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GDC-002/55

Wireless Broadband Access System

System Description
Edition 3.0
Confidential

INTRACOM S.A. TELECOM SOLUTIONS, 2012. All rights reserved.


All copyright, intellectual and industrial rights in this document and in the technical knowledge it contains
are owned by INTRACOM S.A. TELECOM SOLUTIONS and/or their respective owners.
This document is made available to the end users only for their internal use.
No part of this document nor any data herein may be published, disclosed, copied, reproduced,
redistributed by any form or means, electronically or mechanically, or used for any other purpose
whatsoever without the prior written approval of INTRACOM S.A. TELECOM SOLUTIONS.
Information as well as drawings and specifications contained in this document are subject to change
without prior notice.
All trademarks and copyrights mentioned herein are the property of INTRACOM S.A. TELECOM
SOLUTIONS and/or their respective owners.
Any rights not expressly granted herein are reserved.
Printed in Greece.

INTRACOM TELECOM
19.7 km Markopoulou Ave., Peania, Athens, GR 19002
T +30 210 667 1000, F +30 210 667 1001
http://www.intracom-telecom.com

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Document Revision History

Document Revision History

Revisions

Previous Edition: 2.0


Current Edition:

Reasons of
change

3.0

The following table lists the changes effected in relation to the previous edition
of the WiBAS System Description document:
Part
E = Edited/ Modified, A = Added, M = Moved, R = Removed

Page(1)

System Overview
Key strengths and benefits

6 - 14

TS composition

17

Key features

19

CONV-PAN-IDC-BNC

20

OmniWAY-2G

20 - 21

New SG 26/ 28 GHz BRA

25

Introduction

28

Key features

Front Panel Description

29
30

Full Outdoor

35

Functional Description

36

Statistical multiplexing

37

Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation

38

Sector Protection

39

50

Typical Applications
WiBAS
Network Architecture
WiBAS
-C Overview:
WiBAS
-C External Units:

Base Station Radio Antenna (BRA):


Equipment Description of WiBASTM Terminal Stations
MSAD Subrack:

Managing WiBAS
C Systems & Networks

Continued on next page

(1)

Page references refer to current document

-I-

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Document Revision History

Document Revision History, Continued

Reasons of change (continued)

Part
E = Edited/ Modified, A = Added, M = Moved, R = Removed

Page(1)

System Specifications::
General: Radio Features

57

General: Max net Capacity per BS & TS

58

Networking

60 61

Air Interface Characteristics

62

Technical Specifications

64

Technical specifications: Environmental

67

71

Full Outdoor Terminal Station Specifications

77

Radio Performance:

82 - 84

System Gains

85

Sector Capacity (with Split-Mount Terminal Stations):

87

WiBAS
Specifications :
OmniWAY-2G Specifications:
MSAD Specifications:
Coaxial cable characteristics

Air transmission rate

Sector Capacity (with Full Outdoor Terminal Stations)

88

Cell Sector Ranges

93

Band Characteristics

96

BRA-2690-V-H SG

108

Specifications of 10.5 GHz integrated TRA

110

112

113

Band 10.5 GHz:


26 GHz Base Station Antennas:
10.5 GHz Terminal Station Antennas:
26 GHz Terminal Station Antennas:
Specifications of TRA-2603 & TRA 2606
28 GHz Terminal Station Antennas:
Specifications of TRA-2803 & TRA 2806

(1)

Page references refer to current document

-II-

Table of Contents

Table of Contents
Document Revision History .................................................................................................. I
1

System Overview............................................................................................................... 5

Typical Applications ......................................................................................................... 6


LTE Backhauling................................................................................................................. 7
Small Cell Backhaul ............................................................................................................ 8
2G/ 3G Mobile Backhauling................................................................................................. 9
Broadband Access for Business Customers...................................................................... 10
WiMAX Backhauling.......................................................................................................... 11
Voice Services with VoIP Telephony................................................................................. 12
Legacy Access for Business Customers ........................................................................... 13
Broadband Access Networks Backhauling ........................................................................ 14

WiBAS Network Architecture.......................................................................................... 15

Equipment Description of WiBASTM Base Station......................................................... 18

4.1 WiBASTM-C Subrack ......................................................................................................... 18


WiBAS-C Overview ........................................................................................................... 18
WiBAS-C Front Panel Description..................................................................................... 19
WiBAS-C External Units.................................................................................................... 20
4.2 Base Station Radio System - BRS .................................................................................... 22
BRS Overview................................................................................................................... 22
Base Station Radio Box (BRB).......................................................................................... 23
Base Station Radio Antenna (BRA)................................................................................... 25
Extended BRS .................................................................................................................. 27
5

Equipment Description of WiBASTM Terminal Stations................................................. 28

5.1 Split-Mount Terminal Station ............................................................................................. 29


MSAD Subrack ................................................................................................................. 29
Terminal Station Radio System (TRS) Overview............................................................... 31
Terminal Station Radio Box (TRB) .................................................................................... 33
Terminal Station Radio Antenna (TRA) ............................................................................. 34
5.2 Full Outdoor Terminal Station ........................................................................................... 35
Full Outdoor Terminal Station Description......................................................................... 35
6

Functional Description.................................................................................................... 36
Statistical Multiplexing....................................................................................................... 37
Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation .......................................................................................... 38
Sector Protection Mechanism ........................................................................................... 39
Air Scheduling................................................................................................................... 41
Ethernet QoS .................................................................................................................... 46
TR3C Policing Mechanism ................................................................................................ 47
Security Features.............................................................................................................. 49

Managing WiBAS-C Systems & Networks ..................................................................... 50

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

uni|MS Overview ............................................................................................................... 51


WiBAS-C Management Features ...................................................................................... 53
8

Technical Specifications................................................................................................. 56

8.1 System Specifications ....................................................................................................... 56


System Specifications ....................................................................................................... 56
8.2 Equipment Specifications .................................................................................................. 64
WiBAS-C Specifications.................................................................................................... 64
OmniWAY-2G Specifications ............................................................................................ 67
MSAD Specifications......................................................................................................... 69
BRB / TRB Specifications.................................................................................................. 73
Full Outdoor Terminal Station Specifications..................................................................... 77
8.3 Radio & Modem Performance ........................................................................................... 81
Radio Performance ........................................................................................................... 82
System Gains.................................................................................................................... 85
Sector Capacity (with Split-Mount Terminal Stations)........................................................ 87
Sector Capacity (with Full Outdoor Terminal Stations) ...................................................... 88
Carrier to Noise Ratio (C/N) .............................................................................................. 89
Sensitivity.......................................................................................................................... 90
Cell Sector Ranges ........................................................................................................... 91
Appendix A - Band Characteristics & Available Channels .................................................. 96
Band 10.5 GHz ................................................................................................................. 96
Band 26 GHz .................................................................................................................... 98
Band 28 GHz .................................................................................................................. 102
Appendix B - Antenna Characteristics................................................................................ 106
10.5 GHz Base Station Antennas.................................................................................... 107
26 GHz Base Station Antennas....................................................................................... 108
28 GHz Base Station Antennas....................................................................................... 109
10.5 GHz Terminal Station Antennas .............................................................................. 110
26 GHz Terminal Station Antennas ................................................................................. 112
28 GHz Terminal Station Antennas ................................................................................. 113
Glossary................................................................................................................................ 114

List of Figures

List of Figures
Fig. 1 LTE backhaul application schematic................................................................................. 7
Fig. 2 Small-cell application schematic ....................................................................................... 8
Fig. 3 2G/ 3G Mobile Backhaul application schematic ................................................................ 9
Fig. 4 Broadband Access for Business Customers application schematic ................................ 10
Fig. 5 WiMAX backhaul application schematic ......................................................................... 11
Fig. 6 Voice Services with VoIP Telephony application schematic............................................ 12
Fig. 7 Legacy Access for Business Customers application schematic ...................................... 13
Fig. 8 Broadband Access Networks Backhauling application schematic................................... 14
Fig. 9 PtMP Architecture........................................................................................................... 15
Fig. 10 WiBAS Architecture ................................................................................................... 16
Fig. 11 WiBAS End-to-End Network Interconnection ............................................................. 17
Fig. 12 WiBAS -C .................................................................................................................. 18
Fig. 13 WiBAS -C Front Panel ............................................................................................... 19
Fig. 14 WiBAS -C P32E1....................................................................................................... 20
Fig. 15 CONV-PAN-IDC-BNC................................................................................................... 20
Fig. 16 OmniWAY-2G............................................................................................................... 20
Fig. 17 OmniWAY-2G - WiBAS -C Base Station interconnection schematic .......................... 21
Fig. 18 BRB with High-Gain BRA 26/ 28 GHz mounted on a mast ........................................... 22
Fig. 19 BRB 10.5 GHZ mounted on a mast, through mounting bracket .................................... 23
Fig. 20 BRA 26/ 28 GHz High Gain .......................................................................................... 25
Fig. 21 BRA 26GHz Standard Gain .......................................................................................... 25
Fig. 22 BRA 10.5 GHz High Gain ............................................................................................. 26
Fig. 23 Extended BRS 26/28 GHz ............................................................................................ 27
Fig. 24 Extended BRS coverage .............................................................................................. 27
Fig. 25 MSAD........................................................................................................................... 29
Fig. 26 MSAD Front Panel........................................................................................................ 30
Fig. 27 TRA 26/28 GHz ............................................................................................................ 34
Fig. 28 TRA 10.5 GHz .............................................................................................................. 34
Fig. 29 Statistical Multiplexing .................................................................................................. 37
Fig. 30 Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation (DBA) ........................................................................... 38
Fig. 31 1+1 Sector Protection ................................................................................................... 39
Fig. 32 1:1 Sector Protection .................................................................................................... 40
Fig. 33 Uplink Scheduling Scheme........................................................................................... 41
Fig. 34 WiBAS Uplink Scheduler ........................................................................................... 43
Fig. 35 WiBAS Packet Scheduler .......................................................................................... 44
Fig. 36 uni|MS customizable desktop .................................................................................... 52
Fig. 37 Full Oudoor TS Front and Rear View............................................................................ 77
Fig. 38 WiBAS BS Configuration ........................................................................................... 91
Fig. 39 Band 26 GHz Frequency Spectrum .............................................................................. 98
Fig. 40 Band 28 GHz Frequency Spectrum ............................................................................ 102

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Page intentionally left blank)

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

System Overview

Introduction

WiBAS is a carrier-grade Point-to-Multi-Point (PtMP) microwave platform


family of products that operates in the 10.5 / 26 / 28 GHz bands. It provides
operators a powerful and cost-effective broadband wireless solution that fits
all their current and upcoming backhaul & access needs.
Employing state-of-the-art IEEE 802.16 technology and offering top-notch
performance, as well as unparalleled configuration flexibility, WiBAS is
specially designed for traffic-intensive broadband applications and coverage
of large geographical areas. Its ultra-wide service area footprint allows
reaching distant underserved areas, or areas lacking infrastructure, easily
and cost-effectively.
WiBAS is explicitly designed to address two key trends in todays
telecommunications environment, that is:
Next Generation Network (NGN) migration or the migration of traditional
telephone networks to IP-based infrastructure.
Fixed Mobile Convergence (FMC), as a need for simplicity through
integration.
For fixed-line network operators, WiBAS represents a unique solution for
both the access and transmission networks, providing backhauling links
within the network and access services to high-end business customers.
For the mobile operator, WiBAS stands for the ideal solution for
backhauling legacy and traffic-intensive networks.

Key strengths
and benefits

Industry-leading net throughputs of up to 157 Mbit/s(1) per sector (on a


single 28 MHz channel).
Proven multi-service platform (IP/Ethernet, TDM & ATM).
Multiple operator frequencies (10.5 / 26 / 28 GHz) & channel sizes
(7 / 14 / 28 MHz).
High Base Station capacity: 2x28 MHz capacity per sector and
simultaneously allowing 1:1 protection
High Terminal Station capacity: up to 8 x E1 ports and up to 4 x Ethernet
ports achieving full sector capacity.
Exceptional system performance, full QoS support and carrier-grade
protection mechanisms.
Powerful core mechanisms for reliable, high-speed and bandwidth-efficient
wireless connections:
Hitless adaptive modulation (up to 256QAM).
Dynamic bandwidth allocation & Statistical multiplexing.
Packet switching.
High spectral efficiency 5.6 bit/s/Hz (net rate).
Forward Error Correction.
Continued on next page

(1)

Feature available with Release 3.3.

Chapter: 2 Typical Applications

Typical Applications
Element

Description

WiBAS BS

WiBAS Base Station, located in the centre of a cell


sector.

WiBAS TS

WiBAS Terminal Station, located at the customers


premises.

uni|MS

Unified Management Suite, for manage the WiBAS


network.

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

LTE Backhauling

Market
requirements

The transition to the LTE era is expected to complete in the upcoming years,
since most mobile operators plan to maintain their existing GSM / UMTS
infrastructure for quite some time. The last mile is about to be dominated by a
flat, carrier Ethernet network with legacy traffic support to support backward
compatibility.

Application
schematic

Fig. 1 LTE backhaul application schematic

Description

WiBAS can provide last-mile connectivity while performing intense traffic


aggregation. In metro areas, where mobile subscriber density is very high,
last-hop connections can optimally be established with WiBAS backhaul.
A rich features set is available, including:
Aggregation of LTE traffic from multiple sites in urban areas.
Over-the-air traffic prioritization based on VLAN / priority bit / DSCP with
eight priority classes for end-to-end QoS.
Exchange of any signalling information (3GPP R.10 x 2 interfaces) among
the connected LTE cells (only 2 hops needed).
Low end-to-end latency and high user data privacy to meet the stringent
LTE requirements.
Legacy traffic (E1 TDM / ATM) support for migrating from mixed RAN to
LTE sites.
Synchronous Ethernet support.

Chapter: 2 Typical Applications

Small Cell Backhaul

Market
requirements

Small cells are expected to dominate the mobile network evolution towards
4G. Intracom Telecom proposes a synergistic solution for small-cell
backhauling, which primarily can be established with WiBAS, and extend
further with the utilization of E-Band PtP backhaul technology (60 GHz).
These technologies have similar performance characteristics and are both
very attractive from a techno-economical perspective.

Application
schematic

Fig. 2 Small-cell application schematic

Description

Technology synergies, co-jointly with a smart network planning approach,


can overcome the LOS constraint and constitute a generalized and efficient
solution for small-cell backhaul applications.
Selecting PtMP as the primary small-cell backhaul technology, the entire
macro region can be covered by a single base station, strategically placed at
the aggregation point. In real networks, a careful deployment of the PtMP
base station can achieve LOS visibility to the majority of the desired small-cell
locations, typically at a percentage of 50% to 70%. Anyway, the expected
small-cell footprint range from 100 m to 300 m, which, from the radio planning
perspective, provides some flexibility with regard to the selection of the
appropriate location (lamp post or building), i.e. flexibility that could satisfy the
LOS backhaul condition.
Main advantages of a quad-sector PtMP system are: i) Single-hop approach,
ii) High scalability (several small cells per base station), iii) High reliability
(protection at the Base Station), iv) Minimum footprint at the aggregation
point, vi) Less operation and maintenance costs. New PtMP terminal, that is
about to serve a small cell, can be deployed without visiting the PtMP base
station.
Deploying LOS backhaul for small cells heavily depends on the network
design flexibility. When direct sight with the PtMP BS is impossible, there
exist additional connection points with existing backhaul infrastructure, i.e. the
surrounding macro cells, or the adjacent small cells. Where a LOS condition,
between a small cell and the overlaying macro cell, can be achieved, the 60
GHz unlicensed PtP system Ultralink-t60, available by Intracom Telecom, is
an excellent choice offering minimum incurring costs and zero spectrum fees.

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

2G/ 3G Mobile Backhauling

Market
requirements

Mobile network operators prefer building their own backhaul networks to


leasing network capacity.
With the emergence of 3G networks and the ever-increasing network traffic,
point-to-multipoint broadband backhauling systems represent a compelling
solution for the access and transmission networks of telecommunications.

Application
schematic

Fig. 3 2G/ 3G Mobile Backhaul application schematic

Description

WiBAS provides a robust, high-performance and comprehensive


backhauling solution, which can also be leveraged to provide access services
to large enterprises, and create new revenue streams for the operators.
The system seamlessly integrates with both 2G and 3G networks, addressing
the particular needs of mobile networks and providing a future-proof solution
for a reliable and cost-effective access and transmission network.

Chapter: 2 Typical Applications

Broadband Access for Business Customers

Market
requirements

Enterprises, banks, agencies and other high-end customers need to connect


through robust and high bit rate connections, either to the Internet or to their
remote offices.

Application
schematic

Fig. 4 Broadband Access for Business Customers application schematic

Description

The WiBAS system provides broadband IP services, via Ethernet interfaces


that can be used by corporations for:
Broadband Internet access
Broadband Virtual Private Networks (Packet-switched Leased Lines)
WiBAS employs all the necessary mechanisms to provide guaranteed QoS
to end-users and enable the operators to offer SLAs.

Intra-switch
capability

10

The WiBAS system supports the intra-switch capability with which operators
are able to direct TDM/ ATM/ Ethernet traffic from one Terminal Station to
another within the same WiBAS cell sector. This feature allows the saving of
backbone network resources. Also, core network intelligence is not involved
when two Terminal Stations communicate with each other.

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

WiMAX Backhauling

Market
requirements

Mobile network operators prefer building their own backhaul networks to


leasing network capacity.
With the emergence of WiMAX networks and the ever-increasing network
traffic, point-to-multipoint broadband backhauling systems represent a
compelling solution for the access and transmission networks of
telecommunications.

Application
schematic

Fig. 5 WiMAX backhaul application schematic

Description

WiBAS provides a robust, high-performance and comprehensive backhauling


solution, which can also be leveraged to provide access services to large
enterprises, and create new revenue streams for the operators.
The system seamlessly integrates with WiMAX networks, addressing the
particular needs of mobile networks and providing a future-proof solution for a
reliable and cost-effective access and transmission network.

11

Chapter: 2 Typical Applications

Voice Services with VoIP Telephony

Market
requirements

Business customers need low-cost, flexible, toll-quality telephony services.

