ntire f amily

Caring Dentistry for the entire family

Mueller Dental

(608) 835-0900

152 Alpine Pkwy, Oregon www.muellerdental.com

adno=465058-01

Proudly Serving the Oregon Area for Over 18 Years!

WE ALTH MANAGEM ENT WORTHY OF YOUR GOALS. Investing. Rollovers. Retirement planning. Trustee services. Your financial

WE ALTH

MANAGEM ENT

WORTHY OF YOUR

GOALS.

Investing. Rollovers. Retirement planning. Trustee services. Your financial future is important, and it should be in the right hands so you can reach your goals and develop the security you need. That’s where State Bank of Cross Plains’ Wealth Management professionals come in. They offer expert wealth and portfolio management services, and more importantly, peace of mind. If you’re looking for a wealth management partner who is worth your time, look no further than State Bank of Cross Plains.

(608) 826-3570 • crossplainsbank.com

WORTHY OF YOUR GOALS. Investing. Rollovers. Retirement planning. Trustee services. Your financial future is important, and

Yeah, we can do that.

WORTHY OF YOUR GOALS. Investing. Rollovers. Retirement planning. Trustee services. Your financial future is important, and

adno=464898-01

ConnectOregonWI.com

May 12, 2016

Oregon Observer

13

OASIS: Alternative high school will move to ‘beautiful’ space in OHS addition in fall 2017

Continued from page 1

new space will feature small- group instructional areas, art and science areas, “comfort- able collaboration spaces,” computer spaces, a meeting space for families, and a community gathering space and kitchen. “All of the things (OASIS staff) was very important to the learning needs of the students are included in this design, which makes the teachers feel very posi - tive about the entire OASIS

move,” she said.

The most recent estimate for the space is $700,000, which can be fit into the district’s construction bud - get due to “favorable” bids received on the OASIS proj- ect, according to the district. T he preliminary comple - tion date for the addition is January 2017, and district superintendent Brian Busler said he will leave it to OHS staff and principal Jim Plin- er whether they want to try to mo ve OASIS program - ming to the high school

mid-school year or wait until fall of 2017. “The OASIS staff has been deeply involved in planning this space,” he said, noting that the building layout is in the “near-final” phase. Board member Gwen Mai- tzen, a former OSD teacher, said the design for the new OASIS area is “beautiful.” “I just wish it happened four or five years earlier,” she said. “I look back at the history of OASIS, and there was a lot of struggle that, in reflection, I wish was

handled differently.”

Teacher pay update

Board members and administrators discussed the final recommendation of a committee tasked to come up with a new teacher com - pensation plan to allow the district to “retain, develop and recruit highly qualified educators.” The committee, which has been working on the project for around three years, currently consists of board member Charles Uphoff, Oregon Education

Association members Col - leen Christenson, Dave Ebert, Jon Fishwild and Col- leen Schell and administra - tors Leslie Bergstrom, Jina Jonen and Andy Weiland. The board has been aiming at November for a referen - dum on a teacher compen - sation plan. The board has scheduled a special meeting a 6 p.m. Monday, May 23, to talk more about the plan.

Email reporter Scott De Laruelle at scott.delaruelle@ wcinet.com.

If You Go

What: Oregon School Board teacher compensa- tion plan special meeting

When:

6 p.m. Monday,

May 23

Where: Netherwood Knoll

Elementary

School,

276

Soden Drive

Info: 835-4000

Legals

TOWN OF OREGON OPEN BOOK AND BOARD OF REVIEW THURSDAY, MAY 12, 2016 5:00 P.M.-7:00 P.M. & SATURDAY, MAY 14, 2016 10:00 A.M.-NOON

The 2016 Town of Oregon Open Book will be held at the Oregon Town

Hall, 1138 Union Road on Thursday, May 12, 2016, from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. and on Saturday, May 14, 2016, from 10:00 p.m. to Noon. Appointments are not re- quired. Open Book is an informal meeting with the assessor to ask questions and review assessment records. Property Owners are encouraged to attend the open book to verify the as- sessment of their property. In addition, property owners can learn how their assessment was calculated, compare your property to similar properties, verify open land acreages and valuations, and learn how market activity affected the assessment. The 2016 Town of Oregon Board of Review will be held on Saturday, June 4,

  • 2016 from 9:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. To ap-

pear at the Board of Review, it is required

that an appointment is scheduled 48

hours prior to the start of Board of Re- view. Appointments are scheduled with

the Clerk’s Office at 835-3200.

Denise Arnold Town Clerk Published: May 5 and 12, 2016 WNAXLP

* * *

TOWN OF OREGON NOXIOUS WEED NOTICE

Notice is hereby given to each and every person who owns, occupies or controls land in the Town of Oregon, Dane County, State of Wisconsin, is re-

quired by law to cut or destroy all nox- ious weeds, including all Canada thistle, leafy spurge, and field bindweed (creepin Jenny) before such weeds bloom, bear seed and spread to adjourning proper- ties, as required in Section 66.0407 of the Wisconsin States Statutes.

(Photos available here http://dnr.

wi.gov/files/pdf/pubs/fr/FR0464.pdf.)

If property is found not in compli- ance with the above Notice, the Town

of Oregon shall issue an Official Notice

stating that action must be taken within

five days of the written notice or the Town

of Oregon will destroy the weeds at the responsible person’s expense. Dated this 28th of April, 2016 Wayne L. Ace, Town Chairman Posted: April 28, 2016 Published: May 5 and 12, 2016 WNAXLP

* * *

2. Land Division and Rezone Re- quest. Petition # DCPREZ-2016-10994; Parcel # 0509-141-8500-1; 425’ east of 5093 Lincoln Road. The request is to

creating one residential lot. The property would be rezoned from A-3 to RH-1. Peti- tioner and Owner is Tom Buglass, 5075 Lincoln Road, Oregon, WI 53575. An effort has been made to notify neighbors of this proposed change. To

ensure that everyone has been notified,

please share this notice with anyone who you think would be interested. Note: Agendas are subject to amend-

ment after publication. Check the official posting locations (Town Hall, Town of

Oregon Recycling Center and Oregon Village Hall) including the Town website at www.town.oregon.wi.us or join the Town’s e-mail list to receive agendas at townoforegon@mailbag.com. It is possi- ble that members of and possibly a quo- rum of members of other governmental

bodies of the town may be in attendance at any of the meetings to gather informa- tion; however, no action will be taken by any governmental body at said meeting other than the governmental body spe-

cifically referred to in the meeting notice.

Requests from persons with disabilities who need assistance to participate in

this meeting or hearing should be made

to the Clerk’s office at 835-3200 with 48

hours notice.

