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50 WAYS TO MAKE MONEY

FROM PHOTOGRAPHY
1. School Graduation Photography

2. Wedding Photography

3. Event Photography

4. Banquet Photography

5. Fashion Photography

6. Trade Show Photography

7. Opening Day Photography

PEOPLE

8. Equestrian Photography

9. Exhibition Photography

10. Motocross Photography

12. ID/Passport photography

13. Model books and portfolios

14. Sports photography

15. Corporate Portrait Photography

16. Industrial photography

17. Sales manuals and catalogues

18. Architectural Photography

19. Public relation’s Photography

20. Store-front Photography

21. Real-estate photography

22. Promotional brochure Photography

23. Macro photography

24. In-store merchandise display photography

25. Postcard prints to gift shops and hotels

26. Mobile Portrait Photography


NOVELTY PHOTOGRAPHY

27. Calendar Photography

28. Photographs on Mugs

29. Photographs on T-shirts

30. Decorative photo plaques

31. Custom calendars

SERVICES

32. Photo duplicating service

34. Restoring old photos

35. Producing CD / DVD Photo Albums

36. Retouching service

37. Photo oil portraits

MISCELLANEOUS

38. News Photography

39. Aerial photography

40. Medical Photography

41. Insurance Photography

42. Stock Photography

43. Fine Art Photography

44. Personalized Calendars

45. Photographs on Glass

46. Photographs on Canvas

47. Decorative photo plaques

48. Custom calendars

49. Photo duplicating service

50. Photo restoration

51. Photography Books

52. Photo oil portraits


CHAPTER ONE

My first every camera was a Rollieflex given to me by an Uncle. An unusual but


beautiful piece of kit, that produced top quality photographs. I had no idea how to use
it and nor did anyone else in my family. What’s more, it produced an upside down
image in the vertical viewfinder that I couldn’t get my head round. The whole notion
of viewing things upside down bothered me too much and sadly, the camera was put
back in its box.

Years later, when I first travelled to the Far East, I did what many holidaymakers tend
do on most of these trips – I took pictures, pictures of everything. The natives,
wildlife, scenery; just about everything that stood still long enough for me to point a
lens at. Came home, got the slides developed and put the whole lot in a drawer. How
many of you can relate to this, statistically is not important but this book will put paid
to a lot of that.

However, it didn’t stop there, though. I had a secret weapon - the same one you will
learn in this book - how to earn money with those photographs.

Kevin Daly loves taking pictures of his home city San Diego. He used this very same
secret to make $2,000 for just 10 shots. And later, he used this secret to travel to
Kauai, a Hawaiian Island renowned for its enchanting beauty, cascading emerald
mountains, flower-bedecked streams and swaying, palm-fringed shores. There, he
stayed for a week, all expenses paid.

Sean Nell has used this secret to make a career out of photography… one that earns
him over $60,000 a year and the freedom and flexibility to set his own hours and buy
a brand new 4 x 4 SUV.

Of course, you don’t even have to stray far from home to pursue the photographer’s
life. Rich Wagner made over $10,000 from a single photograph he took of a pumpkin
patch just an hour from his home in Connecticut… and it's still selling.
These people aren’t doing anything you can’t learn to do. You don’t need fancy
equipment. And you don’t need to know a thing about photography to get started.
All you need is the same secret to success these folks are using to profit from their
photos. With it, you can make money even as a novice photographer.
To learn this secret – including how you can take better photographs – the kind that
make people go, “WOW, I wish I could do that”... simply read on!

MKT 11
Principles of Professional Photography
A professional photographer needs to achieve a balance between art, craft, and
business acumen to succeed. This course digs into the details of photography as a
business and how studios operate.

MKT 12
Advertising
Chances are, you will be advertising your services in the future. This course will
introduce you to the various advertising media, show you how to plan campaigns
around traditional selling seasons, and explore how top photographers use advertising.
You will write advertising copy and explore type and design options to create a logo
and letterhead that reflects your personality. There will also be discussions about
advertising theory and ethics.