Application
schematic

Fig. 6 Voice Services with VoIP Telephony application schematic

Description

The WiBAS solution for voice services combines all necessary elements
together: QoS-enabled access and transmission system, call routing
equipment, gateway to the PSTN, customer equipment, management and
billing systems.
In the preceding schematic:
IP-PBX enables corporations to manage their own private network
Soft Switch routes calls to remote VoIP users
Gateway enables connectivity with the public telephone network

12

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Legacy Access for Business Customers

Market
requirements

Due to the large installed base of TDM network equipment and the
proliferation of E1 lines in virtually any existing networks, the support for
legacy technologies in the access network is still as important as ever.

Application
schematic

Fig. 7 Legacy Access for Business Customers application schematic

Description

The WiBAS system can be leveraged to provide TDM connections for:


PBX connections
Leased Lines
WiBAS relays full or fractional E1 lines with great efficiency, effectively
providing a great alternative for PBX connections and Leased Lines to
expensive wireline solutions.

13

Chapter: 2 Typical Applications

Broadband Access Networks Backhauling

Market
requirements

Wireless networks are much more inexpensive and faster to build than landline
networks. Building high-capacity cost-effective backhauling networks is a
prerequisite for the profitable operation of truly broadband services.

Application
schematic

Fig. 8 Broadband Access Networks Backhauling application schematic

Description

WiBAS extends the reach of broadband technologies, such as Wi-Fi, WiMAX


and xDSL.
The system seamlessly integrates with existing network infrastructure and can
be leveraged to simultaneously provide broadband access services to highend business customers.

14

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

WiBAS Network Architecture

Overview

A WiBAS network is based on a Point-to-Multi-Point (PtMP) architecture with


cell sectorization. A cell is a geographical area covered by a WiBAS system
incorporating a Base Station (BS), at the centre of the cell, and several
Terminal Stations (TS) scattered within the cell, as shown below:

Fig. 9 PtMP Architecture


Continued on next page

15

Chapter: 3 WiBAS Network Architecture

WiBAS Network Architecture, Continued

Typical
WiBAS

architecture

A WiBAS cell is physically divided into usually two or four sectors and
served by the Base station Radio System (BRS), the outdoor part of the BS.
The BRS controls the radio links, between the BS and the scattered TS and
communicates with the outdoor part of each TS, the Terminal station Radio
Systems (TRS).
The indoor part of the BS (i.e. WiBAS -C), aggregates traffic from all TS
and provides the network interfaces to the backbone. The MSAD (MultiService Access Device), the indoor part of the TS, provides the user
interfaces.
All WiBAS network elements, for as many systems, may be configured,
controlled and monitored remotely through advanced Network Management
System (uni|MS)(1).
The schematic below depicts a typical WiBAS cell composed of a four
sectored Base Station serving several scattered Terminal Stations.
The Base Station aggregates and processes legacy TDM/ ATM and
packetized traffic from all served sites, and forwards it to the core network,
always preserving end-to-end Quality of Service.

Fig. 10 WiBAS
Architecture
Continued on next page

(1)

Refer to uni| MS System Description document for detailed information about uni| MS.

16

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

WiBAS Network Architecture, Continued

End-to-end
network
interconnection

The following schematic depicts the components and the end-to-end network
interconnection for a WiBAS system:

Fig. 11 WiBAS
End-to-End Network Interconnection

BS composition

The BS comes in split form and comprises the components that the
following table shows.
BS Component

TS composition

Description

WiBAS
-C
(Compact Base
Station subrack)

Base Station indoor subrack variants.


Applying system control.

BRS (Base station


Radio System)

Incorporates the radio transceivers and the sector


antennas, for one or more sectors.

Incorporating the baseband modems, and


implementing the aggregation and switching
operations. Also, providing the network interfaces.

The TS comes in two types; In Split-Mount and in Full Outdoor. The


following table shows the components that each type is consisted of..
Type

Split-Mount

TS Component
MSAD (Multi-Service
Access Device)
TRS (Terminal station
Radio System)

Full Outdoor

FOTS (Full Outdoor


Terminal Station)

Description
Applies TRS control.
Includes the baseband modem and
provides the user interfaces
Incorporates the radio transceiver
and integrated or external antenna.
Includes baseband modem, provides
the user interfaces and incorporates
the radio transceiver, all from the
same box.

17

Chapter: 4 Equipment Description of WiBASTM Base Station

Equipment Description of WiBASTM Base Station

Introduction

This chapter describes in detail the equipment of WiBAS Base Station:


Indoor equipment of the WiBAS BS (WiBAS -C subrack)
Outdoor equipment of the WiBAS BS (Base Station Radio System - BRS)

4.1 WiBASTM-C Subrack


WiBAS-C Overview

Description

WiBAS -C is a PtMP Base Station subrack variant that combines the


compact size with industry-leading performance. It addresses the operator
need for a traffic aggregation solution in low-density environments that is
cost-effective, technologically-advanced and easy to implement.
With a compact 1 RU design, WiBAS -C indoor subrack offers PtMP
features for Ethernet, TDM and ATM applications. WiBAS -C is capable of
serving multiple terminal stations with assured QoS, while it can be
configured for single-sector or dual-sector operation, as follows:
Single-sector, unprotected (1+0)
Single-sector, protected (1+1)
Dual-sector, unprotected (2+0)
Dual-sector, protected (2+2)
Four sector, unprotected (4+0)
The following photo shows the WiBAS -C subrack configured as a
protected dual-sector (2+2) or unprotected four sector (4+0) Base Station:

Fig. 12 WiBAS
-C

WiBAS -C provides all the required WAN interfaces toward the transport
network. It is used to aggregate IP, TDM and even ATM traffic from all
Terminal Stations and connect to the backbone network. WiBAS -C
includes the baseband modems (up to four, in protected or unprotected
mode), the control logic for the whole system and the WAN network
interfaces.
Continued on next page

18

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

WiBAS-C Overview, Continued

Key features

Highly compact and modular design up to two protected sectors from an


1RU package
High-capacity backhaul interfaces up to 32 x E1 (1) the (optional)
OmniWAY-E1 subrack provides all E1s at RJ-45 receptacles
2 x Gigabit Ethernet (GbE) WAN interfaces
Hot-swap capability for modem, power supply and fan modules
All connections accessible from front panel

WiBAS-C Front Panel Description

Below, the description of the WiBAS -C front panel is provided.

Fig. 13 WiBAS
-C Front Panel

Item

Module

1A, 1B,
1C, 1D

Point-to-Multi Point (PtMP) modem (802.16, FDD processing), with


adaptive modulation up to 256 QAM for serving one geographical
sector. Up to four modems in protected or unprotected operation can
be accommodated.

E1 tributary module accommodating up to 32 E1 backhaul interfaces


(balanced 120 ohm).
Main processor module; it aggregates E1 and Ethernet traffic and
accommodates:
2 x GbE (electrical & optical(2)) WAN interfaces
2 x Fast Ethernet interfaces, for outband management
1 x auxiliary interface, for connecting external alarms and for
controlling external devices
Sync IN / OUT reference timing ports
Power supply 170 W. Up to two modules can be accommodated for
providing power redundancy.

4A, 4B
5

Fan module, hot-swappable, for protecting the housed electronics


against overheating.

(1)

For connection toward the legacy SDH network, the (optional) OmniWAY-2G subrack can provide
STM-1 (VC-12/4) WAN interfaces.
(2)
Optical GbE interface is compatible with a wide variety of SFP modules.

19

Chapter: 4 Equipment Description of WiBASTM Base Station

WiBAS-C External Units

WiBAS
-C
P32E1

WiBAS -C P32E1is an external 1 RU subrack that provides up to 32


balanced (120 ohm) E1 backhaul interfaces at RJ-45 receptacles.
WiBAS -C P32E1 is connected to the WiBAS -C through two
interconnection cables, each terminated to HD-68 connectors at both ends.

Fig. 14 WiBAS
-C P32E1

CONV-PAN-IDC
-BNC

Conversion Panel 120 / 75 accommodating:


1 x IDC 68 pin male receptacle featuring 16 x balanced (120 ) E1 inputs.
16 x BNC receptacle pairs featuring 16 x unbalanced (75 ) E1 outputs.

Fig. 15 CONV-PAN-IDC-BNC

OmniWAY-2G

OmniWAY-2G is an extrnal 1 RU subrack capable of providing legacy STM-1


(VC-12/4) uplink interfaces, instead of the E1 ones provided directly by the
WiBAS -C.

Fig. 16 OmniWAY-2G
Continued on next page

20

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

WiBAS-C External Units, Continued

OmniWAY-2G
(continued)

Item

Description

Fan module, for protecting the housed electronics against


overheating.

GbE traffic interfaces (electrical or optical).

Optical SDH Interfaces:


2 x STM-1 (VC-4) in 1+0 and 2+0 configurations (3A)
4 x STM-1 (VC-12) in 2+0, 1+1, 2+2 configuration (3B)

Fast Ethernet interface, for outband management.

DC power input.

I/O port, for external alarms.

Sync IN/OUT reference timing ports.

Serial RS-232, for local management.

The following connectivity example depicts the interconnection of the


OmniWAY-2G with one WiBAS -C Base Station subrack, for forwarding cell
sector traffic toward the core network.
The link C refers to GbE interconnection link between the WiBAS -C
subrack and OmniWAY-2G.
The links A1, A2 refer to a protected (1+1) STM-1 / VC-12 or VC-4 link
toward the SDH network for backhauling legacy TDM traffic from the
WiBAS-C Base Station.
Finally, the link D refers to GbE interconnection link between the WiBAS-C
subrack and the Ethernet / IP / MPLS network for backhauling Ethernet
traffic.

Fig. 17 OmniWAY-2G - WiBAS


-C Base Station interconnection schematic
Continued on next page

21

Chapter: 4 Equipment Description of WiBASTM Base Station

4.2 Base Station Radio System - BRS


BRS Overview

Description

The BRS is an optimally designed radio system for excellent wireless


coverage, discrete deployments, fast installation, and low-cost maintenance.
The system consists of the following sub-units:
Base station Radio Box (BRB)
Base station Radio Antenna (BRA)
The following picture shows a BRB together with a High-Gain BRA at 26/ 28
GHz mounted on a mast:

Fig. 18 BRB with High-Gain BRA 26/ 28 GHz mounted on a mast

The number of BRB/ BRA sub-units to install depends on the number of


sector areas to be covered by the BS. For a BS covering n sector areas in
the cell sector, the BRS outdoor unit is composed of n x BRB sub-units, n x
BRA sub-units, and n x IF coaxial cables.

Key features

Very high-gain, compact, lightweight, sectorized radio and antenna


Multiple antenna options, with both vertical & horizontal polarizations
Single coaxial cable for interconnecting data, power and management with
the indoor equipment; the BRS is fully manageable
Pole or wall mounted
Optimized mounting bracket for easy installation and alignment retention
for hassle-free replacement
Pressure die cast aluminium structure for maximum endurance and
minimum maintenance costs
Continued on next page

22

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

BRS Overview, Continued

Management &
control

Through the service channel, provided by the IF interconnection cable, the


BRS can be fully managed/ controlled both locally, by an LCT application,
and remotely by the uni|ms Network Management System.
The management and control features include:
Alarms monitoring
Statistics (temperature, Tx power)
RF configuration (Tx power, Tx/ Rx frequencies)
Software upgrading

Base Station Radio Box (BRB)

Description

BRB is a powerful full-duplex radio transceiver of particularly small size and


weight (approx. 2.5 kg). Further, BRB is environmentally hardened to
guarantee quality operation under all conditions.
BRBs case meets IP55 requirements, is very rigid and is made of pressure
die cast aluminium. It is suitable for mounting on a wall or mast, through the
supplied mounting bracket (see below picture).

Fig. 19 BRB 10.5 GHZ mounted on a mast, through mounting bracket

The setup requires minimum effort, as the unit is self-programmable.


All the needed accessories are included in the delivered packages; four BRB
boxes can be installed on the same pole (with back-to-back configuration),
occupying minimum space by utilizing the supplied mounting accessories.

Connection
receptacles

Externally, the BRB sub-unit features the following connection receptacles:


Female F-Type (or optional N-Type) receptacle, to connect the IF coaxial
cable coming from the Modem Card of the WiBAS -C subrack.
Waveguide flange (BRA antenna interface) (in case of 26/ 28 GHz BRB)
Female N-Type or SMA receptacle, to connect the RF coaxial cable coming
from the antenna (BRA) (in case of 10.5 GHz BRB).
Continued on next page

23

Chapter: 4 Equipment Description of WiBASTM Base Station

Base Station Radio Box (BRB), Continued

Extra BRB
features

In addition, the BRB case features:


Mounting bracket with minimum number of screws and orientation retention
M4 threaded hole, with pre-installed M4 ring terminal for terminating the
grounding cable.
Transportation handle.
Mounting holes for vertical and horizontal polarization, with orientation
designation.

Interconnection
with the indoor
unit

Connection of the BRB with a Modem Card of the WiBAS-C subrack is


realized via a coaxial cable, for carrying the required signals (Tx IF, Rx IF,
the service channel and the BRBs power supply) in multiplexed form.

24

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Base Station Radio Antenna (BRA)

26/ 28 GHz BRA

BRA at 26/ 28 GHz is a small-size sector antenna attached to the BRB


through a well-protected flange, with no external adapters, cables, or
waveguides in between. This results in better performance and reliability,
since there are no interconnection losses and no sensitive material is
exposed to extreme environmental conditions for a long time.
Further, a BRB attached to a BRA occupies minimum space and can be
handled as a single unit, lowering transportation, installation and replacement
costs.
The following pictures show the two types of Base Station Radio Antennas
(BRA):

Fig. 20 BRA 26/ 28 GHz High Gain

Fig. 21 BRA 26GHz Standard Gain

See also Appendix B - Antenna Characteristics, on page 106 for the


technical specifications of the available Base Station Antennas at 26/ 28
GHz.
Continued on next page

25

Chapter: 4 Equipment Description of WiBASTM Base Station

Base Station Radio Antenna (BRA), Continued

10.5 GHz BRA

BRA at 10.5 GHz is a small-size sector antenna connected to the BRB


through a coaxial cable, for carrying the RF signal. This cable is terminated
to a male N-Type or SMA connector (BRB side) and to an N-Type connector
(BRA side).
For multi-sectored Base Station configurations, appropriate mechanical
supports are utilized, for mounting all the sector antennas on the same pole
(and at the same height), where installation space is at a premium.
The following photo shows a 10.5 GHz Base Station Radio Antenna (BRA):

Fig. 22 BRA 10.5 GHz High Gain

See also Appendix B - Antenna Characteristics, on page 106 for the


technical specifications of the available Base Station Antennas at 10.5 GHz.

26

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Extended BRS

Extended BRS addresses the operator need for wide cell sector coverage (360o
and 180o) or longer ranges through dedicated links.
Extended BRS at 10.5 GHz is composed of a 4-way or 2-way microwave
splitter connected to BRB through coaxial cable for driving up to four or two
antennas through equal in number coaxial cables.
Extended BRS at 26/ 28 GHz is composed of a 4-way or 2-way microwave
splitter attached at the back of the BRB for driving up to four or two antennas
through equal in number waveguides. The following schematic shows an
indicative extended BRS at 26/ 28 GHz that is composed of 4-way microwave
splitter attached to BRB.

Fig. 23 Extended BRS 26/28 GHz

Extended BRS can be implemented either through four or two sectoral


antennas for 360o or 180o cell sector coverage respectively, or through four or
two directional antennas for communicating with equal in number distant sites.
For instance, four sectoral antennas can be connected to a 4-way splitter to
cover a 360 Geographical area, using only a single modem. In this case, the
sector capacity (throughput) will be distributed to the whole area.
Also, the directional antennas can point toward Terminal Station sites not
previously reached through sector Base Station antennas.
Another benefit of the Extended sites not previously reached through sector
Base BRS solution is that the interferences are very low in levels achieved by
PtP links.

Fig. 24 Extended BRS coverage

27

Chapter: 5 Equipment Description of WiBASTM Terminal Stations

Equipment Description of WiBASTM Terminal Stations

Introduction

This chapter describes in detail the equipment of WiBAS Terminal Station.


There are 2 types of Terminal Stations:
Split-Mount Terminal Station
Full Outdoor Terminal Station
The Split-Mount Terminal Station is consisted of the following pats:
Indoor equipment of the WiBAS TS (MSAD Subrack)
Outdoor equipment of the WiBAS TS (Terminal Station Radio System
(TRS) Overview)

28

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

5.1 Split-Mount Terminal Station


MSAD Subrack

Description

The MSAD is an advanced network device that can perfectly meet all access
requirements at a service location for a large number of different
applications.
The MSADs role is to control the TRS, implement the baseband modem,
and provide the user network interfaces. With the support of highly
developed interworking mechanisms and sophisticated QoS features, it
stands for a comprehensive gateway, addressing the needs of demanding
high-end customers.
The MSAD is a 1 RU ETSI 19 subrack suitable for desktop, wall or rack
mounting.
The case is environmentally and temperature hardened and is made of
pressure die cast aluminium.
No movable mechanical parts (i.e. fans) are employed for cooling, as they
turn out to be unreliable and prone to failures. Instead, passive cooling is
employed, a technique that also provides outstanding mechanical reliability.
All connection receptacles are accessible from the front panel.
The following photo shows an MSAD subrack:

Fig. 25 MSAD

Key features

Full-duplex FDD operation


Up to 256 QAM
Static LAG
RSTP
Full QoS support
Up to 138 Mbps net E1 L1 throughput on a single 28 MHz channel
AC and DC versions available
Case designed to effectively dissipate heat no fans used for cooling
Continued on next page

29

Chapter: 5 Equipment Description of WiBASTM Terminal Stations

MSAD Subrack, Continued

Front Panel
Description

The front panel of an MSAD is shown in Figure 26 (in this example the
MSADe-4ETH-8E1DC):

Fig. 26 MSAD Front Panel

Element
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9

MSAD models

Description

IF Cable input.
E1 Interfaces 120.
Fast Ethernet traffic interfaces.
Fast Ethernet interface, for local management.
Serial RS-232, for local management.
Synchronization output 2048 MHz.
Reset Button.
Reserved for future use.
DC power input.