Denise R. Arnold Clerk Posted: May 2, 2016 Published: May 5 and 12, 2016 WNAXLP

* * *

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS HISTORIC TIN MAN WATER TOWER PAINTING VILLAGE OF OREGON DANE COUNTY, WISCONSIN

The Village of Oregon is seeking a contractor to help the Village complete a community based project to restore and repaint a historic Tin Man Style Water Tower. The first phase involved the resto- ration of a 1899 Pump House, which sits under the Tin Man Water Tower. The last phase is the restoration and repainting of the Tower. The Tin Man Water Tower is a local, state, and national landmark. Permission to restore and repaint the Tin Man Water Tower has been granted by the Wisconsin State Historical Society. The Village of Oregon is looking for a contractor who will partner with the Vil- lage and complete this last phase of the project. Sealed Bids will be received by Vil- lage of Oregon at 117 Spring Street, Or- egon, WI 53575 no later than 2:30 p.m. local time on June 1, 2016. Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud at the above time and place.? Project involves minor repairs to and painting a non-functional water tow- er.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING OREGON PLAN COMMISSION TUESDAY, MAY 17, 2016 6:30 P.M. OREGON TOWN HALL 1138 UNION ROAD OREGON, WI 53575

NOTICE HEREBY GIVEN for a PUB- LIC HEARING to be held on Tuesday, May

17, 2016 at 6:30 p.m., before the Town of Oregon Plan Commission at the Oregon Town Hall, 1138 Union Road, Oregon, WI

The Project Manager for this Proj- ect is Daniel R. Butler, P.E., who may be contacted at Ruekert & Mielke, Inc., W233 N2080 Ridgeview Parkway, Waukesha, WI

53188-1020, (262) 542-5733 regarding the

Project. All Work is included in a single prime contract. Bidding Documents, including Drawings and Specifications, may be examined at the offices of Village of Ore- gon, and the Consulting Engineer during regular business hours. Project Bidding Documents are

  • 53575. available at www.questcdn.com. Digi- tal project Bidding Documents may be downloaded for $30 by inputting Quest project #4478464 on the website’s Project Search page. Please contact QuestCDN. com at 952-233-1632 or info@Questcdn. com for assistance in free membership registration, downloading, and working

1. Land Division and Rezone Re- quest. Petition # DCPREZ-2016-10993; Parcel #0509-044-8020-0; 5; west of 5553 Netherwood Road. The request is for creating one residential lot. The property

would be rezoned from A-1Ex to A-2(4).

Petitioner and Owner is Rita Kluever,

  • 5848 Madsen Circle, Oregon, WI 53575.

with this digital project information.

adno=467270-01
adno=467270-01
adno=467263-01
adno=467263-01

Optional paper sets of project Bid- ding Documents may be obtained from

the Issuing Office, BPI Color. The cost of printed (hard copy) Bidding Documents

is dependent upon the size of the Bid- ding Document set, taxes and shipping costs. Upon ordering, printed Bidding Documents will be sent via customer’s delivery mode of choice and the deliv- ery charge will be dependent upon the

shipping method chosen. Bidding Docu- ments may also be picked up in person at BPI, Inc., 11331 West Rogers Street, Milwaukee, WI 53227 or 4121 East Towne Blvd, Madison, WI 53704 if ordered be-

forehand. Call (414) 327-5010 for pricing.

Partial sets of Bidding Documents are not available. Neither Owner, Engi-

neer nor Issuing Office is responsible

for full or partial sets of Bidding Docu- ments, including any Addenda, obtained from other sources. The cost of Bidding Documents is non-refundable. Each en- tity obtaining Bidding Documents from

the Issuing Office will be designated as

a Plan Holder of Record. Bids received

from entities who are not Plan Holders of Record may be returned as being nonre- sponsive.

A Bidder’s qualification statement

must be delivered to Village of Oregon at

least 5 days before the Bid opening date. Bids shall be accompanied by a Bond

or Certified Check payable to Village of

Oregon equal to 5 percent of the Bid. If the successful Bidder fails to execute the Contract and furnish payment and performance bonds within 15 days after the award, the Check or Bid Bond may be forfeited to Village of Oregon as liquidat- ed damages. Prevailing wage rates for all trades and occupations involved in the Work shall be in accordance with Wisconsin Statutes 66.0903 and the Prevailing Wage Rate Determination issued by Wisconsin Department of Workforce Development for this Project. Construction time is of the essence. Completion delays are subject to liqui- dated damages. The Village of Oregon reserves the

right to accept the most advantageous Bid, or to reject any and all Bids. Award of Work described herein is subject to the provisions of the Wisconsin Statutes. Village of Oregon, WI Steve Staton, Village President

Candie Jones, Deputy Clerk/Treasurer

RUEKERT & MIELKE, INC. W233 N2080 Ridgeview Parkway Waukesha, Wisconsin 53188-1020

Phone: (262) 542-5733 Fax: (262) 542-5631

Published: May 12 and 19, 2016 WNAXLP

* * *

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS 2016 SOUTH MAIN STREET & ELM STREET UTILITY AND STREET IMPROVEMENTS VILLAGE OF OREGON DANE COUNTY, WISCONSIN

Sealed Bids will be received by the Village of Oregon at the Village Hall, 117 Spring Street, Oregon WI 53575-1494 no

later than 2:00 p.m. location time on June 1, 2016. Bids will be publicly opened and read aloud at the above time and place. Project involves two different street reconstruction areas which are adjacent

to each other and are identified as Base

Bid A (Elm Street) and Base Bid B (South

Main Street). Below are descriptions of each area:

Base Bid A (Elm Street) work in- cludes, but shall not be limited to approx-

imately 560 feet of urban section (32 feet

face to face of curb) street reconstruc- tion including removal of existing road- way, 8 inches of crushed aggregate base course, 449 Tons of asphaltic concrete pavement, 1,125 L.F. of concrete curb and gutter, concrete driveway approach-