MKT 13
Salesmanship
With the right attitude and a good grasp of selling procedures, anybody can become a
great salesperson. This course will give you important tips on how to open and close a
sale, how to encourage minimum order customers to buy more, how to appeal to
specialty customers, and how to sell by mail.

MKT 14
Public Relations I
Establishing a good reputation in the community is invaluable to any business. In this
course, you will learn how to plan a public relations campaign, how to write press
releases, and how to get them placed. Guidelines on how to throw a studio open house
and insights on the importance of joining civic organizations will be shared.

MKT 15
Sales Promotion
Advertising isn't the only way to get customers into a studio. In this course, we will
talk about personal contact, window and in-store displays, attendance at shows, and
other promotional methods that will attract business.

MKT 22
Marketing Analysis
Who buys graduation, portrait, and commercial photography? How can you best
locate industrial customers? This course is all about finding buyers for your services
by mining existing markets and by developing new ones.

MKT 24
Pricing
In order to make money, your prices have to be right. This course will show you how
to establish prices through cost analysis, how to design a printed price list, and how to
use it effectively as a sales tool.

MKT 25
Packaging
Nice things come in beautiful packages and that should be true of your work. In this
course, you will discover what products are available for packaging and delivering
photographs. You will also be exposed to an array of mounts, frames, albums and
finished packages.

MKT 31
Out-of-Studio Displays
This course will show you how to create an attractive photographic display and where
to find locations to hang it. Libraries, banks, and merchandise shows are a few of the
possibilities that will be explored as ideal places to promote your work.

MKT 32
Product Development
Finding a niche in the photographic market that you can fill is a great way to build
business. This course will show you how to group sizes and styles to meet specific
needs, how to duplicate other styles, how to create unique products, and how to price
it all.

MKT 33
Selling Plans
This course will give you the confidence you need to present your photography
effectively to prospects. We will cover how to create a hard working selling plan for
employee use and how to make "cold calls" to commercial and industrial accounts.

MKT 34
Public Relations II
A continuation of Public Relations I, this course delves more deeply into planning PR
campaigns, writing and publishing press releases, and the value of community service
as a communications tool.

MKT 41
Contracts and Proposals
The elements of sales proposals, how and when to submit them, and the production of
sales and service contracts for high school, commercial, industrial, portrait, and
wedding photography will be covered. We will also provide information on the
availability of stock forms and discuss photographic copyrights.

MKT 43
Allied Products
Frames and framing, cards, invitations, albums, plaques, cameras, and other
photographic supplies are natural add-ons to a studio business. This course will show
you how to merchandise them effectively.

1. School Graduation Photography

2. Wedding Photography

3. Event Photography

4. Banquet Photography

5. Fashion Photography

Fashion photography
If you are considering a career in the artistic field, photography in particular, you will
almost certainly be tempted by fashion photography, because you get to travel a lot,
mix up with the rich and famous at posh cocktail parties, work with some of the most
attractive people on the planet, you receive high-pay checks, and you have a huge
audience of magazine readers, in front of whom you can show your talent at its best.
Bear in mind, however, that it is far from easy to make it to a worldly renowned
fashion magazine; many photographers are forced by circumstances to give up their
dreams and start dealing with celebrity portraiture, advertising or even paparazzi work
to make both ends meet. Patience, persistence, devotion and self-criticism are
qualities you will be lost without.
If you have only just began pursuing your career, you will need some promotional
material to show the photo editors at the magazine you would like to work for. That is
to say, your portfolio, in which you need to include at least twenty pictures, which
best represent your personality, your style, your sense of beauty and harmony.
They should be also thematically related to the specific work you would like to do
and, preferably, to one another. You will make a strong impression if your work looks
complete, if the photos tell a story, if the pages of your portfolio radiate the very 'you'.
Still, the photos should be chosen in a way that best demonstrate your range. Always
try to be unique, different, instead of copying others. You should showcase a few
beautiful portraits, as they are known to be the most memorable, the most inspiring
pictures.
When you are called in for an interview, remember that you are not selling your work,
you are demonstrating skills. Photo editors probably won`t be interested in buying
those pictures that you have included in your portfolio, but if you impress them with
your work, you stand a chance of being offered a job.