In the following table are shown the available MSAD models which can be
provided with AC or DC-input power supply.
Picture

(1)

Limited availability. Applicable up to 64QAM

30

MSAD Model

Number of I/Fs

ETH

E1 / G703

MSADe-4ETH-8E1

MSADe-4ETH

MSADa-2ETH (1)

MSADa-1ETH (1)

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Terminal Station Radio System (TRS) Overview

Description

The TRS is an optimally designed radio system for superior RF performance,


discreet deployments, fast installation, and low-cost maintenance. The setup
of TRB requires minimum effort, as the unit is self-programmable and also,
all the needed accessories are included in the delivered packaging
Picture

Description
26/ 28 GHz TRS is consisted of the
following sub-units:
Terminal station Radio Box (TRB)
Terminal station Radio Antenna (TRA)
The picture on the left shows a 26/ 28 GHz
TRS composed of TRB and TRA, installed
on the mast via the mounting bracket.
10.5 GHz TRS is consisted of the following
sub-units:
Terminal station Radio Box (TRB), with or
without integrated antenna
Optional, external Terminal station Radio
Antenna (TRA).
The 10.5 GHz TRB with integrated TRA
takes minimum space and can be handled
as a single unit, lowering installation and
transportation costs.
The picture on cthe left shows a 10.5 GHz
TRS composed of TRB with integrated
antenna, installed on the mast via the
mounting bracket.

Key features

Very high-gain, compact, lightweight radio and antenna


Integrated antenna inside the radio box for lower costs in case of 10.5 GHz
Multiple options for external antennas in special cases
Single coaxial cable for interconnecting data, power and management with
the indoor equipment. TRS is fully manageable
Pole or wall mounted
Optimized mounting bracket for easy installation and alignment retention
for hassle-free replacement
Pressure die cast aluminum structure for maximum endurance and
minimum maintenance costs
Audio-aided antenna alignment for easy and fast optimal installation
Continued on next page

31

Chapter: 5 Equipment Description of WiBASTM Terminal Stations

Terminal Station Radio System (TRS) Overview, Continued

Management &
control

Through the service channel, provided by the IF interconnection cable, the


TRS can be fully managed/ controlled both locally, by an LCT application,
and remotely by the NMS.
The management and control features include:
Alarms monitoring
Statistics (temperature, Tx power)
RF configuration (Tx power, Tx/ Rx frequencies)
Software upgrading

32

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Terminal Station Radio Box (TRB)

Description

TRB is a powerful full-duplex radio transceiver of particularly small size and


weight. Further, it is environmentally hardened to guarantee quality operation
under all conditions. TRBs case meets IP55 requirements, is very rigid and
is made of pressure die cast aluminium. Also, it is suitable for mounting on a
wall or mast, through a mounting bracket.

Connection
receptacles

Externally, the TRB sub-unit features the following connection receptacles:

Extra TRB
features

Female F-Type (or optional N-Type) receptacle, to connect the coaxial


cable coming from the indoor unit (MSAD)
Waveguide flange (TRA antenna interface) (in case of 26/ 28 GHz BRB)
Female N-Type or SMA receptacle(1), to connect the RF coaxial cable
coming from the 10.5 GHz external antenna, if any
Weather-protected audio jack 3.5 mm, female, to connect the headset for
antenna alignment purposes

In addition, the TRB case features:


Mounting bracket with minimum number of screws and orientation retention
M4 threaded hole, with pre-installed M4 ring terminal for terminating the
grounding cable
Transportation handle
Mounting holes for vertical and horizontal polarization, with orientation
designation

Interconnection
with the indoor
unit (MSAD)

Connection of the TRB with the indoor unit (MSAD) is realized via a coaxial
cable, for carrying the required signals (Tx IF, Rx IF, the service channel and
the TRBs power supply) in multiplexed form.

Installation/
alignment

Regarding the TRB with external TRA antenna, a coaxial cable length(2) is
used to connect the TRB with the external antenna, for carrying the RF
signal. In this case, the alignment procedure concerns the antenna itself and
not the TRB (and its mechanical support).
Regarding the 10.5 GHz TRB with integrated antenna, the alignment of the
antenna is carried out with the use of headset indicating the optimum
antenna pointing. Additionally, the mounting bracket is specially designed to
hold its orientation when 10.5 GHz TRB needs to be replaced. In this case,
readjustment of its orientation will not be needed.

(1)

Only used in 10.5 GHz TRB with externally connected antenna.

(2)

Terminated to male SMA or N-Type connectors (at both sides). For 10.5 GHz WiBAS system, an
additional W/G-to-SMA adapter is required for fitting the coaxial cable on the TRA antenna.

33

Chapter: 5 Equipment Description of WiBASTM Terminal Stations

Terminal Station Radio Antenna (TRA)

26/ 28 GHz TRA

26/ 28 GHz TRA is a parabolic antenna attached to the TRB through a


well-protected flange, with no external adapters, cables, or waveguides in
between. This results in better performance and reliability, since there are no
interconnection losses and no sensitive material needs to be exposed to
extreme environmental conditions for a long time.
Further, a 26/ 28 GHz TRB attached to a TRA occupies minimum space and
can be handled as a single unit, lowering installation and transportation
costs.
The following photo shows a 28 GHz Terminal Station Radio Antenna (TRA)
installed on the mast together with the a 28 GHz TRB:

Fig. 27 TRA 26/28 GHz

See also Appendix B - Antenna Characteristics, on page 106 for the


technical specifications of the available Terminal Station Antennas.

10.5 GHz TRA

10.5 GHz TRA can be an integrated or an external antenna. The following


photo shows a 10.5 GHz integrated antenna installed on the mast:

Fig. 28 TRA 10.5 GHz

The external antenna is used in case a higher-gain antenna is required.


See also Appendix B - Antenna Characteristics, on page 106 for the
technical specifications of the available Terminal Station Antennas.

34

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

5.2 Full Outdoor Terminal Station


Full Outdoor Terminal Station Description

Overview

The all-outdoor WiBAS Terminal Station perfectly suits the operator needs
for zero-footprint installations in service locations requiring cost-effective and
rapidly implemented 3G / 4G backhaul or high-end access. Operating in the
10.5 / 26 / 28 GHz bands, this all-outdoor solution employs state-of-the-art
Point-to-MultiPoint (PtMP) technology and combines sophisticated QoS
features and robust performance with a highly efficient operation. The
electronics baseband unit / modem / controller and radio circuitry are all
securely accommodated in a lightweight, environmentally-hardened housing
that is directly coupled to the antenna. Operating power is provided over the
electrical Ethernet interfaces (Power over Ethernet).

Key Features

Up to section capacity: 157 Mbit/s peak rate


GbE Interface for Telecom Equipment
External or Integrated Antenna
Compact & Lightweight, 4.1 Kg
Power Over Ethernet (PoE)

35

Chapter: 6 Functional Description

Functional Description

Introduction

This chapter describes some of the inherent functionalities of WiBAS C


System.
Those functionalities are:
Statistical Multiplexing
Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation
Sector Protection Mechanism
Air Scheduling
Ethernet QoS
TR3C Policing Mechanism
Security Features

36

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Statistical Multiplexing

Overview

WiBAS brings to operators the benefits of statistical multiplexing for


exploiting the systems available capacity at the maximum.
Instead of dedicating fixed bandwidths for the several downlink wireless
connections (see schematic below, A), a single, wide-bandwidth pipe is used
(B) to serve the instantaneous capacity demands. This way, the excessive
system capacity can be used for other users and applications.
A
1

Time

Wasted capacity (fixed BW allocation).

Excessive capacity (statistical multiplexing).

Fig. 29 Statistical Multiplexing

37

Chapter: 6 Functional Description

Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation

Overview

Within a WiBAS PtMP network, each served Terminal Station is


guaranteed a minimum bandwidth, while peak capacity (per sector) has been
calculated during the radio network planning.
Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation (DBA) efficiently addresses the peak
demands that occur randomly in the WiBAS network (see the schematic
below). Excessive bandwidth demands (A1) are served in real time by an
available capacity pool (B2). This pool is shared among those Terminal
Stations that really need bandwidth beyond their predefined guaranteed
value.
The DBA mechanism of WiBAS is especially important in mobile 3G
networks where traffic demands may greatly vary over time.

Fig. 30 Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation (DBA)

38

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Sector Protection Mechanism

Introduction

A very important key feature of WiBAS is the Sector Protection


functionality. WiBAS supports both 1:1 and 1+1 sector protection schemes.
The cases that lead to a TS loss of service due to sector failure, are
presented below:
Hardware or software problem in the working BRB.
Disconnection between of the working BRB and the associated PtMP
modem card.
Faulty PtMP modem card.
Sector antenna fault that leads to the loss of connection between the Base
Station and all configured Terminal Stations.
User initiated switchover command.

1+1 Sector
protection

In the 1+1 protection scheme, one WiBAS PtMP modem/ BRB subsystem
is working and another PtMP modem/ BRB subsystem is in standby mode.
Both subsystems are configured in the same way with the same connection
parameters and both are transmitting at the same frequency.

Fig. 31 1+1 Sector Protection

The working subsystem is considered as the default subsystem for all


processing related to a single sector.
The WiBAS-C control card constantly monitors the operation of the working
subsystem and initiates a switchover operation to the standby subsystem as
soon as it detects a connection failure (see list above).
After the switchover the standby subsystem takes control. Since the new
active sector has the same frequency with the TS the downtime is minimized
and all the TSs automatically get re-attached without the need for a new
ranging process.
Continued on next page

39

Chapter: 6 Functional Description

Sector Protection Mechanism, Continued

1:1 Sector
protection

In the 1:1 protection scheme, two WiBAS PtMP modems/ BRB subsystems
are working in parallel and in different frequencies handling the sector traffic.
When any new connection is added to the network, its guaranteed rate is
calculated and reserved at both subsystems. In this way if one of them fails,
the other will have the capacity to support the total guaranteed rates of all the
connections. All TS have a frequency list that contains 2 frequencies: the
preferred subsystem frequency and the protected subsystem frequency.
The WiBAS -C control card constantly monitors the operation of both subsystems and initiates a switchover operation as soon as it detects connection
failure in any of the subsystems.

Fig. 32 1:1 Sector Protection

The process of the system switchover incorporates the following steps:


When a TS has no link to the subsystem after a number of retries to
reconnect, it will use the second frequency of its frequency list.
Failed TSs are pre-programmed to automatically scan to the active BRB
frequency
The TSs will start re-registering to active subsystem sequentially one by
one.
Information on the PHY parameters of the failed links (DL /UL modulation
formats, SNRs etc) are re-evaluated from the new subsystem controller.
TSs connection parameters like QoS / VLANs are re-established at the
active subsystem
After the switchover on both BS and TS, the guaranteed bit rates of all
connections are maintained and the remaining (non-guaranteed) sector
capacity is shared among all connections in a priority-based, best-effort
manner.

40

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Air Scheduling

Introduction

The WiBAS uplink scheduler undertakes the task of allocating bandwidth to


Terminal Stations (MSADs) for transmitting data over the uplink channel,
upon received bandwidth requests by the MSAD. It is designed in order to
maximize the throughput while maintain fairness and adhere to QoS
guarantees. In both downlink and uplink, data is transmitted in bursts, within
the fixed duration that defines one frame.
The Uplink Scheduling Scheme is shown below:

Fig. 33 Uplink Scheduling Scheme

The mode of Uplink Scheduling Scheme depends on the type traffic send
through the link. Therefore:
For Ethernet traffic, a Packet Scheduler operates before the Air scheduler
and it schedules based on various classifiers using a selectable priority
scheme.
For TDM and traffic, only the Air scheduler is used.

Scheduling
delay

The bandwidth requests sent by the MSADs to inform the Base Station of
their queue status are not instantaneously available to the Base Station
scheduler. As a result, the Base Station scheduler has a delayed view of
the MSADs queues and bases its scheduling on that view which is delayed
by three frames. However, in actual traffic measurements, this delay will
only be observed in cases of near-congestion.
When the channel is not congested the BS scheduler allocates more
bandwidth to the MSADs than they request to reduce the delay of new
packets that may arrive during the scheduling delay.

Real-time delay

Real time (rtPS) connections feature a maximum transfer delay parameter.


In case that such a connection is idle for a period, depending on the
maximum transfer delay, the Base Station will do a periodical polling by
allocating a small amount of bandwidth to allow bandwidth requests from
the MSAD. This ensures that the MSAD can send a bandwidth request in
time for such a connection to be served within its delay requirements when
it becomes active.
Continued on next page

41

Chapter: 6 Functional Description

Air Scheduling, Continued

Fairness

Fairness is achieved by fractional scheduling. This means that any queues that
contend for bandwidth (i.e. have the same priority) and whose total bandwidth
exceeds the available bandwidth, will receive bandwidth proportionally to their
required bandwidth. (1)
The fairness algorithm attempts to achieve fairness on the allocated transfer
bandwidth instead of the physical resource, which may vary according to the
MSADs physical mode.

QoS types &


priorities

A QoS type, a QoS profile and some extra parameters, which are specific to the
QoS type (e.g. Max Rate, Guaranteed Rate, etc) are assigned to each data
connection.
The Base Station air scheduler supports the following QoS types, listed from
highest to lowest priority:
1. Unsolicited Grant Service (UGS). UGS connections are defined by their
maximum traffic rate. The scheduler will always grant dedicated bandwidth
to the connection equal to the specified rate, regardless of whether the
bandwidth is actually utilized.
2. real-time Polling Service (rtPS). rtPS connections are defined by a
maximum traffic rate, a guaranteed traffic rate and a maximum transfer
delay. The scheduler will grant to the connection high-priority bandwidth
up to the guaranteed rate, but only while the connection is active (i.e. has
packets in its queue). If the connection requires bandwidth in excess of
the guaranteed rate, the scheduler will either drop it, treat it as best effort
up to the maximum rate dropping anything that exceeds the maximum rate
or treat it as best effort (ignoring the maximum rate) depending on the
QoS profile.
3. non real-time Polling Service (nrtPS). nrtPS connections are defined by
a maximum traffic rate and a guaranteed traffic rate. Similar to rtPS
connections, the scheduler will grant high-priority bandwidth up to the
guaranteed rate, but will not poll the MSAD for bandwidth requests. If the
connection requires bandwidth beyond the guaranteed rate the scheduler
will behave as in the rtPS case.
4. Best Effort (BE). BE connections are defined by a maximum traffic rate.
They are allotted the lowest priority. The scheduler may restrict the
bandwidth allocated to BE connections to the defined maximum rate or
not, depending on the connections profile.
5. Best Effort (BE+) with guaranteed rate. BE connections with guaranteed
rate are defined by a given guaranteed minimum traffic rate.
The scheduler follows strict priorities when scheduling data connections. This
means that in order to allocate bandwidth to lower-priority connections, the
queues of higher-priority connections must be fully served. For example, if
guaranteed traffic of rtPS, nrtPS and UGS connections takes up the entire
channel bandwidth BE traffic will not be served until the guaranteed portion of the
traffic is fully served.

(1)

42

The queue length is used as a measure of the required bandwidth.

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Air Scheduling, Continued

Uplink Air
Scheduler

The uplink air scheduling is performed at every frame by the Base Station
and the resulting allocation concerns a single frame. The bandwidth
allocation for the uplink is send to the MSADs in a specific field within the
downlink frame.
The schematic below illustrates the WiBAS uplink scheduler.
MSAD 1
Virtual
Queues

Burst allocation
for MSAD 1
Uplink allocations

MSAD 2
BS
SCHEDULER

AIR

LOCAL
SCHEDULER

Actual
Queues
q1
q2
q3

BS receives BW
requests and
updates its tables
MSAD 3

Transmission of
Packets and BW
requests for
queues

Fig. 34 WiBAS
Uplink Scheduler

The uplink scheduling is performed on a per-connection basis, where each


MSAD can have multiple connections and on each connection can be
assigned different QoS types (UGS, rtPS, nrtPS, Best Effort (BE) or Best
Effort Service (BE+) with guaranteed rate). Each restriction that has a perconnection QoS is kept and fairness is maintained among the connections
with the same QoS type. The scheduler also adopts fixed priorities based on
the QoS type.
To achieve a per-connection QoS-based scheduling, the WiBAS Base
Station (BS) is keeping track the queue status for all active connections of
every connected MSAD. This is achieved by building virtual queues, through
bandwidth requests sent by the MSADs to the Base Station with each virtual
queue being a mirror of a correspondence MSAD queue. However, the Base
Station, which can has a minimum guaranteed traffic (the equivalent of UBR+
in the ATM world), allocates bandwidth to each MSAD as a whole instead of
allocating bandwidth to each specific connection.

Continued on next page

43

Chapter: 6 Functional Description

Air Scheduling, Continued

Uplink Air Scheduler (continued)

As a result, the uplink air scheduling is performed in two stages by two


schedulers: one located in WiBAS-C Base Station and the other in the
MSAD (Terminal Station).
At the first stage, called Base Station air scheduler, the Base Station
allocates bandwidth to each MSAD connected to the system, based on the
total bandwidth requested by the MSADs. The Base Station scheduler, via
uplink bandwidth requests, knows the length of the queues for all MSADs
as well as their QoS. So at each air frame, it allocates bandwidth to each
MSAD which is further allocated to the 16 uplink queues from the MSAD
local scheduler.
At the second stage, called local scheduler, each MSAD allocates the
bandwidth granted to it by the Base Station to its connections. Each MSAD
supports 16 queues which are given bandwidth from the MSAD local
scheduler based on the QoS of each queue and the bandwidth allocated
from Base Station.

Packet
Scheduler

For Ethernet traffic a Packet Scheduler operates before the air scheduler and
it schedules based on VLAN TAG P-bits (or DSCP bits) using a selectable
priority scheme. Packet scheduler is used for each Air connection opened for
ETH flows. Packet scheduler is located in MSAD (Terminal Station) while air
scheduling is running at both Base Station and Terminal Station.

Fig. 35 WiBAS
Packet Scheduler

Packet scheduler supports 8 queues where Ethernet frames are stored from
the Classifier which is based on the VLAN TAG P-bits of the Ethernet frame
(or the DSCP bits). Multi-queue priority block selects from the queues based
on its programmed priority scheme and forwards ETH traffic to a specific Air
Scheduler UL queue. This UL queue is scheduled from the Uplink Air
Scheduler based on Air QoS. Multi-queue priority block supports the
following scheduling schemes:
8 Strict Priorities
8 Mixed Priorities: 0-3 Strict, 4-7 WFQ
Continued on next page

44

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Air Scheduling, Continued

Base Station
Air Scheduler

In order to allocate bandwidth to the MSADs, the Base Station initially


determines the bandwidth that should be allocated to each connection,
based on the data kept on the MSAD queues, and reserves it from the
available bandwidth of the channel.
A strict priority order is kept in serving the connections, based on the QoS
type. Thus, in case the available bandwidth is exceeded, connections with
higher priority maintain their guaranteed portion of the channel bandwidth.
Among connections of the same priority fairness is maintained. Finally, the
bandwidth reserved for all connections of an MSAD is aggregated and
allocated to it as a whole.