es, 4,550 S.F. of concrete sidewalk re- placement, minor sanitary sewer repairs, sanitary sewer manhole replacement, re- connect sanitary sewer laterals, 550 L.F. of 8-inch water main, hydrant assembly, replacement of 10 – 1-inch water services including curb stop valve and box. Proj- ect includes excavation of an area of con- taminated soil and nitrile gasket for water main installation. Restoration for terrac- es is included in this project. Project also includes traffic control, erosion control, cleanup and miscellaneous appurtenant facilities to complete construction. Base Bid B (South Main Street) work includes, but shall not be limited to ap- proximately 720 feet of urban section (average 35 feet face to face of curb) street reconstruction including removal of existing roadway, 8 inches of crushed aggregate base course, 688 Tons of as- phaltic concrete pavement, 1,450 L.F. of concrete curb and gutter, concrete drive- way approaches, 7,120 S.F. of concrete sidewalk replacement, minor sanitary sewer repairs, sanitary sewer manhole replacement, reconnect sanitary sewer laterals, 790 L.F. of 12-inch water main, 65 L.F. of 8-inch water main 8-inch valves, 12-inch valves, hydrant assembly, re- placement of 18 – 1-inch water services including curb stop valve and box. Resto- ration for terraces is included in this proj- ect. Project also includes traffic control, cleanup and miscellaneous appurtenant facilities to complete construction. The Project Manager for this Proj- ect is Jason P. Lietha, P.E. who may be contacted at Ruekert & Mielke, Inc., 258 Corporate Drive, Suite 200, Madison, WI 53714-2407, (608) 819-2600, regarding the Project. All Work is included in a single prime contract. Bidding Documents, including Drawings and Specifications, may be examined at the offices of Village of Ore- gon, and the Consulting Engineer during regular business hours. Project Bidding Documents are available at www.questcdn.com. Digi- tal project Bidding Documents may be downloaded for $30 by inputting Quest project #4455393 on the website’s Project Search page. Please contact QuestCDN. com at 952-233-1632 or info@Questcdn. com for assistance in free membership registration, downloading, and working with this digital project information. Optional paper sets of project Bid- ding Documents may be obtained from the Issuing Office, BPI Color. The Project Manual will be 8.5 inches by 11-inch- es and all Drawings are provided at 11 inches by 17 inches (no larger plans will be offered on this project). The cost of printed (hard copy) Bidding Documents is dependent upon the size of the Bid- ding Document set, taxes and shipping costs. Upon ordering, printed Bidding Documents will be sent via customer’s delivery mode of choice and the deliv- ery charge will be dependent upon the shipping method chosen. Bidding Docu- ments may also be picked up in person at BPI, Inc., 11331 West Rogers Street, Milwaukee, WI 53227 or 4121 East Towne Blvd, Madison, WI 53704 if ordered be- forehand. Call (414) 327-5010 for pricing. Partial sets of Bidding Documents are not available. Neither Owner, Engi- neer nor Issuing Office is responsible for full or partial sets of Bidding Docu- ments, including any Addenda, obtained from other sources. The cost of Bidding Documents is non-refundable. Each en- tity obtaining Bidding Documents from the Issuing Office will be designated as a Plan Holder of Record. Bids received from entities who are not Plan Holders of Record may be returned as being nonre- sponsive. A Bidder’s qualification statement must be delivered to the Village of Ore- gon, Village Hall at least 5 days before the Bid opening date. Bids shall be accom- panied by a Bond or Certified Check pay-

adno=467269-01
adno=467269-01
adno=467252-01
adno=467252-01

able to the Village of Oregon, WI equal to 5 percent of the Bid. If the successful Bidder fails to execute the Contract and furnish payment and performance bonds within 15 days after the award, the Check or Bid Bond may be forfeited to the Vil- lage of Oregon, WI as liquidated damag- es.

  • 6. Public Comments.

  • 7. Presentation by Mark Hazelbaker

on Wisconsin Act 178 regarding the op-

tion to withdraw from Dane County Zon- ing. Informational only, no decisions will be made.

  • 8. Discussion and possible Action

re: Re-appointment of Arlan Kay and Bri-

Prevailing wage rates for all trades and occupations involved in the Work

an Duffin to plan commission for a term of three (3) years (6/2019).

shall be in accordance with Wisconsin

  • 9. Discussion and possible Action

Statutes 66.0903 and the Prevailing Wage

re: TORC procedures.

Rate Determination issued by Wisconsin

10.

Update on Anderson Park.

Department of Workforce Development

11.

Communications.

for this Project.

12.

Adjournment.

Note: Agendas are subject to amend-

Construction time is of the essence. Completion delays are subject to liqui-

dated damages. Village of Oregon, WI reserves the

right to accept the most advantageous Bid, or to reject any and all Bids. Award of Work described herein is subject to the provisions of the Wisconsin Statutes. Village of Oregon, WI Steve Staton, Village President

ment after publication. Check the official posting locations (Town Hall, Town of

Oregon Recycling Center and Oregon Village Hall) including the Town website at www.town.oregon.wi.us or join the Town’s e-mail list to receive agendas at townoforegon@mailbag.com. It is possi- ble that members of and possibly a quo- rum of members of other governmental

Candie Jones, Deputy Clerk/Treasurer

bodies of the town may be in attendance

RUEKERT & MIELKE, INC.

at any of the meetings to gather informa-

258 Corporate Drive, Suite 200 Madison, WI 53714-2407

tion; however, no action will be taken by any governmental body at said meeting

cifically referred to in the meeting notice.

Phone: (608) 819-2600 Fax: (608) 819-2601

other than the governmental body spe-

Published: May 12 and 19, 2016 WNAXLP

Requests from persons with disabilities who need assistance to participate in this meeting or hearing should be made

* * *

to the Clerk’s office at 835-3200 with 48

TOWN OF OREGON PLAN COMMISSION AGENDA

TUESDAY, MAY 17, 2016 @ 6:30 PM OREGON TOWN HALL, 1138 UNION ROAD, OREGON, WI

  • 1. Open Public Hearing:

    • a. Land Land Division and Rezone

Request. Petition # DCPREZ-2016-10993; Parcel #0509-044-8020-0; 5; west of 5553 Netherwood Road. The request is for creating one residential lot. The property

would be rezoned from A-1Ex to A-2(4).

Petitioner and Owner is Rita Kluever,

  • 5848 Madsen Circle, Oregon, WI 53575.

    • b. Land Division and Rezone Re-

quest. Petition # DCPREZ-2016-10994;

Parcel # 0509-141-8500-1; 425’ east of

  • 5093 Lincoln Road. The request is to

creating one residential lot. The property would be rezoned from A-3 to RH-1. Peti- tioner and Owner is Tom Buglass, 5075 Lincoln Road, Oregon, WI 53575.

  • c. Land Division and Rezone Re-

quest. Petition # DCPREZ-2016-10968; Parcel # 0509-142-8800-0 & 0509-142- 8526-0; west of 5207 Lincoln Rd., Ore-

gon, WI 53575. The request is to transfer the building site location. No additional building sites requested. The 5.11 acre property would be rezoned from RH-2 to A-4 and 5.35 acre property would be rezoned from A-3 to RH-2. Petitioner is Paulson & Associates LLC, 135 W. Hlum St., Deforest, WI 53532. Owners are Steve Gasner, 6225 Stony Hill Dr., Oregon, WI 53575 & Roger Parsons, 5207 Lincoln Rd., Oregon, WI 53575. Location of drive- way to be discussed.

  • 2. Close Public Hearing.

  • 3. Call Plan Commission meeting to

order.

  • 4. Discussion and possible Recom-

mendation to the Town Board:

  • a. Land Division and Rezone Re-

quest. Petition # DCPREZ-2016-10993;

Parcel #0509-044-8020-0; 5; west of 5553 Netherwood Road.