TOP TIP
Google Base is a place where you can add all types of information that they will host
and make searchable online. Based on the relevance of your items, they may also be
included in the main Google search index and other Google products such as Froogle
and Google Local. Better still, it’s FREE!

Supply and demand, it's a buyers market right now.

Let’s face it photos just aren't worth what they used to be anymore. With the demise
of conventional film and cheaper technology anyone with a half decent camera can
take great pictures for next to nothing. Resolution and quality doesn't even really
matter that much anymore. When it comes to designing websites small images are
increasingly the norm.

The market is now flooded with photos of virtually anything imaginable. If I want a
picture of a dog next to a roll of toilet paper the question is no longer can I find one,
it's how do I choose just one.

Unless digital cameras start making people sterile then people will still use them and
photos will still flood the market.

Photos just aren't special anymore. Welcome to the real world. Wishing it were
different won't make it so.

Just how do you get started as a Fashion Photographer..


I think the most important thing is not only to be totally dedicated to the profession
and feeling that you have that flair that this job needs, but always to keep studying
fashion magazines, catalogs, brochures and other fashion promotional literature and to
keep on practicing your skills as a photographer.
A good way to find these answers is to try to work out how a photographer might
have covered an assignment that you may have been reviewing in a fashion magazine,
trying to work out what equipment he might have used and carefully studying his
technique and how affective it is in illustrating the fashion shoot he covered and in
your opinion was he successful in doing the best work, or could you see room for
improvement in his results.
The trick is to keep on practicing you skills, especially in the Studio, weather it's your
own studio or a hired studio, together with practicing shooting on location and
learning the technical stuff, using stand in models to try out these ideas and improving
your own technique untill it's almost second nature.
It would be a good idea to check out all the top studios and try to present yourself for
an appointment. Be prepared to be disappointed, but be positive and keep trying,
sooner or later someone will recognize your talents - and "your in".
However, if getting a job as an assistant with an ad/fashion studio or photographer is
out of reach for the moment, why not consider a position as an assistant with a good
"High St" portrait and wedding photographer, meantime practice your skills, also at
the same time keeping your eyes open for an opportunity with an ad/fashion studio.
Seek out your opportunity, study photography, check out your local photo art training
courses, or evening courses, (if you are working in the day), keep reading fashion and
photo mag's, also check out galleries in your spare time, set yourself assignments, and
be critical about the results you produce.
It's most important to try and see if you can work for an established photographer as
his assistant, it's really the only way to learn.FACT: It's the way most well known
photographers got started.

6. Trade Show Photography

7. Opening Day Photography

PEOPLE

8. Equestrian Photography

9. Exhibition Photography

10. Motocross Photography

Get at least a 300mm zoom lens and a wide angle plus a camera with a
shutter speed of at least 1000 or 2000th of a second. A lot of action
shots can be good with just 500th of a second. Get out to whatever
sports you plan on shooting and practice a lot. I had a sports
segment of shooting in my college photo class and had to shoot all
kinds of stuff.
If you have the lenses I described that is most of the solution, a
good Digital SLR is also pretty much a must for this stuff and a
motor drive of at least 3 frames per second is needed as well. I
still shoot some action images because it is more of a challenge than
the "Old Barn in The Field Thing" Action shooting can be fun so take
a shot at it.If you don't have the bucks for a super wide angle then
at least get the 300mm zoom.
TOP TIP
Lisa Gagne http://www.istockphoto.com/user_view.php?id=162596