MSAD (Local)
Scheduler

The MSAD (local) scheduler runs, as it is denoted, on the MSAD and


distributes the bandwidth allocated to it by the BS to its connections.
Similar to the BS air scheduler, the MSAD local scheduler respects any QoS
restrictions on its connections and maintains fairness in the case that the
total required bandwidth exceeds its allocated bandwidth.
In a way, the MSAD local scheduler is a scaled-down version of the BS air
scheduler.

Downlink
Scheduling

On the downlink path the data follow the reverse process that is described in
the previous paragraphs. Ethernet traffic is processed by a packet scheduler
exhibiting the same capabilities as those of the UL one with the 8 priority
queues and TR3C Policing Mechanism. In addition the DL packet scheduler
is capable of manipulating double tags supporting effectively Q-in-Q
functionality.
A main difference on the downlink direction is that the air cells are forwarded
through a cell shaper & scheduler that applies the QoS requirements of each
connection. (UGS, RTPS, nRTPS, BE, BE+)

45

Chapter: 6 Functional Description

Ethernet QoS

Ethernet QoS

WiBAS-C(1) supports advanced Ethernet QoS functionality at Layer 2/ 3 of


OSI model enabling the traffic prioritization and performing dynamic multicast
filtering. Ethernet QoS prioritizes network traffic and manages the available
bandwidth so that the most important traffic (packets with higher priority) to
be forwarded first when network congestion occurs.
The Ethernet traffic processing stages, which contribute to the WiBAS-C
QoS mechanism (ingress to egress), are described below:
Stage
Classifier

Meter

(1)

Function
Classifies the incoming packets in distinct Class of
Services (CoS) based on various L2 or L3 criteria,
such as:
Port
VLAN id
p-bit
DSCP
Measures the incoming information rate.

Policer

Compares the measured information rate with the


predefined rate limits typically CIR / EIR and CBS /
EBS and applies traffic policing with drop option
(two-rate, three-color marking) for post- processing
by the scheduler stage. Non-conforming frames are
either discarded or tagged (marked).

Forwarder

Forwards the packets to the physical (Ethernet) ports


based on their VLAN id and MAC address.

Enqueuer

Enqueues egress packets in eight (8) queues based


on L2 port p-bits to queue mapping, or based on
policer.

Scheduler

Schedules the egress packets based on Strict


Priority or WFQ. Depending on the color marking,
packets are accordingly forwarded.

Transmitter

Transmits the packets toward the radio path.

L2 bridge functionality is supported by the WiBAS-C BASE STATION indoor equipment and also by the
following MSAD models: MSADe-4ETH-8E1and MSADe-4ETH.

46

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

TR3C Policing Mechanism

Policing
Mechanism

WiBAS-C system supports the Two-Rate 3 Colors (TR3C) method(1) of


measuring the bandwidth profile. Two-rate, three-color metering allows
incoming frames that conform to the Committed Information Rate (CIR) to be
admitted to the network. Frames that exceed even the Excess Information
Rate (EIR) are discarded immediately, and frames that exceed the CIR, but
not the EIR, are marked yellow for possible discard later, should the network
become congested.
Two-Rate TCM policer requires a bandwidth profile that specifies the
average rate of committed and excess Ethernet packets allowed into
network at the switch port.
Packets that are transmitted up to the committed rate are allowed into the
providers network and delivered per the service performance objectives
specified in the Service Level Agreement (SLA) or Service Level
Specification (SLS). Those packets are in-profile or conformant with the
bandwidth profile.
Packets sent above the committed rate and below the excess rate are
allowed into the providers network but are delivered without any service
performance objectives. Those packets are out-of-profile or nonconformant to the bandwidth profile.
Packets sent above the excess rate are discarded.

Bandwidth
Profile
Parameters

Profile Parameter
Committed Information
Rate (CIR)
Excess Information Rate
(EIR)

Description
Is the average rate up to which packets are
marked green. These packets are referred to
as CIR-conformant.
Specifies the average rate up to which packets
are admitted to the network. The EIR is greater
than or equal to the CIR. Packets that exceed
the CIR, but are below the EIR are marked
yellow. Because these packets do not conform
to the CIR, the network does not provide any
guarantees with regard to their delivery.
Packets that exceed the EIR, do not conform
and are marked red, and are discarded.
Because traffic levels can fluctuate, the tworate, three color metering process enables the
traffic to burst above the CIR and EIR a certain
amount before marking the packets yellow and
red, respectively
Continued on next page

(1)

There are two main methods of measuring the bandwidth profile, the Two-Rate, three colors metering
and the Single-Rate, three colors metering. WiBAS-C system supports the Two-Rate, three colors
metering method.

47

Chapter: 6 Functional Description

TR3C Policing Mechanism, Continued

Bandwidth
Profile
Parameters
(continued)

Profile Parameter

Description

Committed Burst Size


(CBS)

Is the maximum number of bytes allowed for


incoming packets to burst above the CIR, but
still be marked green.

Excess Burst Size (EBS)

Is the maximum number of bytes allowed for


incoming packets to burst above the EIR and
still be marked yellow. When the burst size has
been exceeded, packets above the EIR are
marked red.

Policer types

Policer Type

48

Description

Color Blind TCM


Policer

Directs all frames through the entire policer,


regardless of their color, thus enables the frame to
receive any output color no matter what color it
entered with. This means that a low priority frame
(red) can receive a higher priority (e.g. green).

Color Aware TCM


Policer

Classifies the frames color before it is sent through


the policer, and thus enables a frame to receive only
the same or a lower priority than the one it has. For
example: a yellow marked frame cannot receive a
green colour in a colour aware TCM policer, only a
yellow or a red colour.

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Security Features

Introduction

WiBAS advanced inherent features enable provisioning of efficient


solutions to address contemporary communication needs of the Corporate
users. The system employs advanced QoS mechanisms that assure service
delivery and preserve the quality of voice and broadband data applications.
The requirements for communication integrity and security, which is essential
for critical applications, are fulfilled by the closed system architecture and
the use of DES encryption algorithm.

Security
mechanism

The WiBAS system effectively uses a central Hub station that establishes
direct links with each individual Terminal Station The communication
between Base Station and Terminal Stations is controlled by a highly
advanced scheduler that resides in the WiBAS Base Station.
During the initial ranging phase each individual Terminal Station is registered
to the Base station with each unique credentials that are entered at the Base
Station by the Operator. Therefore, the Base Station fully controls the
communication towards the Terminal Stations and no Terminal Station can
register to the central Hub autonomously.
The communication between the Base Station and the Terminal Station is
not only based on proprietary, closed and highly advanced mechanism but
it is also of dynamic nature. Effectively allocation of system resources (i.e.
transmission time slots) and operation mode (i.e modulation scheme) is
dynamically adapting to bandwidth demand and transmission conditions.
Thus the transmission mechanism is not fixed and predefined. Within this
context, an eavesdropper could not possibly decrypt the information
transmitted. Moreover, due to WiBAS proprietary nature no standard
equipment analyzing the air frame exists in the market.
Also attempting to impersonate MAC address is not possible since this would
require first of all analysing the transmitted air frame. Even in this case, MAC
antispoofing mechanism exists that uniquely bind the MAC address to
specific air connections.

Additional
security
features

Additional security is offered by encrypting the information transmitted over


the air by employing DES with four TEKs and IVPs that are common to all
Terminal Stations, for encrypting/ decrypting the MAC PDUs.

49

Chapter: 7 Managing WiBAS-C Systems & Networks

Managing WiBAS-C Systems & Networks

As it is shown in the table below, multiple options to manage the WiBASC


systems and networks exist. Therefore
Option

Local / Remote
Node
Management

Command Line Interface (CLI)

uni|MS- Node Manager

uni|MS- Domain Manager

Centralized Domain
Resource
(Element)
(Network)
Management
Management

uni|MS- Inventory Manager

uni|MS- Audit Manager

uni|MS- Service Manager

uni|MS- Historical
Performance Manager

This chapter provides a uni|MS- overview and the WiBAS--C management


features.

50

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

uni|MS Overview

One solution
manages all
products

The uni|MS- Unified Management Suite is a state-of-the-art solution for


supervising and managing modern telecommunication networks.
uni|MS is a carrier-class multi-technology Element, Network and Service
Management platform supporting off-the-shelf all Intracom Telecom wireless
and wireline products, inclusive of:
 OmniBAS-

 INTRALINK-

 iBAS-

 WiBAS-

 OmniMAX-

 UltraLink-

 OmniRural-

 FASTmux Cabinet Solution

Furthermore, third-party Network Elements can be managed through element


mediation drivers that can be developed as a service.
uni|MS- unifies the management of access and transport networks,
improving user experience, lowering OpEx and improving efficiency.
Unified Fault, Performance and Inventory management and Service order
Management are carried out through a powerful and intuitive user interface
that personalizes user workspace and adapts to user needs.
uni|MS consists of the following applications which all share the same
Graphical User Interface:
Node Manager, a Craft application to manage local or remotely a Network
Element.
Domain Manager, for centralized multi-technology Element Network
management.
Service Manager, for E2E service provisioning and management.
Historical Performance Manager, an application enabling collection and
analysis of historical performance network-wide.
Audit Manager, an application enabling advanced monitoring and analysis
of all user, system and network events and actions.
Inventory Manager, an application that enables collection, storage and
monitoring of resource inventory, network-wide.
Continued on next page

51

Chapter: 7 Managing WiBAS-C Systems & Networks

uni|MS Overview, Continued

Unprecedented
visualization of
the operator
network

uni|MS- featuring a customizable desktop that is based on Perspectives


(see Fig 34, allows you to:
Best adapt visible workspace at run time.
View any combination of reports on a single screen.
Navigate through tree, map or photorealistic view.
Drag-n-drop containers and tabs.

Fig. 36 uni|MS
customizable desktop

Network modeling allows creating a hierarchy of geographical and


administrative domains that are displayed in the network topology and can be
used to execute domain-wide actions.
uni|MS features comprehensive reports for Inventory / Status / Alarms /
Configuration / Performance with advanced filtering and integrated usercustomizable graph generation tool.
uni|MS enables real-time network monitoring through graphical topology
and interactive photorealistic equipment views.
Continued on next page

52

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

uni|MS Overview, Continued

Security
Reliability &
Northbound
Integration

uni|MS offers advanced features to assure top-notch reliability. Using


these features, you can:
Implement a warm standby server redundancy scheme with automatic
database synchronization to improve the reliability and minimizing the
downtime of the system.
Assure a high NMS availability through a clustered architecture with
automatic switchover in case of hardware, application or system software
failure.
Furthermore, with the uni|MS North Bound Interface (NBI), you can
integrate uni|MS with higher-level umbrella fault monitoring systems.

WiBAS-C Management Features

Introduction

In order to manage a WiBAS-C network by the existing uni|MS, a


WiBAS-C driver needs to be incorporated in uni|MS installations.
This paragraph provides the WiBAS-C management features available
through the uni|MS.

Fault
Management

uni|MS Fault Management is responsible for the detection, isolation and


resolution of problems in order to keep the supervised network running at an
optimum level, provide a measure of fault tolerance and minimize downtime.
Users can monitor alarms in real-time, while active and historical alarms are
stored in the relational database, and are presented with additional views
that provide extensive filtering and exporting capabilities.
Fault management features include:
Alarms Collection: Real time & Synchronization
Trap Anti-flooding protection
Availability Monitoring through Management Heartbeat
Alarms Reduction through classification (severities), filtering, maintenance
mode, top level graphical view
Alarms Troubleshooting through Historical Alarms, Adaptive Menus and
Photorealistic equipment views
Alarms Notifications through e-mail
Continued on next page

53

Chapter: 7 Managing WiBAS-C Systems & Networks

WiBAS-C Management Features, Continued

Configuration
Management

uni|MS Configuration Management offers centralized:


Setting and monitoring of network and radio configuration parameters such
as radio parameters, Ethernet interfaces, VLAN settings, SNMP settings, etc.
Setting and Monitoring of advanced configuration parameters such as QoS
classification & scheduling, traffic shaping, RSTP, LAG, etc.
Automatic deep discovery and initial configuration of the Network Elements
and of their components.
Network Element configuration through automated fulfillment function (in
case of interruptions).
Adaptation to planned operational modifications or user requirements (FW
Upgrade).
Configuration backup and restore.

Performance
Management

uni|MS Performance Management constitutes a means of measuring the


quality of several operating parameters. It ensures that the supervised
network is operating as expected and that the available network resources
are efficiently allocated.
Performance is determined by a specific period where appropriate
measurements are taken on specific Network Elements (such as ports,
traffic connections, etc.). Within this period, measurement data is collected
and stored in the database for later view or further analysis. When
necessary, measurement data can be exported to files and presented in a
list or graphical form.
Immediate network detection and troubleshooting of deficiencies can be
realized via Real-Time Performance monitoring for:
Radio transmission
Ethernet ports
VLAN traffic
Network performance analysis can be done via uni|MS Historical
Performance Manager that is based on predefined Key Performance
Indicators (KPIs) that are Instantaneous & Cumulative as collected from
Network Elements, or Calculated after calculations performed by uni|MS
Historical Performance Manager on raw data collected from Network
Elements. uni|MS provides advanced reporting and graph capabilities that
allow monitoring of KPIs efficiently.
Continued on next page

54

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

WiBAS-C Management Features, Continued

Security
Management

uni|MS Security Management is responsible to protect both the entire


network and the Network Elements against intentional or accidental abuse,
unauthorized access and communication loss. Security management is also
responsible to set constraints per Network Element according to the TMF
MTNM specifications.
uni|MS incorporates enhanced security features to cater for:
Authentication
Local or remote (TACACS, LDAP etc.)
Secure logins, strong passwords, etc.
Authorization
Multiple Roles according to predefined templates
Fine grained privileges
Network Segmentation
Network Access Domains to segment the network
Applicable to all objects (e.g. cards, ports, etc.)

55

Chapter: 8 Technical Specifications

Technical Specifications

This chapter provides the following WiBAS specifications:


System Specifications
Equipment Specifications
Radio & Modem Performance

8.1 System Specifications


System Specifications

Introduction

This section provides general specifications of the system as well as


specifications concerning:
General Specifications
Baseband Physical (PHY) Layer
Networking
Air Interface Characteristics
IP services
TDM services
Outband management ports
Continued on next page

56

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

System Specifications, Continued

General
Specifications

The following table provides the general system specifications.

Description
System Design
Radio System Compliance

Specification
Based on industry standard IEEE 802.16
ETSI EN 302 326-1 v1.2.2, Annex E
(Overview & Requirements for Digital Multipoint
Radio Systems).
Parameter

Value

EqC-PET

EqC-SET

Null

EqC-EMO

Variable 2, 4, 6

EqC-ChS

14 MHz, 28 MHz

MGBR

(2)

(1)

See par. Cell Sector


Ranges (page 84).(net
values)

Reference Point for


EqC-EMO, MGBR &
BER Measurement

Operating Frequency
Bands
Network Topology
Coverage Radius

Radio Features

Xn, Xn

10.5 GHz/ 26 GHz/ 28 GHz


Point-to-multipoint, with cell sectorization.
Depends on rain & environmental conditions and
on availability objectives. See paragraph. Cell
Sector Ranges (page 91).
Hitless Adaptive Modulation
Statistical Multiplexing Gain
Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation
Radio Resource Control (RRC)
Power Control (BS Static & TS ATPC)
FEC ensuring robust communication witout the
need to increase transmission capacity.

Continued on next page

(1)

The computing method for the assumed EqC-EMO is given below (Outer Error Coding & Inner Error
Coding are utilized):
4QAM2/3: 2/3 x (239/255) x log2(4) = 1.25  2
4QAM:
(239/255) x log2(4) = 1.87  2
16QAM:
(239/255) x log2(16) = 3.75  4
64QAM:
(239/255) x log2(64) = 5.62  6
256 QAM:
(239/255) x log2(256) = 7.50 8 (for DL 26/ 28 GHz)
(2)
Minimum Gross Bit Rate (for all modulation types)

57

Chapter: 8 Technical Specifications

System Specifications, Continued

General Specifications (continued)

Description
Max. net Capacity (ETH) per BS Sector (DL)
Max. net Capacity (ETH) per TS (full outdoor)

Specification
157 Mbit/s(1) (28 MHz channel)
157 Mbit/s

Max. net Capacity (ETH) per TS (split type)


Sectors (per Base Station)
Max. Number of Terminal Stations

138 Mbit/s
1 to 4

32 per BS sector.
64 per BS chassis.
Continued on next page

(1)

Feature available with Release 3.3

58

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

System Specifications, Continued

Baseband
Physical (PHY)
Layer

The following table provides the baseband PHY layer specifications.

Specification

Description

Transmission
Technique (UL &
DL)

Single-carrier, with Decision Feedback Equalization


(DFE)

Duplexing
Method

Frequency Division Duplex (FDD)

Multiple Access
Scheme

TDM (DL)

Channel
Bandwidth
(UL/ DL)

28 / 14 MHz

Modulation
Schemes

256 QAM

TDMA (UL)
7.0 MHz (only in 10.5 GHz band)

64 QAM
16 QAM
4 QAM
4 QAM 2/3

Coding Scheme
(FEC) (UL & DL)

Concatenated RS (Reed Solomon) plus convolutional


inner code (2/3 coding rate)

Filter

Squared Root Raised Cosine filter, 0.25 roll-off

Adaptive Coding
& Modulation

Burst by burst, for different TS (UL)

Symbol Rates

Symbol rates (and frame lengths) are programmable and


are given in the following table, per channel size.

Frame by frame, for given TS (DL)

Channel
Size
(MHz)

Symbol
Rates
(Msym/s)

Frame
Length
(symbols)

Frame
Duration
(ms)

(1)

11200

1.72

(1)

22400

1.72

(1)

22400

0.86

5.6

6.5

14

11.2

13

28

22.4

26

(1)
(1)
(1)

Continued on next page

(1)

Feature available with Release 3.3

59

Chapter: 8 Technical Specifications

System Specifications, Continued

Networking

The following table provides the WiBAS networking protocols.


