Вы находитесь на странице: 1из 57

2015

Aerodynamic Airfoil Wing Project

Jose Pardellas Bello & Marcos Bened


European University of Madrid UEM
Aerospace Engineering in Aircrafts

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

INDEX

Introduction And Data


2D Analysis. Conclussions
3D Analysis. Conclussions
Comparisson 2D & 3D.
Final Conclussions

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Introduction to the Project And Relevant Data to be used:


The main objective of the project is to obtain acknowledgments on how an airfoil and a wing
behaves in experimental analysis process.
We have to take into consideration that the airfoil we have used is an airfoil that may not fit
real flight conditions; and that flight conditions that we have assume for each airfoil may not
be the correct ones to obtain real values for our profile; we assume a lot of flight conditions as
flight velocity; height at steady state; density of the fluid in where the airfoil is analyzed;
treated the fluid as air; and all assumptions it concerns relates to air flow model.
We have to know that the Root Chord measurements are 20 cm. and the span assumed to be
analyzed in 3D are 0,5m.

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

ANALYSIS
We have to analyze an airfoil profile (2D) and an airfoil wing (3D).

ANALYSIS WITH XFLR 5 (2D)


1st we have to export our airfoil which we have created with EXCEL and a notepad page; taking
the measured points for our first airfoil profile; but after iterate our measured points with an
N-10 ideal profile with XFLR5; we obtain the airfoil profile which we going to operate during
the analysis (2D & 3D)

Airfoil Before Iteration; Green = N-10 & Red = Approach Airfoil Measures

Airfoil After Iteration & Airfoil taken for Ansys Analysis in 2D

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

After interpolations, we obtain the next graph values:

Cl /Alpha Graph; we can see at 0 angle of attack we obtain a value near to 0,4 lift coefficient;
we have the Zero lift angle of attack near to -3.5

At 0 angle of attack, we obtain a Lift to Drag Coefficient ratio of 24

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

3D ANALYSIS
To make the 3D analysis we will start setting up the Xflow menu; and import the NACA
geometry saved in .igs format

We will set the wind tunnel and after interpolate with k-epsilon equations solutions &
introduce the velocity by components (from 10 to -10 degrees; taking 20 & -20 as extreme
values); taking 50 as Speed Module

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Setting XFLOW for 3D analysis

We start setting velocity as 50 m/s and the wind tunnel dimensions (2,2,2)

In orientation field, we have to set the angle of attack we want to analyze.

We set the simulation time & the scale which XFLOW will used as a mesh; we have to set the
frames frequency as well.

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Change the surface info part & the field too to obtain (Vorticity, Static Pressure, Cp
Distribution, and Velocity by Components) for each degree we have analyzed; to obtain the
graphs we will see later.

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

0 Degree Angle of Attack

Cp Distribution

Static Pressure
8

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Vorticity

Velocity in X-Component

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Velocity in Y-Component

10

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

2 Degrees Angle of Attack

Cp Distribution

Static Pressure

11

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Vorticity

Velocity in X-Component

12

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Velocity in Y-Component

13

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

5 Degrees Angle of Attack

Cp Distribution

Static Pressure

14

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Velocity in X-Component

Velocity in Y-Component

15

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

6 Degrees Angle of Attack

Cp Distribution

Static Pressure

16

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Vorticity

Velocity in X-Component

17

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Velocity in Y-Component

18

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

7 Degrees Angle of Attack

Cp Distribution

Static Pressure

19

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Vorticity

Velocity in X-Component

20

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Velocity in Y-Component

21

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

8 degrees Angle of Attack

Cp distribution

Static Pressure
22

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Vorticity

Velocity in X-Component
23

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Velocity in Y-Component

24

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

10 Degrees Angle of Attack

Cp Distribution

25

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Static Pressure

26

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Vorticity

27

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Velocity in X-Component

28

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Velocity in Y-Component

29

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

20 Degrees Angle of Attack

Cp Distribution

Static Pressure

30

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Vorticity

Velocity in X-Component

31

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Velocity in Y-Component

32

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

-2 Degrees Angle of Attack

Cp Distribution

Static Pressure

33

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Vorticity

Velocity in X-Component

34

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Velocity in Y-Component

35

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

-5 Degrees Angle of Attack

Cp Distribution

Static Pressure

36

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Vorticity

Velocity in X-Component

37

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Velocity in Y-Component

38

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

-6 Degrees Angle of Attack

Cp Distribution

Static Pressure

39

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Vorticity

Velocity in X-Component

40

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Velocity in Y-Component

41

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

-7 Degrees Angle of Attack

Cp Distribution

Static Pressure

42

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Vorticity

Velocity in X-Component

43

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Velocity in Y-Component

44

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

-8 Degrees Angle of Attack

Cp Distribution

Static Pressure

45

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Vorticity

Velocity in X-Component

46

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Velocity in Y-Component

47

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

-10 Degrees Angle of Attack

Cp Distribution

Static Pressure

48

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Vorticity

Velocity in X-Component

49

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Velocity in Y-Component

50

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

-20 Degrees Angle of Attack

Cp Distribution

Static pressure

51

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Vorticity

Velocity in X-Component

52

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

Velocity in Y-Component

At the same time we obtain those previous graphs with contours and surfaces distributions;
we obtain de Lift, Drag & Moment in Z-Component Coefficients for each angle of attack
previously analyzed.

53

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

We use those values to create some plotted graphs to observe when the wing could be
consider stable.

54

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

FINAL CONCLUSSION GRAPHS

55

Aerodynamics

Politechnnical School

As we can see in the 2D graphs get with XFLR5 and compared with those ones we have obtain
or the 3D analysis with XFLOW, we can conclude that the stable zone for the wing that we
have study in our project is between the -5 to 0 degrees angle of attack region. Out of these
region, the wing can behaves in very rare ways; giving us a lot of lift or a lot of drag for 3
degrees variation.

Our wing does not behaves as a symmetric airfoil profile could behaves; even we have taken
the N-10 ideal airfoil design; but the interpolation with our approach measurements, change
completely the results of the analysis.
We can conclude that for the aerodynamic analysis of a wing, we cannot take measurements
by hand; and we have to make it always by mechanized ways (laser measurements as an
example) to make our analysis as accurate as possible.

56