  • b. Land Division and Rezone Re-

quest. Petition # DCPREZ-2016-10994;

Parcel # 0509-141-8500-1; 425’ east of

  • 5093 Lincoln Road.

    • c. Land Division and Rezone Re-

quest. Petition # DCPREZ-2016-10968; Parcel # 0509-142-8800-0 & 0509-142-

8526-0; west of 5207 Lincoln Rd., Oregon, WI 53575.

hours notice. Posted: May 10, 2016 Published: May 12, 2016 WNAXLP

* * *

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

VILLAGE OF OREGON

  • 53575 AMENDING & ADOPTING

CHAPTER 41 FLOODPLAIN ORDINANCE

PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the Vil-

lage of Oregon Village Board will hold a public hearing at 5:00 p.m. on June 6, 2016 to amend Chapter 41 of the Village

Code of Ordinances relating to Flood-

plain Regulations. The purpose of the

public hearing is to solicit comments on

the floodplain revisions that are required

by state and federal law.

This ordinance governs develop-

ment and activity in mapped floodplain

areas. The proposed regulations are in-

tended to protect life, health and prop-

erty in floodplain areas and will govern uses permitted in mapped floodplains.

Activities such as dredging, filling, exca- vating and construction of buildings are generally allowed, but may be restricted according to which flood zone the prop- erty is in. A copy of the amended Floodplain

Ordinance is on file at the office of the Village Clerk for public review. Office

hours of the Clerk are 7:30 a.m. to 4:30

p.m., Monday through Friday. All persons

interested are invited to attend this hear- ing and be heard. Subsequent to the hearing, the Vil-

lage Board intends to deliberate and act

upon the request.

Any person who has a qualifying

disability as defined by the Americans

with Disabilities Act that requires the

meeting or materials at the meeting to

be in an accessible location or format

must contact the Village Clerk at (608)

835-3118, 117 Spring Street, Oregon, Wis-

consin, at least twenty-four hours prior

to the commencement of the meeting so that any necessary arrangements can be

made to accommodate each request.

Peggy S.K. Haag

Village Clerk Published: May 12 and 19, 2016 WNAXLP

* * *

  • 5. Approval of minutes from the last

meeting. adno=467273-01
meeting.
adno=467273-01
  • 14 May 12, 2016

Oregon Observer

ConnectOregonWI.com

Legals

STATE OF WISCONSIN, CIRCUIT COURT, DANE COUNTY, NOTICE TO CREDITORS (INFORMAL ADMINISTRATION) IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF HOWARD STUART ROPER

Case No. 16PR289 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:

 

1.

An application for Informal Admin-

istration was filed.

 

2.

The decedent, with date of birth

January 19, 1948 and date of death De-

cember 7, 2015, was domiciled in Dane County, State of Wisconsin, with a mail- ing address of 603 Janesville Street, Ore- gon, WI 53575.

 

3.

All interested persons waived no-

tice.

 

4.

The deadline for filing a claim

against the decedent’s estate is August

5, 2016.

 
 

5.

A claim may be filed at the Dane

County Courthouse, Madison, Wiscon-

sin, Room 1000

Lisa Chandler Probate Registrar April 25, 2016

Michael S. Roper 592 S. Burr Oak Avenue Oregon, WI 53575 (608) 235-3346 Published: May 12, 19 and 26, 2016 WNAXLP

* * *

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF THE OREGON SCHOOL DISTRICT HELD ON APRIL 11, 2016

The regular meeting of the School Board of the Oregon School District was called to order by the President at 6:32 PM in the Rome Corners Intermediate School in the Village of Oregon, Dane County, Wisconsin. Upon roll call, the following board members were present:

Ms. Barbara Feeney, Mr. Charles Uphoff, Ms. Gwen Maitzen, Mr. Jeff Ramin, Mr. Steve Zach, Ms. Rae Vogeler and Mr. Dan Krause, The following board members were absent: none. Administrators pres- ent: Dr. Brian Busler, Mr. Andy Weiland, Mrs. Candace Weidensee, Mr. Dan Rikli, Mrs. Shannon Anderson, Dr. Leslie Berg- strom, Mr. Jon Tanner, Ms. Jina Jonen, Ms. Tori Whitish, Ms. Kerri Modjeski, Mr.

Jim Pliner, Mr. Jason Zurawik, Mr. Josh Iverson, Ms. Cynthia Olander, Mr. Mike

Carr, Ms. Dawn Goltz, Mr. Chris Kluck and Ms. Kelly Kluck, and Ms. Jayne Wick.

Proof in the form of a certificate by

the Oregon Observer of communications and public notice given to the public and

the Oregon Observer and a certificate of

posting as required by Section 19.84 Wis- consin Statutes as to the holding of this meeting was presented by Mr. Krause.

Ms. Vogeler moved and Ms. Feeney seconded the motion to proceed with the

meeting according to the agenda as post-

ed. In a roll call vote, the following mem- bers voted yes: Ms. Vogeler, Ms. Feeney, Mr. Uphoff, Mr. Zach, Mr. Ramin, Ms. Mai- tzen and Mr. Krause. Motion passed 7-0.

  • A. CONSENT CALENDAR:

Mr. Ramin moved and Ms. Feeney

seconded the motion to approve the fol-

lowing items on the Consent Calendar.

  • 2. Student Report - Nina LeBrun :

Nina reported: She was part of the OHS

ground breaking ceremony on April 7th, Indoor track meet - State at White- water, Fine Arts week is this week with dance studio, jazz ensemble, student bands, shadow percussion and guard performances. The Drumline is leaving Wednesday for the Wordl Championship. DECA is preparing for Nationals in Nash- ville, TN. Last week had an event ending

child abuse awareness. Student Council held a volleyball game and money was

donated to the Humane Society. This weekend there will be a character break- fast for young students. If they bring a

toy for St. Jude?s there will be a discount on tickets.

  • A. ACTION ITEMS:

    • 1. Issuance of Teacher Contracts:

Mr. Zach moved and Mr. Uphoff second-

ed the motion to approve the issuance

er requested that 180 meeting be on the agenda regarding board packets.

  • e. Vision Steering: Mr. Zach stated

the next meeting will be April 20 meet-

ing and will discuss the inclusion of the board paper that was recently approved.

  • 2. Health Insurance Proposal: Mr.

Zach recused his participation in discus-

sion of the health insurance proposal be- cause his wife works for Dean Care. Ms. Jonen gave a brief overview of the health insurance proposal that the board will vote on the April 25 board meeting.

  • A. INFORMATION ITEMS:

    • 1. Election Update: Mr. Ramin report-

ed on the results: Mr. Krause received

3,405 votes and Krista Flanagan received

5,134 votes and Uriah Carpenter 2,704.

  • 2. Capital Improvements/Referen-

dum Slide Presentation: Mr. Weiland did

a slide presentation on the capital project improvements and the referendum work.