Specification

Description

Traffic Type

Full & Fractional E1 TDM / Ethernet / IP / ATM

MAC

Point-to-Multi-Point (PtMP) connection-oriented

Security

Use of four TEKs and IVPs, common to all TS, for


encrypting/ decrypting the MAC PDUs (through DES)
Full support of certificate check and of frequent exchanges
of AK and TEKs (1)

Interworking

IPv4
802.1q (VLAN), max 400 VLANs per BS
802.1ad (Provider bridging)

Ethernet QoS

Multiple air-links of five Classes of Service, for real/ nonreal, committed and best-effort traffic.
Bandwidth allocation based on VLAN or physical port
separation.
Packet prioritization: VLAN, p-bit, IP QoS DSCP
Packet scheduling: 8 queues per air-link
Queuing schemes: Strict Priority and WRR (Weighted
Round Robin)

Ethernet
Protection

Static Link Aggregation (LAG)

Air MAC QoS

Unsolicited Grant Service (UGS)

Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP)


Real-Time Polling Service (rtPS)
Non-Real Time Polling Service (nrtPS)
Best-Effort Service (BE) with guaranteed rate
Best-Effort Service (BE+) without guaranteed rate

STM-1
(VC-12 / VC-4)

ITU-T G.707 / G.781 / G.783

TDM

ITU-T G.703 / G.704 / G.706 / G.732


Continued on next page

(1)

Future system release.

60

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

System Specifications, Continued

Networking (continued)

Specification

Description

TDM
ITU-T G.783, Characteristics of Synchronous Digital
synchronization
Hierarchy (SDH) Equipment Functional Blocks
ITU-T G.811, Timing characteristics of Primary Reference
Clocks
ITU-T G.812, Timing Requirements of Slave Clocks
Suitable for Use as Node Clocks in Synchronization
Networks
ITU-T G.813, Timing Characteristics of SDH Equipment
Slave Clocks (SEC)
ITU-T G.823, The Control of Jitter and Wander within
Digital Networks which are based on the 2048 kbit/s
Hierarchy
ITU-T G.825, The Control of Jitter and Wander within
Digital Networks which are based on the Synchronous
Digital Hierarchy (SDH)
ITU-T G 8262, Synchronous Ethernet.
IEEE 1588-2008, Precision Time Protocol (PTP)
(transparently supported)

ATM/ IMA

ITU-T G.703 / G.704 / G.804 / G.706 / G.736 / G.775 /


G.823 / I.431 / O.151
ITU-T I.432-03/93 B-ISDN UNI (User Network Interface) Physical Layer specification
ETSI (ETS 300 011 / ETS 300 166 / ETS 300 233 / CTR12 /
CTR4)
AT&T: TR-54016, TR-62411
ATM Forum Inverse Multiplexer for ATM/ IMA, Specification
1.1
Continued on next page

61

Chapter: 8 Technical Specifications

System Specifications, Continued

Air Interface
Characteristics

The following table provides the air interface characteristics.

Specification
Carrier Frequencies

Description
10.15 GHz to 10.65 GHz
24.5 GHz to 26.5 GHz
27.50 GHz to 29.50 GHz

Duplex Spacing

1008 MHz (in 26/ 28 GHz band)


350 MHz (in 10.5 GHz band)

Duplexers Bandwidth

2 x 224 MHz (in 26/ 28 GHz band)


2 x 35 MHz (in 10.5 GHz band)

BS, TS Antennas

See Appendix B Antenna (page 100)

BS Power Control

Static power control (through management),


10 dB range, continuous variable

TS Power Control

40 dB range, Granularity 0.5 dB


(in 26/ 28 GHz band)
45 dB range, Granularity 1 dB
(in 10.5 GHz band)

Transmitting
Spectrum Mask

ETSI EN 301 021

Spurious Emissions

CEPT/ ERC/ REC 74-01E

(1)

14.8 dB (4QAM 2/3 + RS)

Co-channel C/ I
(for 1 dB threshold
degradation @
BER = 10-11)

18.3 dB (4QAM 1 + RS)


26.0 dB (16QAM 1 + RS)
33.8 dB (64QAM 1 + RS)
41.0 dB (256 QAM 1 + RS)

Residual BER

10-11

Reliability

MTBF>50 years
Continued on next page

(1)

Only for 10.5 GHz band

62

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

System Specifications, Continued

IP services

WiBAS system supports up to 400 concurrent VLAN services and 4094


customer VLAN IDs (corresponding to a maximum of 4094 IP services) through
the available GbE physical ports. These ports can be configured in trunk mode
and support auto negotiation 1000 Mbit/s operation.
The customer VLANs can be assigned as follows (without any limitation):
Up to 4094 customer VLAN IDs can be assigned to the WiBAS Base Station
(VLAN transparent services)
Up to 4094 customer VLAN IDs can be assigned to each WiBAS Terminal
Station (VLAN transparent services)
IP services can be configured through the LCT application, or through the
uniIMS Network Management System.

TDM services

Through the systems available E1/G.703 and STM-1 (VC-12) physical ports,
the following TDM services are supported:
Structured nx64 kbit/s TDM services (n = 2 to 32, CRC / no-CRC)
Unstructured (unframed) TDM services
The number of TDM services that can be delivered depends on the type and the
number of the physical TDM ports at the Base Station and the Terminal
Stations.
For instance, assuming 64 kbit/s unstructured TDM services (nx64 kbit/s, n = 1)
and E1/G.703-only physical ports, each E1 stream can deliver up to 32 TDM
services, and as follows:
WiBAS-C Base Station can provide up to:
32 TDM services (per E1 port) x 32 E1 ports = 1024 total TDM services
A Terminal Station (equipped with the appropriate MSAD model) can provide up
to 32 TDM services (per E1 port) x 12 E1 ports = 384 total TDM services

TDM services can be configured through the LCT application or through the
uni|MS Network Management System.

Outband
management
ports

The Fast Ethernet (FE) ports of the WiBAS-C Base Station subrack are used
for outband local / remote management. These ports comply with IEEE 802.3
(10BaseT & 100BaseT) standard and support:
Auto detection
Auto negotiation
Full/ half duplex operation

63

Chapter: 8 Technical Specifications

8.2 Equipment Specifications

This section provides the electrical, mechanical and environmental technical


specifications of the systems equipment (WiBAS-C, MSAD and BRB/ TRB)
and also provides the interface characteristics of the WiBAS-C and MSAD
subracks.

WiBAS-C Specifications

Introduction

This paragraph provides the technical specifications of WiBAS-C subrack.

Technical
specifications

The following table provides the electrical, mechanical and environmental


specifications of WiBAS-C.
Specification

Description

Electrical
Input DC Power (Current)

-40.5 V to -60 V (5.3 A)

Power Supply Standards

ETSI EN 300 132-2 v2.1.2: 2003

EMC

EN 300 386 v.1.3.2: 2003


EN 301 489-4 v.1.3.1 (EN 55022 Emissions class A)
EN 61000-3-2:2000 Part 3-2
EN 61000-3-3:1995 Part 3-3

Resistibility

ITU K.45

Electrical Safety

EN 60950-1: 2001
Continued on next page

64

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

WiBAS-C Specifications, Continued

Technical specifications (continued)

Specification

Description

Electrical
Power Consumption

The typical Power Consumption (Pc) values given


below are valid for operating temperature 25 oC:
Per WiBAS-C Base Station Component:
Component

Pc (typical)

PtMP Modem Module


Working:

14.3 W

Standby:

12.3 W

32xE1 Tributary Module

3.8 W

Main Processor Module

11.2 W

Power Supply Module

7.4 W

Fan Module

13.7 W

ODU
Working:

15.8 W

Standby:

11.2 W

Per WiBAS-C Base Station Configuration:


Configuration

Pc (typical)

1+0

75 W

1+1

97 W

2+0

104 W

2+2

150 W

3+0

134 W

4+0

164 W

Mechanical
External Dimensions
(H x W x D)

44.5 mm (1U) x 482.6 mm (19) x 284.7 mm

Weight

8.4 kg (approx., fully equipped)


Continued on next page

65

Chapter: 8 Technical Specifications

WiBAS-C Specifications, Continued

Technical specifications (continued)

Specification

Description

Environmental
Temperature Range

-5oC to +45o C

Relative Humidity
(RH)

10 % to 95 %, non-condensing

Standards

Transportation: ETSI EN 300 019-2-2 V2.1.2:1999,


Class 2.3
Storage: ETSI EN 300 019-2-1 V2.1.2: 2000, Class 1.1

Stationery Use: ETSI EN 300 019-2-3 V2.2.2: 2003,


Class 3.2

GbE

The GbE interface conforms to the following standards:


IEEE 802.3i (10 Mbit/s, electrical)
IEEE 802.3u (100 Mbit/s, electrical)
IEEE 802.3ab (1000 Mbit/s, electrical)
IEEE 802.3z (1000 Mbit/s, optical)

E1 TDM

The following table provides the specifications of the E1 TDM interface.


Specification

Description

Standard

ITU-T G.703

Data Rate

2.048 MHz 50 ppm

Line Code

HDB3

Termination

75 (unbalanced)
120 (balanced)

Cable Type

Coaxial 75 (for unbalanced termination)


Shielded twisted pair (for balanced termination)

66

Nominal Peak Voltage


(for a Mark/ for a Space)

2.37 V/ 0 0.237 V, for unbalanced termination

Nominal Pulse Width

244 ns

Max. Jitter
(at the output)

Refer to clause 2 of ITU-T G.823

3 V/ 0 0.3 V, for balanced termination

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

OmniWAY-2G Specifications

Introduction

This paragraph provides the technical specifications (electrical, mechanical


and environmental) of OmniWAY-2G and the specifications concerning its
optical STM-1 and Gb network interfaces.

Technical
specifications

The following table provides the electrical, mechanical and environmental


specifications of OmniWAY-2G.
Specification

Description

Electrical
Input DC Power

-40.8 V to -60 V

Max. Power
Consumption

80 W

Resistibility

ITU K.20

Electrical Safety

EN 60950-1: 2001

Mechanical
External Dimensions
(H x W x D)

44.5 mm (1U) x 482.6 mm (19) x 284.7 mm

Environmental
Temperature Range

-5oC to +45o C

Relative Humidity (RH)

10 % to 95 %, non-condensing
Continued on next page

67

Chapter: 8 Technical Specifications

OmniWAY-2G Specifications, Continued

Optical STM-1

The following table provides the specifications of the optical STM-1 interface for:
Multi Mode (I-1)
Short-haul Single Mode (S.1-1)
Long-haul Single Mode (L.1-1)
Specification

Description per mode


I-1

Data Rate

1260 nm to 1360 nm

Nominal Wavelength

1310 nm

Fiber Type
Transmitter Type

As per ITU-T G.652


2 km

approx. 15 km

approx. 40 km

LED

MLM

SLM

Spectral Characteristics
Mean Launched Tx Power
(max./ min.)
Min. Extinction Ratio

As per ITU-T G.957


-8 dBm /
-15 dBm

-8 dBm /
-15 dBm

0 dBm /
-5 dBm

8.2 dB

8.2 dB

10 dB

Attenuation Range &


Max. Dispersion

GbE

As per ITU-T G.957

Receivers Min. Sensitivity

-23 dBm

- 28 dBm

-34 dBm

Receivers Min. Overload

-8 dBm

-8 dBm

-10 dBm

The GbE interface conforms to the following standards:


IEEE 802.3i (10 Mbit/s, electrical)
IEEE 802.3u (100 Mbit/s, electrical)
IEEE 802.3ab (1000 Mbit/s, electrical)
IEEE 802.3z (1000 Mbit/s, optical)

68

L.1-1

155.52 Mbit/s

Operating Wavelength
Range

Max. Distance

S.1-1

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

MSAD Specifications

Introduction

This paragraph provides the technical specifications (electrical, mechanical


and environmental) of the MSAD and the specifications concerning the user
interfaces:
E1/ G.703 software configurable either as:
E1 TDM
Ei ATM/ IMA
Ethernet (10/100 Base T)
See below for the specifications of the Control interface.

Technical
specifications

The following table provides the electrical, mechanical and environmental


specifications of the MSAD.
Specification

Description

Electrical
Input Power Range

DC version: -40,5 V to -60 V (-48V typical)


AC version: 90 V to 255 V at 50 Hz/ 60 Hz

Power Consumption

22 W (max.)

EMC/ EMI

ETSI EN 301 489-4 v1.3.1


(EN 55022 Emissions class B)
EN 61000-3-2: 2000
EN 61000-3-3: 1995

Electrical Safety

EN 60950-1: 2001
EN 50385: 2002

Resistibility

ITU K.45

Mechanical
External Dimensions
(H x W x D)

44.45 mm (1U) x 442 mm x 240 mm

Case

Environmentally and temperature hardened.


Made of pressure die cast aluminium.
Design provides effective passive cooling.

Weight

4 kg
Continued on next page

69

Chapter: 8 Technical Specifications

MSAD Specifications, Continued

Technical specifications (continued)

Specification

Description

Environmental
Operating Temperature

-5oC to +45o C (operating)

Relative Humidity (RH)

10 % to 95 %, non-condensing

Standards

Transportation: ETSI EN 300 019-2-2


V2.1.2:1999, Class 2.3
Storage: ETSI EN 300 019-2-1 V2.1.2: 2000,
Class 1.1
Stationery Use: ETSI EN 300 019-2-3 V2.2.2:
2003, Class 3.2

E1 TDM

The following table provides the specifications of the E1 TDM user interface.
Specification

Description

Standards

ITU-T G.703 / G.704 / G.706 / G.732

Data Rate

2.048 Mbit/s

Framing

Unframed
PCM31C
PCM31

Clock Modes

(1)

Synchronous
Slave Synchronization
Master Synchronization
Loop

Line Code

AMI
HDB3

Line Impedance

120 (balanced)
75 (unbalanced)
Continued on next page

(1)

Clock Mode values: Synchronous (Timing of the E1 frame is retrieved from the synchronization
network), Slave Sync (The E1 interface is waiting for synchronization information from the other end in
order to recover clock), Master Sync (The E1 interface generates synchronization information in the link
so that the other end can recover the E1 clock) and Loop (Timing of the transmitted E1 frame is retrieved
from the received E1 frame).

70

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

MSAD Specifications, Continued

E1 TDM (continued)

Specification
Alarms

Description
LOS (Loss Of Signal)
LOF (Loss Of Frame)
AIS (Alarm Indication Signal)
RAI (Remote Alarm Indication)

E1 ATM/ IMA

Jitter Performance

ETSI ETS 300 011 (per ITU-T recommendation


G.823)

Receptacle

RJ-45 (120 balanced) (1)

The following table provides the specifications of the E1 ATM/ IMA user
interface.
Specification
Standards

Description
AT&T: TR-54016, TR-62411
ITU-T recommendations G.703, G.704, G.804, G.706,
G.736, G.775, G.823, I.431, O.151
ITU-T recommendation I.432-03/93 B-ISDN UNI
(User-Network Interface) Physical Layer specification
ETSI: ETS 300 011, ETS 300 166, ETS 300 233,
CTR12, CTR4
ATM Forum Inverse Multiplexer for ATM (IMA),
Specification 1.1

Line Impedance

120 (balanced)
75 (unbalanced)

Receptacle

RJ-45 (120 balanced) (1)


Continued on next page

(1)

Unbalanced (75 ) E1 termination is via an external adapter.

71

Chapter: 8 Technical Specifications

MSAD Specifications, Continued

Ethernet
(10/100 BaseT)

The following table provides the specifications of the Ethernet user interface.

Specification
Standards

Description
IEEE 802.3 (10BaseT)
IEEE 802.3u (100BaseT)
802.1p
802.1q

Control

Data Rate

10 Mbit/s or 100 Mbit/s (full duplex, auto negotiation)

Range

Up to 100 m (on UTP Cat.5 cable)

Receptacle

RJ-45

The following table provides the specifications of the Control interface.


Specification

Description

Standard

RS-232

Data Rates

9.6 kbit/s
19.2 kbit/s
38.4 kbit/s
57.6 kbit/s

Receptacle

72

DB9

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

BRB / TRB Specifications

Introduction

This paragraph provides the technical specifications (electrical, mechanical


and environmental) of the BRB/ TRB and the characteristics of the IF coaxial
cable used for connecting the transceiver with the indoor unit.

Electrical

The following table provides the electrical specifications of the BRB/ TRB.
Specification

Mechanical

Description

Input DC Power
Range
Max. Power
Consumption
EMC/ EMI

-40 V to -60 V (Supplied by the indoor unit through


the IF coaxial cable, with signal multiplexing).
15.8 W

Electrical Safety

EN 60950-1: 2001
EN 50385: 2002

ETSI EN 301 489-4 v1.3.1 (EN 55022 Emissions,


class B)

The following table provides the mechanical specifications of the BRB/ TRB.
Specification
Enclosure Material
Class
Mounting Bracket
Adjustment Range

Description
Pressure die cast aluminum
IP55
For mounting on pole/ mast:
15 o (Elevation plane)
75 o (Azimuth plane)
The radio box can be mounted on poles of outer
diameter between 1 (25 mm) and 2.4 (62 mm), via
the standard bracket. For poles of greater outer
diameter, the radio box can be mounted via a
bracket extension.
For mounting on wall:
15 o (Elevation plane)
46 o (Azimuth plane)

External Dimensions
(H x W x D)

285 mm x 262 mm x 75 mm (10.5 GHz BRB/ TRB)


200 mm x 210 mm x 40 mm (26/ 28 GHz BRB/
TRB)

Weight

3.0 kg (approx.) (10.5 GHz BRB/ TRB)


2.5 kg (approx.) (26/ 28 GHz BRB/ TRB)
Continued on next page

73

Chapter: 8 Technical Specifications

BRB / TRB Specifications, Continued

Environmental

The following table provides the environmental specifications of the BRB/


TRB.
Specification

Description
o

Operating Temperature
Range (1)

-33 C to +60 C (10.5 GHz BRB/ TRB)

Relative Humidity (RH)

0% to 95%, non-condensing

-50oC to +60o C (26/ 28 GHz BRB/ TRB)


10% to 100%, condensing

Standards

Transportation: ETSI EN 300 019-2-2


V2.1.2:1999, Class 2.3
Storage: ETSI EN 300 019-2-1 V2.1.2: 2000,
Class 1.1
Stationery Use: ETSI EN 300 019-2-4 V2.2.2:
2003, Class 4.1E (non weather-protected
locations - extended, climatic test).