12. ID/Passport photography

13. Model books and portfolios

14. Sports photography

15. Corporate Portrait Photography

16. Industrial photography

17. Sales manuals and catalogues

18. Architectural Photography

19. Public relation’s Photography

20. Store-front Photography

21. Real-estate photography

22. Promotional brochure Photography

23. Macro photography

24. In-store merchandise display photography

25. Postcard prints to gift shops and hotels

26. Mobile Portrait Photography

NOVELTY PHOTOGRAPHY

27. Calendar Photography

28. Photographs on Mugs

29. Photographs on T-shirts

30. Decorative photo plaques

31. Custom calendars

SERVICES

32. Photo duplicating service

34. Restoring old photos

35. Producing CD / DVD Photo Albums

36. Retouching service

37. Photo oil portraits

MISCELLANEOUS
38. News Photography

39. Aerial photography

40. Medical Photography

41. Insurance Photography

42. Stock Photography

Micro-stock is the name given to stock agencies that provide stock


photos and illustrations at affordable prices. The name apparently
originated from the fact that photographers make a nominal sum per
photo compared to traditional methods, but they make up the
difference in selling large quantities of images. Many photographers
earn their entire income by selling images through online agencies.

I’ve had a few questions about how my microstock experiment is going,


so here’s a little summary. I started uploading images to a handful
of microstock sites in February of 2005 as a test to see how it would
go. These sites allow people to upload images which are then sold
cheaply for royalty free use, with a certain percentage of the sale
going to the photographer. There were two sides to the debate, in my
mind: the first side that can’t believe how cheap these sites sell
their images and can’t help but think that this business model is
contributing to what might be called the “Wal-martization” of
photography, and the second, which sees this as a model that is
closer to an “Open source” model of photography, providing affordable
images to a broader base of designers, bloggers, churches,
nonprofits, etc.

On reflection, I have to come down on the latter side. For one thing,
images on these sites are generally being uploaded by people with the
means to buy a digital camera and access to the internet—not children
in third world sweatshops. (That said, I do think a few of these
sites could raise their payment rates some). Also, providing low-
cost, legal imagery will allow many people to use it who would
otherwise use none, or use other copyrighted images that they found
online (perhaps illegally).

And for those who are worried about the future of photography as an
occupation, you’ll always have the bigger companies and corporations
who will pay top dollar for exclusivity or for images that are not
sold on sites such as these. With the countless digital cameras that
are out there, it was inevitable that a model like this would spring
up.

My goals (beyond seeing how these sites worked) were fairly modest:
to pay off my digital camera. I am almost there. To the right are the
five sites I have uploaded to with my total revenue to date on each
site listed beside it and a few graphs of earnings. If you are
thinking about uploading, take these numbers with a grain of salt,
because each site has a slightly different audience and not all sites
have the same number of pictures uploaded (for various reasons). If
you want to try selling images, I recommend submitting the same batch
to all sites for a few months to see how your images do on each one
and where they fit in best.
I also recommend editing the EXIF data in the files to add your
keywords and description directly in the file. These sites can all
read that information and input it automatically into the correct
fields as you upload, saving a lot of time. (Keywords and description
can be incredibly important in actually having your image come up
when a designer is searching for imagery.) Once you have the keywords
and description you just have to choose the categories it belongs to
on each site as the final step after uploading. Many of the sites
have batch upload capabilities as another way to save time.

It’s also worth noting that two of these sites allow vector imagery
to be uploaded: istockphoto and shutterstock. So if you don’t have a
digital camera, you could still create vectors (sort of like clip
art) to upload.

The benefits of stock photography have been argued for years by


professionals and semi-pro’s alike. However, the burning question
remains, can you actually make money from stock photography? The
obvious answer is YES but there’s a bit more to it than that.

Many agencies and businesses globally do not have the time or


resources to commission their own stock photography, be it for a
company website or brochure advertising campaign.
Photographs, which qualify as stock, need to be top quality. Well
taken, properly exposed, clean, high resolution and most importantly,
what the customer needs!
A snapshot of your granny at the beach just won’t do, no matter how
great she looks. The resolution needs to be interpolated up to around
48mb with minimal loss in quality.