Zach. Ms. Maitzen nominated Mr. Uphoff.

Dr. Busler called three times for ad-

ditional nominations. There were none. Mr. Uphoff and Mr. Zach had an opportu- nity to address the Board members. Ms. Jonen distributed ballots to board mem-

bers. Mr. Zach received four votes and Mr. Uphoff received three votes. Mr. Zach is the Board President.

  • 2. Mr. Zach asked for nominations

for Vice President. Mr. Ramin nominated Ms. Feeney for Vice President. Ms. Flanagan moved and Ms.

Maitzen seconded the motion to close

the nominations and cast the vote for Vice President. Motion passed 7-0 for Ms. Feeney for Vice President.

  • 3. Mr. Zach asked for nominations

for Treasurer. Mr. Zach nominated Mr.

Ramin for Treasurer. Mr. Krause moved and Ms. Maitzen seconded the motion to

close nominations and cast the vote for

 

1.

Approve minutes of the March 14,

of contracts for the certified teachers for

  • 3. 2016-2017 Staffing Plan: Dr. Bu-

Treasurer. By voice vote, motion passed

 

2016 meeting;

the 2016-17 school year consistent with

sler and Ms. Jonen gave a brief overview

7-0 for Mr. Ramin as Treasurer.ˇ

 

2.

Approve payments in the amount

Wisconsin State Statute chapter 118. In a

of the staffing plan that will be an action

  • 4. Mr. Zach asked for nominations

of $ 2,120,814.88;

roll call vote, the following members vot-

item at the April 25th board meeting.

for Clerk. Mr. Ramin nominated Ms. Fla-

 

3.

Treasurer?s Report - none;

ed yes: Mr. Zach, Mr. Uphoff, Ms. Feeney,

  • 4. Ravenoaks Busing Concerns:

nagan for Clerk. Ms. Feeney moved and

4.

Resignations/Retirements:

Ms. Vogeler, Mr. Ramin, Ms. Maitzen and

Dr. Busler, Mr. Weiland and Mr. Fink ex-

Ms. Maitzen seconded the motion to

Resignation of:

Mr. Krause. Motion passed 7-0.

plained parents concerns regarding long

close the nominations and cast the vote

* Jerry Maddi - OHS; * Michelle Gard - Principal at RCI;

* Amy Schleinz - PVE Teacher

* Confidential Retirement

* Laura Flood - OT - District wide

  • 2. Issuance of Administrative Con-

tracts: Mr. Zach moved and Ms. Feeney

bus rides and arriving too early before school start time and before supervision

for Clerk. By voice vote, motion passed 7-0 for Ms. Flanagan for Clerk.

* Martha Klug - PVE Teacher

seconded the motion to approve the issu-

is available. Mr. Fink is working with a

A.

COMMUNICATION FROM PUB-

Retirement of:

ance of contracts for the administrators

new software program for options to

LIC:ˇ

for the 2016-2017 school year consistent

make this better.

No one present to address the

with Wisconsin State Statute chapter 118.

  • 5. Superintendent?s Report: Dr. Bu-

Board. Mr. Zach welcomed Ms. Flana-

In a roll call vote, the following members

sler reported:

gan to the School Board and thanked

5.

Staff Assignments - none;

voted yes: Mr. Zach, Ms. Feeney, Mr. Up-

* Parent University on March 31st

Mr. Krause for his two years of service

6.

Field Trips:

hoff, Mr. Ramin, Ms. Vogeler, Ms. Maitzen

* Kids get Fit on April 9th - Grades

as Board President. Mr. Zach expressed

* FCCLA State Leadership Confer-

and Mr. Krause. Motion passed 7-0.

5-12 - 150 kids in attendance;

sympathy to the families of Bailey Con-

ence in Wisconsin Dells;

  • 3. Issuance of Licensed Non-Repre-

* April 1st Circle of Hope Award for

nery and Melissa Robinson.

* FFA Washington Leadership Con-

sented Contracts: Mr. Zach moved and

4 staff members, Nikki Jagdfeld, Laura

B.

INFORMATION ITEMS:

ference in Washington DC

Ms. Maitzen seconded the motion that the

Flood, Billie Farrar and Amy Janssens.

  • 1. OEA Report - no one present to

* FFA State Envionthon Conference

Board approve the issuance of contracts

* Herb Kohl Fellowship - Nathan

report.

 

7.

Donations:

for the licensed non-represented staff

voted yes: Mr. Zach, Ms. Maitzen, Mr. Up-

Johnson Top 10 Scholars - Herb Kohl

  • 2. Student Report: Student rep, Nina

* Oregon Pool Water Jugs from Drew Garty; * OHS Scholarship - $500 from Charles Uphoff Family * $800 Anonymous Donation to fund

for the 2016-2017 school year consistent with Wisconsin State Statue chapter 118. In a roll call vote, the following members

hoff, Mr. Ramin, Ms. Vogeler, Ms. Feeney,

Educational Foundation Scholarship, Fellowship and leadership recognition Luncheon on Sunday, April 10th at Sun Prairie. * OHS and OMS Ground breaking

LeBrun stated that she attended the WASC Conference for student councils at the Concourse in Madison; The Executive Committee with Ms. Weinert caucused at

the Capitol; nominations for officers for

two computers for online program

and Mr. Krause. Motion passed 7-0.

ceremonies on April 7th;

student councils by grade level will be

* Community Ground Works - Trees

A.

DISCUSSION ITEMS:

A.

CLOSING:

made in the next two weeks. Ms. LeBrun

for OMS;

1.

Committee Reports

  • 1. Future Agenda was established.

recommended a fellow student for next

In a roll call vote, the following mem-

a.

Financial Assets: Mr. Ramin re-

Mr. Uphoff would like to see us look at

year’s student liaison to the board. She

bers voted yes: Mr. Ramin, Ms. Feeney,

ported - no meetings

revising the drivers ed program and is

also reported the OHS DECA group is at

Mr. Uphoff, Mr. Zach, Ms. Vogeler, Ms.

b.

Human Assets: Ms. Jonen - noth-

interested in seeing the information re-

Nationals in Nashville. She shared the ex-

Maitzen and Mr. Krause. Motion passed

ing to report

garding interest and cost in a report this

citement of being involved in the ground-

7-0.

c.

Physical Assets: Mr. Uphoff re-

summer.

breaking ceremony at OHS and students

 
  • A. COMMUNICATION FROM PUB-

ported on the presentation that Mr. Wei-

  • 2. Check Out: Mr. Uphoff shared a

are excited to see the changes. Ms. LeB-

LIC:

land gave at the committee meeting and

poem and also stated that he is not plan-

run also reported the loss of classmate,

 

None.

will do so later in the evening.

ning on running for school board next

Bailey Connery.

 

INFORMATION ITEMS:

  • B. Policy: Ms. Maitzen said the next

d.

year. His area is City of Fitchburg. Ms.