Radio
parameters
standards

The BRB/ TRB conform to the following radio parameters standards:


ETSI EN 302 326-2
ETSI EN 302 326-3
ETSI TS 102 123
Continued on next page

(1)

Lower operating temperature value can be available upon request.

74

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

BRB / TRB Specifications, Continued

Coaxial cable
characteristics

The following table provides the physical characteristics of the RF and IF


coaxial cables used for connecting the transceiver (BRB, TRB) with the external
antenna and the indoor unit (WiBAS-C, MSAD), respectively.
Specification

Description
IF: 75

Nominal
Impedance

RF: 50

Typical Length (IF)


(for 26/ 28 GHz)

175 m(1), using RG-11 low-loss coaxial cable of 8.3 dB/


100 m at 420 MHz attenuation.
Under no circumstance should the total attenuation
(imposed by the IF cable itself) exceed 15 dB.

Typical Length (IF)


(for 10.5 GHz)

135 m(1), using RG-11 low-loss coaxial cable of 10.15


dB/ 100 m at 616 MHz attenuation.
Under no circumstance should the total attenuation
(imposed by the IF cable itself) exceed 15 dB.

Typical Length (RF)

For coaxial cable 1/2 or 1/4, maximum length


depends on the exact cable characteristics and the
maximum allowed link performance degradation that
can be introduced by the cable itself.
Continued on next page

(1)

Longer IF cable distance can be provided upon request.

75

Chapter: 8 Technical Specifications

BRB / TRB Specifications, Continued

Characteristics
of microwave
splitters

This paragraph provides the technical characteristics of the 4-way and 2-way
microwave splitters used in the extended BRS.
The PtMP calculations have been carried out according to the technical
requirements and objectives as described by ITU. The analysis of the
different factors influencing the RF design and the PtMP calculations has
been carried out in accordance with ITU-R Rec. P.530-9/10.
Assumptions:
Extended BRS Height: 40 m ASL
Extended BRS LOS with all potential terminals

Specification

BRA10-4SP

BRA10-2SP

BRA26/28-4SP

BRA26/28-2SP

Photo

Frequency band 10.5 GHz

10.5 GHz

26/ 28 GHz

26/ 28 GHz

Type

2-way

4-way

2-way

Mean Insertion
Loss(1)

4-way
7.5 dB

(2)

Connectors type N-type


Weight

1.72 kg (bracket
included)
0.92 kg
(no bracket
included)

Available
modulation
schemes

(1)

76

6.8 dB

(2)

3.4 dB(3)

N-type

Waveguide

Waveguide

1.20 kg
(bracket
included)

0.50 kg
(26 GHz)

0.28 kg
(26 GHz)

0.45 kg
(28 GHz)

0.24 kg
(28 GHz)

0.40 kg
(no bracket
included)

4 QAM 2/3, 4 QAM, 16 QAM, 64 QAM, 256 QAM

Not including IF cable or waveguide loss.


For 0.4 dB passband ripple.
(3)
For 0.2 dB passband ripple.
(2)

3.8 dB

(3)

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Full Outdoor Terminal Station Specifications

Introduction

This paragraph provides the technical specifications (electrical, mechanical


and environmental) of the Full Outdoor Terminal Station. The below pictures
show the front and the back of the equipment:

Fig. 37 Full Oudoor TS Front and Rear View

Electrical
Specifications

The following table provides the electrical specifications of the Full Outdoor
Terminal Station.
Specification

Description

Operating Voltage, (V)

-31 to -60

Max. Power Consumption, (W)

43

EMC / EMI

ETSI EN 301 489-4 V1.4.1 (EN 55022


Emissions Class B) (MSAD/TRB)
EN 61000-3-2:2006, EN 61000-3-3:2008
(MSAD)
EN 60950-1 (2006) + A11:2009

Electrical Safety

EN 50385 (2002)

Mechanical
Specifications

The following table provides the mechanical specifications of the Full


Outdoor Terminal Station.
Specification
Mechanical Design /
Structure

Dimensions (H x W x D), mm
Weight (antenna excluded),
kg

Description

Pressure die cast aluminium


IP66 class
Pressure vent (for balancing inner pressure)
Water-tight cable glands at the bottom

290.3 x 237.4 x 95.3

4.1

Continued on next page

77

Chapter: 8 Technical Specifications

Full Outdoor Terminal Station Specifications, Continued

Environmental
Specifications

The following table provides the environmental specifications of the Full


Outdoor Terminal Station.
Specifications

Description

Operating Temperature:
Operating (Normal / Extended)

(-33 oC to +55 oC / -50 oC to +55 oC)

Transportation / Storage

-40 oC to +70 oC / -33 oC to +55 oC

Relative Humidity

0% to 95%, non-condensing
10% to 100%, condensing

Environmental

ETSI EN 300 019-2-4 V2.2.2:2003,


Class 4.1E (Operation TRB)
ETSI EN 300 019-2-3 V2.2.2:2003,
Class 3.2 (Operation MSAD)
ETSI EN 300 019-2-2 V2.1.2:1999,
Class 2.3 (Transportation TRB/MSAD)
ETSI EN 300 019-2-1 V2.1.2:2000,
Class 1.2 (Storage TRB/MSAD)

Interfaces
Specifications

The following table provides the interfaces characteristics of the Full Outdoor
Terminal Station.
Specification

Description

Radio Capacity (net),

157 Mbit/s

Modulation

4-QAM 2/3 / 4-QAM / 16-QAM / 64-QAM /


256-QAM

Interface / Port 1 x GbE (RJ-45)

Traffic / inband NMS

Interface / Port 1 x GbE (SFP)

Traffic

Interface / Port 1 x FE (RJ-45)

Outband NMS

Interface / Port 1 x GbE (RJ-45)

Reserved

Ethernet

IEEE 802.3-2008 (10 / 100 /


1000Base-T)
IEEE 802.3-2008 (Optical Gigabit
Ethernet through 1000Base-SX / LX)
RMON Statistics

Radio

ETSI EN 302 326-1 V1.2.2 Annex E


ETSI EN 302 326-2 /-3
Based on ETSI TS 102 123
Based on IEEE 802.16 (Single Carrier)

Continued on next page

78

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Full Outdoor Terminal Station Specifications, Continued

Radio
Specifications

The following table provides the radio characteristics of the Full Outdoor
Terminal Station.

Specification

TRB-10

TRB-26

TRB-28

Operation:
Band, (GHz)

10.5

26

28

Frequencies,
(MHz)

10,157.50 to 10,290.50 (DL


or UL)

24,556 to 25,438 (DL)

27,555.50 to 28,437.50 (DL)

25,564 to 26,446 (UL)

28,563.50 to 29,445.50 (UL)

10,507.50 to 10,640.50 (UL


or DL)
RF Channel
Arrangement

CEPT / ERC /
Recommendation 12-05E

CEPT T/R 13-02 E,


Annex B

CEPT T/R 13-02, Annex C

Sub-bands

Channel Size,
MHz

7 / 14 / 28

14 / 28

14 / 28

Duplex Spacing,
(MHz)

350

1008

1008

Tx Power, max.

25.0

23.0

23.0

-89.0 (28 MHz)

-87.0 (28 MHz)

-87.0 (28 MHz)

-92.0 (14 MHz)

-90.0 (14 MHz)

-90.0 (14 MHz)

Panel 268 mm x 268


mm / 25.0 dBi / UBR120

Parabolic 300 mm
/ 35.9 dBi / UBR220

Parabolic 300 mm /
36.5 dBi / UBR-320

Parabolic 600 mm /
33.6 dBi / UBR-120

Parabolic 600 mm
/ 41.0 dBi / UBR220

(4-QAM 2/3 @ 25
oC), dBm
Sensitivity (4QAM 2/3), dBm

-95.0 (7 MHz)
Antenna Options:
Type / Gain /
ConnectorFlange

Parabolic 600 mm /
42.0 dBi / UBR-320

Continued on next page

79

Chapter: 8 Technical Specifications

Full Outdoor Terminal Station Specifications, Continued

Features

The following table provides feature information of the Full Outdoor Terminal
Station.
Features
Scalability

Features & QoS

Description
Up to 32 Terminal Stations per Sector
Up to 64 Terminal Stations per
WiBAS-C Base Station indoor unit
Interworking
IEEE 802.1q (VLAN)
IEEE 802.1p
IEEE 802.1ad (Provider bridging)
RSTP
Static LAG (based on IEEE 802.3ad)

Synchronization

ITU-T G.8262 (Synchronous Ethernet)


IEEE 1588v2 (Transparent)

Ethernet QoS

Bandwidth allocation based on VLAN


or physical port separation
Packet prioritization: VLAN, p-bit, IP
QoS DSCP
Packet scheduling: 8 queues
Queuing schemes: Weighted Round
Robin (WRR) or Strict Priority

Air MAC QoS

Unsolicited Grant Service (UGS)


Real Time Polling Service (rtPS)
Non-Real Time Polling Service (nrtPS)
Best-Effort Service (BE), with
guaranteed rate
Best-Effort Service (BE), without
guaranteed rate

Security

Reliability

80

Proprietary closed system


architecture
DES Encryption
MTBF > 50 years

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

8.3 Radio & Modem Performance

Introduction

To attain the highest possible net spectrum efficiency, WiBAS utilizes


minimum overhead for transporting all types of traffic.
WiBAS also employs adaptive PHY modes to guarantee optimal robustness
vs performance balance, together with maximum capacity.
The PHY mode that will be used depends on the environmental conditions,
the interference and the RF channel, which is different for each subscriber/
frame.
Moving from the most robust PHY mode (4QAM 2/3 + RS) toward less robust
PHY modes (e.g. 64QAM), the system switches from the highest robustness
(required at poorest RF conditions) to higher efficiency (required at good RF
conditions), which results in increased bandwidth.
This section provides the WiBAS radio and modem performance, inclusive
of:
Radio Performance
System Gains
Sector Capacity (with Split-Mount Terminal Stations)
Sector Capacity (with Full Outdoor Terminal Stations)
Carrier to Noise Ratio (C/N)
Sensitivity
Cell Sector Ranges

81

Chapter: 8 Technical Specifications

Radio Performance

Introduction

WiBAS is designed in accordance to ETSI EN 302 326 specifications.


In the DL direction (i.e. from the Base Station to the Terminal Stations), static
Tx power control is applied. The maximum Tx power values for the Base
Station (see following paragraphs) are supported for all modulation schemes.
In the UL direction (i.e. from the Terminal Stations to the Base Station), Tx
power control at the Terminal Stations is realized using Automatic
Transmitting Power Control (ATPC).

Radio
performance at
10.5 GHz

The following table provides the radio performance of WiBAS in the 10.5 GHz
band (BER = 10-6) for integrated TRA(1).
Value per Channel Size
Specification

28 MHz
(2)

Typical. Tx Power (dBm)

14 MHz

UL

DL

UL

DL

UL

DL

25.0

23.0

25.0

23.0

25.0

23.0

46.5

36.5

(1)

BS Antenna Gain (dBi)

15.0

BS antenna cable losses (dB)

1.5

(1)

TS Antenna Gain (dBi)

22.0

TS antenna cable losses (dB)

0.5

EIRP (dBm)

(2)(3)

46.5

36.5

Noise Figure (dB)


(2)

7 MHz

46.5

36.5
3.5

Sensitivity (dBm)

-89.0

-92.0

-95.0

Max. System Gain (dB) (using


integrated TRA) (2)(4)

147.0

150.0

153.0

RF Frequency Stability(5)

3 ppm
Continued on next page

(1)

90 single-sector coverage; valid for integrated TRA.


4 QAM 2/3 modulation and increased Tx Power at Base Station.
(3)
EIRP is calculated based on the Split Mount TS
(4)
The use of TRA 1006 instead of integrated TRA improves System Gain by 11.5 dB.
(5)
Throughout the operating temperature range
(2)

82

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Radio Performance, Continued

Radio
performance
at 26 GHz

The following table provides the typical radio performance of WiBAS (BER =
10-6) in the 26 GHz band:
Value per Channel Size
Specification
Typical. Tx Power (dBm)

(1)(2)

28 MHz
UL

DL

UL

DL

17.0

19.0

17.0

19.0

58.2

38.5

(3)

19.5

(2)

41.2

BS Antenna Gain (dBi)

TS Antenna Gain (dBi) )


EIRP (dBm)

(1)(2)(4)

58.2

Noise Figure (dB)


Sensitivity (dBm)

38.5

(2)

5.5

(1)(2)

Max. System Gain (dB)

(1)(2)

-87.0

-90.0

164.5

167.5

RF Frequency Stability (5)

Radio
performance
at 28 GHz

14 MHz

4 ppm

The following table provides the typical radio performance of WiBAS (BER =
10-6) in the 28 GHz band:
Value per Channel Size
Specification
Typical. Tx Power (dBm)

EIRP (dBm)

Sensitivity (dBm)

UL

DL

UL

DL

14.5

17.0

14.5

17.0

56.5

36.5

19.5

(2)

42.0

(1)(2)(4)

Noise Figure (dB)

14 MHz

(3)

BS Antenna Gain (dBi)


TS Antenna Gain (dBi)

(1)(2)

28 MHz

56.5

36.5

(2)

5.5

(1)(2)

Max. System Gain (dB)

(1)(2)

RF Frequency Stability(5)

-87.0

-90.0

163.0

166.0
4 ppm
Continued on next page

(1)

4 QAM 2/3 modulation and increased Tx Power at Base Station.


2dB variation
(3)
Using BRA-2690 H/V-HG and BRA-2890 H/V-HG antenna models.
(4)
EIRP is calculated based on the Split Mount TS.
(5)
Throughout the operating temperature range.
(2)

83

Chapter: 8 Technical Specifications

Radio Performance, Continued

Tx Downlink
Mode A
Standard
Power
(Base Station)

Tx Downlink
Mode B
Increased
Power
(Base Station)

Tx Uplink
Standard
Power
(Terminal
Station)

The Base Station Downlink typical Tx power values(1) (per modulation scheme)
are given below(2):
Tx Power for Downlink Direction (dBm) Standard Power
Modulation

Frequency Band
10.5 GHz

26 GHz

28 GHz

256QAM

18.0

14.0

12.0

64QAM

20.0

16.0

14.0

16QAM

20.0

16.0

14.0

4QAM

20.0

16.0

14.0

The Base Station Downlink typical Tx power values(1) (per modulation scheme)
are given below(2):
Tx Power for Downlink Direction (dBm) Increased Power
Modulation

Frequency Band
10.5 GHz

26 GHz

28 GHz

256QAM

18.0

14.0

12.0

64QAM

20.0

16.0

14.0

16QAM

21.0

17.0

15.0

4QAM

23.0

19.0

17.0

The Terminal Station Uplink Typical Tx power values(1) (per modulation scheme)
are given below(2):
Tx Power for Uplink Direction (dBm) Standard Power
Modulation

Frequency Band
10.5 GHz

26 GHz

28 GHz

64QAM

20.0

12.0

9.5

16QAM

24.0

16.0

13.5

4QAM

25.0

17.0

14.5

(1)

Typical RMS values, in dBm, valid at 25oC operating temperature

(2)

2dB variation

84

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

System Gains

Introduction

This paragraph provides the typical margin-less System Gains per


frequency band, for manual modulation selection and BER = 10-6.
For adaptive modulation selection 7-10 dB switching margin has to be left
(except of the minimum modulation).
-9

For BER = 10 , subtract 0.5 dB (-0.5 dB)


-11

For BER = 10 , subtract 1 dB (-1 dB)


NOTE

NOTE

System Gain at
10.5 GHz

Operation of 256 QAM is available only with the use of adaptive


modulation including switching margin. Use of minimum
modulation is recommended for modulations 16QAM or lower.
64QAM as minimum is also possible provided that there is
enough fade margin and link budget analysis.
For system gains, 64 and 256 QAM modulation is the same for
both standard and increased Tx power. For 4 QAM 2/3, 4 and 16
QAM the system gains are dependant on the Tx power of the BS.

BRA-1090 H/V and integrated TRA antennas(1) have been used for the
following calculations.
System Gain (dB) at 10.5 GHz
Channel Size
Modulation

28 MHz
UL

DL

256 QAM
64 QAM
(2)

16 QAM

(2)

4 QAM

4 QAM 2/3(2)

14 MHz
UL

119.0

DL

7 MHz
UL

DL

122.0

128.0

128.0

131.0

131.0

134.0

134.0

138.0

134.0

141.0

137.0

144.0

140.0

144.0

141.0

147.0

144.0

150.0

147.0

144.0

147.0

150.0

16 QAM(3)

138.0

135.0

141.0

138.0

144.0

141.0

4 QAM(3)

146.0

144.0

149.0

147.0

152.0

150.0

4 QAM 2/3(3)

147.0

150.0

153.0
Continued on next page

(1)

See Appendix B - Antenna Characteristics, page 106 for technical specifications of the antenna
models.
(2)

Tx Downlink Mode A with Standard Power at Base Station

(3)

Tx Downlink Mode B with Increased Power at Base Station

85

Chapter: 8 Technical Specifications

System Gains, Continued

System Gain
at 26 GHz

BRA-2690 H/V-HG and TRA-2606 antennas (1) were used for the following
calculations:
System Gain (dB) at 26 GHz
Channel Size
28 MHz

Modulation
UL

DL

256 QAM
64 QAM
(2)

16 QAM

(2)

4 QAM

(3)

4 QAM

141.5

147.5

146.5

150.5

153.5

153.5

156.5

156.5

161.5

160.5

164.5

163.5

163.5

166.5

153.5

154.5

156.5

157.5

161.5

163.5

164.5

166.5

(3)

4 QAM 2/3

System Gain
at 28 GHz

DL

143.5

(2)

16 QAM

UL

138.5

4 QAM 2/3

(3)

14 MHz

164.5

167.5

BRA-2890 H/V-HG and TRA-2806 antennas(1) were used for the following
calculations:
System Gain (dB) at 28 GHz
Channel Size
28 MHz

Modulation
UL

DL

256 QAM
64 QAM
(2)

16 QAM

(2)

4 QAM

(2)

4 QAM 2/3

(3)

16 QAM

(3)

4 QAM

(3)

4 QAM 2/3

14 MHz
UL

DL

137.5

140.5

142.0

146.5

145.0

149.5

152.0

152.5

155.0

155.5

160.0

159.5

163.0

162.5

162.5

165.5

152.0

153.5

155.0

156.5

160.0

162.5

163.0

165.5

163.0

166.0

(1)

See Appendix B - Antenna Characteristics, page 106 for technical specifications of antenna models.