The great thing about stock photography is that even if you stop
submitting you continue to earn. Things might slow down over time but
there’s very few businesses that offer non-traditional income for no
additional effort.

EQUIPMENT NEEDED
Stock Photography Equipment - The Camera
Because of the quality required for most stock libraries you are
going to need a decent camera especially if you are shooting digital.
If you are shooting film, its more the quality of the lens that you
should consider and perhaps a medium format camera.
For digital, I would recommend a minimum of 8 mega pixels (Although
you can get away with 6-6.3) and shoot with a Digital SLR , not an
8MP compact. Remember, the better the quality straight from the
camera, the less work required in post-processing to get it "Up to
scratch", and compacts have smaller sensors.
The only digital SLR capable of producing acceptable prints direct
from the camera, is the Canon EOS 1ds MKII with its full-frame,
16.7MP sensor. Although, as it comes with a hefty €8,000 ($8,000)
price tag, you may want to get started with something smaller.
Cameras such as the Canon EOS 20D or the Canon EOS 350D Rebel XT , or
from the Nikon camp, try the Nikon D70, D70s, D200 of the more
affordable 6MP Nikon D50.
Stock Photography Equipment - The Lenses
I would actually say that the quality of the lens that you use is the
most important factor in any type of photography. For a brief
explanation, see my lenses page.
Some cheaper lenses give off a phenomenon called "chromatic
abberation" or "purple fringing" creating a halo effect around your
subject. It is caused by cheap glass but I won´t go into detail,
however, this is not acceptable for stock libraries.
Don´t panic though, you don´t have to go out and spend thousands on
the best quality glass out there. There are a lot of mid-range lenses
that do a fine job. 2 lenses that I still keep in my bag from when I
started, are the Canon EF 50mm 1.4 and the Canon EF 28-135mm USM.
These are reasonably priced and can throw out some top quality
images, especially the 50mm 1.4! Before you buy a new set of lenses,
think about what type of photography you will be doing, follow this
guide:
• Interiors/Landscapes/Architectural/Artistic/Groups – Wide angle
lens.
Bear in mind that most semi-professional DSLRs have a “crop effect”
of about 1.6x so choose the lens accordingly. Look at 16mm, 24mm,
28mm and 35mm. You can also use zoom lenses such as a 16-35mm, 17-
40mm or a 24-70mm, they do a great job but prime lenses tend to give
slightly better results. If budget is an issue, go for a good zoom
lens, you can cover a wide focal area for a fraction of the cost.
• Portraits/People/Still life/Everyday scenes - Standard/small
telephoto lens
Great lenses for these types of photography would be 50mm, 85mm,
100mm, 135mm. Any of these prime lenses are fantastic for people
portraits, and I would highly recommend you have at least one in your
bag. Again the zoom options for these would be 24-70mm, 28-135mm (My
choice for a great walk-around lens), 28-85mm or 35-135mm.
• Sports/Wildlife/Press – Telephoto lens
You are going to need to get in close for these subjects and for that
you need to spend a little bit more on your stock photography
equipment. Do not buy cheap telephoto lenses for stock photography.
Because you are magnifying the image many times, you are also
magnifying any imperfections in the glass and this will really stand
out! Look at 135mm, 200mm, 300mm, 400mm and 500mm anything bigger
gets very expensive. As these lenses are not cheap anyway, you should
consider a quality zoom.
Remember, these lenses can last a lifetime so it is worth the cost
for the long haul. Look at 70-200mm (My choice), 80-200mm, 100-400mm
or the excellent (and cheap) Sigma 50-500mm. Most reviews rate this
lens and it has an awesome range!
It is also worth considering a 1.4x or 2x teleconverter but please
buy a good quality one. By doing this you greatly extend your
telephotos range without the need for splashing out on more glass!
Stock Photography Equipment - The Software
Ok! You have taken your photographs with your quality lenses, now you
need to get them to a decent level for approval by the stock
libraries. Some of the adjusments you will need to make are;
• Dust/Blemishes/Mistakes etc
You need to be able to zoom deep into your photo and check for dirt.
This can normally be caused by dust on your sensor (before you go
scrubbing the sensor - DON´T, I will cover this later on). To remove
any nasties, you need software with a cloning or healing tool. These
incredible tools enable you to safely remove anything from the
photograph that doesn’t need to be there without anyone ever knowing.