A.

ACTION ITEMS:

1.

OEA - no one present

meeting will be May 3rd and Ms. Vogel-

Maitzen recently attended PVE Science

1.

Official Designations:

 

Fair; participated in BKE Pioneer Days

  • a. Newspaper: Mr. Krause moved

HEA LTHY A DULTS 18-55 NEED ED FO R A RESEARCH STUDY IN MAD ISON!

Here are the details for research study 8328-354:

• Available to make one stay of 4 overnights, complete 5 outpatient visits, and 7 phone calls

• Compensation up to $3,000 may be provided for time and participation

• You may be eligible for a $25 gas card for all visits, including screening. See website for details.

• Study checks into Covance Madison on Thursday and checks out on Monday

Go to Cova nceClinicalTrials.co m or call 1-866-429-3700 3402 Kinsman Blvd., Madison, WI 53704

©2016 Covance Clinical Research Unit, Inc.

©2016 Covance Clinical Research Unit, Inc.

with her spinning wheel; will be part of PVE as well. She doing a mural for NKE Arboretum and hope to have it done by May. Ms. Maitzen also attended Coaches appreciation dinner and enjoyed con- versation about STEAM and Art; she also enjoyed ground breaking ceremony and stated this is a great school district with great offerings. Mr. Zach stated it is heartening to see the work begin at OHS and is excited to watch the project. Ms. Feeney attended the FFA banquet and was encouraged to see all the outstand- ing young people at OHS; she thanked parents and members of the community that are supportive of the FFA club. Ms. Vogeler thanked everyone who elected her to be on the board, She thanked ev- eryone for all of their help and support. She stated she decided not to run be- cause she planned to spend more time with family. She welcomed Krista Flana- gan to the Board.

  • A. ADJOURNMENT:

Ms. Vogeler moved and Mr. Ramin seconded the motion to adjourn the meeting. Motion passed by unanimous voice vote. Meeting adjourned at 9:09 p.m.

Jeff Ramin, Clerk Oregon School District Published: May 12, 2016 WNAXLP

* * *

MINUTES OF THE REGULAR MEETING OF THE SCHOOL BOARD OF THE OREGON SCHOOL DISTRICT HELD ON APRIL 25, 2016

The regular meeting of the School Board of the Oregon School District

was called to order by Dr. Brian Busler,

Superintendent atˇ6:00 PMˇin the Rome

Corners Intermediate School in the Vil- lage of Oregon, Dane County, Wisconsin. Upon roll call, the following board mem- bers were present: Ms. Barbara Feeney, Mr. Charles Uphoff, Ms. Gwen Maitzen, Mr. Jeff Ramin, Mr. Steve Zach, Ms. Kris- ta Flanagan and Mr. Dan Krause, The following board members were absent:

none. Administrators present: Dr. Brian Busler, Mr. Andy Weiland, Mrs. Candace Weidensee, Mr. Dan Rikli, Mrs. Shannon Anderson, Dr. Leslie Bergstrom, Mr. Jon Tanner, Ms. Jina Jonen, Dr. Heather Sve-

and Mr. Uphoff seconded the motion to approve the Resolution 2016-01 stating the Oregon Observer be the official dis-

trict newspaper. In a roll call vote, the fol- lowing members voted yes: Mr. Krause, Mr. Uphoff, Ms. Feeney, Ms. Maitzen, Ms. Flanagan, Mr. Ramin and Mr. Zach. Mo- tion passed 7-0.

  • b. Resolution regarding Investment

of District Funds: Mr. Krause moved and

Ms. Maitzen seconded the motion to ap-

prove Resolution 2016-02 regarding in- vestment of district funds. In a roll call vote, the following members voted yes:

Mr. Krause, Ms. Maitzen, Ms. Feeney, Mr. Uphoff, Ms. Flanagan, Mr. Ramin and Mr. Zach. Motion passed 7-0.

  • c. Resolution - Depositories: Mr.

Ramin moved and Mr. Krause seconded the motion to approve Resolution 2016-

03 regarding depositories for district funds. In a roll call vote, the following members voted yes: Mr. Ramin, Mr.

Krause, Ms. Maitzen, Ms. Feeney, Mr. Up- hoff, Ms. Flanagan and Mr. Zach. Motion passed 7-0.

  • 1. Appointment of Representatives:

    • a. CESA #2 Delegate: Mr. Zach ap-

pointed Mr. Charles Uphoff to be CESA

#2 delegate representative. Unanimous approval by the Board.

  • b. Village Park Board: Mr. Zach

appointed Ms. Gwen Maitzen to be rec-

ommended to the Village President for Village Park Board representative.ˇUnan- imous approval by the Board.ˇ

  • c. WASB Delegate: Mr. Zach appoint-

ed Ms. Gwen Maitzen to be the WASB

Delegate representative. Unanimous ap- proval by the Board.

  • 1. Health Insurance Proposal: Mr.

Zach and Ms. Maitzen recused them- selves from discussion and vote of the health insurance proposal. Mr. Jaeger was present to answer questions regard- ing the proposal. Mr. Krause moved and Mr. Ramin seconded the motion to ap- prove a 3-year agreement with Unity that offers dual choice during the 2016-2017 school year with a 4% rate increase, and

then moves to Unity as the sole provid-

er effectiveˇJuly 1, 2017-June 30, 2019

with a 0% rate increase effective July 1,

2017 and a cap of a 5.5% rate increase

effectiveˇJuly 1, 2018. In a roll call vote,

the following members voted yes: Mr.

Krause, Mr. Ramin, Ms. Feeney, Mr. Up- hoff and Ms. Flanagan. Members Zach and Maizen abstained from vote. Motion

om, Ms. Kelly Kluck, Mr. Chris Kluck, Ms. Kerri Modjeski, Ms. Cyndi Olander, Mr. Dan Rikli, Mr. Jim Pliner, Mr. Jason Zu- rawik, and Ms. Jayne Wick.

Proof in the form of a certificate by

the Oregon Observer of communications and public notice given to the public and

the Oregon Observer and a certificate

of posting as required by Section 19.84 Wisconsin Statutes as to the holding of this meeting was presented by Dr. Busler. Mr. Uphoff moved and Mr. Zach seconded the motion to proceed with the meeting according to the agenda as posted. Motion passed 7-0.

passed 5-0-2.ˇ

  • 2. 2016-2017 Staffing Proposal: Ms.

Feeney moved and Mr. Krause seconded

the motion to confirm the approval of the

3 FTE when they approved open enroll- ment spaces and to approve the addition of .80 FTE at Netherwood Knoll Elemen- tary School for increased sections in world language, art, music and physical

education of .20 FTE each. In a roll call vote, the following members voted yes:

Ms. Feeney, Mr. Ramin, Ms. Maitzen, Mr. Uphoff, Ms. Flanagan, Mr. Ramin and Mr. Zach. Motion passed 7-0.