(2)

Tx Downlink Mode A with Standard Power at Base Station

(3)

Tx Downlink Mode B with Increased Power at Base Station

86

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Sector Capacity (with Split-Mount Terminal Stations)

Introduction

This paragraph provides the WiBAS sector capacity values for Ethernet
traffic with the following assumptions:
Sector is served only by a Split-Mount Terminal Station
The Ethernet traffic refers to Layer 2 with packet size of 1542 bytes.
Tolerance 2 % may be expected for actual ETH Layer 1 rate, depending
on type of traffic, number of users and path (UL or DL).

Sector capacity
for 28 MHz
channel size

Sector Capacity (Mbit/s) in 28 MHz Ch. Size

Modulation

UL

256 QAM

Sector capacity
for 14 MHz
channel size

138.0

64 QAM

108.0

102.0

16 QAM

72.0

68.0

4 QAM

36.0

34.0

4 QAM 2/3

24.0

22.5

Sector Capacity (Mbit/s) in 14 MHz Ch. Size

Modulation

UL

256 QAM

Sector capacity
for 7 MHz
channel size

DL

DL

69.0

64 QAM

54.0

51.0

16 QAM

36.0

34.0

4 QAM

18.0

17.0

4 QAM 2/3

12.0

11.2

Sector Capacity (Mbit/s) in 7 MHz Ch. Size

Modulation

UL

256 QAM

DL

32.5

64 QAM

27.0

24.6

16 QAM

17.9

16.3

4 QAM

9.0

8.1

4 QAM 2/3

5.9

5.4

87

Chapter: 8 Technical Specifications

Sector Capacity (with Full Outdoor Terminal Stations)

Introduction

This paragraph provides the WiBAS sector capacity values for Ethernet
traffic with the following assumptions:
Sector is served only by a Full Outdoor(1) Terminal Station
The Ethernet traffic refers to Layer 2 with packet size of 1542 bytes.
Tolerance 2 % may be expected for actual ETH Layer 1 rate, depending
on type of traffic, number of users and path (UL or DL).

Sector capacity
for 28 MHz
channel size

Sector Capacity (Mbit/s) in 28 MHz Ch. Size

Modulation

UL

256 QAM

Sector capacity
for 14 MHz
channel size

160.0

64 QAM

125.0

118.0

16 QAM

83.0

79.0

4 QAM

41.5

39.0

4 QAM 2/3

27.5

26.0

Sector Capacity (Mbit/s) in 14 MHz Ch. Size

Modulation

UL

256 QAM

Sector capacity
for 7 MHz
channel size

64 QAM

62.5

59.0

16 QAM

41.5

39.0

4 QAM

20.5

19.5

4 QAM 2/3

13.5

13.0

Sector Capacity (Mbit/s) in 7 MHz Ch. Size

Modulation

UL

DL

37.5

64 QAM

31.0

28.0

16 QAM

20.5

18.5

4 QAM

10.2

9.2

4 QAM 2/3

6.7

6.1

Feature available with Release 3.3

88

DL

80.0

256 QAM

(1)

DL

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Carrier to Noise Ratio (C/N)

The following table provides the C/ N values per modulation in 10.5 / 26 / 28


GHz bands for BER = 10-6. Note that no switching margin (if required) is
included.
Modulation

C/N (dB)

256 QAM

31

64 QAM

24

16 QAM

18

4 QAM

11

4 QAM 2/3

-9

For BER = 10 , add 0.5 dB (+0.5 dB)


-11

For BER = 10 , add 1 dB (+1 dB)

89

Chapter: 8 Technical Specifications

Sensitivity

Introduction

This paragraph provides the Sensitivity thresholds per frequency band, for
manual modulation selection and BER = 10-6.
For adaptive modulation selection extra switching margin has to be left.
-9

For BER = 10 , add 0.5 dB (+0.5 dB)


-11

For BER = 10 , add 1 dB (+1 dB)


NOTE

Sensitivity at
10.5 GHz

Operation of 256 QAM is available only with the use of adaptive


modulation including switching margin. Use of minimum modulation
is recommended for modulations 16QAM or lower. 64QAM as
minimum is also possible provided that there is enough fade
margin and link budget analysis.

The following table provides the Sensitivity thresholds, for BER = 10-6 in the
10.5 GHz band.
Sensitivity (dBm) at 10.5 GHz
Modulation

Sensitivity at
26/ 28 GHz

Channel Size
28 MHz

14 MHz

7 MHz

256 QAM

-66

-69

64 QAM

-73

-76

-79

16 QAM

-79

-82

-85

4 QAM

-86

-89

-92

4 QAM 2/3

-89

-92

-95

The following table provides the Sensitivity thresholds, for BER = 10-6 in the
26/ 28 GHz band.
Sensitivity (dBm) at 26/ 28 GHz
Modulation

90

Channel Size (dBm)


28 MHz

14 MHz

256 QAM

-64

-67

64 QAM

-71

-74

16 QAM

-77

-80

4 QAM

-84

-87

4 QAM 2/3

-87

-90

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Cell Sector Ranges

Introduction

This paragraph provides indicative cell sector ranges for all the WiBAS
frequency bands (10.5 / 26 / 28 GHz).
Various configurations of the WiBAS Base Station (BS) are possible,
depending on the specific area coverage needs (see schematics at the bottom
depicting the lobes of Base Station antennas):
Standard BRS: Basic BS configuration for wide coverage of a geographical
sector area (typically 90o), using a single BRB radio box and an attached
BRA sector antenna.
Extended BRS: Special BS configuration for extended coverage (60% to
80% gain with respect to standard BRS ranges), using a single BRB radio
box, one 2-way / 4-way splitter and up to four parabolic antennas.

WiBAS BS configuration with four

WiBAS BS configuration with two

90 sectors (360 coverage)

90 and four pencil-beamed sectors


(extended range)

Fig. 38 WiBAS
BS Configuration
Continued on next page

91

Chapter: 8 Technical Specifications

Cell Sector Ranges, Continued

Assumptions

For the calculation of the provided link ranges, the following assumptions are
taken into account:
Parameter

Assumption

Region

Moscow

Rain Intensity (R0.01)


Geo-climatic Factor

(1)

(2)

32 mm/hr
1.95E-04

Average Site Height


(ASL)

90 m (for 10.5 GHz band)

Channel Sizes

28/ 14 / 7 MHz (for 10.5 GHz band)

200 m (for 26/ 28 GHz band)


28 / 14 MHz (for 26/ 28 GHz band)

Annual Availability
(due to propagation)

99.995%

Frequency bands

10.5 / 26 / 28 GHz

Modulation schemes

4 QAM 2/3, 4 QAM, 16 QAM, 64 QAM, 256 QAM

BS-TS Antenna Height


Difference

10 m

Modulation selection

Adaptive / Minimum

Antenna Polarization

Vertical

NOTE

Prerequisites

In case of adaptive modulation, the 4 /16 /64/ 256 QAM


modulations are also feasible under non-fading
conditions.

Operation of 256 QAM is available only with the use of adaptive


modulation including switching margin. Use of minimum modulation
is recommended for modulations 16QAM or lower. 64QAM as
minimum is also possible provided that there is enough fade margin
and link budget analysis.

The ranges values mentioned hereinafter are indicative and cannot be used for
planning, dimensioning and design (special analysis per region and network is
necessary). The provided cell sector ranges values are valid with the following
prerequisites:
No intra-system or inter-system interference effects
No antenna off-axis loss effects
Clear line of sight
No adverse propagation effects (ducting, ground reflections, etc.)
Professional installation
Continued on next page

(1)
(2)

According to ITU-R Rec. P.837-5


According to ITU-R Rec. P.530-13

92

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Cell Sector Ranges, Continued

Ranges at
10.5 GHz

The following table provides the cell sector ranges values in 10.5 GHz band for:
Adaptive and manual (minimum) modulation selections of standard BRS
Adaptive and manual (minimum) modulation selections of extended BRS(1)
BRA 1090V and TRA-1006 antennas(2) have been used for the calculations
concerning Standard BRS.
2 x TRA-1006 antennas(2) driven by 2-way microwave splitter (at BS) and
TRA-1006 antenna (at TS) have been used for the calculations concerning
Extended BRS.
Ranges (km) at 10.5 GHz
Manual (Minimum)
Modulation
28 MHz 14 MHz 7 MHz

Standard BRS

4 QAM 2/3
4 QAM
16 QAM
64 QAM
256 QAM

Extended BRS (2)

4 QAM 2/3
4 QAM
16 QAM
64 QAM
256 QAM

UL
DL
UL

17.2

19.3
17.2

19.3

9.9

11.6

13.3

UL

5.3

7.4

DL

6.5

7.9

DL

25.0

32.5

36.5

UL
DL

UL
DL
UL
DL
UL
DL
UL
DL
DL

28 MHz

14 MHz

7 MHz

17.2

19.3

21.5

9.6

12.2

15.2

3.8

5.1

6.8

4.6

6.2

8.1

1.9

2.6

3.5

25.0

32.5

36.5

24.2

27.6

31.1

13.2

16.3

19.6

15.2

18.5

21.9

7.4

9.6

12.19

21.5

15.2

DL

Adaptive
Modulation

9.4

25.0

29.0

32.5

18.6

20.8

23.2

13.9

15.8

17.9

Continued on next page

(1)
(2)

S/W upgrade may be required for hop lengths up to 13 km at 28 MHz and 26 km at 14 MHz.
See Appendix B - Antenna Characteristics, page 106 for technical specifications of antenna models.

93

Chapter: 8 Technical Specifications

Cell Sector Ranges, Continued

Ranges at
26 GHz

The following table provides the cell sector ranges values in 26 GHz band for:
Adaptive and manual (minimum) modulation selections of standard BRS
Adaptive and manual (minimum) modulation selections of extended BRS
BRA 2690 V-HG and TRA-2606 antennas(1) have been used for the calculations
concerning Standard BRS.
4 x TRA-2606 antennas (1) driven by 4-way microwave splitter (at BS) and
TRA-2606 antenna (at TS) have been used for the calculations concerning
Extended BRS.
Ranges (km) at 26 GHz for Moscow
Manual (Minimum)
Modulation

Standard BRS

4 QAM 2/3
4 QAM
16 QAM

64 QAM
256 QAM

Extended BRS

4 QAM 2/3
4 QAM
16 QAM
64 QAM
256 QAM

28 MHz

14 MHz

6.3

6.9

UL

5.7

6.3

DL

6.1

6.7

UL

4.2

DL

Adaptive
Modulation(2)
28 MHz

14 MHz

6.3

6.9

4.7

5.6

6.8

4.4

4.9

6.3

6.9

UL

2.7

3.1

2.5

3.2

DL

3.3

3.7

4.0

4.9

DL

1.9

2.5

9.8

10.7

UL

9.0

9.8

DL

9.5

10.4

9.8

10.7

UL

7.0

7.7

DL

7.3

8.0

UL

5.0

5.6

7.1

8.5

DL

5.8

6.4

9.8

10.7

DL

5.9

7.1

UL
DL

UL
DL

Continued on next page

(1)

See Appendix B - Antenna Characteristics, page 106 for technical specifications of antenna models.

(2)

The modulation availability of the Adaptive mode is 99.9%

94

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Cell Sector Ranges, Continued

Ranges at
28 GHz

The following table provides the cell sector ranges values (in km) at 28 GHz for:
Adaptive and manual (minimum) modulation selections of standard BRS
Adaptive and manual (minimum) modulation selections of extended BRS
BRA 2890 V-HG and TRA-2806 antennas(1) have been used for the
calculations concerning Standard BRS.
4 x TRA-2806 antennas(1) driven by 4-way microwave splitter (at BS) and
TRA-2806 antenna (at TS) have been used for the calculations concerning
Extended BRS.
Ranges (km) at 28 GHz for Moscow
Manual (Minimum)
Modulation

Standard BRS

4 QAM 2/3
4 QAM

16 QAM

64 QAM
256 QAM

Extended BRS

4 QAM 2/3
4 QAM
16 QAM

64 QAM
256 QAM

(1
(2)

28 MHz

14 MHz

5.1

5.6

UL

4.6

5.1

DL

5.0

5.6

UL

3.4

DL

Adaptive
Modulation(2)
28 MHz

14 MHz

5.1

5.6

3.9

4.5

5.5

3.6

4.1

5.1

5.6

UL

2.2

2.5

2.0

2.5

DL

2.7

3.1

3.3

4.1

DL

1.6

2.1

8.1

8.8

UL

7.5

8.1

DL

8.0

8.7

8.1

8.8

UL

5.9

6.5

DL

6.2

6.8

UL

4.2

4.7

6.0

7.2

DL

4.9

5.4

8.1

8.8

DL

5.1

6.2

UL
DL

UL
DL

See Appendix B - Antenna Characteristics, page 106 for technical specifications of antenna models.
The modulation availability of the Adaptive mode is 99.9%

95

Appendix A - Band Characteristics & Available Channels

Appendix A - Band Characteristics & Available Channels

This appendix provides the band characteristics and tables with the available
RF channels for the WiBAS system:
Band 10.5 GHz
Band 26 GHz
Band 28 GHz

Band 10.5 GHz

Band
Characteristics

The following table provides the characteristics of the 10.5 GHz frequency
band.
Characteristic

Value

Sub-bands1

wide-band radio unit A through E.

Channelization

7 / 14 / 28 MHz

Duplex Spacing

350 MHz

Operating Bandwidth

10157.50 MHz to 10640.50 MHz

Standard

CEPT/ ERC/ Recommendation 12-05 E


Continued on next page

Both, Low/ High and High/ Low duplexing, schemes can be supported upon customer request.

96

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Band 10.5 GHz, Continued

Available
channels

The following table provides the nominal channels, i.e. the low/ high
frequency pairs1 (in MHz), as per CEPT/ ERC Recom. 12-05 E.
Other, non-listed channels are available on request.
Subband

Ch. Size 7 MHz


Low

High

10157.50

10507.50

10164.50

10514.50

10171.50

10521.50

10178.50

10528.50

10185.50

10535.50

10192.50

10542.50

10199.50

10549.50

10206.50

10556.50

10213.50

10563.50

10220.50

10570.50

10227.50

10577.50

10234.50

10584.50

10241.50

10591.50

10248.50

10598.50

10255.50

10605.50

10262.50

10612.50

10269.50

10619.50

10276.50

10626.50

10283.50

10633.50

10290.50

10640.50

Ch. Size 14 MHz


Low

High

10161

10511

10175

10525

10189

10539

10203

10553

10217

10567

10231

10581

10245

10595

10259

10609

10273

10623

10287

Ch. Size 28 MHz


Low

High

10168

10518

10196

10546

10224

10574

10252

10602

10280

10630

10637

Both Low/ High and High/ Low duplexing schemes can be supported upon customer request.

97

Appendix A - Band Characteristics & Available Channels

Band 26 GHz

Band
Characteristics

The following table provides the characteristics of the 26 GHz frequency band.

Characteristic

Value

Sub-bands

Channelization

14/ 28 MHz

Duplex Spacing

1008 MHz

DL Operating Bandwidth

24563 MHz to 25431 MHz

UL Operating Bandwidth

25571 MHz to 26439 MHz

Standard

CEPT T/R 13-04E, Annex B

Frequency
spectrum
Frequency band 24.5 GHz to 26.5 GHz

Sub-band E

Sub-band C

Sub-band B

Sub-band A

Sub-band E

Sub-band D

Lower band

Center gap
112 MHz

Sub-band D

Guard band
47 MHz

Overlapped zones

Sub-band C

Sub-band B

Sub-band A

Guard band
49 MHz

Upper band

Fig. 39 Band 26 GHz Frequency Spectrum

Continued on next page

98

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Band 26 GHz, Continued

Available
channels

The following table provides the nominal channels, i.e. the low/ high
frequency pairs (in MHz), as per CEPT T/R 13-04E. Other, non-listed
channels are available on request.
The grey-shaded channels of the following table concern the overlapped
zones.
Sub- band

Ch. Size 14 MHz


Low

High

24556

25564

24570

25578

24584

25592

24598

25606

24612

25620

24626

25634

24640

25648

24654

25662

24668

25676

24682

25690

24696

25704

24710

25718

24724

25732

24738

25746

24752

25760

24766

25774

Ch. Size 28 MHz


Low

High

24563

25571

24591

25599

24619

25627

24647

25655

24675

25683

24703

25711

24731

25739

24759

25767

Continued on next page

99

Appendix A - Band Characteristics & Available Channels

Band 26 GHz, Continued

Available channels (continued)

Sub- band

Ch. Size 14 MHz


Low

High

24724

25732

24738

25746

24752

25760

24766

25774

24780

25788

24794

25802

24808

25816

24822

25830

24836

25844

24850

25858

24864

25872

24878

25886

24892

25900

24906

25914

24920

25928

24934

25942

24892

25900

24906

25914

24920

25928

24934

25942

24948

25956

24962

25970

24976

25984

24990

25998

25004

26012

25018

26026

25032

26040

25046

26054

25060

26068

25074

26082

25088

26096

25102

26110

Ch. Size 28 MHz


Low

High

24731

25739

24759

25767

24787

25795

24815

25823

24843

25851

24871

25879

24899

25907

24927

25935

24899

25907

24927

25935

24955

25963

24983

25991

25011

26019

25039

26047

25067

26075

25095

26103

Continued on next page

100

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Band 26 GHz, Continued

Available channels (continued)

Sub- band

Ch. Size 14 MHz


Low

High

25060

26068

25074

26082

25088

26096

25102

26110

25116

26124

25130

26138

25144

26152

25158

26166

25172

26180

25186

26194

25200

26208

25214

26222

25228

26236

25242

26250

25256

26264

25270

26278

25228

26236

25242

26250

25256

26264

25270

26278

25284

26292

25298

26306

25312

26320

25326

26334

25340

26348

25354

26362

25368

26376

25382

26390

25396

26404

25410

26418

25424

26432

25438

26446

Ch. Size 28 MHz


Low

High

25067

26075

25095

26103

25123

26131

25151

26159

25179

26187

25207

26215

25235

26243

25263

26271

25235

26243

25263

26271

25291

26299

25319

26327

25347

26355

25375

26383

25403

26411

25431

26439

101

Appendix A - Band Characteristics & Available Channels

Band 28 GHz

Band
Characteristics

The following table provides the characteristics of the 28 GHz frequency band.