Here is a quick example of colour correction and dust removal!

Tyler Olson wrote:


It seems to me that it IS possible to earn a living at micro-stock
agencies. There has been a bit of discussion recently of people
earning $100 a day, which seems like it is competing with macro stock
income. And of course the all stars like who earns $500/day Lisa
Gagne You can check her download stats today, and then again in 2
days to check my figures. Of course she is an exception and the
likelyhood of me selling that much is the same as being a sports
star, but selling $2000 a month is atainable by anyone with some hard
work I figure.

So the question remains, where is it better to focus ones energies.


Macro or micro. I would like to think macro, as it feels good to be
paid $100/image. Images also sell for $5000 on Macro sites, but then
this is Licensed images NOT royalty free (so with Licensed, there is
no question, Macro is your only choice.)

So in the end, where do the 1000 images earn more. A macro site, or a
micro. I am beginning to think it might be micro.

Another thought... with the enourmous amout of micro sites poping up


everywhere, why would people purchase from a macro site. It is common
knowledge that you can get professional looking images from a micro
site. TV commercials, and news ads, and websites all use the micro
stocks for their images.. i might think that this is where the future
is going for Royalty Free images.

Here is a TV commercial with images from istock. here


I had the image of a van in there.

Did i feel 'used' to get paid only 50 cents for that image: Yes
However I HAVE earned $15.00 from that image in the last 6 months...
which is closer to a better price.

I have had 600 images on Alamy the past three months now... only 1
download, earning $50.00 (actually that download was 6 months ago
when i had 12 images on alamy but will include it in my calculations)
.... I have had 350 images for the last 3 months micro sites..
earning $750. ($3.39) a day. If i wanted to earn $2000/month I would
need 19.66 X more images. My images seem to be not very popular
though... i don't have many people and not many isolated objects.
Lisa G has only 2000 (excellent images) images, for her $500/day.

The following list is by no means exhaustive but will give you some
idea of where the money is to be made in this business.

Let’s look at the top 10 agencies in turn.

43. Fine Art Photography

44. Personalized Calendars

45. Photographs on Glass

46. Photographs on Canvas

47. Decorative photo plaques

48. Custom calendars


49. Photo duplicating service

50. Photo restoration

51. Photography Books

52. Photo oil portraits

53. Scanner Photography

Use a flatbed scanner as a camera


The dusty scanner connected to your computer on your desk can be used
to capture stunning images. In this first Photo-Vinc article the
basics on how to use a flatbed scanner for "photography" are
described. After reading the article there is left enough room for
own experiments.

The idea
Flatbed scanners normally are used to scan documents, photos or film.
The inventor of the CCD flatbed scanner Ray Kurzweil had in mind to
develop a machine to scan paper and recognize the text written on it.
There are however more exciting applications for flatbed scanners. In
this first Photo-Vinc article information, is shared on how to use
the scanner to make "photographs". I will return to the term
"photographs" in a moment but first lets see how I realized that the
dusty scanner left on my desk could be used for more exiting subjects
as intended by the inventor.

The reason why I started to use my flatbed scanner was that in the
autumn of 2005, I wanted to make some photographs of colorful leaves.
Normally I take pictures on slide film but in this case I did not
want to wait for the films to be developed. I wanted to see the
intensive colors directly on my screen and print them on paper.

The leaves where put on the scanner and after a few experiments
results where so good that I started to make other experiments with
three-dimensional objects on the scanner.

Is this photography?
Some people react strongly and say things like; "this has nothing to
do with photography". Emotional but interesting discussions sometimes
follow.