  • A. DISCUSSION ITEMS:

  • 1. Meet and Confer with OEA: Pres-

ent for OEA were, Kathy Hauser, Jen Er-

lich, Cyndi Ellestad, John Wedge, Laurie Lebwohl, Heather Molnar, Nathan John- son, Diana Kirchdoerfer and Diane Frey. Discussion included proposed language to amend the grievance policy. It was agreed that a sub-group would be formed to discuss amended language. Discus- sion was held on teacher evaluations and

the wording regarding educators who are on a plan of improvement. For future discussion with Board, OEA would like to discuss inserting language into the employee handbook regarding employee safety policies and procedures.

Mr. Krause and Ms. Flanagan completed

their oath of office prior to the meeting.

for President. Ms. Feeney nominated Mr.

  • 1. OASIS: Dr. Bergstrom, Mr. Wei-

land and Mr. Pliner shared plans for OA-

SIS to be part of the referendum addition project at OHS. Mr. Weiland will share budget info on project and ask for Board approval at the May 9th board meeting.

  • 2. Schedule Special Board Meeting

to discuss Teacher Compensation Plan:

The Board will meet onˇMay 23rdˇto dis- cuss Teacher Compensation Plan.ˇ

  • A. CLOSING:

    • 1. Future Agenda was established.

    • 2. Check Out: Nina LeBrun recom-

mended a poem to read called Dash by

Linda Ellis. Ms. Maitzen attended the

District Office Art Open House and also

  • 2. stated she is displaying her artwork at

Reorganization

  • a. Board Members Oath of Office:

the Firefly beginning May 1st. Ms. Feeney

thanked Mr. Krause for his leadership

the past two year. Dr. Busler thanked Mr.
b.

Election of Officers:ˇ

  • 1. Dr. Busler asked for nominations

Krause for his service and leadership as

Board President the past two years.

  • A. ADJOURNMENT:

Mr. Ramin moved and Ms. Maitzen seconded the motion to adjourn the meet-

ing. Motion passed by unanimous voice vote. Meeting adjourned at 9:17 p.m. Krista Flanagan, Clerk Oregon School District

Published: May 12, 2016 WNAXLP

* * *

NOTICE OF THE BOARD OF REVIEW FOR THE VILLAGE OF OREGON

Notice is hereby given that the

Board of Review for the Village of Or-

egon, Dane County, Wisconsin, shall

hold its first meeting on May 23, 2016,

from 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m., at the Oregon Village Hall Boardroom. Please be advised of the following

requirements to appear before the board

of review and procedural requirements if

appearing before the board:

  • 1. No person will be allowed to ap-

pear before the board of review, to testify to the board by telephone, or to contest the amount of any assessment of real or personal property if the person has

refused a reasonable written request by

certified mail of the assessor to view the

property.

  • 2. After the first meeting of the board

of review and before the board’s final ad-

journment, no person who is scheduled to appear before the board of review may contact or provide information to a mem- ber of the board about the person’s ob-

jection, except at a session of the board.

  • 3. The board of review may not hear

an objection to the amount or valuation

of property unless, at least 48 hours be-

fore the board’s first scheduled meeting,

the objector provides to the board’s clerk

written or oral notice of an intent to file an

objection, except that upon a showing of good cause and the submission of a writ- ten objection, the board shall waive that

requirement during the first 2 hours of

the board’s first scheduled meeting, and

the board may waive that requirement up to the end of the 5th day of the session

or up to the end of the final day of the

session if the session is less than 5 days with proof of extraordinary circumstanc-

es for failure to meet the 48-hour notice

requirement and failure to appear before

the board of review during the first 2

hours of the first scheduled meeting.

  • 4. Objections to the amount or val-

uation of property shall first be made

in writing and filed with the clerk of the board of review within the first 2 hours of the board’s first scheduled meeting,

except that, upon evidence of extraor- dinary circumstances, the board may waive that requirement up to the end of the 5th day of the session or up to the

end of the final day of the session if the

session is less than 5 days. The board

may require objections to the amount or valuation of property to be submitted on forms approved by the Department of Revenue, and the board shall require that any forms include stated valuations of the property in question. Persons who own land and improvements to that land may object to the aggregate valuation of

that land and improvements to that land,

but no person who owns land and im- provements to that land may object only

to the valuation of that land or only to the valuation of improvements to that land. No person may be allowed in any action

or proceedings to question the amount or

valuation of property unless the written

objection has been filed and that person

in good faith presented evidence to the

board in support of the objections and

made full disclosure before the board, under oath, of all of that person’s proper- ty liable to assessment in the district and

the value of that property. The require-

ment that objections be in writing may be waived by express action of the board.

  • 5. When appearing before the board

of review, the objecting person shall

specify in writing the person’s estimate

of the value of the land and of the im- provements that are the subject of the person’s objection and specify the infor-

mation that the person used to arrive at

that estimate.

  • 6. No person may appear before the

board of review, testify to the board by

telephone, or object to a valuation if that valuation was made by the assessor or the objector using the income method of valuation, unless the person supplies the assessor with all the information about

income and expenses, as specified in the

assessor’s manual under s. 73.03 (2a), Wis. stats., that the assessor requests.

The Village of Oregon has an ordinance

for the confidentiality of information

about income and expenses that is pro- vided to the assessor under this para- graph that provides exceptions for per- sons using information in the discharge of duties imposed by law or the duties of

their officer or by order of a court.* The

information that is provided under this

paragraph, unless a court determined that it is inaccurate, is not subject to the right of inspection and copying un- der s. 19.35 (1), Wis. stats.

  • 7. The board shall hear upon oath, by

telephone, all ill or disabled persons who

present to the board a letter from a physi-

cian, surgeon, or osteopath that confirms

their illness or disability. No other per- sons may testify by telephone unless the Board, in its discretion, has determined

to grant a property owner’s or their repre-

sentative’s request to testify under oath

by telephone or written statement.

  • 8. No person may appear before the

board of review, testify to the board by

telephone, or contest the amount of any assessment unless, at least 48 hours

before the first meeting of the board, or

at least 48 hours before the objection

is heard if the objection is allowed un- der s.70.47 (3) (a), Wis. stats., that person provides to the clerk of the board of re-

view notice as to whether the person will

ask for the removal of a member of the

board of review and, if so, which mem-

ber, and provides a reasonable estimate of the length of time the hearing will take. Notice is hereby given this 12th day

of May, 2016.

Respectfully submitted, Peggy Haag, Clerk Village of Oregon Posted: May 12, 2016

Published: May 12, 2016

WNAXLP

402 Help Wanted, General

DISHWASHER, COOK, WAITRESS, & DELI STAFF WANTED. Applications available at Sugar & Spice Eatery. 317 Nora
DISHWASHER, COOK,
WAITRESS, & DELI STAFF
WANTED.
Applications available at
Sugar & Spice Eatery.
317 Nora St. Stoughton.