Characteristic

Value

Sub-bands

Channelization

14/ 28 MHz

Duplex Spacing

1008 MHz

DL Operating Bandwidth

27555.5 GHz to 28430.5 GHz

UL Operating Bandwidth

28563.5 GHz to 29438. GHz

Standard

CEPT T/R 13-04E, Annex C

Frequency
spectrum
Frequency band 27.5 GHz to 29.5 GHz

Sub-band E

Sub-band C

Sub-band B

Sub-band A

Sub-band E

Sub-band D

Sub-band C

Sub-band B

Sub-band A

Lower band

Center gap
112 MHz

Sub-band D

Guard band
47.5 MHz

Guard band
48.5 MHz

Upper band

Fig. 40 Band 28 GHz Frequency Spectrum

Continued on next page

102

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Band 28 GHz, Continued

Available
channels

The following table provides the nominal channels, i.e. the low/ high
frequency pairs (in MHz), as per CEPT T/R 13-04E. Other, non-listed
channels are available on request.
The grey-shaded channels of the following table concern the overlapped
zones.
Sub- band

Ch. Size 14 MHz


Low

High

27555.5

28563.5

27569.5

28577.5

27583.5

28591.5

27597.5

28605.5

27611.5

28619.5

27625.5

28633.5

27639.5

28647.5

27653.5

28661.5

27667.5

28675.5

27681.5

28689.5

27695.5

28703.5

27709.5

28717.5

27723.5

28731.5

27737.5

28745.5

27751.5

28759.5

27765.5

28773.5

Ch. Size 28 MHz


Low

High

27562.5

28570.5

27590.5

28598.5

27618.5

28626.5

27646.5

28654.5

27674.5

28682.5

27702.5

28710.5

27730.5

28738.5

27758.5

28766.5

Continued on next page

103

Appendix A - Band Characteristics & Available Channels

Band 28 GHz, Continued

Available channels (continued)

Sub- band

Ch. Size 14 MHz


Low

High

27723.5
27737.5
27751.5
27765.5
27779.5
27793.5
27807.5
27821.5
27835.5
27849.5
27863.5
27877.5
27891.5
27905.5
27919.5
27933.5
27891.5
27905.5
27919.5
27933.5
27947.5
27961.5
27975.5
27989.5
28003.5
28017.5
28031.5
28045.5
28059.5
28073.5
28087.5
28101.5

28731.5
28745.5
28759.5
28773.5
28787.5
28801.5
28815.5
28829.5
28843.5
28857.5
28871.5
28885.5
28899.5
28913.5
28927.5
28941.5
28899.5
28913.5
28927.5
28941.5
28955.5
28969.5
28983.5
28997.5
29011.5
29025.5
29039.5
29053.5
29067.5
29081.5
29095.5
29109.5

Ch. Size 28 MHz


Low

High

27730.5

28738.5

27758.5

28766.5

27786.5

28794.5

27814.5

28822.5

27842.5

28850.5

27870.5

28878.5

27898.5

28906.5

27926.5

28934.5

27898.5

28906.5

27926.5

28934.5

27954.5

28962.5

27982.5

28990.5

28010.5

29018.5

28038.5

29046.5

28066.5

29074.5

28094.5

29102.5

Continued on next page

104

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Band 28 GHz, Continued

Available channels (continued)

Sub- band

Ch. Size 14 MHz


Low

High

28059.5

29067.5

28073.5

29081.5

28087.5

29095.5

28101.5

29109.5

28115.5

29123.5

28129.5

29137.5

28143.5
28157.5
28171.5
28185.5

29151.5
29165.5
29179.5
29193.5

28199.5

29207.5

28213.5

29221.5

28227.5

29235.5

28241.5

29249.5

28255.5

29263.5

28269.5

29277.5

28227.5

29235.5

28241.5

29249.5

28255.5

29263.5

28269.5

29277.5

28283.5

29291.5

28297.5

29305.5

28311.5
28325.5
28339.5
28353.5

29319.5
29333.5
29347.5
29361.5

28367.5

29375.5

28381.5

29389.5

28395.5

29403.5

28409.5

29417.5

28423.5

29431.5

28437.5

29445.5

Ch. Size 28 MHz


Low

High

28066.5

29074.5

28094.5

29102.5

28122.5

29130.5

28150.5

29158.5

28178.5

29186.5

28206.5

29214.5

28234.5

29242.5

28262.5

29270.5

28234.5

29242.5

28262.5

29270.5

28290.5

29298.5

28318.5

29326.5

28346.5

29354.5

28374.5

29382.5

28402.5

29410.5

28430.5

29438.5

105

Appendix B - Antenna Characteristics

Appendix B - Antenna Characteristics

This appendix provides the characteristics of the following antennas that can
be used for the WiBAS system:
10.5 GHz Base Station Antennas
26 GHz Base Station Antennas
28 GHz Base Station Antennas
10.5 GHz Terminal Station Antennas
26 GHz Terminal Station Antennas
28 GHz Terminal Station Antennas
Other antennas, with different characteristics, are available on request.

106

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

10.5 GHz Base Station Antennas

The following table provides the characteristics of the antennas provided for
the Base Station at 10.5 GHz.
Specification

Value/ Description
BRA 1090 V

BRA 1090 H

BRA 1060 V

BRA 1060 H

Picture

Electrical
Frequency
Band
Type

10.15 GHz to 10.65 GHz

Sectoral 90o

Sectoral 60o

Gain

16 dBi

15 dBi

Polarization

Vertical

Horizontal

Beamwidth
Azim./Elev.

17 dBi
Vertical

Horizontal

87 - 95 / 6

60 4 / 9 (typical)

EN 302 095 V1.1.2, CS2


(asymmetrical elevation
pattern)

EN 302 085 V1.1.2


(2001-2002), CS1 CS3

ETSI CS2 compliant

25 dB

35 dB (typical)

35 dB (max.)

VSWR 50

1.5:1

1.7:1 (max.)

Power Rating

10 W

6 W (max.)

ETSI
standard
XPD
F/ B Ratio

Mechanical
HxWxD
(mm)
Weight (max.)
Input Flange

360 x 265 x 20 240 x 200 x 15 300 x 200 x 6

1.2 kg

1 kg

1 kg

200 x 200 x 6

0.7 kg

N Type, Female

Environmental
Operating
Temperature
Humidity
Wind Speed
Surv.

-40 C to +60 C
95%, at 30 C
220 km/ h

107

Appendix B - Antenna Characteristics

26 GHz Base Station Antennas

Below are shown the characteristics of the antennas for the BS at 26 GHz.
Value/ Description

Specification

BRA-2690 H-HG

BRA-2690 V-HG

BRA-2690-V-H SG

Picture

Electrical
Frequency Band

24.25 GHz to 26.5


GHz

24.25 GHz to 26.75 GHz


o

Type

Sectoral 90

Gain
Polarization

18.5 dBi

19.5 dBi

14.5 dBi

Horizontal

Vertical

Horizontal/ Vertical

Nominal Beamwidth
(Azimuth/ Elevation)

90 / 11

90 / 3.4

F/B Ratio

30 dB

>25 dB

XPD

30 dB

>20dB

-15 dB

Return Loss
Lighting Protection

DC Grounded

Radiation Pattern

ETSI EN 301 215-2 CS3

Mechanical
Diameter

23 cm (9.0 in)
o

Adj. Tuning Range


Dimensions

45 (azimuth) / 15 (elevation)

8 (azim)/ 1.5
(elev)

Depth: 10 cm (3.9 in)

135x70x80 mm

2.5 kgr

200 gr

PBR 220 (WR42)

WR 34

Weight
Input Flange

Environmental
Operating
Temperature

Humidity

95 % at 30 C

Solar Radiation

1200 W/m
(1)

Wind Speed Sur.l


Standards

(1)

Survival with 25 mm radial ice load.

108

-45 C to +70 C

-40 C to +60 C

200 km/h
ETSI EN 300 019-1-4, ETSI EN 301-215

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

28 GHz Base Station Antennas

The following table provides the characteristics of the High-Gain (HG)


antennas provided for the Base Station at 28 GHz.
BRA-2890 H/V-HG antenna is single polarized for vertical polarization or
horizontal polarization.

Specification

Value/ Description
BRA-2890 H-HG

BRA-2890 V-HG

27.5 GHz to 29.5 GHz

27.5 GHz to 29.5 GHz

Picture

Electrical
Frequency Band

Sectoral 90o

Type

Sectoral 90

Gain

19 dBi

19.5 dBi

Horizontal

Vertical

Polarization
Nominal Beamwidth
(Azimuth/ Elevation)

90o/ 3.4o

F/B Ratio

30 dB

XPD

30 dB
-15 dB

Return Loss
Lighting Protection

DC Grounded

Radiation Pattern

ETSI EN 301 215-2 CS3

Mechanical
Diameter
Adj. Tuning Range

23 cm (9.0 in)
o

45 (azimuth) / 15o (elevation)

Depth

10 cm (3.9 in)

Weight

2.5 kg

Input Flange

PBR 320 (WR28)

Environmental
Operating Temperature
Humidity
Solar Radiation
Wind Speed Survival (1)
Standards

(1)

-40 oC to +60 oC
95 % at 30 oC
1200 W/m2
200 km/h
ETSI EN 300 019-1-4, ETSI EN 301-215

Survival with 25 mm radial ice load.

109

Appendix B - Antenna Characteristics

10.5 GHz Terminal Station Antennas

Introduction

This paragraph provides the characteristics of the integrated and external


antennas provided for the Terminal Station at 10.5 GHz.
The available models of the 10.5 GHz Terminal Station antennas are the
following:
TRA 1006
TRA 10PL

Specifications of
10.5 GHz
integrated TRA

This following table provides the characteristics of the integrated antenna


provided for the Terminal Station at 10.5 GHz.

Specification

Value/ Description

Antenna Type

Panel

Operating Frequencies

10.15 GHz to 10.65 GHz

Gain

21.5 dBi

Polarization

Linear H or V

Beamwidth

F/B Ratio

< 36 dB

Return Loss

<-15 dB

XPD

28 dB

Radiation Pattern
Envelope

According to ETSI EN 302 085, TS3

Lightning Protection

DC grounded
Continued on next page

110

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

10.5 GHz Terminal Station Antennas, Continued

Specifications
of external 10.5
GHz TRA

The following table provides the characteristics of the external antenna


provided for the Terminal Station at 10.5 GHz:

Specification

Value/ Description
TRA 1006

TRA 10PL

Picture

Electrical
Frequency Range

10.3 GHz to 10.7 GHz 10.15 GHz to 10.65 GHz

Type

Parabolic 60 cm

Panel

Gain

33.6 dBi

25.0 dBi (min.)

Polarization
VSWR

Vertical/ Horizontal
1.2:1 (20.8 dB RL)

1.7:1 (max.)

3.2

F/ B Ratio

40 dB

40 dB

XPD

28 dB

28 dB

EN 300 833

EN 302 085

Diameter: 60 cm

L x W x D (mm):
261 x 261 x 13.5

10 kg

1 kg

PBR 100

SMA female

250 km/ h

220 km/ h

-40 C to +60 C

-55 C to +70 C

Beamwidth 3 dB

ETSI Standard
Mechanical
Dimensions
Weight
Input Flange
Environmental
Wind Speed Survival (1)

Operating
Temperature

(1)

Survival with 25 mm radial ice load.

111

Appendix B - Antenna Characteristics

26 GHz Terminal Station Antennas

Specifications
of TRA-2603 &
TRA 2606

The following table provides the characteristics of the antennas provided for
the Terminal Station at 26 GHz. The available models of the 26 GHz
Terminal Station antennas are the following: TRA-2603 and TRA-2606.
Value/ Description

Specification

TRA-2603

TRA-2606

Picture

Electrical
Frequency Band

24.25 GHz to 26.50 GHz

Type

Parabolic 30 cm

Parabolic 60 cm

Gain

35.9 dBi

41.0 dBi

Beamwidth 3 dB
F/ B Ratio

3.1

1.7o

60 dB

65 dB
36 dB

Cross-Polar
Discrimination (1)
VSWR/ Return Loss

1.35:1 / 16.5 dB

Polarization

Vertical/ Horizontal

ETSI Compliance

EN 300 833 Nov 2002 Class 2

Lightning Protection

DC Grounded

Mechanical
Diameter

0.3 m (11.8 in)

0.6 m (23.6 in)

Depth

143 mm

208 mm

Weight

2.3 kg

4.6 kg

Input Flange

Wind Survival Rating

UBR 220
(2)

250 km/h

Environmental
Operating Temperature
Relative Humidity

(1)
(2)

Within a -1 dB co-polarized contour


Survival with 25 mm radial ice load

112

-40 oC to +80 oC

-40 oC to +55 oC

15% to 100%

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

28 GHz Terminal Station Antennas

Specifications
of TRA-2803 &
TRA 2806

The following table provides the characteristics of the antennas provided for
the Terminal Station at 28 GHz. The available models of the 28 GHz
Terminal Station antennas are the following: TRA-2803 and TRA-2806.
Value/ Description

Specification

TRA-2803

TRA-2806

Photo

Electrical
Frequency Band

26.50 GHz to 29.50 GHz

Type

Parabolic 30 cm

Parabolic 60 cm

Gain

36.5 dBi

42.0 dBi

2.3

1.6o

F/ B Ratio

62 dB

68 dB

Cross-Polar
Discrimination (1)

30 dB

28 dB

Beamwidth 3 dB

VSWR/ Return Loss

1.35:1 / 16.5 dB

Polarization

Single linear, Vertical or Horizontal

ETSI Compliance

EN 300 833 Nov 2002 Class 2

Lightning Protection

DC Grounded

Mechanical
Diameter

0.3 m (11.8 in)

0.6 m (23.6 in)

Depth

143 mm

208 mm

Weight

2.3 kg

4.6 kg

Input Flange
Wind Survival Rating

UBR 320
(2)

250 km/h (156 mph)

Environmental
Operating Temperature
Relative Humidity

(1)
(2)

-40 oC to +80
o
C

-40 oC to +55 oC

15% to 100%

Within a -1 dB co-polarized contour


Survival with 25 mm radial ice load

113

Glossary

Glossary

AIS

Alarm Indication Signal

AK

Authentication Key

AMI

Alternate Mark Inversion

ASL

Above Sea Level

ATM

Asynchronous Transfer Mode

ATPC

Automatic Transmitting Power Control

BBRAS

Broad Band Remote Access Server

BE

Best Effort

BE+

Best Effort with guaranteed rate

BER

Bit Error Ratio

BRA

Base station Radio Antenna

BRB
BRS

Base station Radio Box


Base station Radio System

BS

Base Station

BSC
BTS

Base Station Controller


Base Transceiver Station

CBR

Constant Bit Rate

CBS

Committed Burst Size

CIR
CNR

Committed Information Rate


Carrier to Noise Ratio

C/N

Carrier to Noise

CoS

Class of Services

DBA
DCN

Dynamic Bandwidth Allocation


Data Communication Network

DES

Data Encryption Standard

DFE

Decision Feedback Equalization

DL
DSCP

DownLink

DSL

Digital Subscriber Line

EBS

Excess Burst Size

EIR
EIRP

Excess Information Rate


Equivalent Isotropically Radiated Power

ETSI

European Telecommunications Standards Institute

FDD

Frequency Division Duplexing

FEC

Forward Error Correction

Differentiated Services Code Point

Continued on next page

114

WiBAS-C
System Description - Edition 3.0

Glossary, Continued

FMC

Fixed Mobile Convergence

GbE

Gigabit Ethernet

HDB3

High Density Bipolar of order 3

IEEE

Institute of Electrical & Electronics Engineers

IF

Intermediate Frequency

IP

Internet Protocol

ISP
IVP

Internet Service Provider


Initialization Vector Parameter

LCT

Local Craft Terminal

LED

Light Emitting Diode

LOF
LOS

Loss Of Frame
Line Of Sight

LTE

Long Term Evolution

MAC

Medium Access Control

MLM
MSAD

Multi Longitudinal Mode (laser)


Multi-Service Access Device

NBI

North Bound Interface

NMS
ODU

Network Management System


Out Door Unit

OpEx

Operational Expenditure

OSI

Open Systems Interconnection

OSS

Operations Support Systems

PBX
PDU

Private Branch eXchange


Protocol Data Unit

PHY

PHYsical (layer)

PtMP

Point to Multi Point

PSTN
PS-rt

Public Switched Telephone Network


Polling Service- real-time

PS-nrt

Polling Service- non real-time

PtP

Point-to-Point

QAM

Quadrature Amplitude Modulation

QoS

Quality of Service

RAI

Remote Alarm Indication


Relative Humidity

RH
RL
RF

Return Loss
Radio Frequency
Continued on next page

115

Glossary

Glossary, Continued

116

RL

Return Loss

RF

Radio Frequency

RNC

Remote Node Controller

RS
SDH

Reed Solomon
Synchronous Digital Hierarchy

SLA

Service Level Agreement

SLM

Single Longitudinal Mode (laser)

STM
TCP

Synchronous Transport Module


Transmission Control Protocol

TDM

Time Division Multiplexing

TDMA

Time Division Multiple Access

TEK
TR3C

Traffic Encryption Key

TRA

Terminal station Radio Antenna

TRB
TRS

Terminal station Radio Box


Terminal station Radio System

TS

Terminal Station

UBR

Unspecified Bit Rate

UGS
UL

Unsolicited Grant Service

UMTS

Universal Mobile Telecommunications System

uniMS

Unified Management Suite

VBR-rt
VBR-nrt

Variable Bit Rate real time


Variable Bit Rate non real time

VLAN

Virtual Local Area Network

VoIP

Voice over Internet Protocol

XPD
WiBAS

Cross Polarization Discrimination


Wireless Broadband Access System

WIMAX

Worldwide Interoperability for Microwave Access

WRR

Weighted Round Robin

Two-Rate 3 Colors

UpLink

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All information contained in this document
is subject to change without prior notice.
2012 Intracom S.A. Telecom Solutions