I am not looking for general agreement on my statement but in my eyes


this definitively is a form of photography. It has to do with
exposure, contrast, depth of field, and even motion plays a role.
Some people called it "scannography", I just prefer to use the term
photography and consider the scanner as a kind of slow camera, which
takes shots of single rows and assembles them together as a
photograph. The flatbed scanner only can be moved within some
restrictions; instead of bringing the camera to the subject the
subject must be moved to the flatbed scanner.

Photography can be described as a process to capture and display an


image. In the past this was done with a lens, a shutter and film. The
latent image was developed and became visible as negative on film.
Next step in that process was to put the film an enlarger and a
second lens was used to project the image on paper with a light
sensitive coating. Step by step parts of the original process have
been replaced by other technologies. In the case of using a scanner
to take photographs the camera has been replaced by the flatbed
scanner. Another example is the inkjet printer which has replaced the
enlarger, this allows new possibilities and new limitations but it
does not harm the process description of photography.

At this point the time has come to stop with the argumentations.
After all who cares, how to call the technique described in the next
chapters? It *is* fun, creative and results can be stunning if the
right technique is applied. I leave it to the reader if this should
be seen as photography. If you want to express your ideas about this
post your opinion in the Photo-Vinc forum related to this article.
What is needed?
To make photographs with a flatbed scanner a computer and a flatbed
scanner are needed. There is no special need to the operating system;
results will be comparable on all operating systems.

I started with an older Microtek scanner model, after a while I


replaced it by a Canon CanoScan 4200F which had a higher resolution
and allowed faster scanning. When putting investment in relation with
results it can be said that we are talking about low-cost
photography, what is needed is time and creativity. People who get
enthusiastic probably are going to spend more on the subjects (or
objects, but that is another philosophic discussion besides the
question on the definition of photography) than on the scanner
technology itself.

The CanoScan 4200F scans up to 3200 dpi, this allows to enlarge the
scans easily 10 times when printing at 300 dpi. This means that a 4-
inch shrimp will grow to a 40-inch sea monster. When currently have a
scanner which scans at lower resolution, don’t run to the PC shop.
First look around for subjects to scan and wait buying a better
flatbed scanner.

Each scanner arrives with its own software. I tried the software that
came with the scanners I owned. This software does a fine job for
scanning documents, OCR and sometimes it offers creation of PDF
documents. For this application of the flatbed scanner, it is
recommended to use a dedicated 3rd party scan Software package that
allows more flexibility in capturing the image and controlling the
results. I am using Hamrick VueScan and did use Lasersoft Silverfast
in the past. Both applications will perfectly serve the needs to do
the job. I just stayed with VueScan because of the lower price and
broader support for various scanners. In the workflow, described
bellow I will refer to VueScan settings, of course the same things
can be done with Silverfast or similar software.

Besides this there is needed cleaning material to clean the scanner


before and after scanning. An additional light source might be used
but to start it is not needed.
Which subjects to choose?
There are some limitations on the subjects to choose. First of all
the main and most obvious limitation is the size of the flatbed
scanner used. The subject must fit on the glass of the scanner
scanner, which normally is the size of a sheet of letter/A4 paper.
Subjects do not need to be flat shapes like leaves; they can have
three-dimensional forms as well. Depending on the flatbed scanner,
the limitation by Depth Of Field (DOF) and available light it will be
perfectly possible to capture an area up to half an inch above the
scanner glass.

Favorite subjects are all kinds of food, which allows variation.


Consider not only how the colors and detail will work but also think
about making thin slices that are almost transparent.

The good things about taking food, as subject is that in some extend
there is control over the subject. To get the variations or increase
the character food as a subject can be cut, squashed, dried or
moistened (of course as long as the insider of the flatbed scanner
stays dry).

Talking about taking care of the flatbed scanner: be careful with


sharp and heavy objects. The glass (or transparent plastic) is
designed to carry paper and books.

Try candies or flowers. When having the "scanner fever" visits to the
supermarket are done with complete different eyes.

Talking about fever, how long will it last? This probably depends on
the supermarket and the season of the year. Consider taking things
from the street, sand or stones.