FORT LITTLEGREEN Youth Camp & Nature Center, in Stoughton, is hiring camp counselors for summer. Full and part time available. Email resume to fort. littlegreen@gmail.com.

GROWING CONCRETE company

looking for experienced flat work

finisher, foundation form setter, concrete foremen and operator. DL/CDL helpful. Competitive wages, insurance benefits.

608-289-3434

LAKE KEGONSA State Park LTE Labor-

er Position ID Number 9984 Please see

our website for job and application Apply by May 20 dnr.state.wi.ltejobs For questions contact 608-873-9695

THEY SAY people don’t read those little ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you? Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or

835-6677.

STUDENT HELP WANTED. Sundays 8:30am-2:30pm. Start 5/15 until Christ- mas. Lawn leaf raking, various house and yard projects. Must have car and able to lift 40 lbs. $12.50/hour Email your phone# to kristine@kegonsa.com.

434 HealtH Care, Human ServiCeS & CHild Care

COMFORT KEEPERS IN MADISON

Seeking caregivers to provide care to seniors in their homes. Valid DL/ Dependable Vehicle required. FT & PT positions available. Flexible scheduling.

UP TO $2000 Sign-On Bonus!

Call 608-442-1898

UNITED CEREBRAL Palsy of Dane County is looking for experienced, con- fident care providers. We support a wide variety of children and adults with devel- opmental disabilities throughout Dane County. Part-time positions available immediately! For more information, or to request an application, please visit our

website at www.ucpdane.org or contact

Shannon at shannonmolepske@ucp- dane.org or (608) 273-3318. AA/EOE

THEY SAY people don’t read those little ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you? Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or

835-6677.

444 ConStruCtion, tradeS & automotive

HELP WANTED: Looking for a Heavy Equipment Operator for Residential Pit/ Quarry experience preferred. and also looking for a Dump Truck Driver w/CDL license. If qualified and interested please call 608-835-3630 or 608-835-5858

CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE IS Noon Friday for The Great Dane and Noon Monday for the Oregon Observer unless changed because of holiday work sched- ules. Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or 835-6677.

446 aGriCulture,

landSCapinG & laWn Care

AGRONOMY SALES and Service Spe- cialist. Responsibilities include sales, blending, delivery and service CDL required, salary with benefits. Qualified applicants send resume to mfcoop@ chorus.net Middleton Farmers Coop PO BOX 620348, Middleton, WI 53562-0348 www.middleton coop.com

THEY SAY people don’t read those little ads, but YOU read this one, didn’t you? Call now to place your ad, 873-6671 or

835-6677.

ConnectOregonWI.com

May 12, 2016

Oregon Observer

15

AGRONOMY SALES and Service Spe- cialist Responsibilities include sales, blending, delivery and service. CDL required, salary with benefits. Qualified applicants send resume to mfcoop@ chorus.net Middleton Farmers Coop, PO Box 620348, Middleton, WI 53562-0348 www.middletoncoop.com

DRIVER/NURSERY EMPLOYEE, PART- TIME/FULL TIME, flexible schedule, Company is experienced and profession- al. Call Ron at 608-217-6662

  • 554 lanDScaping, laWn, tree & garDen Work

ART'S LAWNCARE: Mowing, trimming, roto-tilling. Garden maintenance available.608-235-4389

LAWN MOWING

Residential & Commercial Fully Insured. 608-873-7038 or 608-669-0025

RIGHT HAND MAN Services: Spring lawn mowing & trimming, cleaning, etc.

  • 449 338-9030.

& WarehouSing

Driver, Shipping

Over 17 years experience. Call Jer 608-

COURIER – Naviant is looking for a cou- rier to be the face of Naviant's physical records division. We are looking for a well-rounded individual that can provide traditional courier duties as well as com- plete tasks in our warehouse and produc- tion area. Courier and forklift experience is a plus but will train for the right fit. If you are interested, please email Tricia Shields @ tshields@naviant.com.

SHREDDED TOPSOIL Shredded Garden Mix Shredded Bark Decorative Stone Pick-up or Delivered Limerock Delivery O'BRIEN TRUCKING
SHREDDED TOPSOIL
Shredded Garden Mix
Shredded Bark
Decorative Stone
Pick-up or Delivered
Limerock Delivery
O'BRIEN TRUCKING
5995 Cty D, Oregon, WI
608-835-7255
www.obrientrucking.com

DRIVERS: CO Guaranteed Pay! Region- al Dedicated, M-F CDL-A w/tank /Haz End 855-252-1634

  • 451 Janitorial & Maintenance

EVENING CLEANING help needed in Oregon WI. Part time shift can start 4,5 or 6pm. 4 hours per night. Monday through Friday. NO WEEKENDS! Vacuuming, dusting, mopping, restrooms, etc. Apply at DIVERSIFIED BUILDING MAINTE- NANCE, 1105 Touson Drive, Janesville, WI 53546 or call 608-752-9465

JANITORIAL / Custodian Cleaning Job in Verona. We are currently hiring night time staff for cleaning from 6pm-10pm or 6pm-11pm, Monday-Friday. Starting pay is $9.00 per hour with semi-annual performance based raises. Call or text Kevin today for more information and set up an interview, 608-228-8729. Cleen Trax Maintenance Inc

  • 452 general

  • 602 antiqueS & collectibleS

COLUMBUS ANTIQUE MALL

& CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS

MUSEUM

"Wisconsin's Largest Antique Mall" Customer Appreciation Week! June 6-12 20% Discount! Enter daily 8am-4pm 78,000 SF 200 Dealers in 400 Booths Third floor furniture, locked cases Location: 239 Whitney St Columbus, WI 53925

920-623-1992

www.columbusantiquemall.com

LIKE NEW 1975 Through 2009 Syttende Mai Plate Collection 873-0371

  • 652 garage SaleS

MT VERNON Zwingli UCC in Mt Vernon all church garage sale. Friday May 13

8-6, Saturday May 14, 9-2. Something for

everyone in the family

OFFICE CLEANING in Stoughton Mon-Fri 4 hours/night. Visit our website:

OREGON- 294 Waterman St 5/13 8am-4pm, 5/14 8am-1pm Stampin Up, Collectibles, TV, records, toys, sewing patterns, teacher resources,, lamps,
516 clothes

www.capitalcityclean.com or call our office: 608-831-8850

cleaning ServiceS

KT CLEANING

House and office cleaning, errand-running, yardwork, dog-walking. Free estimates.

608-514-4510.

hoMe iMproveMent

A&B ENTERPRISES

Light Construction Remodeling No job too small

608-835-7791

DOUG'S HANDYMAN

SERVICE Gutter Cleaning & Gutter Covers "Honey Do List"